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  • Blarina hylophaga (mammal)

    short-tailed shrew: carolinensis), and Elliot’s (B. hylophaga) short-tailed shrew. Blarina is one of many genera classified with “true shrews” of the family Soricidae in the order Soricimorpha, which belongs to a larger group of mammals referred to as insectivores. Their evolutionary history extends back to the late Pliocene Epoch…

  • Blarney (Ireland)

    Blarney, village, County Cork, Ireland, 5 miles (8 km) northwest of Cork city, famous for Blarney Castle (c. 1446). Below the battlements on the southern wall of the castle is the Blarney Stone, reputed to confer eloquence on those who kiss it; this feat can be achieved only by hanging head

  • Blarney Stone (stone, Blarney, Ireland)

    Blarney: …of the castle is the Blarney Stone, reputed to confer eloquence on those who kiss it; this feat can be achieved only by hanging head downward. “Blarney” as an expression of dubiousness is attributed to Elizabeth I of England, who used it when impugning the worth of Lord Blarney’s promises.…

  • Blaschka glass

    Blaschka glass, glass models, primarily of natural history specimens, made by Leopold Blaschka (died 1895) and his son Rudolph (died 1939). The Blaschkas were Bohemian, or Czech, by birth but worked in Germany. Their most famous production was the Ware Collection of Glass Models of Plants, a

  • Blaschka, Leopold (German craftsman)

    Blaschka glass: …natural history specimens, made by Leopold Blaschka (died 1895) and his son Rudolph (died 1939). The Blaschkas were Bohemian, or Czech, by birth but worked in Germany. Their most famous production was the Ware Collection of Glass Models of Plants, a collection of almost 4,000 models of flowers, plants, and…

  • Blaschka, Rudolph (German craftsman)

    Blaschka glass: … (died 1895) and his son Rudolph (died 1939). The Blaschkas were Bohemian, or Czech, by birth but worked in Germany. Their most famous production was the Ware Collection of Glass Models of Plants, a collection of almost 4,000 models of flowers, plants, and flower parts, made at Dresden between 1887…

  • Blaschke, Wilhelm Johann Eugen (German mathematician)

    Wilhelm Johann Eugen Blaschke, German mathematician whose major contributions to geometry concerned kinematics and differential and integral geometry. Blaschke became extraordinary professor of mathematics at the Deutsche Technische Hochschule (German Technical University), Prague, in 1913 and two

  • Blasco Ibá?ez, Vicente (Spanish writer)

    Vicente Blasco Ibá?ez, Spanish writer and politician, who achieved world renown for his novels dealing with World War I, the most famous of which, Los cuatro jinetes del Apocalipsis (1916; The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, 1918), was used as the basis for two U.S. films. He was associated with

  • Blasedow und seine S?hne (work by Gutzkow)

    Karl Gutzkow: …he had published the novel Blasedow und seine S?hne (1838; “Blasedow and His Sons”), a humorous satire on the educational theories of the time.

  • Blasis, Carlo (Italian ballet teacher)

    Carlo Blasis, Italian ballet teacher and writer on the technique, history, and theory of dancing. He was the first to codify and publish an analysis of the classic ballet technique in his Traité élémentaire, théorique, et pratique de l’art de la danse (1820; An Elementary Treatise upon the Theory

  • Blasius, Saint (Christian saint)

    St. Blaise, ; Western feast day, February 3; Eastern feast day, February 11), early Christian bishop and martyr, one of the most popular medieval saints. He is venerated as the patron saint of sufferers from throat diseases and of wool combers and as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. According to

  • Blasius, Saint (Christian saint)

    St. Blaise, ; Western feast day, February 3; Eastern feast day, February 11), early Christian bishop and martyr, one of the most popular medieval saints. He is venerated as the patron saint of sufferers from throat diseases and of wool combers and as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. According to

  • Blasko Béla Ferenc Dezs? (Hungarian-American actor)

    Bela Lugosi, Hungarian-born motion-picture actor who was most famous for his sinister portrayal of the elegantly mannered vampire Count Dracula. At age 12 Lugosi ran away from home and began working odd jobs, including stage acting. He studied at the Budapest Academy of Theatrical Arts and made his

  • Blaskowitz, Johannes (German military officer)

    Johannes Blaskowitz, German colonel-general, a tank specialist who commanded German military forces on several fronts during World War II and who deplored and protested Nazi atrocities. A professional soldier who served in World War I, Blaskowitz rose rapidly during the Third Reich, acting as a

  • blason (satiric verse)

    Blason, a type of catalog verse in which something is either praised or blamed through a detailed listing of its attributes or faults. The word is normally used more specifically to refer to a type of verse in which aspects of the beloved’s appearance are enumerated. This type of blason was said to

  • Blasphemers’ Banquet, The (work by Harrison)

    English literature: Poetry: …the evils of censorship (The Blasphemers’ Banquet [1989], a verse film partly written in reaction to the fatwa on Salman Rushdie for The Satanic Verses).

  • blasphemy (religion)

    Blasphemy, irreverence toward a deity or deities and, by extension, the use of profanity. In Christianity, blasphemy has points in common with heresy but is differentiated from it in that heresy consists of holding a belief contrary to the orthodox one. Thus, it is not blasphemous to deny the

  • Blass, Bill (American fashion designer)

    Bill Blass, American designer who helped define the relaxed, pared-down elegance that would characterize American fashion in the late 20th century. Blass left home at age 17 to attend the Parsons School of Design in New York City. He served more than three years in the U.S. Army during World War

  • Blass, William Ralph (American fashion designer)

    Bill Blass, American designer who helped define the relaxed, pared-down elegance that would characterize American fashion in the late 20th century. Blass left home at age 17 to attend the Parsons School of Design in New York City. He served more than three years in the U.S. Army during World War

  • BLAST (computer program)

    bioinformatics: Goals of bioinformatics: An example is the program BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool). A development of BLAST, known as position-specific iterated- (or PSI-) BLAST, makes use of patterns of conservation in related sequences and combines the high speed of BLAST with very high sensitivity to find related sequences.

  • blast (plant anatomy)

    plant disease: Variable factors affecting diagnosis: …or early fall freezes cause blasting (sudden death) of leaf and flower buds or sudden blighting (discoloration and death) of tender foliage.

  • blast bomb (military technology)

    bomb: Conventional bomb types: Demolition bombs rely on the force of the blast to destroy buildings and other structures. They are usually fitted with a time-delay fuze, so that the bomb explodes only after it has smashed through several floors and is deep inside the target building. Fragmentation bombs,…

  • blast furnace (metallurgy)

    Blast furnace, a vertical shaft furnace that produces liquid metals by the reaction of a flow of air introduced under pressure into the bottom of the furnace with a mixture of metallic ore, coke, and flux fed into the top. Blast furnaces are used to produce pig iron from iron ore for subsequent

  • blast injury

    Blast injury, any injury caused by a pressure wave such as that following an explosion. Blast injuries may be inflicted by such waves traveling in gases, liquids, or solids. The first is exemplified by the air blast caused by bomb explosions. Underwater blasts may originate from torpedoes, mines,

  • blast lung (injury)

    H.L. Hunley: Known as blast lung, it either killed the crew instantaneously or incapacitated them, causing the Hunley to sink.

  • blast roaster (metallurgy)

    Sintering, the welding together of small particles of metal by applying heat below the melting point. The process may be used in steel manufacturing—to form complex shapes, to produce alloys, or to work in metals with very high melting points. In a steel-sintering plant a bed of powdered iron ore,

  • Blast: Review of the Great English Vortex (British publication)

    Wyndham Lewis: …first of two numbers of Blast: Review of the Great English Vortex, a publication that announced the new art movement in a manifesto attacking Victorian values. Contributors included the American Imagist poet Ezra Pound, the French-born sculptor Jacob Epstein, and the French sculptor Henri Gaudier-Brzeska. Lewis’s writings in this journal…

  • Blastares, Matthew (Greek theologian and scholar)

    Matthew Blastares, Greek Orthodox monk, theological writer, and Byzantine legal authority whose systematizing of church and civil law influenced the development of later Slavic legal codes. A priest-monk of the Esaias monastery at Thessalonica, Greece, Blastares in 1335 compiled the Syntagma

  • Blasted Pine, The (work by Smith and Scott)

    A.J.M. Smith: Later anthologies include The Blasted Pine (1957; rev. ed. 1967), edited with F.R. Scott, a collection of Canadian satiric and invective verse; and The Oxford Book of Canadian Verse in English and French (1960). In his own poetry, collected in volumes such as News of the Phoenix (1943),…

  • blastema (biology)

    Blastema, in zoology, a mass of undifferentiated cells that has the capability to develop into an organ or an appendage. In lower vertebrates the blastema is particularly important in the regeneration of severed limbs. In the salamander, for example, tissues in the stump of a limb

  • blasthole

    mining: Horizontal openings: drifts: A pattern of parallel blastholes is drilled into the rock face at the end of the drift. The diameter of these holes ranges from 38 to 64 mm (1.5 to 2.5 inches), but in general one or more larger-diameter uncharged holes are also drilled as part of the initial…

  • blasthole stoping

    mining: Blasthole stoping: When the dip of a deposit is steep (greater than about 55°), ore and waste strong, ore boundaries regular, and the deposit relatively thick, a system called blasthole stoping is used. A drift is driven along the bottom of the ore body, and…

  • blasting

    Blasting, process of reducing a solid body, such as rock, to fragments by using an explosive. Conventional blasting operations include (1) drilling holes, (2) placing a charge and detonator in each hole, (3) detonating the charge, and (4) clearing away the broken material. Upon detonation, the

  • blasting cap (explosive device)

    Blasting cap, device that initiates the detonation of a charge of a high explosive by subjecting it to percussion by a shock wave. In strict usage, the term detonator refers to an easily ignited low explosive that produces the shock wave, and the term primer, or priming composition, denotes a s

  • blasting gelatin (chemical explosive)

    Alfred Nobel: …more powerful form of dynamite, blasting gelatin, which he patented the following year. Again by chance, he had discovered that mixing a solution of nitroglycerin with a fluffy substance known as nitrocellulose results in a tough, plastic material that has a high water resistance and greater blasting power than ordinary…

  • blasting oil (chemical compound)

    Nitroglycerin, a powerful explosive and an important ingredient of most forms of dynamite. It is also used with nitrocellulose in some propellants, especially for rockets and missiles, and it is employed as a vasodilator in the easing of cardiac pain. Pure nitroglycerin is a colourless, oily,

  • Blastocladiales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Blastocladiales Parasitic (on many different substrates, including decaying fruits) or saprotrophic; example genera include Allomyces and Coelomomyces. Phylum Microsporidia Parasitic on animals and protists; unicellular; highly reduced mitochondria

  • Blastocladiomycetes (class of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Class Blastocladiomycetes Parasitic or saprotrophic; contains 1 order. Order Blastocladiales Parasitic (on many different substrates, including decaying fruits) or saprotrophic; example genera include Allomyces and Coelomomyces. Phylum Microsporidia

  • Blastocladiomycota (phylum of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Phylum Blastocladiomycota Parasitic on plants and animals, some are saprotrophic; aquatic and terrestrial; flagellated; alternates between haploid and diploid generations (zygotic meiosis); contains 1 class. Class Blastocladiomycetes Parasitic or saprotrophic; contains 1 order. Order Blastocladiales

  • blastocoel (biological cavity)

    blastula: …enclosing a fluid-filled cavity, the blastocoel. After the blastula develops, it undergoes transition to the gastrula (q.v.), a process called gastrulation. In organisms such as mammals, the earlier morula (q.v.), a berrylike cluster of cells, develops into a somewhat different form of blastula, the blastocyst (q.v.).

  • blastocyst (embryo phase)

    Blastocyst, a distinctive stage of a mammalian embryo. It is a form of blastula that develops from a berrylike cluster of cells, the morula. A cavity appears in the morula between the cells of the inner cell mass and the enveloping layer. This cavity becomes filled with fluid. The blastocyst

  • blastoderm (biological membrane)

    blastula: …epithelial (covering) layer, called the blastoderm, enclosing a fluid-filled cavity, the blastocoel. After the blastula develops, it undergoes transition to the gastrula (q.v.), a process called gastrulation. In organisms such as mammals, the earlier morula (q.v.), a berrylike cluster of cells, develops into a somewhat different form of blastula, the…

  • blastogenesis (reproduction)

    Budding, in biology, a form of asexual reproduction in which a new individual develops from some generative anatomical point of the parent organism. In some species buds may be produced from almost any point of the body, but in many cases budding is restricted to specialized areas. The initial

  • blastoid (fossil echinoderm)

    Blastoid, any member of an extinct class (Blastoidea) of echinoderms, animals related to the modern starfish and sea lilies, that existed from the Middle Ordovician to the Late Permian periods (from 472 million to 251 million years ago). Blastoids were sedentary animals anchored to the seafloor by

  • Blastoidea (fossil echinoderm)

    Blastoid, any member of an extinct class (Blastoidea) of echinoderms, animals related to the modern starfish and sea lilies, that existed from the Middle Ordovician to the Late Permian periods (from 472 million to 251 million years ago). Blastoids were sedentary animals anchored to the seafloor by

  • blastomere (biology)

    animal development: Cleavage: …produced during cleavage are called blastomeres. The divisions are mitotic—i.e., each chromosome in the nucleus splits into two daughter chromosomes, so that the two daughter blastomeres retain the diploid number of chromosomes. During cleavage, almost no growth occurs between consecutive divisions, and the total volume of living matter does not…

  • Blastomyces (genus of fungus)

    blastomycosis: …fungal organisms of the genus Blastomyces. There are two major types of blastomycosis: the North American, caused by B. dermatitidis, and the South American, caused by B. brasiliensis. In North American blastomycosis, skin and lung lesions are most common: pulmonary lesions vary in size from granulomatous nodules to confluent, diffuse…

  • Blastomyces brasiliensis (fungus)

    blastomycosis: …the South American, caused by B. brasiliensis. In North American blastomycosis, skin and lung lesions are most common: pulmonary lesions vary in size from granulomatous nodules to confluent, diffuse areas of pus-forming inflammation involving the entire lobe of the lung. In the skin, micro-abscesses lie just beneath the epidermis, the…

  • Blastomyces dermatitidis (fungus)

    blastomycosis: …the North American, caused by B. dermatitidis, and the South American, caused by B. brasiliensis. In North American blastomycosis, skin and lung lesions are most common: pulmonary lesions vary in size from granulomatous nodules to confluent, diffuse areas of pus-forming inflammation involving the entire lobe of the lung. In the…

  • blastomycosis (disease)

    Blastomycosis, infection of the skin and viscera caused by fungal organisms of the genus Blastomyces. There are two major types of blastomycosis: the North American, caused by B. dermatitidis, and the South American, caused by B. brasiliensis. In North American blastomycosis, skin and lung lesions

  • Blastophagus nota (insect)

    fig wasp: B. nota, originally found in the Philippines, pollinates the flowers of F. nota.

  • Blastophagus psenes (insect)

    fig wasp: The female fig wasp, Blastophaga psenes, about 1.5 mm (0.06 inch) in length, was introduced into the western United States to pollinate the Smyrna fig, a commercially important variety. B. nota, originally found in the Philippines, pollinates the flowers of F. nota.

  • blastopore (anatomy)

    Blastopore, the opening by which the cavity of the gastrula, an embryonic stage in animal development, communicates with the exterior. During maturation of some animals it evolves into the anus or the mouth; in others it is covered over and contributes to the canal joining the primitive gut with

  • Blastozoa (fossil echinoderm subphylum)

    echinoderm: Annotated classification: ?Subphylum Blastozoa (blastozoans) Cambrian to Permian about 280,000,000–540,000,000 years ago. Stalked echinoderms with soft parts enclosed in a globular theca (chamber) equipped with simple, erect food-gathering appendages (brachioles). ?Class Eocrinoidea Lower Cambrian to Silurian about 430,000,000–570,000,000 years ago; body usually

  • blastozoan (fossil echinoderm subphylum)

    echinoderm: Annotated classification: ?Subphylum Blastozoa (blastozoans) Cambrian to Permian about 280,000,000–540,000,000 years ago. Stalked echinoderms with soft parts enclosed in a globular theca (chamber) equipped with simple, erect food-gathering appendages (brachioles). ?Class Eocrinoidea Lower Cambrian to Silurian about 430,000,000–570,000,000 years ago; body usually

  • blastula (biology)

    Blastula, hollow sphere of cells, or blastomeres, produced during the development of an embryo by repeated cleavage of a fertilized egg. The cells of the blastula form an epithelial (covering) layer, called the blastoderm, enclosing a fluid-filled cavity, the blastocoel. After the blastula

  • Blatch, Harriot Eaton Stanton (American suffragist)

    Harriot Eaton Stanton Blatch, leader in the woman suffrage movement in the United States. Harriot Stanton was a daughter of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and early absorbed a reformer’s zeal from her and from her father, Henry B. Stanton, an abolitionist, a politician, and a journalist. She graduated from

  • Blatch, Nora Stanton (American civil engineer and architect)

    Nora Stanton Blatch Barney, American civil engineer, architect, and suffragist whose professional and political activities built on her family’s tradition of women leaders. Nora Stanton Blatch was the daughter of Harriot Stanton Blatch and the granddaughter of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, both of whom

  • Blatchford Field (airport, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada)

    Edmonton: History: …in Edmonton, Blatchford Field (later, Edmonton City Centre Airport), played an important military role that continued throughout the Cold War. The U.S. military used the field as its base of operations for the defense of Alaska during World War II but, after outgrowing that facility, built another one north of…

  • Blatchford, Samuel (United States jurist)

    Samuel Blatchford, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court (1882–93). Blatchford graduated from Columbia College (later Columbia University) in 1837 and served as private secretary to William H. Seward until attaining his majority. In 1842 he was admitted to the bar and began to

  • Blatta orientalis (insect)

    cockroach: The Oriental cockroach (Blatta orientalis) is considered one of the filthiest of household pests. It is oval, shiny black or dark brown, and 25 to 30 mm (1 to 1.2 inches) long, with a life cycle similar to that of the American cockroach. The male has…

  • Blattaria (insect)

    Cockroach, (order Blattodea), any of about 4,600 species of insects that are among the most primitive living winged insects, appearing today much like they do in fossils that are more than 320 million years old. The word cockroach is a corruption of the Spanish cucaracha. The cockroach is

  • Blattella germanica (insect)

    cockroach: The German cockroach (Blattella germanica), a common household pest sometimes erroneously called a waterbug, is light brown with two dark stripes on the prothoracic region. The female produces the ootheca three days after mating and carries it for about 20 days. Three or more generations may…

  • Bl?tter für die Kunst (German magazine)

    Stefan George: …or contributed to its journal, Bl?tter für die Kunst, published from 1892 to 1919. The chief aim of the journal was to revitalize the German literary language.

  • Blatter, Joseph S. (Swiss sports executive)

    Sepp Blatter, Swiss sports executive who served as the president (1998–2015) of FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association), the governing body of international football (soccer) that is best known for overseeing the World Cup. Blatter’s tenure was marked by massive corporate profits

  • Blatter, Sepp (Swiss sports executive)

    Sepp Blatter, Swiss sports executive who served as the president (1998–2015) of FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association), the governing body of international football (soccer) that is best known for overseeing the World Cup. Blatter’s tenure was marked by massive corporate profits

  • Blattner, Géza (Hungarian painter and puppeteer)

    Arc-en-Ciel: …of the painter and puppeteer Géza Blattner (1893–1967).

  • Blattodea (insect)

    Cockroach, (order Blattodea), any of about 4,600 species of insects that are among the most primitive living winged insects, appearing today much like they do in fossils that are more than 320 million years old. The word cockroach is a corruption of the Spanish cucaracha. The cockroach is

  • Blatty, William Peter (American screenwriter and novelist)

    William Peter Blatty, American author (born Jan. 7, 1928, New York, N.Y.—died Jan. 12, 2017, Bethesda, Md.), wrote the classic horror novel The Exorcist (1971) and produced and wrote the phenomenally successful 1973 film version, the screenplay for which Blatty won an Academy Award. The book, a

  • Blau, Jeno Ormandy (American conductor)

    Eugene Ormandy, Hungarian-born American conductor who was identified with the Late Romantic and early 20th-century repertoire. Ormandy graduated from the Budapest Royal Academy, where he studied violin with Jen? Hubay, at age 14. By age 17 he was a professor of violin, undertaking concert tours

  • Blau, Peter M. (American sociologist)

    sociology: Social stratification: Peter M. Blau and Otis Dudley Duncan used this technique in the study published as The American Occupational Structure (1967).

  • blaue Band, Das (work by Kellermann)

    Bernhard Kellermann: …activity in Germany in 1918; Das blaue Band (1938; “The Blue Band”), based on the sinking of the ocean liner Titanic; and Totentanz (1948; “Dance of Death”).

  • blaue Engel, Der (film by Sternberg [1930])

    Josef von Sternberg: Films with Dietrich: Der blaue Engel (1930; The Blue Angel), filmed simultaneously in German and in English, was a raw portrait of sexual degradation in which a distinguished professor (Jannings) is brought low by his obsession with the sultry nightclub singer Lola Lola (Marlene Dietrich in her breakthrough role).

  • Blaue Reiter, Der (German artists organization)

    Der Blaue Reiter, (German: “The Blue Rider”) organization of artists based in Germany that contributed greatly to the development of abstract art. Neither a movement nor a school with a definite program, Der Blaue Reiter was a loosely knit organization of artists that organized group shows between

  • Blaue Vier, Die (art group)

    Die Blaue Vier, (German: “The Blue Four”) successor group of Der Blaue Reiter (“The Blue Rider”; 1911–14), formed in 1924 in Germany by the Russian artists Alexey von Jawlensky and Wassily Kandinsky, the Swiss artist Paul Klee, and the American-born artist Lyonel Feininger. At the time of the

  • Blavatsky, Helena (Russian spiritualist)

    Helena Blavatsky, Russian spiritualist, author, and cofounder of the Theosophical Society to promote theosophy, a pantheistic philosophical-religious system. At the age of 17, Helena Hahn married Nikifor V. Blavatsky, a Russian military officer and provincial vice-governor, but they separated after

  • Blaw-Knox Rotocell extractor

    fat and oil processing: Extractors: The Blaw-Knox Rotocell has become the most popular extractor in the huge American soybean industry. The flakes are conveyed into wedge-shaped segments of a large cylindrical vessel. Solvent percolating through the cells falls into the bottom of the extractor housing, where it is picked up by…

  • Blaxland, Gregory (Australian explorer)

    European exploration: Australia: In 1813 the Australian explorer Gregory Blaxland successfully crossed the Blue Mountains by following a ridge instead of taking a valley route. Rivers were found beyond the mountains, but they did not behave as expected. Another explorer, the Australian John Oxley, in 1818 observed: “On every hill a spring, in…

  • blaxploitation movie

    Blaxploitation movies, group of films made mainly in the early to mid-1970s that featured black actors in a transparent effort to appeal to black urban audiences. Junius Griffin, then president of the Beverly Hills chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP),

  • Blaze (film by Hawke [2018])

    Ethan Hawke: …he also cowrote and directed Blaze, a biopic about a little-known folk musician. The film was lauded for its unconventional narrative. Movies from 2019 included The Kid, wherein Hawke played a sheriff on the trail of a notorious outlaw.

  • Blaze, Johnny (comic-book character)

    Ghost Rider: …Ghost Rider is motorcycle stuntman Johnny Blaze, who, upon learning that his foster father is afflicted with a terminal disease, sells his soul to a demon named Mephisto in exchange for a cure. Blaze’s foster father is cured but soon dies in a motorcycle accident. When Mephisto is thwarted in…

  • Blazejowski, Carol (American basketball player and sports executive)

    Carol Blazejowski, American basketball player and sports executive whose playing career featured a number of records and firsts. Blazejowski grew up in Cranford, N.J., and began playing basketball on a school team in her senior year of high school in 1974. The following year she joined the team at

  • Blazey, Saint (Christian saint)

    St. Blaise, ; Western feast day, February 3; Eastern feast day, February 11), early Christian bishop and martyr, one of the most popular medieval saints. He is venerated as the patron saint of sufferers from throat diseases and of wool combers and as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. According to

  • Blazing Saddles (film by Brooks [1974])

    Mel Brooks: Films of the 1970s: …with his third directorial effort, Blazing Saddles (1974), that Brooks cemented his reputation as Hollywood’s foremost purveyor of hilarious tastelessness. He collaborated with writer-director Andrew Bergman and stand-up comedian-actor Richard Pryor, among others, on the script for this uninhibited burlesque of the western genre, the comic targets of which ranged…

  • blazing star (plant, Liatris squarrosa)

    Liatris: …button snakeroot, gay feather, and blazing star.

  • blazing star (plant, Mentzelia laevicaulis)

    Loasaceae: 4-inch), cupped, five-petalled flowers of blazing star (M. laevicaulis) of western North America. The yellow, fragrant blooms of blazing star open in the early evening. A few Loasaceae grow in Africa, western Asia, and Polynesia (Marquesas Islands).

  • blazon (heraldry)

    heraldry: The nature and origins of heraldic terminology: Heraldic descriptions are called blazons. The term is derived from the French blason, the etymology of which is uncertain. Originally it denoted the shield of arms itself and still retains that meaning, but it is now generally used in a derivative sense as meaning the description of the arms.…

  • Blazon of Gentrie (book by Ferne)

    heraldry: Early writers: …works of Sir John Ferne, Blazon of Gentrie (1586), Gerard Legh, The Accedens of Armorie (1562), and John Guillim, A Display of Heraldrie (1610), not only perpetuate the nonsensical natural history of olden days but are largely responsible for erroneous beliefs about heraldic charges having definite symbolic meanings and their…

  • Blé Goudé, Charles (Ivorian political leader)

    C?te d'Ivoire: Prosecution of the Gbagbos and Blé Goudé: …with that of his associate, Charles Blé Goudé, and their trial began in January 2016; they were both acquitted in January 2019. Gbagbo’s wife, Simone, was tried in an Ivoirian court for her alleged acts during the postelection crisis. In 2015 she was found guilty of having undermined state security…

  • Blé qui lève, Le (work by Bazin)

    René Bazin: Le Blé qui lève (1907; “The Rising Wheat”) portrays the corrupting influence of trade unionism on woodcutters.

  • Bleach (album by Nirvana)

    Kurt Cobain: …1988 and its first album, Bleach, in 1989. The album had a unique (and soon-to-be signature) sound that mixed the rawness of punk rock with pop hooks, and the group soon became a target of major record labels. With new drummer Dave Grohl (who joined the band in 1990) Nirvana…

  • bleach (chemistry)

    Bleach, solid or liquid chemical used to whiten or remove the natural colour of fibres, yarns, other textiles, and paper. In textile finishing, the bleaching process is used to produce white cloth, to prepare fabrics for other finishes, or to remove discoloration that has occurred in other

  • Bleachers (novel by Grisham)

    John Grisham: …as Christmas with the Kranks), Bleachers (2003), Playing for Pizza (2007), and Calico Joe (2012). The crime thrillers Camino Island (2017) and Camino Winds (2020) centre on a female writer.

  • bleaching (chemistry)

    flour: …(separated from bran and germ), bleached or unbleached, and suitable for any recipe not requiring a special flour; cake flour, refined and bleached, with very fine texture; self-rising flour, refined and bleached, with added leavening and salt; and enriched flour, refined and bleached, with added nutrients.

  • bleaching (marine biology)

    Coral bleaching, whitening of coral that results from the loss of a coral’s symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) or the degradation of the algae’s photosynthetic pigment. Bleaching is associated with the devastation of coral reefs, which are home to approximately 25 percent of all marine species. Coral

  • bleaching powder (chemistry)

    bleach: Bleaching powder, a solid combination of chlorine and slaked lime, introduced in 1799 by Scottish chemist Charles Tennant, was thereafter produced in large quantity to bleach cloth and paper. It had the same effect as chlorine and could be more easily handled and shipped, but…

  • bleak (fish)

    Bleak, (Alburnus alburnus), small, slender fish of the carp family, Cyprinidae, found in rivers and lakes of England and Europe. A silvery-green fish, it grows to a maximum length of about 20 centimetres (8 inches). It lives in schools, usually near the surface, and eats aquatic invertebrates. The

  • Bleak House (novel by Dickens)

    Bleak House, novel by British author Charles Dickens, published serially in 1852–53 and in book form in 1853 and considered to be among the author’s best work. Bleak House is the story of the Jarndyce family, who wait in vain to inherit money from a disputed fortune in the settlement of the

  • Bleak House (building, Broadstairs and Saint Peter’s, England, United Kingdom)

    Broadstairs and Saint Peter's: …houses associated with him, notably Bleak House, atop a cliff near the pier. Pop. (2001) 24,370; (2011) 24,903.

  • Bleak Moments (film by Leigh [1971])

    Mike Leigh: His play Bleak Moments (1970), about a woman grappling with the demands of everyday life, evolved from this process, and he adapted the script a year later for his first feature film.

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