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  • blacklist, Hollywood (United States history)

    Hollywood blacklist, list of media workers ineligible for employment because of alleged communist or subversive ties, generated by Hollywood studios in the late 1940s and ’50s. In the anticommunist furor of post-World War II America, many crusaders—both within the government and in the private

  • Blacklist, The (American television series)

    Alan Alda: …30 Rock; The Big C; The Blacklist; and Ray Donovan. He also appeared in the Web series Horace and Pete (2016), Louis C.K.’s comedy about the goings-on at a bar. In addition, Alda hosted the TV series Scientific American Frontiers from 1993 to 2007.

  • Blackmail (film by Hitchcock [1929])

    Alfred Hitchcock: First films: …talking picture was the thriller Blackmail (1929). One of the year’s biggest hits in England, it became the first British film to make use of synchronized sound only after the completed silent version was postdubbed and partly reshot. Polish actress Anny Ondra (who had starred in The Manxman) played a…

  • blackmail (law)

    Extortion, the unlawful exaction of money or property through intimidation. Extortion was originally the complement of bribery, both crimes involving interference with or by public officials. But extortion and, to a limited extent, bribery have been expanded to include actions by private citizens

  • Blackman, Garfield (Trinidadian musician)

    soca: …the 1970s by Trinidadian musician Lord Shorty (Garfield Blackman), who sang calypso, a type of Afro-Trinidadian song style characterized by storytelling and verbal wit. According to Lord Shorty, the new music was meant to be a fusion of calypso with East Indian music, a reflection of Trinidad’s two dominant ethnic…

  • Blackman, Honor (British actress)

    Goldfinger: …Bond meets Pussy Galore (Honor Blackman), who oversees female stunt pilots in the millionaire’s employ. While imprisoned at the farm, Bond breaks out of his cell and overhears Goldfinger briefing a group of Mafia leaders about the true meaning of Operation Grand Slam: he intends to have Galore’s pilots…

  • Blackmer, Sidney (American actor)

    Rosemary's Baby: …Roman Castevet (Ruth Gordon and Sidney Blackmer, respectively) are eccentric and nosy but seemingly harmless, and after befriending them, Guy’s acting career suddenly takes off. Rosemary’s subsequent pregnancy, however, is fraught with difficulties. After reading a book that suggests that Roman is the son of an infamous Satanist, Rosemary begins…

  • Blackmore, Richard Doddridge (British author)

    Richard Doddridge Blackmore, English Victorian novelist whose novel Lorna Doone (1869) won a secure place among English historical romances. Educated at Blundell’s School, Tiverton, and at Exeter College, Oxford, Blackmore was called to the bar but withdrew because of ill health. He married in 1852

  • Blackmore, Ritchie (British musician)

    Jon Lord: …Hammond B-3 organ, combined with Ritchie Blackmore’s guitar at extraordinary decibel levels, earned (1972) the group a designation by the Guinness Book of Records as the world’s loudest band. Lord started studying classical piano at age five. (Deep Purple later incorporated some classical music influences, and in 1969 the band…

  • Blackmore, Sir Richard (British physician and author)

    Sir Richard Blackmore, English physician and writer, physician in ordinary to King William III (who knighted him in 1697 for professional services) and Queen Anne. Though he regarded poetry as merely the entertainment of his idle hours, he wrote four epics in 10 or more books, Prince Arthur (1695),

  • Blackmun, Harry A. (United States jurist)

    Harry A. Blackmun, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1970 to 1994. Blackmun graduated in mathematics from Harvard University in 1929 and received his law degree from that institution in 1932. He joined a Minneapolis, Minnesota, law firm in 1934, and while advancing to

  • Blackmun, Harry Andrew (United States jurist)

    Harry A. Blackmun, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1970 to 1994. Blackmun graduated in mathematics from Harvard University in 1929 and received his law degree from that institution in 1932. He joined a Minneapolis, Minnesota, law firm in 1934, and while advancing to

  • Blackmur, R. P. (American literary critic)

    American literature: Moral-aesthetic critics: …reading can be found in R.P. Blackmur’s The Double Agent (1935), Allen Tate’s Reactionary Essays on Poetry and Ideas (1936), John Crowe Ransom’s The World’s Body (1938), Yvor Winters’s Maule’s Curse (1938), and Cleanth Brooks’s The Well Wrought Urn (1947). Though they were later

  • blackout (electronics)

    Yemen: Resources and power: …meet national demands, and scheduled blackouts are common. In the 2000s only about two-fifths of the country was tied into the national grid.

  • blackpoll warbler (bird)

    Blackpoll warbler, species of woodwarbler

  • Blackpool (town and unitary authority, England, United Kingdom)

    Blackpool, town and unitary authority, geographic and historic county of Lancashire, England, on the Irish Sea coast. It is one of the largest and most popular resorts in the country. Blackpool’s growth has been fairly rapid since the late 18th century, when it was transformed from a small hamlet

  • Blackpool FC (British soccer team)

    Sir Stanley Matthews: …Matthews was transferred (traded) to Blackpool in 1946. With that team he competed in the 1953 Football Association Cup Final, considered to be his most famous game. Matthews set up Blackpool’s last three goals to help defeat the Bolton Wanderers in what became known as “the Matthews final.” In 1961…

  • Blackpool Opera House (theatre, Blackpool, England, United Kingdom)

    Blackpool: …is also home to the Blackpool Opera House, one of the largest theatres in the United Kingdom. In addition, Blackpool has developed as a major British conference and convention centre. Area 14 square miles (35 square km). Pop. (2001) 142,283; (2011) 142,065.

  • Blackpool Tower (tower, Blackpool, England, United Kingdom)

    Blackpool: …(1895) of the 520-foot (158-metre) Blackpool Tower, a regional landmark modeled on the Eiffel Tower in Paris, and the introduction of illuminations, a complex decoration of seafront buildings by coloured lights and tableaux.

  • Blackrock (Ireland)

    Blackrock, southeastern suburb of Dublin, Ireland, and an administrative part of Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown county, on Dublin Bay. Blackrock grew substantially in the 18th century as a fashionable bathing resort; it developed further with the opening of a rail line between Dublin and Kingstown in 1834.

  • Blacks (medieval Italian political faction)

    Florence: The early period: …policy was embraced by the Blacks (Neri; the rich merchants), the latter by the Whites (Bianchi; the lesser citizens).

  • Blacks Unlimited, the (Zimbabwean musical group)

    Thomas Mapfumo: …personnel) into the 21st century, the Blacks Unlimited. When Zimbabwe won independence in 1980, Mapfumo was considered to have played no small part in the achievement. During the 1980s he added a real mbira to the band and continued to nurture and promote the traditional music of Zimbabwe.

  • Blacks, The (play by Genet)

    Jean Genet: …The Balcony), Les Nègres (1958; The Blacks), and Les Paravents (1961; The Screens), are large-scale, stylized dramas in the Expressionist manner, designed to shock and implicate an audience by revealing its hypocrisy and complicity. This “Theatre of Hatred” attempts to wrest the maximum dramatic power from a social or political…

  • Blackshirt (Italian history)

    Blackshirt, member of any of the armed squads of Italian Fascists under Benito Mussolini, who wore black shirts as part of their uniform. The first squads—each of which was called Squadre d’Azione (“Action Squad”)—were organized in March 1919 to destroy the political and economic organizations of

  • Blackshirt (corps of Nazi Party)

    SS, the black-uniformed elite corps and self-described “political soldiers” of the Nazi Party. Founded by Adolf Hitler in April 1925 as a small personal bodyguard, the SS grew with the success of the Nazi movement and, gathering immense police and military powers, became virtually a state within a

  • blacksmith (metalworker)

    Blacksmith, craftsman who fabricates objects out of iron by hot and cold forging on an anvil. Blacksmiths who specialized in the forging of shoes for horses were called farriers. The term blacksmith derives from iron, formerly called “black metal,” and farrier from the Latin ferrum, “iron.” Iron

  • blacksmith frog (amphibian)

    Anura: Breeding behaviour: The South American nest-building hylid, Hyla faber, has a long, sharp spine on the thumb with which males wound each other when wrestling. The small Central American Dendrobates pumilio calls from the leaves of herbaceous plants. Intrusion into a territory of one calling male by another results in a wrestling…

  • blackspot (plant disease)

    Black spot, common disease of a variety of plants caused by species of Pseudomonas bacteria or by any number of fungus species in the genera Asterina, Asterinella, Diplotheca, Glomerella, Gnomonia, Schizothyrium, Placosphaeria, and Stigmea. Infections occur during damp periods and appear as round

  • Blackstairs Mountain (mountain, Ireland)

    Wexford: The Blackstairs Mountains—which have two main peaks, Blackstairs Mountain (2,402 feet [732 metres]) and Mount Leinster (2,602 feet [793 metres])—form a striking range rising from lowlands on all sides. Between the two main summits is the deep Scullogue Gap. Most of the county consists of a…

  • Blackstar (album by Bowie)

    David Bowie: The searching, jazz-infused Blackstar (2016) was released two days before his death from cancer. In Bowie’s final years he also cowrote the musical Lazarus (premiered 2015), which was inspired by The Man Who Fell to Earth, and he was the subject of a blockbuster art exhibition, David Bowie…

  • Blackstone (watermelon variety)

    vegetable farming: Planting: …for 1,000 seeds; those of Blackstone variety average 4.4 ounces (125 grams). If the two are grown on two separate plots of the same area and 4.4 ounces of seeds of each cultivar are planted, the result would be three times as many of the Sugar Baby plants as the…

  • Blackstone River (river, United States)

    Blackstone River, river rising in south central Worcester County, Mass., U.S., and flowing generally southeast past Worcester city and Northbridge, Mass.; it continues across the northeast corner of Rhode Island, past Woonsocket, Central Falls, and Pawtucket, where it becomes the Seekonk River

  • Blackstone’s Commentaries: With Notes of Reference to the Constitution and Laws of the Federal Government of the United States and of the Commonwealth of Virginia (work by Tucker)

    Second Amendment: …1803 in his great work Blackstone’s Commentaries: With Notes of Reference to the Constitution and Laws of the Federal Government of the United States and of the Commonwealth of Virginia, as the “true palladium of liberty.” In addition to checking federal power, the Second Amendment also provided state governments with…

  • Blackstone, Harry, Sr. (American magician)

    conjuring: …era, while Kellar, Thurston, and Harry Blackstone, Sr. (1885–1965), conducted large and popular touring shows. After a considerable slump in the popularity of stage illusion, Doug Henning revitalized the art by appearing on Broadway in the 1970s and paved the way for the success of the magic show of David…

  • Blackstone, Sir William (English jurist)

    Sir William Blackstone, English jurist, whose Commentaries on the Laws of England, 4 vol. (1765–69), is the best-known description of the doctrines of English law. The work became the basis of university legal education in England and North America. He was knighted in 1770. Blackstone was the

  • Blackstonia (plant)

    Gentianaceae: Major genera and species: …that close in the afternoon; yellow-wort (Blackstonia) has bright yellow flowers and broad leaves. Both genera contain species used in herbal remedies and in the making of dyes.

  • blackstrap (beverage)

    rum: …mixed with molasses and called blackstrap or mixed with cider to produce a beverage called stonewall.

  • blackstrap molasses (agricultural product)

    molasses: …third and final extraction yields blackstrap molasses, a heavy, viscous, dark-coloured product that has had all the sugar removed from it that can be separated practically by ordinary crystallization.

  • blackthorn (shrub)

    Blackthorn, (Prunus spinosa), spiny shrub of the rose family (Rosaceae), native to Europe but cultivated in other regions. Blackthorn usually grows less than 3.6 metres (12 feet) tall and has numerous small deciduous leaves. Its dense growth makes it suitable for hedges. The white flowers, about 2

  • blacktip reef shark (shark)

    carcharhinid: One small species, C. melanopterus, is found in shallow Indo-Pacific waters.

  • blacktip shark (fish)

    Blacktip shark, any of several shark species in the family Carcharhinidae. See

  • Blackton, J. Stuart (American film director)

    J. Stuart Blackton, British-born U.S. film director and producer who introduced animation and other important film techniques that helped shape and stimulate the development of cinematic art. While interviewing Thomas A. Edison in 1895, Blackton’s interest in films was so aroused that in the

  • Blackton, James Stuart (American film director)

    J. Stuart Blackton, British-born U.S. film director and producer who introduced animation and other important film techniques that helped shape and stimulate the development of cinematic art. While interviewing Thomas A. Edison in 1895, Blackton’s interest in films was so aroused that in the

  • Blackton, Jay (American composer, pianist, and arranger)
  • Blackwall hitch (knot)

    knot: A Blackwall hitch is used to fasten a rope to a hook. It is made by doubling a rope near its end to form a loop and putting the shank of the hook through the loop so that the loop may be jammed between the rope’s…

  • Blackwall Tunnel (tunnel, London, United Kingdom)

    Weetman Dickinson Pearson, 1st Viscount Cowdray: His firm built the Blackwall Tunnel under the Thames River, London, and several railroad tunnels under the East River, New York City; enlarged the Dover (England) harbour; and in 1926 completed a large dam on the Blue Nile in Sudan.

  • Blackwater (Queensland, Australia)

    Blackwater, town, central Queensland, Australia. A coal-mining town, it lies along the Capricorn Highway, 100 miles (160 km) west of Rockhampton. The German explorer Ludwig Leichhardt noted the presence of coal in the area in 1844–45; the town was laid out in 1886 and given its name because of the

  • blackwater fever (pathology)

    Blackwater fever, one of the less common yet most dangerous complications of malaria. It occurs almost exclusively with infection from the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Blackwater fever has a high mortality. Its symptoms include a rapid pulse, high fever and chills, extreme prostration, a rapidly

  • blackwater stream (hydrology)

    Amazon River: Physiography of the river course: …highlands are classified as either blackwater (Jari, Negro, and Tocantins-Araguaia) or clearwater (Trombetas, Xingu, and Tapajós). The blackwater tributaries have higher levels of humic acids (which cause their dark colour) and originate in

  • Blackwater, River (river, Ireland)

    River Blackwater, river rising in the uplands on the border of Counties Cork and Kerry, Ireland, and flowing 104 miles (167 km) to the sea at Youghal, County Cork. In its upper course the Blackwater flows between uplands and a sandstone ridge with summits above 2,200 feet (670 m). East–west lines

  • Blackwater, River (river, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    River Blackwater, river in Northern Ireland, rising in the uplands near the Dungannon Fermanagh district boundaries and fed by a network of small streams northeast of a drainage divide near Fivemiletown. The river flows northeast through southern Dungannon district and then turns southeast, forming

  • Blackwell’s Island (island, New York, United States)

    Roosevelt Island, island in the East River, between the boroughs of Manhattan and Queens, New York City. Administratively part of Manhattan, it is 1.5 miles (about 2.5 km) long and 18 mile wide, with an area of 139 acres (56 hectares). In 1637 the Dutch governor Wouter van Twiller bought the

  • Blackwell, Alice Stone (American leader and editor)

    Alice Stone Blackwell, suffragist and editor of the leading American women’s rights newspaper. Alice Stone Blackwell was the daughter of Lucy Stone and of Henry B. Blackwell, who in turn was the brother of Elizabeth Blackwell and brother-in-law of Antoinette Brown Blackwell. Her childhood in

  • Blackwell, Antoinette Brown (American minister)

    Antoinette Brown Blackwell, first woman to be ordained a minister of a recognized denomination in the United States. Antoinette Brown was a precocious child and at an early age began to speak at meetings of the Congregational church to which she belonged. She attended Oberlin College, completing

  • Blackwell, Bumps (American record producer)

    Specialty Records: Little Richard, Lloyd Price, and a Los Angeles Label: …1955, newly appointed artists-and-repertoire man Robert (“Bumps”) Blackwell went to New Orleans for the label’s first session with Richard, which resulted in “Tutti Frutti.”

  • Blackwell, Chris (British promoter)

    Melissa Etheridge: …and bars until 1986, when Chris Blackwell, founder of Island Records, signed her to a recording contract. Her first album, Melissa Etheridge (1988), with its hit single “Bring Me Some Water,” earned her a Grammy Award nomination. Success continued with the release of Brave and Crazy (1989) and Never Enough…

  • Blackwell, David (American statistician and mathematician)

    David Blackwell, American statistician and mathematician who made significant contributions to game theory, probability theory, information theory, and Bayesian statistics and who broke racial barriers when he was named (1965) the first African American member of the U.S. National Academy of

  • Blackwell, David Harold (American statistician and mathematician)

    David Blackwell, American statistician and mathematician who made significant contributions to game theory, probability theory, information theory, and Bayesian statistics and who broke racial barriers when he was named (1965) the first African American member of the U.S. National Academy of

  • Blackwell, Edward Joseph (American musician)

    Edward Joseph Blackwell, American jazz drummer who was known for his role in the development of free jazz beginning in the 1960s. Blackwell played with rhythm-and-blues groups in New Orleans, where he was influenced by the city’s musical tradition and by such drummers as Paul Barbarin. From 1951

  • Blackwell, Elizabeth (British American physician)

    Elizabeth Blackwell, Anglo-American physician who is considered the first woman doctor of medicine in modern times. Elizabeth Blackwell was of a large, prosperous, and cultured family and was well educated by private tutors. Financial reverses and the family’s liberal social and religious views

  • Blackwell, Emily (American physician and educator)

    Emily Blackwell, English-born American physician and educator who, with her elder sister, Elizabeth Blackwell, contributed greatly to the education and acceptance of women medical professionals in the United States. Like her sister, Emily was well educated by the private tutors afforded her by her

  • Blackwell, Ewell (American athlete)

    Ewell Blackwell, ("THE WHIP"), U.S. sidearm fastball pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds baseball team during the 1940s and ’50s whose whiplike delivery intimidated batters; he compiled a career record of 82 wins and 78 losses, with a 3.30 earned run average (b. Oct. 23, 1922--d. Oct. 29,

  • Blackwell, John (Welsh author)

    John Blackwell, poet and prose writer, regarded as the father of the modern Welsh secular lyric. While an apprentice shoemaker, he began attending meetings of the Cymreigyddion, an organization of Welshmen in London dedicated to preserving ancient Welsh literature, and he participated in

  • Blackwell, Mr. (American fashion designer and Hollywood tastemaker)

    Mr. Blackwell, (Richard Sylvan Selzer), American fashion designer and Hollywood tastemaker (born Aug. 29, 1922, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Oct. 19, 2008, Los Angeles, Calif.), attracted media and public attention for his annual “10 Worst Dressed Women’s List,” in which he used his biting wit to pillory

  • Blackwell, Otis (American musician)

    Otis Blackwell, American singer and songwriter (born Feb. 16, 1931/32, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died May 6, 2002, Nashville, Tenn.), began as a singer but saw that career overshadowed by his writing of more than 1,000 songs, which hugely influenced the development of the sound of rock and roll. Among his h

  • Blackwell, Robert (American record producer)

    Specialty Records: Little Richard, Lloyd Price, and a Los Angeles Label: …1955, newly appointed artists-and-repertoire man Robert (“Bumps”) Blackwell went to New Orleans for the label’s first session with Richard, which resulted in “Tutti Frutti.”

  • Blackwell, Scrapper (American musician)

    Leroy Carr: …with the guitar playing of Scrapper Blackwell (1903–62); their work was especially notable for the expressive and pensive quality of Carr’s singing and the intimate melancholy in the songs that he wrote, often with Blackwell’s aid. They recorded a large catalog in 1928–35 that made Carr one of the most…

  • Blackwood convention (bridge)

    bridge: Blackwood convention: In this convention, devised in 1934 by Easley Blackwood of Indianapolis, Ind., a bid of four no trump asks partner to show his total number of aces. A response of five clubs shows no aces (or all four aces); five diamonds shows one…

  • Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (Scottish publication)

    John Gibson Lockhart: …Tory-oriented Edinburgh Monthly Magazine (later Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine) from the time of its founding in 1817. With others, he wrote the “Translation from an Ancient Chaldee Manuscript,” which lampooned Scottish celebrities in a parody of Old Testament style; this article made Blackwood’s an immediate succès de scandale. Another article, “On…

  • Blackwood’s Magazine (Scottish publication)

    John Gibson Lockhart: …Tory-oriented Edinburgh Monthly Magazine (later Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine) from the time of its founding in 1817. With others, he wrote the “Translation from an Ancient Chaldee Manuscript,” which lampooned Scottish celebrities in a parody of Old Testament style; this article made Blackwood’s an immediate succès de scandale. Another article, “On…

  • Blackwood, Algernon Henry (British author)

    Algernon Henry Blackwood, British writer of tales of mystery and the supernatural. After farming in Canada, operating a hotel, mining in the Alaskan goldfields, and working as a newspaper reporter in New York City, experiences that he recalled in Episodes Before Thirty (1923), Blackwood returned to

  • Blackwood, Caroline (Irish journalist and novelist)

    Caroline Blackwood, Irish journalist and novelist whose psychological fiction examines physical and emotional deformity. She was married at different times to the British artist Lucian Freud and the American poet Robert Lowell. Blackwood, a descendant of the 18th-century dramatist Richard Brinsley

  • Blackwood, Easley (American composer)

    Easley Blackwood, American composer whose music combined rhapsodic and romantic passion with chromatic materials and modified serial techniques. Besides composing for standard ensembles and instruments, he also composed for electronic instruments. Blackwood—whose father, Easley Blackwood, Sr., was

  • Blackwood, Frederick Temple Hamilton-Temple- (British diplomat)

    Frederick Temple Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 1st marquess of Dufferin and Ava, British diplomat who was a distinguished governor-general of Canada and viceroy of India. The son of the 4th Baron Dufferin, he was educated at Eton and Christ Church College, Oxford. He held undersecretaryships in

  • Blackwood, James (American singer)

    James Blackwood, American gospel singer (born Aug. 4, 1919, Choctaw county, Miss.—died Feb. 3, 2002, Memphis, Tenn.), was a founding member and leader of the Blackwood Brothers Quartet, the first gospel group to sell one million records. Blackwood was also a well-known solo performer and was a l

  • Blackwood, William (Scottish publisher)

    William Blackwood, Scottish bookseller and publisher, founder of the publishing firm of William Blackwood and Sons, Ltd. After learning antiquarian bookselling, Blackwood set up a business in Edinburgh in 1804. By 1810 he was acting in Scotland for several London publishers and publishing on his

  • BLAD (pathology)

    animal breeding: Immunogenetics: For example, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is a hereditary disease that was discovered in Holstein calves in the 1980s. The presence of the BLAD gene leads to high rates of bacterial infections, pneumonia, diarrhea, and typically death by age four months in cattle, and those that…

  • Blad el-Hawa (Algeria)

    Constantine, city, northeast Algeria. A natural fortress, the city occupies a rocky diamond-shaped plateau that is surrounded, except at the southwest, by a precipitous gorge through the eastern side of which flows the Rhumel River. The plateau is 2,130 feet (650 metres) above sea level and from

  • bladder (anatomy)

    Bladder, membranous sac in animals that serves as the receptacle of a fluid or gas. See gallbladder; swim bladder; urinary

  • bladder (botany)

    bladderwort: The bladders, or traps, are hollow underwater structures with a flexible door or valve that is kept closed. A physiological process moves water from the interior to the exterior of the bladders, generating a state of low pressure within the traps. If a small animal triggers…

  • bladder campion (plant)

    campion: Bladder campion (S. vulgaris) has large, white, drooping flowers, and it has subspecies in different habitats throughout Europe. Many species are cultivated. Maltese Cross, or Jerusalem Cross (S. chalcedonica), has flowers of such a bright scarlet that they can be difficult to integrate into border…

  • bladder cancer (pathology)

    Bladder cancer, disease characterized by the growth of malignant cells within the urinary bladder, the organ responsible for storing urine prior to elimination. Bladder cancer can also be associated with cancers of the kidneys, ureters, or urethra. Over 90 percent of bladder cancers are

  • bladder senna (plant)

    senna: The bladder sennas (Colutea species) are Old World shrubs or small trees; their yellow flowers are followed by inflated pods. Scorpion senna (Coronilla emerus), also shrubby, is grown as an ornamental for its yellow flowers.

  • bladder urine (metabolic waste)

    urine: …solution of waste material called final, or bladder, urine. It consists of water, urea (from amino acid metabolism), inorganic salts, creatinine, ammonia, and pigmented products of blood breakdown, one of which (urochrome) gives urine its typically yellowish colour. In addition, any unusual substances for which there is no mechanism of…

  • bladder worm (biology)

    tapeworm: …(encysts) and is called a cysticercus, or bladder worm. If the cysticercus is eaten alive in raw meat, it attaches itself to the host’s intestine and develops directly into a mature adult.

  • bladderbush (plant)

    Burro-fat, (species Cleome isomeris), shrub or small tree of the Cleome genus (of the family Cleomaceae, which is closely related to the mustard family, Brassicaceae), native to southwestern North America, with showy spikes of yellow flowers and gray-green foliage. Burro-fat, up to 3 metres (10

  • bladdernose seal (mammal)

    Hooded seal, (Cystophora cristata), large grayish seal with dark spots that is found in open waters of the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. Hooded seals range from the Svalbard archipelago and the Barents Sea to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Average-sized adult males measure about 2.6 metres (8.5

  • bladdernut (plant)

    Bladdernut, any shrub or small tree of the genus Staphylea of the family Staphyleaceae. All of the 10–15 known species occur in the North Temperate Zone. The commonest species usually grow to about 3.5–4.5 m (12–15 feet) tall. The trees are admired more for their handsome green foliage than for

  • bladdernut family (plant family)

    Crossosomatales: Most members of Staphyleaceae, or the bladdernut family, are deciduous trees restricted to the northern temperate region, but some species range as far south as Bolivia and Malaysia. Staphylea (bladdernut) consists of 11 species in the temperate region and is often cultivated. Turpinia, with at least 10 species,…

  • bladderwort (plant)

    Bladderwort, (genus Utricularia), genus of carnivorous plants in the family Lentibulariaceae (order Lamiales). The bladderwort genus contains 220 widely distributed species of plants characterized by small hollow sacs that actively capture and digest tiny animals such as insect larvae, aquatic

  • bladderwort family (plant family)

    bladderwort: …carnivorous plants in the family Lentibulariaceae (order Lamiales). The bladderwort genus contains 220 widely distributed species of plants characterized by small hollow sacs that actively capture and digest tiny animals such as insect larvae, aquatic worms, and water fleas. Bladderworts can be found in lakes, streams, and waterlogged soils around…

  • bladderwrack (brown algae)
  • blade (plant leaf)

    angiosperm: Leaves: The blade is the major photosynthetic surface of the plant and appears green and flattened in a plane perpendicular to the stem.

  • blade (cutting tool)

    cutlery: History: Scissors with blades connected by a C-shaped spring at the handle end also originated at about this time. As various metals became known, the art of forging blades developed in China, India, and Europe. Pivoted scissors of bronze or iron, connected by a rivet or screw between…

  • blade (mineralogy)

    mineral: Crystal habit and crystal aggregation: …platelike individuals arranged in layers; bladed, elongated crystals flattened like a knife blade; fibrous, an aggregate of slender fibres, parallel or radiating; acicular, slender, needlelike crystals; radiating, individuals forming starlike or circular groups; globular, radiating individuals forming small spherical or hemispherical groups; dendritic, in

  • Blade (film by Norrington [1998])

    Wesley Snipes: …portraying a vampire hunter in Blade. The film was a box-office hit and led to the sequels Blade II (2002) and Blade: Trinity (2004). Snipes later appeared in several straight-to-video features, including 7 Seconds (2005) and The Contractor (2007). He played a drug dealer in the crime thriller Brooklyn’s Finest…

  • blade (ice skating)

    figure skating: Boots and blades: Skaters wear leather boots, sometimes custom-fitted, reinforced with thick padding to brace the ankle and with wide tongues for control and flexibility. The figure skate’s blade is about 316 inch (4 mm) thick. It is hollow-ground to emphasize its two edges, although the skater…

  • Blade Among the Boys (novel by Nzekwu)

    Onuora Nzekwu: To the hero of Blade Among the Boys (1962), traditional practices and beliefs ultimately gain dominance over half-absorbed European and Christian values. In 1963 he published a children’s book, Eze Goes to School (written with Michael Crowder), and his third novel, Highlife for Lizards, appeared in 1965.

  • Blade II (film by del Toro [2002])

    Wesley Snipes: …and led to the sequels Blade II (2002) and Blade: Trinity (2004). Snipes later appeared in several straight-to-video features, including 7 Seconds (2005) and The Contractor (2007). He played a drug dealer in the crime thriller Brooklyn’s Finest (2009) and Doctor Death, an assassin in the action thriller The Expendables…

  • Blade III (film by Goyer [2004])

    Ryan Reynolds: Hollywood career: …Snipes in the action movie Blade: Trinity (2004), for which he trained for three months and gained 25 pounds.

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