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  • black-headed gull (bird)

    charadriiform: Gulls (suborder Lari): …“hooded” gulls, exemplified by the black-headed gull (Larus ridibundus) and laughing gull (L. atricilla), have a striking “swoop-and-soar” aggressive flight display, and a ground display (called the “forward”) wherein the neck is lowered, the head withdrawn and angled upward, and the wings held out from the body.

  • black-headed munia (bird)

    munia: The black-headed munia, or chestnut mannikin (Lonchura malacca, including atricapilla and ferruginosa), is a pest in rice fields from India to Java and the Philippines; as a cage bird it is often called tricolour nun. Others kept as pets include the white-headed munia (L. maja) of…

  • black-headed uakari (monkey)

    uakari: …hands, and feet of the black-headed uakari (C. melanocephalus) are black, and the coat is chestnut-coloured with a saddle of reddish or yellowish hair. It lives in southern Venezuela, southeastern Colombia, and northwestern Brazil. Males are particularly red, which leads some scientists to speculate that the colour attracts females; in…

  • black-legged kittiwake (bird)

    Kittiwake, (Rissa tridactyla), oceanic gull, a white bird with pearl-gray mantle, black-tipped wings, black feet, and yellow bill. It nests on the North and South Atlantic coasts. Kittiwakes have evolved a number of behavioral and structural modifications for nesting on narrow cliff ledges. A c

  • black-legged seriema (bird)

    seriema: …black-legged, or Burmeister’s, seriema (Chunga burmeisteri), sometimes called gray seriema, which inhabits wooded areas, is darker and grayer, with a shorter crest and shorter legs.

  • black-legged tick (arachnid)

    Lyme disease: …the carrier tick is usually Ixodes scapularis (I. dammini); in the West, I. pacificus; and in Europe, I. ricinus. Ticks pick up the spirochete by sucking the blood of deer or other infected animals. I. scapularis mainly feeds on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and white-footed mice (

  • black-light lamp

    Ultraviolet lamp, device for producing electromagnetic radiations in the wavelengths between those of visible light and X-rays. The Sun’s rays are rich in such radiation, sometimes referred to as black light because it is not visible to the unaided eye. The ultraviolet lamp usually consists of an

  • black-lung disease (disease)

    Black lung, respiratory disorder, a type of pneumoconiosis caused by repeated inhalation of coal dust over a period of years. The disease gets its name from a distinctive blue-black marbling of the lung caused by accumulation of the dust. Georgius Agricola, a German mineralogist, first described

  • black-masked lovebird (bird)

    lovebird: The black-masked lovebird, A. personata (see photograph), of Tanzania is green with a blackish brown head and a yellow band across the breast and hindneck; a common mutation in captivity is blue and whitish. The largest species is the rosy-faced lovebird, A. roseicollis, of Angola to…

  • black-mouthed mamba (snake)

    Black mamba, (Dendroaspis polylepis), species of mamba snake known for its large size, quickness, and extremely potent venom. It lives in sub-Saharan Africa and is one of the continent’s most dangerous snakes. The average black mamba is 2–2.5 metres (6.6–8.2 feet) long, with a maximum length of 4.3

  • black-necked cobra (snake)

    cobra: …of southern Africa and the black-necked cobra (Naja nigricollis), a small form widely distributed in Africa, are spitters. Venom is accurately directed at the victim’s eyes at distances of more than two metres and may cause temporary, or even permanent, blindness unless promptly washed away. The Egyptian cobra (N. haje)—probably…

  • black-necked screamer (bird)

    screamer: …east-central South America, and the black-necked screamer (C. chavaria), of Colombia and Venezuela, have hind crests of feathers.

  • black-necked stilt (bird)

    stilt: …the Old World, and the black-necked stilt (H. h. mexicanus), of the New World; and very dark birds occur in New Zealand.

  • black-nosed dace (fish)

    dace: …genus Rhinichthys, among them the black-nosed dace (R. atratulus), a fine-scaled, black-banded, 7.5-centimetre-long fish found from New England to Minnesota, and the long-nosed dace (R. cataractae), a widely distributed species with a comparatively long snout. The creek chub is often known also as the horned dace, because of the hornlike…

  • Black-Red-Gold coalition (German history)

    Friedrich Ebert: …Democrats had formed the so-called Black–Red–Gold (Weimar) coalition, named after the colours of the flag of the liberal revolution of 1848.

  • Black-Scholes formula (economics)

    Robert C. Merton: …whose option valuation model, the Black-Scholes formula (developed with economist Fischer Black), provided the foundation for much of Merton’s work. (Upon his death in 1995, Black became ineligible for the Nobel Prize, which is not awarded posthumously.)

  • black-shanked douc (primate)

    douc: The black-shanked douc (P. nigripes) is found south of 14° N and has black legs, gray arms, and a darker face. The ranges of the two species overlap, apparently with very little interbreeding, in the Southern Highlands of Vietnam. In the 1990s a third species, the…

  • black-shouldered opossum (marsupial)

    woolly opossum: Woolly opossums include the black-shouldered opossum (Caluromysiops irrupta), the bushy-tailed opossum (Glironia venusta), and three species of true woolly opossums (genus Caluromys). The black-shouldered opossum is found only in southeastern Peru and adjacent Brazil. The bushy-tailed opossum is rare, known from only 25 specimens and a few records based…

  • black-shouldered possum (marsupial)

    woolly opossum: Woolly opossums include the black-shouldered opossum (Caluromysiops irrupta), the bushy-tailed opossum (Glironia venusta), and three species of true woolly opossums (genus Caluromys). The black-shouldered opossum is found only in southeastern Peru and adjacent Brazil. The bushy-tailed opossum is rare, known from only 25 specimens and a few records based…

  • black-spotted trout (fish)

    Cutthroat trout, (Oncorhynchus clarki), black-spotted game fish, family Salmonidae, of western North America named for the bright-red streaks of colour beneath the lower jaws. It strikes at flies, baits, and lures and is considered a good table fish. Size is usually up to 2 to 4 kg (4.4 to 8.8

  • black-tailed deer (mammal)

    Black-tailed deer, Pacific Northwest subspecies of the mule deer

  • black-tailed godwit (bird)

    godwit: The black-tailed godwit (L. limosa), about 40 centimetres (16 inches) long including the bill, has a black-banded, white tail. The bill is long and straight. The black-tailed godwit, which breeds in Iceland and on wet plains across Eurasia, is the emblem of the Netherlands Ornithological Union.…

  • black-tailed prairie dog (rodent)

    prairie dog: The common black-tailed (C. ludovicianus) and Mexican (C. mexicanus) species live in large, dense colonies that early explorers described as “towns.” Colonies are divided by topographic and vegetational features into semidiscrete wards formed from smaller extended family groups, or coteries. Colonies usually cover about 100 hectares (247…

  • black-tailed tityra (bird)

    tityra: …to Bolivia and Brazil, the black-tailed tityra (T. cayana) occurs throughout tropical South America, and the black-crowned tityra (T. inquisitor) ranges from Mexico to Argentina. The males of all three species are about 20 cm (8 inches) long and are pale gray with black on the head, wings, and tail;…

  • black-throated calla lily (plant)

    calla: The spotted, or black-throated, calla lily (Z. albomaculata), with white-spotted leaves, has a whitish to yellow or pink spathe that shades within to purplish brown at the base.

  • black-throated diver (bird)

    loon: …but some species, especially the Arctic loon, or black-throated diver (G. arctica), winter or migrate in flocks. The voice is distinctive, including guttural sounds and the mournful, eerie wailing cries that in North America may have given rise to the common name loon. (Some sources suggest it arises from the…

  • black-throated honey guide (bird)

    ratel: …calls of a bird, the greater, or black-throated, honey guide (Indicator indicator); the ratels break open the bees’ nests to feed on the honey, and the birds in return obtain the remains of the nest. Ratels are strong, fearless fighters but in captivity can become tame and playful. A litter…

  • Black-Water Draw National Archaeological Site (region, New Mexico, United States)

    Curry: Black-Water Draw National Archaeological Site and Cannon Air Force Base are located in the county.

  • black-winged bellbird (bird)

    bellbird: The mossy-throated, bearded, or black-winged bellbird (P. averano) has many thin wattles hanging from the throat. The three-wattled bellbird (P. tricarunculata), confined to Central America, has three bill wattles. One hangs from each corner of the mouth, and another dangles from the bill’s upper base, each wattle measuring about…

  • Blackadder (British television show)

    Rowan Atkinson: …1983 the first installment of Blackadder, written by Atkinson and Curtis, slithered onto British TV screens. The show featured the twisted relationship between four incarnations of the groveling, spineless Lord Blackadder and his foully fleshed retainer, Baldrick, as they cajoled their way through history from the Crusades to the end…

  • blackamoor (fish)

    tetra: The black tetra (Gymnocorymbus ternetzi), also called blackamoor, or petticoat fish, is a deep-bodied fish that is 4–7.5 cm (1.5–3 inches) long. When small, it is marked with black on its hind parts and dorsal and anal fins; the black fades to gray as the fish…

  • Blackball Bullet, the (New Zealand rugby player and coach)

    Ces Mountford, New Zealand rugby player and coach who was considered to be one of the best stand-off halfs in the sport. He joined Wigan (Lancashire, Eng.) in 1946 and in 1947–48 set an appearance record of 54 games in a season. In 1952 he moved to Warrington (Cheshire) as manager and steered them

  • Blackbeard (English pirate)

    Blackbeard, one of history’s most famous pirates, who became an imposing figure in American folklore. Little is known of Blackbeard’s early life, and his origins have been left to speculation. He has been widely identified as Edward Teach (or several variations thereof, including Thatch and Thack),

  • Blackbeard’s Ghost (film by Stevenson [1968])

    Robert Stevenson: Films for Disney: Blackbeard’s Ghost (1968) was enlivened by the casting of Peter Ustinov as the eponymous pirate. In 1969 Stevenson had another major box-office success with The Love Bug. The sleeper hit featured Jones as the bewildered owner of Herbie, a Volkswagen with a mind of its…

  • BlackBerry (wireless device)

    BlackBerry, wireless handheld communications device manufactured by the Canadian company Research in Motion (RIM). The BlackBerry’s roots go back to the RIM 850, a pager created by RIM in 1999. Featuring a tiny keyboard, the device provided wireless e-mail access, allowing users to send and receive

  • blackberry (fruit)

    Blackberry, usually prickly fruit-bearing bush of the genus Rubus of the rose family (Rosaceae), known for its dark edible fruits. Native chiefly to north temperate regions, wild blackberries are particularly abundant in eastern North America and on the Pacific coast of that continent and are

  • blackberry lily (plant)

    Blackberry lily, with red-spotted orange flowers, a popular garden flower. It is native to East Asia and is naturalized in some parts of North America. It is a member of the iris family (Iridaceae) and has branching stems, lower, grassy foliage, a stout rootstalk, and blackberry-like seeds. The

  • blackbird (bird species, Turdus merula)

    migration: In Europe: (Carduelis carduelis), and blackbirds (Turdus merula) are usually sedentary in western Europe; they are usually migratory, however, in northern Europe, where their flights resemble a short migration. Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) are sedentary in western Europe, where large numbers gather from eastern Europe. Large flocks also pass the winter…

  • Blackbird (aircraft)

    U-2: …Earth-orbiting satellites or the supersonic SR-71 Blackbird spy plane—but intelligence and military services consistently have found it useful because of its operational flexibility, excellent aerodynamic design, and adaptable airframe. In 2011 the USAF indicated that the U-2 was scheduled for retirement from service sometime after 2015, with many of its…

  • blackbird (bird)

    Blackbird, in the New World, any of several species belonging to the family Icteridae (order Passeriformes); also, an Old World thrush (Turdus merula). The Old World blackbird is 25 cm (10 inches) long; males are black and females brown, with orange bill and eye-rims. Common in woods and gardens

  • blackbirding (slavery practice)

    Blackbirding, the 19th- and early 20th-century practice of enslaving (often by force and deception) South Pacific islanders on the cotton and sugar plantations of Queensland, Australia (as well as those of the Fiji and Samoan islands). The kidnapped islanders were known collectively as Kanakas

  • Blackbirds (work by Mills)

    Florence Mills: In 1926 she appeared in Blackbirds (1926), singing “I’m a Little Blackbird Looking for a Bluebird,” which became her trademark song. She took Blackbirds to London and Paris, but serious illness forced her return to America in 1927; she died late that year. Her funeral was attended by some 150,000…

  • blackboard crayon (art)

    crayon: …the colouring crayon and the chalk crayon.

  • Blackboard Jungle (film by Brooks [1955])

    Blackboard Jungle, American social-commentary film, released in 1955, that highlighted violence in urban schools and also helped spark the rock-and-roll revolution by featuring the hit song “Rock Around the Clock” (1954) by Bill Haley and His Comets. It was the first major film to feature rock

  • Blackboard Jungle, The (novel by Hunter)

    Evan Hunter: …novel is among his earliest: The Blackboard Jungle (1954), a story of violence in a New York high school that was the basis of a popular film (1955). After Strangers When We Meet (1958; filmed 1960) and A Matter of Conviction (1959; also published as The Young Savages) became best…

  • blackbody (physics)

    Blackbody, in physics, a surface that absorbs all radiant energy falling on it. The term arises because incident visible light will be absorbed rather than reflected, and therefore the surface will appear black. The concept of such a perfect absorber of energy is extremely useful in the study of

  • blackbody radiation (physics)

    light: Blackbody radiation: Blackbody radiation refers to the spectrum of light emitted by any heated object; common examples include the heating element of a toaster and the filament of a light bulb. The spectral intensity of blackbody radiation peaks at a frequency that increases with the…

  • blackbody radiation sequence (physics)

    colour: Incandescence: …colours is known as the blackbody radiation sequence. Examples of incandescence include daylight, candlelight, and light from tungsten filament lamps, flashbulbs, the carbon arc, and pyrotechnic devices such as flares and fireworks (see figure).

  • blackboy (plant)
  • Blackbrook Series (geology)

    Longmyndian: …have been recognized: the lowermost Blackbrook Series, overlain in turn by the Maplewell Series and the Brand Series. These rocks, collectively known as the Charnian, consist largely of volcanic rocks (most prominent in the Maplewell Series and least in the Brand Series) and of sedimentary conglomerates, sandstones, siltstones, and slates.

  • blackbuck (mammal)

    Blackbuck, (Antilope cervicapra), an antelope (family Bovidae) indigenous to the plains of India. The blackbuck is an antelope of the same tribe (Antilopini) that includes gazelles, the springbok, and the gerenuk. What sets the blackbuck apart from the rest is the adult male’s horns, which are long

  • Blackburn Buccaneer (aircraft)

    military aircraft: Supersonic flight: One example was the British Blackburn Buccaneer, capable of exceptional range at low altitudes and high subsonic speeds. The Douglas A-4 Skyhawk, entering service in 1956, sacrificed speed for ordnance-delivery capability. One of the most structurally efficient aircraft ever built, it carried the burden of U.S. Navy attacks on ground…

  • Blackburn with Darwen (unitary authority, England, United Kingdom)

    Blackburn with Darwen, unitary authority, geographic and historic county of Lancashire, northwestern England, 23 miles (37 km) northwest of Manchester. The famous weaving tradition of the town of Blackburn had its beginnings in the 13th-century wool trade. By the reign of Elizabeth I, Blackburn was

  • Blackburn, Elizabeth H. (American molecular biologist and biochemist)

    Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Australian-born American molecular biologist and biochemist who was awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, along with American molecular biologist Carol W. Greider and American biochemist and geneticist Jack W. Szostak, for her discoveries elucidating the

  • Blackburn, Elizabeth Helen (American molecular biologist and biochemist)

    Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Australian-born American molecular biologist and biochemist who was awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, along with American molecular biologist Carol W. Greider and American biochemist and geneticist Jack W. Szostak, for her discoveries elucidating the

  • Blackburn, Gideon (American minister)

    Gideon Blackburn, Presbyterian clergyman, educator, and missionary to the Cherokee Indians. He became a Presbyterian minister about 1794 and was stationed at the military post that later became Maryville, Tenn. He was active in the second Great Awakening (1800–03), an evangelical religious movement

  • Blackburn, Helen (British suffragist)

    Helen Blackburn, early leader of the British movement for the emancipation of women. In 1859, when her family moved to London, she became interested in the cause of woman suffrage. In 1874 she became secretary of the National Society for Women’s Suffrage, which had been formed in 1867. She wrote

  • Blackburn, Jonathan B. (American painter)

    Joseph Blackburn, itinerant portrait painter who, working in Bermuda (c. 1752–53) and later in New England (c. 1753–64), introduced the decorative tradition of English Rococo portraiture to the American colonies. Blackburn’s English connections and sophisticated painting style caused many wealthy

  • Blackburn, Joseph (American painter)

    Joseph Blackburn, itinerant portrait painter who, working in Bermuda (c. 1752–53) and later in New England (c. 1753–64), introduced the decorative tradition of English Rococo portraiture to the American colonies. Blackburn’s English connections and sophisticated painting style caused many wealthy

  • Blackburn, Mount (mountain, Alaska, United States)

    Wrangell Mountains: …10,000 feet (3,000 metres), including Mount Blackburn (16,390 feet [4,996 metres]), the highest point in the range, and Mount Sanford (16,237 feet [4,949 metres]). Snowfields drain into glaciers as long as 45 miles (70 km). Most of the summits are extinct volcanoes; Mount Wrangell (14,163 feet [4,317 metres]) was the…

  • Blackburn, Thomas (British poet)

    Thomas Blackburn, English poet, novelist, and critic whose verse is notable for haunted self-examination and spiritual imagery. The son of a clergyman, Blackburn was educated at the University of Durham. In his autobiographical novel, A Clip of Steel (1969), he depicts a childhood tormented by a

  • Blackburne, Sir Kenneth (British colonial administrator)

    Sir Kenneth Blackburne, British colonial administrator and postindependence leader of Jamaica. The son of an Anglican curate, Blackburne was educated at Marlborough College and at Clare College, Cambridge, where he received an honours degree in modern languages and geography. He then joined the

  • Blackburne, Sir Kenneth William (British colonial administrator)

    Sir Kenneth Blackburne, British colonial administrator and postindependence leader of Jamaica. The son of an Anglican curate, Blackburne was educated at Marlborough College and at Clare College, Cambridge, where he received an honours degree in modern languages and geography. He then joined the

  • blackcap (bird)

    Blackcap, (Sylvia atricapilla), common warbler from Europe and northwestern Africa to central Asia. It belongs to the family Sylviidae (order Passeriformes). It is 14 cm (5.5 inches) long, with brownish upperparts, gray underparts and face, and black (male) or reddish brown (female) crown. Common

  • blackcock (bird)

    grouse: …Old World member is the black grouse (Lyrurus tetrix), of Wales, Scotland, Scandinavia, and north-central Europe; a related form (L. mlokosiewiczi) occurs in the Caucasus. The male, known as blackcock, may be 55 cm (22 inches) long and weigh almost 2 kg (about 4 pounds). He is iridescent blue-black, with…

  • Blackcraig Hill (hill, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    East Ayrshire: …the east and south, where Blackcraig Hill reaches an elevation of 2,298 feet (700 metres). East Ayrshire forms part of the historic county of Ayrshire. Dairy farming is important in the lowlands, while cattle and sheep raising predominate in the uplands. Kilmarnock is the council area’s administrative centre and largest…

  • blackcurrant (shrub)

    Ribes: hirtellum), black currant (R. nigrum), buffalo currant (R. odoratum), and common, or garden or red, currant (R. rubrum). Species of ornamental value include the alpine currant (R. alpinum); buffalo currant; fuchsia-flowered gooseberry (R. speciosum); golden, or clove, currant (R. aureum),

  • blackdamp (mining)

    mine gas: Black damp is an atmosphere in which a flame lamp will not burn, usually because of an excess of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen in the air. Stinkdamp is the name given by miners to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) because of its characteristic smell of rotten…

  • Blackdown Hills (hills, England, United Kingdom)

    Blackdown Hills, range of hills straddling the boundary between the counties of Somerset and Devon, Eng., to the south of the town of Taunton and to the north of the town of Honiton. The hills are developed upon chalk and greensand and are drained mainly by the Rivers Culm (a tributary of the Exe)

  • Blacker the Berry: A Novel of Negro Life, The (novel by Thurman)

    African American literature: Novelists: Thurman’s The Blacker the Berry (1929) exposes colour prejudice among African Americans and is among the first African American novels to broach the topic of homosexuality. The struggles and frustrations Larsen revealed in the black female protagonists of her novels Quicksand (1928) and Passing (1929) likely…

  • Blackett, Patrick (British physicist)

    Patrick Blackett, winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1948 for his discoveries in the field of cosmic rays, which he accomplished primarily with cloud-chamber photographs that revealed the way in which a stable atomic nucleus can be disintegrated by bombarding it with alpha particles (helium

  • Blackett, Patrick Maynard Stuart, Baron Blackett of Chelsea (British physicist)

    Patrick Blackett, winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1948 for his discoveries in the field of cosmic rays, which he accomplished primarily with cloud-chamber photographs that revealed the way in which a stable atomic nucleus can be disintegrated by bombarding it with alpha particles (helium

  • blackface (theatrical style)

    Blackface minstrelsy, indigenous American theatrical form that constituted a subgenre of the minstrel show. Intended as comic entertainment, blackface minstrelsy was performed by a group of white minstrels (traveling musicians) with black-painted faces, whose material caricatured the singing and

  • blackface minstrelsy (theatrical style)

    Blackface minstrelsy, indigenous American theatrical form that constituted a subgenre of the minstrel show. Intended as comic entertainment, blackface minstrelsy was performed by a group of white minstrels (traveling musicians) with black-painted faces, whose material caricatured the singing and

  • Blackfeet (people)

    Blackfoot, North American Indian tribe composed of three closely related bands, the Piegan (officially spelled Peigan in Canada), or Piikuni; the Blood, or Kainah (also spelled Kainai, or Akainiwa); and the Siksika, or Blackfoot proper (often referred to as the Northern Blackfoot). The three groups

  • blackfin tuna (fish)

    tuna: obesus), blackfin tuna (T. atlanticus), and longtail tuna (T. tonggol). These different species range from moderate to very large in size. The giant of the group is the northern bluefin tuna, which grows to a maximum length and weight of about 4.3 metres (14 feet) and…

  • blackfish (mammal)

    Pilot whale, (genus Globicephala), either of two species of small, slender toothed whales of the dolphin family Delphinidae. They are characterized by a round bulging forehead, a short beaklike snout, and slender pointed flippers. The short-finned pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) and the

  • Blackfish (Shawnee chief)

    Tecumseh: Early life and training: …adopted by the Shawnee chief Blackfish and grew to young manhood with several white foster brothers whom Blackfish had captured.

  • Blackfoot (people)

    Blackfoot, North American Indian tribe composed of three closely related bands, the Piegan (officially spelled Peigan in Canada), or Piikuni; the Blood, or Kainah (also spelled Kainai, or Akainiwa); and the Siksika, or Blackfoot proper (often referred to as the Northern Blackfoot). The three groups

  • Blackfoot (Idaho, United States)

    Blackfoot, city, seat (1885) of Bingham county, southeastern Idaho, U.S., near the confluence of the Snake and Blackfoot rivers. Founded on the Utah Northern Railroad in 1878 at the northern edge of Fort Hall Indian Reservation (1869), the city evolved as the centre of an irrigated agricultural

  • Blackfoot River (river, Idaho, United States)

    Blackfoot River, watercourse, southeastern Idaho, U.S., formed by the confluence of Slug and Lanes creeks, near the Caribou-Targhee National Forest in Caribou county. It flows northwestward through Blackfoot River Reservoir (used for irrigation) and then west to join the Snake River in Bingham

  • Blackfriars (neighbourhood, London, United Kingdom)

    Blackfriars, small district in the City of London. It is located on the bank of the River Thames, east of The Temple and southwest of St. Paul’s Cathedral. From 1221 to 1538 the Blackfriars Monastery was located on the riverside. It was a wealthy and influential institution, and its halls were

  • Blackfriars Bridge (bridge, London, England, United Kingdom)

    Blackfriars: Blackfriars Bridge (1860–69) replaced an earlier road bridge that dated to the 1760s. The first structure was paid for by fines and by tolls exacted from its passengers. During the Gordon Riots of 1780 the tollbooths were attacked and looted, and tolls ceased to be…

  • Blackfriars Station (railroad station, Blackfriars, London, United Kingdom)

    Blackfriars: Blackfriars Station was opened in 1886 under the name St. Paul’s Station; its name was changed in 1937. Rebuilt in 1977, it connects with London Bridge Station in Southwark.

  • Blackfriars Theatre (theatre, London, United Kingdom)

    Blackfriars Theatre, either of two separate theatres, the second famed as the winter quarters (after 1608) of the King’s Men, the company of actors for whom Shakespeare served as chief playwright and also as a performer. The name of the theatres derives from their location on the site of a

  • Blackham, J. McC. (British athlete)

    cricket: Test matches: …of the great wicketkeepers in J.McC. Blackham.

  • Blackhat (film by Mann [2015])

    Michael Mann: Mann then directed Blackhat (2015), a thriller that traces the efforts of a hacker and his cohort to track down a cybercriminal. In addition, Mann served as executive producer of the television series Robbery Homicide Division (2002–03), another police drama, and Luck (2011–12), which was set in the…

  • blackhead (acne)

    acne: …vulgaris is the comedo, or blackhead, which consists of a plug of sebum (the fatty substance secreted by a sebaceous gland), cell debris, and microorganisms (especially the bacterium Propionibacterium acnes) filling up a hair follicle. Comedones may be open, their upper or visible portion being darkened by oxidative changes, or…

  • blackhead (bird disease)

    Blackhead, acute liver and intestinal disease of turkeys, chickens, and other game birds, caused by the protozoan parasite Histomonas meleagridis that lives in eggs of the nematode Heterakis gallinarum. Chief symptoms are listlessness and sulfur-coloured diarrhea. Blackhead is usually fatal in

  • blackheart malleable iron (metallurgy)

    iron processing: White iron: Blackheart malleable iron, on the other hand, is made by annealing white iron in a neutral atmosphere, again at a temperature of 900° C. In this process, cementite is decomposed to form rosette-shaped graphite nodules, which are less embrittling than flakes. Blackheart iron is an…

  • Blackheath (neighbourhood, London, United Kingdom)

    Blackheath, open common and residential area mainly in the Greater London boroughs of Lewisham and Greenwich. It lies about 6 miles (10 km) southeast of the City of London. The site of both Roman and Saxon remains, the heath was crossed by the Roman Watling Street (now partly traced by Shooter’s

  • Blackiston’s Island (island, Maryland, United States)

    Saint Clements Island, islet (40 acres [16 hectares]) in the Potomac River, St. Mary’s county, southern Maryland, U.S., just off Coltons Point. The first Maryland settlers under the Calverts (Barons Baltimore) landed there from the ships Ark and Dove on March 25, 1634. A large cross (erected 1934)

  • Blackjack (Soviet aircraft)

    bomber: … and the long-range B-1 and Tu-160 Blackjack, respectively. These planes were designed to slip under early-warning radar at low level and to approach military targets using terrain-following radars and inertial-guidance systems. They could carry gravity bombs (nuclear or conventional), air-launched cruise missiles, or air-launched ballistic missiles.

  • blackjack (card game)

    Blackjack, gambling card game popular in casinos throughout the world. Its origin is disputed, but it is certainly related to several French and Italian gambling games. In Britain since World War I, the informal game has been called pontoon. Players hope to get a total card value of 21 or to come

  • Blackjack Daisy (song)

    forty-nine dance: Setting and style: …loss is contained in “Blackjack Daisy”:

  • blackjack oak (plant)

    red oak: The blackjack oak (Q. marilandica), a cover tree on sandy soils in eastern North America, is about 9 to 15 m tall, with leaves that bear three lobes at the wide apex; they are glossy and dark green above, rusty and hairy below.

  • BlacKkKlansman (film by Lee [2018])

    Spike Lee: …race relations with the film BlacKkKlansman (2018), a satire based on the memoir of a black police officer in Colorado Springs, Colorado, who infiltrated the local Ku Klux Klan chapter in the 1970s. The movie was lauded as a biting commentary on enduring racial tensions in the United States, and…

  • Blackland Prairie (region, Texas, United States)

    Texas: Soils: The Blackland Prairie, a belt of fertile black clay to the west of the Piney Woods, extends southwesterly from the Red River to San Antonio. The soil of the Grand Prairie region, just to the west of the Blackland Prairie, is more rocky and resistant to…

  • Blacklist (work by Paretsky)

    Sara Paretsky: …be a Holocaust survivor, and Blacklist (2003), which is set in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks and uses the backdrop of a murder mystery to criticize the U.S. government’s expanded policing powers. In Fire Sale (2005) Warshawski becomes embroiled in a mystery involving a local discount store when…

  • blacklist

    House Un-American Activities Committee: Assorted…

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