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  • Blige, Mary J. (American singer-songwriter)

    Mary J. Blige , American singer-songwriter and actress who has been called the Queen of Hip-Hop Soul. Blige’s childhood was divided between Savannah, Georgia, and a housing project in Yonkers, New York. Her early musical influences included singing in a Pentecostal church and listening to her

  • Blige, Mary Jane (American singer-songwriter)

    Mary J. Blige , American singer-songwriter and actress who has been called the Queen of Hip-Hop Soul. Blige’s childhood was divided between Savannah, Georgia, and a housing project in Yonkers, New York. Her early musical influences included singing in a Pentecostal church and listening to her

  • Bligh, William (English admiral)

    William Bligh, English navigator, explorer, and commander of the HMS Bounty at the time of the celebrated mutiny on that ship. The son of a customs officer, Bligh joined the Royal Navy in 1770. After six years as a midshipman, he was promoted to sailing master of the Resolution and served under

  • Blighia sapida (plant)

    Ackee, (Blighia sapida), tree of the soapberry family (Sapindaceae) native to West Africa, widely cultivated throughout tropical and subtropical regions for its edible fruit. Ackee and salt fish is a popular dish in the Caribbean and is the national dish of Jamaica. Taken to the Caribbean area with

  • blight (plant pathology)

    Blight, any of various plant diseases whose symptoms include sudden and severe yellowing, browning, spotting, withering, or dying of leaves, flowers, fruit, stems, or the entire plant. Most blights are caused by bacterial or fungal infestations, which usually attack the shoots and other young,

  • BLIHR (international organization)

    The Coca-Cola Company: …that it would join the Business Leaders Initiative on Human Rights (BLIHR), a group of companies working together to develop and implement corporate responses to human rights issues that affect the business world.

  • Blijdorp Zoo (zoo, Rotterdam, Netherlands)

    Royal Rotterdam Zoological Garden Foundation, zoological garden in Rotterdam, Neth., that was opened in 1887 by a private zoological society. It was essentially the outgrowth of the private collection of two railway workers who kept exotic animals as a hobby. Because of the need for additional

  • blimp (aircraft)

    Blimp, nonrigid or semirigid airship dependent on internal gas pressure to maintain its form. The origin of the name blimp is uncertain, but the most common explanation is that it derives from “British Class B airship” plus “limp”—i.e., nonrigid. Blimps were used by navies during World War I in

  • blimp (soundproof camera housing)

    history of the motion picture: Conversion to sound: …camera housings known as “blimps.” Within several years, smaller, quieter, self-insulating cameras were produced, eliminating the need for external soundproofing altogether. It even became possible again to move the camera by using a wide range of boom cranes, camera supports, and steerable dollies. Microphones too became increasingly mobile as…

  • Blind Adventure (film by Schoedsack [1933])

    Ernest B. Schoedsack: King Kong and other films of the early 1930s: …Rose, they also collaborated on Blind Adventure, with Armstrong and Helen Mack (the leads in Son of Kong) paired as amateur detectives in London’s West End. (Cooper was not involved; his career as a director was over, although for another two decades, he would continue to produce films successfully, including…

  • Blind Alley (film by Vidor [1939])

    Charles Vidor: Early work: …studio was the film noir Blind Alley (1939), an early attempt to add psychoanalysis to the crime picture. It centres on a psychologist (played by Ralph Bellamy) who, after being taken hostage by an escaped killer (Chester Morris), tries to uncover the roots of the man’s criminal behaviour. Vidor closed…

  • Blind Assassin, The (work by Atwood)

    Canadian literature: Fiction: …while Alias Grace (1996) and The Blind Assassin (2000), winner of the Booker Prize, are situated in a meticulously researched historical Ontario and expose the secret worlds of women and the ambiguous nature of truth and justice. Set in Montreal, London, and Paris, Mordecai Richler’s novels The Apprenticeship of Duddy…

  • Blind Bay (bay, New Zealand)

    Tasman: …Bay beyond Separation Point into Tasman Bay; the latter appeared landlocked, and Cook named it Blind Bay. In 1772–73 Cook returned to Blind Bay and renamed it Tasman Bay, mistaking it for Tasman’s Murderers’ Bay. In 1827 J.-S.-C. Dumont d’Urville reached Tasman Bay; from that time the nucleus of European…

  • Blind Date (film by Edwards [1987])

    Blake Edwards: Later films: …Kim Basinger in the farce Blind Date (1987) and as the cowboy actor Tom Mix investigating a murder in 1920s Hollywood in Sunset (1988). With Skin Deep (1989), Edwards returned to the world of the sexual farce, this time with John Ritter playing the role of a novelist with writer’s…

  • Blind Date (work by Stine)

    R.L. Stine: His first scary novel, Blind Date, was released in 1986 and launched Stine’s career as a horror writer. His Fear Street series of stories for young teens began with The New Girl (1989), and the Goosebumps series for age 8 to 11 was launched with Welcome to Dead House…

  • Blind Faith (British music group)

    Eric Clapton: …and Baker formed the group Blind Faith with keyboardist-vocalist Steve Winwood and bassist Rick Grech, but the group broke up after recording only one album. Clapton emerged as a capable vocalist on his first solo album, which was released in 1970. He soon assembled a trio of strong session musicians…

  • Blind Fireworks (poetry by MacNeice)

    Louis MacNeice: MacNeice’s first book of poetry, Blind Fireworks, appeared in 1929, followed by more than a dozen other volumes, such as Poems (1935), Autumn Journal (1939), Collected Poems, 1925–1948 (1949), and, posthumously, The Burning Perch (1963). An intellectual honesty, Celtic exuberance, and sardonic humour characterized his poetry, which combined a charming…

  • blind fish (fish)

    Blind fish, any of various eyeless fishes, among them several unrelated cave-dwelling species of the families Amblyopsidae, Characidae, and others. See cave

  • Blind Girl, The (painting by Millais)

    Sir John Everett Millais, 1st Baronet: …of his greatest public successes, The Blind Girl—a tour de force of Victorian sentiment and technical facility.

  • blind goby (fish)

    perciform: Interspecific relationships: The blind goby, Typhlogobius californiensis, depends entirely upon holes dug by the ghost shrimp (Callianassa) for a home and is unable to live without its help. Other gobies are known to share holes with burrowing worms, pea crabs, and snapping shrimps.

  • Blind Harry (Scottish writer)

    Harry The Minstrel, author of the Scottish historical romance The Acts and Deeds of the Illustrious and Valiant Champion Sir William Wallace, Knight of Elderslie, which is preserved in a manuscript dated 1488. He has been traditionally identified with the Blind Harry named among others in William

  • Blind Husbands (film by von Stroheim)

    Erich von Stroheim: …played the leading role in Blind Husbands (1919), his first independently directed picture. As an early exemplar of the changing postwar morality, it intimated that a woman had the right to seek love outside of an unsatisfying marriage. Stroheim’s growing obsession with painstaking detail was reflected in The Devil’s Passkey…

  • Blind Lion, The (poetry by Allen)

    Paula Gunn Allen: …her first book of poetry, The Blind Lion (1974). Married and divorced twice more, Allen began to identify herself as a lesbian.

  • blind man’s buff (game)

    Blindman’s buff, children’s game played as early as 2,000 years ago in Greece. The game is variously known in Europe: Italy, mosca cieca (“blind fly”); Germany, Blindekuh (“blind cow”); Sweden, blindbock (“blind buck”); Spain, gallina ciega (“blind hen”); and France, colin-maillard (named for a

  • Blind Man’s Meal (work by Picasso)

    Pablo Picasso: Blue Period: …in 1902–03 (Crouching Woman [1902]; Blind Man’s Meal [1903]; Old Jew and a Boy [1903]). The subject of maternity (women were allowed to keep nursing children with them at the prison) also preoccupied Picasso at a time when he was searching for material that would best express traditional art-historical subjects…

  • blind mole rat (rodent)

    Blind mole rat, (subfamily Spalacinae), any of eight species of burrowing rodents living in the eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea regions. Among the several rodents referred to as “mole rats” (see zokor), the blind mole rat is among the most molelike in form, having a furred, cylindrical body,

  • Blind Pavilion, The (art installation by Eliasson)

    Olafur Eliasson: …the 50th Venice Biennale with The Blind Pavilion, an architectural structure made of alternating black opaque and transparent glass panels that created disorienting reflections for visitors walking through. That same year at Tate Modern in London, he exhibited The Weather Project, a 50-foot (15-metre) in diameter orb resembling a dark…

  • blind printing (printmaking)

    printmaking: Relief etching: …a popular method of making inkless intaglio prints (shallow bas-reliefs on paper).

  • Blind Side, The (film by Hancock [2009])

    Sandra Bullock: …mother in the sports drama The Blind Side; she won numerous accolades for her performance, including an Academy Award for best actress. Another maternal role followed in Extremely Loud &amp; Incredibly Close (2011), a film about a boy coping with the death of his father in the September 11 attacks.…

  • blind snake (reptile)

    Blind snake, (superfamily Typhlopoidea), any of several nonvenomous snakes characterized by degenerate eyes that lie beneath opaque head scales. Blind snakes belong to the families Anomalepidae, Leptotyphlopidae, and Typhlopidae in superfamily Typhlopoidea. Since these three families are the only

  • blind spot (anatomy)

    Blind spot, small portion of the visual field of each eye that corresponds to the position of the optic disk (also known as the optic nerve head) within the retina. There are no photoreceptors (i.e., rods or cones) in the optic disk, and, therefore, there is no image detection in this area. The

  • blind staggers (animal disease)

    Blind staggers, symptom of several unrelated animal diseases, in which the affected animal walks with an unsteady, staggering gait and seems to be blind. The many possible causes include poisoning from ingesting plants containing a high level of selenium or from ingesting grasses infected with the

  • blind tree mouse (rodent)

    Asian tree mouse: …Asian tree mice are called blind tree mice (genus Typhlomys): the Chinese blind tree mouse (T. cinereus) and the Chapa blind tree mouse (T. chapensis). They are probably nocturnal and arboreal, inhabiting mountain forests of southern China and northern Vietnam, respectively. Aside from their physical traits, little is known of…

  • blind valley (geology)

    Polje, (Serbo-Croatian: “field”), elongated basin having a flat floor and steep walls; it is formed by the coalescence of several sinkholes. The basins often cover 250 square km (about 100 square miles) and may expose “disappearing streams.” Most such basins have steep enclosing walls that range

  • Blind Watchmaker, The (work by Dawkins)

    Richard Dawkins: …including The Extended Phenotype (1982), The Blind Watchmaker (1986), which won the Royal Society of Literature Award in 1987, and River Out of Eden (1995). Dawkins particularly sought to address a growing misapprehension of what exactly Darwinian natural selection entailed in Climbing Mount Improbable (1996). Stressing the gradual nature of…

  • blindbock (game)

    Blindman’s buff, children’s game played as early as 2,000 years ago in Greece. The game is variously known in Europe: Italy, mosca cieca (“blind fly”); Germany, Blindekuh (“blind cow”); Sweden, blindbock (“blind buck”); Spain, gallina ciega (“blind hen”); and France, colin-maillard (named for a

  • Blinde, Der (play by Dürrenmatt)

    Friedrich Dürrenmatt: In it, as in Der Blinde (1948; “The Blind Man”) and Romulus der Grosse (1949; Romulus the Great), Dürrenmatt takes comic liberties with the historical facts. Die Ehe des Herrn Mississippi (1952; The Marriage of Mr. Mississippi), a serious play in the guise of an old-fashioned melodrama, established his…

  • Blindekuh (game)

    Blindman’s buff, children’s game played as early as 2,000 years ago in Greece. The game is variously known in Europe: Italy, mosca cieca (“blind fly”); Germany, Blindekuh (“blind cow”); Sweden, blindbock (“blind buck”); Spain, gallina ciega (“blind hen”); and France, colin-maillard (named for a

  • Blinding of Samson, The (painting by Rembrandt)

    Rembrandt van Rijn: Rembrandt and Rubens: …could have been either the Blinding of Samson or the Dana? (both from 1636) in its original form. It seems that Huygens did not accept the gift.

  • blindman’s buff (game)

    Blindman’s buff, children’s game played as early as 2,000 years ago in Greece. The game is variously known in Europe: Italy, mosca cieca (“blind fly”); Germany, Blindekuh (“blind cow”); Sweden, blindbock (“blind buck”); Spain, gallina ciega (“blind hen”); and France, colin-maillard (named for a

  • blindness (medical condition)

    Blindness, transient or permanent inability to see any light at all (total blindness) or to retain any useful vision despite attempts at vision enhancement (functional blindness). Less-severe levels of vision impairment have been categorized, ranging from near-normal vision to various degrees of

  • Blindness (work by Saramago)

    Portuguese literature: After 1974: Blindness), one of the greatest allegories in 20th-century world literature, is a chilling and macabre moral tale of iniquity and goodness.

  • Blindness (film by Meirelles [2008])

    Gael García Bernal: …following year he starred in Blindness—a film adaptation of José Saramago’s novel Ensaio sobre a cegueira (1995; Blindness)—and Rudo y Cursi (“Tough and Corny”), which centred on two brothers who play professional football (soccer). His subsequent films included the social drama Mammoth (2009), Jim Jarmusch’s The Limits of Control (2009),…

  • Blindness and Insight: Essays in the Rhetoric of Contemporary Criticism (work by de Man)

    Paul de Man: Life and career: …published articles; the work, titled Blindness and Insight (1971), became widely influential. Initially hired by the university as a professor of French, de Man later joined and became chairman of the department of comparative literature and was elevated to the rank of Sterling Professor of the Humanities.

  • blindsnake (reptile)

    Blind snake, (superfamily Typhlopoidea), any of several nonvenomous snakes characterized by degenerate eyes that lie beneath opaque head scales. Blind snakes belong to the families Anomalepidae, Leptotyphlopidae, and Typhlopidae in superfamily Typhlopoidea. Since these three families are the only

  • blindworm (lizard)

    Slowworm, (Anguis fragilis), a legless lizard of the family Anguidae. It lives in grassy areas and open woodlands from Great Britain and Europe eastward to the Urals and Caspian Sea. Adults reach 40 to 45 cm (16 to 18 inches) in body length, but the tail can be up to two times the length from snout

  • blink reflex (physiology)

    human behaviour: The newborn infant: …with his eyes and will blink or close them at the sudden appearance of a bright light or at a sharp, sudden sound nearby. The newborn infant will suck a nipple or almost any other object (e.g., a finger) inserted into his mouth or touching his lips. He will also…

  • Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (book by Gladwell)

    Malcolm Gladwell: …seller, as did its successor, Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005), which extols the untold virtues of snap judgment.

  • blinking (physiology)

    human eye: The protective mechanisms: Lid closure and opening are accomplished by the orbicularis oculi and levator palpebri muscles; the orbicularis oculi operates on both lids, bringing their margins into close apposition in the act of lid closure. Opening results from relaxation of the orbicularis muscle and contraction of the…

  • Blish, James (American author and critic)

    James Blish, American author and critic of science fiction best known for the Cities in Flight series (1950–62) and the novel A Case of Conscience (1958). His work, which often examined philosophical ideas, was part of the more sophisticated science fiction that arose in the 1950s. Blish had been a

  • Blish, James Benjamin (American author and critic)

    James Blish, American author and critic of science fiction best known for the Cities in Flight series (1950–62) and the novel A Case of Conscience (1958). His work, which often examined philosophical ideas, was part of the more sophisticated science fiction that arose in the 1950s. Blish had been a

  • Bliss (work by Mansfield)

    Katherine Mansfield: …with others, were collected in Bliss (1920), which secured her reputation and is typical of her art.

  • Bliss (novel by Carey)

    Peter Carey: His novels Bliss (1981; filmed 1985), Illywhacker (1985), and Oscar and Lucinda (1988; filmed 1997) are more realistic, though Carey used black humour throughout all three. The later novels are based on the history of Australia, especially its founding and early days.

  • Bliss Classification (bibliographic system)

    Bliss Classification, bibliographic system devised by Henry Evelyn Bliss, of the College of the City of New York, and published in 1935 under the title A System of Bibliographic Classification; the full, second edition appeared in 1940–53. The system is utilized most extensively in British

  • Bliss, Arthur Edward Drummond (English composer)

    Sir Arthur Bliss, one of the leading English composers of the first half of the 20th century, noted both for his early, experimental works and for his later, more subjective compositions. Bliss studied under Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst. Up to the early 1920s, his music was frequently

  • Bliss, Betty (American hostess)

    Margaret Taylor: …social appearances to her daughter Betty Bliss. Margaret’s avoidance of public appearances led to many unfounded rumours, including a persistent story that she was an unsophisticated frontier woman who smoked a pipe. Her grandson pointed out, however, that she could not tolerate the smell of smoke (which made her “actively…

  • Bliss, Gilbert Ames (American mathematician)

    Gilbert Ames Bliss, U.S. mathematician and educator known for his work on the calculus of variations. He received his B.S. degree in 1897 from the University of Chicago and remained to study mathematical astronomy under F.R. Moulton. He received his M.S. degree in 1898 and two years later his

  • Bliss, Henry E. (American librarian)

    library: The Bliss system: …bibliographic classification system invented by Henry E. Bliss of the College of the City of New York (published in 1935 as A System of Bibliographic Classification) has made important contributions to the theory of classification, particularly in Bliss’s acute perception of the role of synthesis and his insistence that a…

  • Bliss, Nathaniel (English astronomer)

    Nathaniel Bliss, Britain’s fourth Astronomer Royal. Bliss graduated from Pembroke College, Oxford (B.A., 1720; M.A., 1723), and became rector of St. Ebbe’s, Oxford, in 1736. He succeeded Edmond Halley as Savilian professor of geometry at the University of Oxford in 1742 and was elected a fellow of

  • Bliss, Ray Charles (American politician)

    Ray Charles Bliss, American politician who worked behind the scenes to reinforce the strength of the Republican Party, serving as both Ohio state chairman (1949–65) and national chairman (1965–69) of the party. During Bliss’s national chairmanship, the Republicans defeated the Democrats in most

  • Bliss, Sir Arthur (English composer)

    Sir Arthur Bliss, one of the leading English composers of the first half of the 20th century, noted both for his early, experimental works and for his later, more subjective compositions. Bliss studied under Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst. Up to the early 1920s, his music was frequently

  • Bliss, Tasker Howard (United States military leader)

    Tasker Howard Bliss, U.S. military commander and statesman who directed the mobilization effort upon the United States’ entry into World War I. After graduating from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1875, Bliss served in various military assignments, including that of instructor at West

  • Bliss, William D. P. (American social reformer)

    William D.P. Bliss, American social reformer and organizer of Christian Socialist societies. The son of American missionaries in Turkey, Bliss was educated at the Hartford Theological Seminary (Hartford, Connecticut). First as a Congregationalist and later as an Episcopalian, he held several

  • Bliss, William Dwight Porter (American social reformer)

    William D.P. Bliss, American social reformer and organizer of Christian Socialist societies. The son of American missionaries in Turkey, Bliss was educated at the Hartford Theological Seminary (Hartford, Connecticut). First as a Congregationalist and later as an Episcopalian, he held several

  • Bliss-Leavitt torpedo

    naval ship: Torpedoes: (This Bliss-Leavitt torpedo remained in extensive use until World War II.) By 1914, torpedoes were usually 18 or 21 inches in diameter and could reach almost 4,000 yards at 45 knots or 10,000 yards at close to 30 knots.

  • Blissfully Yours (film by Weerasethakul [2002])

    Apichatpong Weerasethakul: …films were Sud sanaeha (2002; Blissfully Yours), a diptych that concerns the problems of illegal immigrants and shifts into what seems to be a real-time picnic; and, as co-director with Thai American artist Michael Shaowanasai, Hua jai tor ra nong (2003; The Adventure of Iron Pussy), a tongue-in-cheek Asian soap…

  • Blissus hirtus (insect)

    chinch bug: The hairy chinch bug (Blissus hirtus) does not migrate. This short-winged insect, sometimes a lawn pest, is controlled by fertilizing, watering, and cutting grass. The false chinch bug (Nysius ericae) is brownish gray and resembles the chinch bug. It feeds on many plants but is rarely…

  • Blissus leucopterus (insect)

    Chinch bug, (Blissus leucopterus), important grain and corn pest belonging to the insect family Lygaeidae (order Heteroptera). Though a native of tropical America, the chinch bug has extended its range to include much of North America. It is a small bug, not more than 5 mm (0.2 inch) long. The

  • blistelle (wine)

    Languedoc: Blistelle is a sweet wine whose fermentation is artificially stopped; new cultures are then added and the wine is allowed to age. Regional cuisine relies heavily on olive oil and garlic; pork fat is widely used in the Cévennes. Soups include aigo bouillido, which is…

  • blister (dermatology)

    Blister, a rounded elevation of the skin containing clear fluid, caused by a separation either between layers of the epidermis or between the epidermis and the dermis. Blisters are classified as vesicles if they are 0.5 cm (0.2 inch) or less in diameter and as bullae if they are larger. Blisters

  • blister agent (chemical compound)

    chemical weapon: Blister agents: Blister agents were also developed and deployed in World War I. The primary form of blister agent used in that conflict was sulfur mustard, popularly known as mustard gas. Casualties were inflicted when personnel were attacked and exposed to blister agents like sulfur mustard…

  • blister beetle (insect)

    Blister beetle, (family Meloidae), any of approximately 2,500 species of beetles (insect order Coleoptera) that secrete an irritating substance, cantharidin, which is collected mainly from Mylabris and the European species Lytta vesicatoria, commonly called Spanish fly. Cantharidin is used

  • blister cave (geology)

    cave: Other types of lava caves: …plastic state to form small blister caves. These cavities consist of dome-shaped chambers somewhat resembling those of spatter cones. They are generally small, ranging from one to a few metres in diameter, but they often occur in great numbers in many lava flows rich in volatile components.

  • blister copper (metallurgy)

    copper processing: Roasting, smelting, and converting: …remaining values), leaving a “blister” copper containing between 98.5 and 99.5 percent copper and up to 0.8 percent oxygen. The converter is rotated for skimming the slag and pouring the blister copper.

  • blister pearl

    cultured pearl: …China have been almost exclusively blister pearls (hemispherical pearls formed attached to the mussel’s shell), which are filled with resin and capped with a flat piece of nacre (mother-of-pearl) to become a mabe pearl or pearl doublet.

  • blister rust (plant disease)

    Blister rust, any of several diseases of pine trees caused by rust fungi of the genus Cronartium. Blister rust is found nearly worldwide and affects pines of all ages and sizes, including economically important timber trees. The disease can be lethal, and surviving trees are left vulnerable to

  • blister rust fungus (fungus)

    Ribes: …alternative hosts of the destructive blister rust fungus, which also attacks white pines, there are local prohibitions to growing Ribes near any white pine plantations.

  • blister steel (metallurgy)

    steel: Blister steel: In order to convert wrought iron into steel—that is, increase the carbon content—a carburization process was used. Iron billets were heated with charcoal in sealed clay pots that were placed in large bottle-shaped kilns holding about 10 to 14 tons of metal and…

  • blistering (painting)

    art conservation and restoration: Paintings on canvas: …a condition variously called “cleavage,” “flaking,” “blistering,” or “scaling.” The traditional method to address these problems is to reinforce the back of the canvas by attaching a new canvas to the old in a process called “lining,” also referred to as “relining.” A number of techniques and adhesives have…

  • Blitar (Indonesia)

    Blitar, city and kabupaten (regency), Jawa Timur propinsi (East Java province), Java, Indonesia. It is located 70 miles (113 km) southwest of Surabaya, the provincial capital. The city lies at an elevation of 528 feet (161 m) above sea level. Linked by road and railway with Malang to the east and

  • Blith, Walter (British army captain)
  • Blithe Spirit (television film by Coward [1956])

    Claudette Colbert: …Bacall in the made-for-television movie Blithe Spirit (1956) and on the television miniseries and her last major project, The Two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987), for which she won a best supporting actress Golden Globe). In 1989 she was honoured with a Kennedy Center award for lifetime achievement.

  • Blithe Spirit (film by Lean [1945])

    David Lean: …was Coward’s classic supernatural comedy Blithe Spirit (1945), regarded as a good effort but little more than a stage play on celluloid. The last of the Coward vehicles, the romantic melodrama Brief Encounter (1945; based on Coward’s play Still Life), was a masterpiece and the first of many Lean films…

  • Blithe Spirit (work by Coward)

    Blithe Spirit, farce by No?l Coward, produced and published in 1941 and often regarded as Coward’s best work. This play about a man whose domestic life is disturbed by the jealous ghost of his first wife shows Coward’s humour at its ripest. The combination of drawing-room comedy and ghost story

  • Blithedale Romance, The (work by Hawthorne)

    The Blithedale Romance, minor novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne, published in 1852. The novel, about a group of people living in an experimental community, was based in part on Hawthorne’s disillusionment with the Brook Farm utopian community near Boston in the

  • BLITS (Russian satellite)

    space debris: …2013, the Russian laser-ranging satellite BLITS (Ball Lens in the Space) experienced a sudden change in its orbit and its spin, which caused Russian scientists to abandon the mission. The culprit was believed to have been a collision between BLITS and a piece of Fengyun-1C debris. Fragments from Fengyun-1C, Iridium…

  • Blitz, the (World War II)

    The Blitz, (September 1940–May 1941), nighttime bombing raids against London and other British cities by Nazi Germany during World War II. The raids followed the failure of the German Luftwaffe to defeat Britain’s Royal Air Force in the Battle of Britain (July–September 1940). Although the raids

  • Blitzer, Wolf (American journalist)

    Wolf Blitzer, American journalist and anchor for the Cable News Network (CNN). In 1990–91 he garnered national attention for his reporting on the Persian Gulf War. Upon graduating from Kenmore West Senior High School in Buffalo, Blitzer entered the University of Buffalo, where he received a B.A. in

  • Blitzer, Wolf Isaac (American journalist)

    Wolf Blitzer, American journalist and anchor for the Cable News Network (CNN). In 1990–91 he garnered national attention for his reporting on the Persian Gulf War. Upon graduating from Kenmore West Senior High School in Buffalo, Blitzer entered the University of Buffalo, where he received a B.A. in

  • blitzkrieg (military tactic)

    Blitzkrieg, (German: “lightning war”) military tactic calculated to create psychological shock and resultant disorganization in enemy forces through the employment of surprise, speed, and superiority in matériel or firepower. Blitzkrieg is most commonly associated with Nazi Germany during World War

  • Blitzkrieg: From the Rise of Hitler to the Fall of Dunkirk (novel by Deighton)

    Dunkirk evacuation: Blitzkrieg and the Allied collapse: On May 10 the German blitzkrieg attack on the Netherlands began with the capture by parachutists of key bridges deep within the country, with the aim of opening the way for mobile ground forces. The Dutch defenders fell back westward, and by noon on May 12 German tanks were on…

  • Blitzstein, Marc (American composer and author)

    Marc Blitzstein, American pianist, playwright, and composer known for his unorthodox operas and plays. As a child, Blitzstein was a musical prodigy, performing at age 5, composing at 7, and at 15 being introduced as a soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra. In the 1920s he studied piano with Nadia

  • Blix, E. (Norwegian translator)

    biblical literature: Scandinavian versions: …readers, but the version of E. Blix (New Testament, 1889; complete Bible, 1921) is in New Norwegian. A revised Bible in this standardized form of the language, executed by R. Indreb?, was published by the Norwegian Bible Society in 1938.

  • Blix, Hans (Swedish diplomat)

    Hans Blix, Swedish diplomat who was director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA; 1981–97) and served as the chief weapons inspector for the United Nations (UN; 2000–03) during the lead-up to the Iraq War (2003–11). Blix studied at Uppsala University in Sweden and Columbia

  • Blixen-Finecke, Karen Christence Dinesen, Baroness (Danish author)

    Isak Dinesen, Danish writer whose finely crafted stories, set in the past and pervaded with an aura of supernaturalism, incorporate the themes of eros and dreams. Educated privately and at the Academy of Fine Arts, Copenhagen, Dinesen married her cousin, Baron Bror Blixen-Finecke, in 1914 and went

  • blizzard (meteorology)

    Blizzard, severe weather condition that is distinguished by low temperatures, strong winds, and large quantities of either falling or blowing snow. The National Weather Service of the United States defines a blizzard as a storm with winds of more than 56 km (35 miles) per hour for at least three

  • Blizzard Entertainment (company)

    Activision Blizzard, Inc.: The history of Blizzard: Blizzard Entertainment was founded in 1991 as Silicon &amp; Synapse by Allen Adham, Michael Morhaime, and Frank Pearce, three UCLA graduates with an interest in electronic gaming. The company’s early projects were conversions of existing titles for a variety of home computer systems, but…

  • Blizzard of One (work by Strand)

    Mark Strand: …Prize for the poetry collection Blizzard of One (1998).

  • Blizzard of Ozz (album by Osbourne)

    Ozzy Osbourne: …of guitarist Randy Rhoads, was Blizzard of Ozz (1980). A multiplatinum success, thanks in part to the standout single “Crazy Train,” it was followed by the equally popular Diary of a Madman (1981), which sold more than five million copies. A defining moment in Osbourne’s career came on the tour…

  • Blizzard, The (novel by Sorokin)

    Vladimir Georgievich Sorokin: Metel (2010; The Blizzard) chronicles the travails of a doctor journeying to a zombie-afflicted village with a lifesaving vaccine.

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