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  • blood volume

    cardiovascular disease: Shock due to inadequate blood volume: …or about 190 pounds) the blood volume is about 78 ml per kilogram (about 6.7 litres [7 quarts] for a man weighing 86 kg), and the loss of any part of this will initiate certain cardiovascular reflexes. Hemorrhage results in a diminished return of venous blood to the heart, the…

  • Blood Wedding (play by García Lorca)

    Blood Wedding, folk tragedy in three acts by Federico García Lorca, published and produced in 1933 as Bodas de sangre. Blood Wedding is the first play in Lorca’s dramatic trilogy; the other two plays are Yerma and The House of Bernarda Alba. The protagonists of Blood Wedding are ordinary women

  • Blood Work (film by Eastwood [2002])

    Clint Eastwood: 2000 and beyond: Blood Work (2002) was a serviceable thriller about a retired Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) profiler who is convinced that only he can locate a murderer.

  • Blood’s a Rover (novel by Ellroy)

    James Ellroy: …final volume of the trilogy, Blood’s a Rover (2009), examines the years 1968–72. The trilogy represents the author’s expressed ambition to “re-create 20th-century American history through fiction.”

  • blood, corruption of (English law)

    attainder: …attainder was the doctrine of corruption of blood, by which the person attainted was disqualified from inheriting or transmitting property and his descendants were forever barred from any inheritance of his rights to title. All forms of attainder—except the forfeiture that followed indictment for treason—were abolished during the 19th century.

  • Blood, Council of (Netherlands history)

    Council of Troubles, (1567–74), special court in the Low Countries organized by the Spanish governor, the Duke of Alba, which initiated a reign of terror against all elements suspected of heresy or rebellion. Alba’s dispatch to the Netherlands at the head of a large army in the summer of 1567 had

  • Blood, Tin, Straw (poetry by Olds)

    Sharon Olds: Olds’s later collections included Blood, Tin, Straw (1999), The Unswept Room (2002), One Secret Thing (2008), and Odes (2016). For Stag’s Leap (2012), which chronicles the 1997 dissolution of her marriage, she was awarded both the T.S. Eliot Prize and the Pulitzer Prize. In 2016 Olds received the Academy…

  • blood-brain barrier (anatomy)

    metabolic disease: Lysosomal storage disorders: …the presence of the so-called blood-brain barrier. Bone marrow transplantation has been attempted in individuals with lysosomal storage disorders, but overall results have been disappointing. Successful therapy for disorders without central nervous system involvement has been accomplished; Gaucher disease type I, for example, is responsive to enzyme replacement therapy, that…

  • blood-clotting protein (biochemistry)

    bleeding and blood clotting: Significance of hemostasis: …cells), and blood proteins (blood-clotting proteins). The blood platelet is a nonnucleated cell that circulates in the blood in an inactive, resting form. Endothelial cells line the wall of the blood vessel and inhibit blood from clotting on the vessel wall under normal conditions. Blood-clotting proteins circulate in the…

  • blood-testis barrier (anatomy)

    drug: Reproductive system drugs: …so-called placental barrier and the blood-testis barrier impede certain chemicals, although both allow most fat-soluble chemicals to cross. Drugs that are more water-soluble and that possess higher molecular weights tend not to cross either the placental or the blood-testis barrier. In addition, if a drug binds to a large molecule…

  • bloodborne disease (pathology)

    Bloodborne disease, any of a group of diseases caused by pathogens such as viruses or bacteria that are carried in and spread through contact with blood. Common bloodborne diseases include hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Viral hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola

  • Bloodbrothers (film by Mulligan [1978])

    Robert Mulligan: Audiences also ignored Bloodbrothers (1978), an adaptation of the Richard Price novel, with Richard Gere, Tony Lo Bianco, and Paul Sorvino. More popular was Same Time, Next Year (1978), which retained the wistful charm of the Bernard Slade play. Alan Alda and Ellen Burstyn starred as two lovers…

  • bloodfin (fish)

    Bloodfin, freshwater fish, a species of characin

  • bloodflower (plant)

    Asclepiadoideae: Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) and bloodflower (A. curassavica) often are cultivated as ornamentals. The butterfly weed (A. tuberosa) of North America has bright orange flowers. Hoya carnosa, which is commonly called wax plant because of its waxy white flowers, is often grown indoors as a pot plant. Several succulent plants—such…

  • bloodhound (breed of dog)

    Bloodhound, breed of dog unsurpassed by any other in scenting ability and from which most of the scent-hunting hounds have been derived. It was known, although not in its present form, in the Mediterranean area in pre-Christian times. The breed’s name derives from its “blooded,” or purebred,

  • Bloodless Revolution (English history)

    Glorious Revolution, in English history, the events of 1688–89 that resulted in the deposition of James II and the accession of his daughter Mary II and her husband, William III, prince of Orange and stadholder of the United Provinces of the Netherlands. After the accession of James II in 1685, his

  • bloodletting (medical procedure)

    leeching: …incorporated into the practice of bloodletting. Enormous quantities of leeches were used for bleeding—as many as 5 to 6 million being used annually to draw more than 300,000 litres of blood in Parisian hospitals alone. In some cases patients lost as much as 80 percent of their blood in a…

  • bloodlily (plant)

    Cape tulip, any plant of the genus Haemanthus of the family Amaryllidaceae, consisting of about 50 species of ornamental South African herbs. Most species have dense clusters of red flowers and broad, blunt leaves that are grouped at the base of the plant. A few species have white flowers. Some

  • Bloodlines: Odyssey of a Native Daughter (essays by Hale)

    Janet Campbell Hale: Bloodlines: Odyssey of a Native Daughter (1993) is a collection of autobiographical essays that reflect on her past and her heritage, with accounts of her paternal grandmother, who was a follower of the Nez Percé leader known as Chief Joseph.

  • bloodroot (plant)

    Bloodroot, (Sanguinaria canadensis), plant of the poppy family (Papaveraceae), native throughout eastern and midwestern North America. It grows in deciduous woodlands, where it blooms in early spring, and is sometimes cultivated as an ornamental. The orange-red sap of the rhizomes was formerly used

  • bloods (book)

    Penny dreadful, an inexpensive novel of violent adventure or crime that was especially popular in mid-to-late Victorian England. Penny dreadfuls were often issued in eight-page installments. The appellation, like dime novel and shilling shocker, usually connotes rather careless and second-rate

  • Bloods (gang)

    Bloods, street gang based in Los Angeles that is involved in drugs, theft, and murder, among other criminal activities. The predominately African American gang is traditionally associated with the color red. It is nationally known for its rivalry with the Crips. The gang was formed in the early

  • Bloodshed and Three Novellas (work by Ozick)

    Cynthia Ozick: In subsequent books, such as Bloodshed and Three Novellas (1976), Ozick struggled with the idea that the creation of art (a pagan activity) is in direct opposition to principles of Judaism, which forbids the creation of idols. The psychological aftermath of the Holocaust is another theme of her work, especially…

  • Bloodshot (film by Wilson [2020])

    Vin Diesel: …movies with the sci-fi feature Bloodshot (2020).

  • bloodstone (mineral)

    Bloodstone, dark-green variety of the silica mineral chalcedony that has nodules of bright-red jasper distributed throughout its mass. Polished sections therefore show red spots on a dark-green background, and from the resemblance of these to drops of blood it derives its name. Bloodstone was

  • bloodwood (tree)

    Myrtales: Economic and ecological importance: …bark; boxes, with rough bark; bloodwoods, with rough scaly bark; gums, with smooth bark; and ironbarks, with hard bark.

  • bloodworm (insect larvae)

    midge: …bloodred, are commonly known as bloodworms. They are important food for aquatic animals, especially trout and young salmon. The nonbiting midge is related to the biting midge, which is in the family Cecidomyiidae (Itonididae); see gall midge.

  • bloodworm (annelid)

    Bloodworm, any of certain bright red, segmented, aquatic worms of the phylum Annelida. Included are worms of the freshwater genus Tubifex, also known as sludge worms (class Oligochaeta, family Tubificidae), which are used as a tropical-fish food. The marine proboscis worm Glycera (class Polychaeta,

  • Bloody Assizes (English history)

    Bloody Assizes, (1685), in English history, the trials conducted in the west of England by the chief justice, George Jeffreys, 1st Baron Jeffreys of Wem, and four other judges after the abortive rebellion (June 1685) of the Duke of Monmouth, illegitimate son of King Charles II, against his Roman

  • Bloody Balfour (prime minister of United Kingdom)

    Arthur James Balfour, 1st earl of Balfour, British statesman who maintained a position of power in the British Conservative Party for 50 years. He was prime minister from 1902 to 1905, and, as foreign secretary from 1916 to 1919, he is perhaps best remembered for his World War I statement (the

  • Bloody Barkers (American outlaws)

    Ma Barker: …included her sons the “Bloody Barkers”—Herman (1894–1927), Arthur, known as “Doc” (1899–1939), and Fred (1902–35)—ranged throughout the Midwestern United States from Minnesota to Texas. All met violent deaths. Ma Barker and Fred were killed at a Florida resort in a gun battle with the FBI, Arthur was killed in…

  • Bloody Chamber and Other Stories, The (work by Carter)

    English literature: Fiction: …resplendently in her short-story collection The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories (1979). Jeanette Winterson also wrote in this vein. Having distinguished herself earlier in a realistic mode, as did authors such as Drabble and Pat Barker, Doris Lessing published a sequence of science fiction novels about issues of gender and…

  • Bloody Harlan (Kentucky, United States)

    Harlan, city, seat of Harlan county, southeastern Kentucky, U.S., in the Cumberland Mountains, on the Clover Fork Cumberland River. It was settled in 1819 by Virginians led by Samuel Howard and was known as Mount Pleasant until renamed in 1912 for Major Silas Harlan, who was killed during the

  • Bloody Mama (film by Corman [1970])

    Roger Corman: …first experience with LSD, while Bloody Mama (1970) was a violent portrayal of the Ma Barker story, starring Shelley Winters, with Robert De Niro as one of her twisted sons.

  • Bloody Marsh, Battle of (United States history)

    Fort Frederica National Monument: …defeated the Spanish at the Battle of Bloody Marsh (1742), ending the Spanish threat to Georgia. Troops were withdrawn in 1748, and the town declined and was completely abandoned by 1758. The monument preserves colonial artifacts in addition to the battle site, the house foundations, and the ruins of the…

  • Bloody Mary (queen of England)

    Mary I, the first queen to rule England (1553–58) in her own right. She was known as Bloody Mary for her persecution of Protestants in a vain attempt to restore Roman Catholicism in England. The daughter of King Henry VIII and the Spanish princess Catherine of Aragon, Mary as a child was a pawn in

  • bloody Mary (alcoholic beverage)

    vodka: …made with orange juice; the bloody Mary, with tomato juice; vodka and tonic, a tall drink; and the vodka martini, with vodka substituted for gin.

  • Bloody Rosa (Polish-German revolutionary)

    Rosa Luxemburg, Polish-born German revolutionary and agitator who played a key role in the founding of the Polish Social Democratic Party and the Spartacus League, which grew into the Communist Party of Germany. As a political theoretician, Luxemburg developed a humanitarian theory of Marxism,

  • bloody shirt (United States history)

    Bloody shirt, in U.S. history, the post-Civil War political strategy of appealing to voters by recalling the passions and hardships of the recent war. This technique of “waving the bloody shirt” was most often employed by Radical Republicans in their efforts to focus public attention on

  • Bloody Sunday (Russia [1905])

    Bloody Sunday, (January 9 [January 22, New Style], 1905), massacre in St. Petersburg, Russia, of peaceful demonstrators marking the beginning of the violent phase of the Russian Revolution of 1905. At the end of the 19th century, industrial workers in Russia had begun to organize; police agents,

  • Bloody Sunday (Ireland [1920])

    Black and Tan: Notably, on “Bloody Sunday,” Nov. 21, 1920, the IRA killed 11 Englishmen suspected of being intelligence agents. The Black and Tans took revenge the same afternoon, attacking spectators at a Gaelic football match in Croke Park, Dublin, killing 12 and wounding 60. The RIC was disbanded in…

  • Bloody Sunday (Northern Ireland [1972])

    Bloody Sunday, demonstration in Londonderry (Derry), Northern Ireland, on Sunday, January 30, 1972, by Roman Catholic civil rights supporters that turned violent when British paratroopers opened fire, killing 13 and injuring 14 others (one of the injured later died). Bloody Sunday precipitated an

  • Bloody Week (French history)

    France: The Commune of Paris: In the course of “Bloody Week” (May 21–28), the Communards resisted, street by street, but were pushed back steadily to the heart of Paris. In their desperation, they executed a number of hostages (including the archbishop of Paris) and in the last days set fire to many public buildings,…

  • Bloody Williamson (county, Illinois, United States)

    Illinois: Progress and politics since 1900: “Bloody Williamson” county was the site of a feud, beginning in 1868, among five families of Tennessee and Kentucky origin. A dispute over a card game in a tavern near Carbondale grew into an eight-year vendetta fought by ambush or nighttime murder in barnyards, bars, and…

  • Bloom (Illinois, United States)

    Chicago Heights, city, Cook county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. It is a suburb of Chicago, about 30 miles (50 km) south of downtown. The city’s name derives from its proximity to Chicago and its elevation, which averages 95 feet (29 metres) above the surrounding area. The site was the intersection

  • bloom (metallurgy)

    bloomery process: …usable product, known as a bloom, may have weighed up to 10 lbs (5 kg). Repeated reheating and hot hammering eliminated much of the slag, creating wrought iron, a much better product. By the 15th century, many bloomeries used low shaft furnaces with waterpower to drive the bellows, and the…

  • bloom casting (metallurgy)

    steel: Billet, bloom, beam, and slab: …to 175-millimetre squares or rounds, bloom casters solidify sections of 300 by 400 millimetres, and beam blank casters produce large, dog-bone-like sections that are directly fed into an I-beam or H-beam rolling mill. Huge slab casters solidify sections up to 250 millimetres thick and 2,600 millimetres wide at production rates…

  • Bloom’s cognitive domain (educational psychology)

    Bloom's taxonomy: Bloom’s cognitive domains: Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy originally was represented by six different domain levels: (1) knowledge, (2) comprehension, (3) application, (4) analysis, (5) synthesis, and (6) evaluation. All of the Bloom domains focused on the knowledge and cognitive processes. The American educational psychologist David Krathwohl…

  • Bloom’s taxonomy (education)

    Bloom’s taxonomy, taxonomy of educational objectives, developed in the 1950s by the American educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom, which fostered a common vocabulary for thinking about learning goals. Bloom’s taxonomy engendered a way to align educational goals, curricula, and assessments that

  • Bloom, Allan (American philosopher and author)

    Allan Bloom, American philosopher and writer best remembered for his provocative best-seller The Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today’s Students (1987). He was also known for his scholarly volumes of interpretive essays and

  • Bloom, Allan David (American philosopher and author)

    Allan Bloom, American philosopher and writer best remembered for his provocative best-seller The Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today’s Students (1987). He was also known for his scholarly volumes of interpretive essays and

  • Bloom, Benjamin (American educational psychologist)

    Bloom's taxonomy: …by the American educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom, which fostered a common vocabulary for thinking about learning goals. Bloom’s taxonomy engendered a way to align educational goals, curricula, and assessments that are used in schools, and it structured the breadth and depth of the instructional activities and curriculum that teachers provide…

  • Bloom, Claire (British actress)

    Claire Bloom, English dramatic actress noted for her moving portrayals of Shakespearean heroines. She appeared on stage, in television, and in motion pictures. Bloom studied at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London. At age 14 she tried out for the part of Juliet with the Shakespeare

  • Bloom, Harold (American literary critic and author)

    Harold Bloom, American literary critic known for his innovative interpretations of literary history and of the creation of literature. Bloom’s first language was Yiddish, and he also learned Hebrew before English. He attended Cornell (B.A., 1951) and Yale (Ph.D., 1955) universities and began

  • Bloom, Hyman (American painter)

    Bloom, Hyman, (Hyman Melamed), American painter (born March 29, 1913, Brinoviski, Latvia, Russian Empire—died Aug. 26, 2009, Nashua, N.H.), was noted for his richly detailed figurative works on mystical themes, though his use of thickly applied bold colours on large canvases also led many to

  • Bloom, Leopold (fictional character)

    Leopold Bloom, fictional character, the Odysseus figure whose wanderings through Dublin during one 24-hour period on June 16, 1904, form the central action of James Joyce’s Ulysses (1922). Bloom is curious, decent, pacific, and somewhat timid. Though he never leaves the streets of Dublin, Bloom is

  • bloom, marine (ecology)

    Water bloom, dense aquatic population of microscopic photosynthetic organisms produced by an abundance of nutrient salts in surface water, coupled with adequate sunlight for photosynthesis. The microorganisms or the toxic substances that they release may discolour the water, deplete its oxygen

  • Bloom, Molly (fictional character)

    Molly Bloom, one of the three central characters in the novel Ulysses (1922) by James Joyce. The unfaithful wife of Leopold Bloom, Molly makes a derisively mocking parallel to Penelope, the faithful wife of Odysseus (Ulysses) in Homer’s Odyssey. In Episode 18, the last section of the book, Molly

  • bloom, water (ecology)

    Water bloom, dense aquatic population of microscopic photosynthetic organisms produced by an abundance of nutrient salts in surface water, coupled with adequate sunlight for photosynthesis. The microorganisms or the toxic substances that they release may discolour the water, deplete its oxygen

  • Bloomberg LP (American company)

    Michael Bloomberg: Early life and Bloomberg LP: Twenty years later the renamed Bloomberg LP had become a global leader in financial data services. Central to the company’s success was the Bloomberg computer terminal, a comprehensive financial news and information source. The company’s other holdings included the Bloomberg Business News wire service, news radio station WBBR in New…

  • Bloomberg News (international news service)

    Bloomberg News, news service based in New York City, New York, known for providing business and economic news to investors and for increasing competition between business newswires. Bloomberg News is operated by Bloomberg LP, a private financial-data services and media company. In 1981 American

  • Bloomberg, Michael (American businessman and politician)

    Michael Bloomberg, American businessman and politician, who founded a financial data-services firm and served as mayor of New York City (2002–13). Bloomberg’s father, a Polish immigrant, was a bookkeeper and his mother a secretary. After studying engineering at Johns Hopkins University (B.S.,

  • Bloomberg, Michael Rubens (American businessman and politician)

    Michael Bloomberg, American businessman and politician, who founded a financial data-services firm and served as mayor of New York City (2002–13). Bloomberg’s father, a Polish immigrant, was a bookkeeper and his mother a secretary. After studying engineering at Johns Hopkins University (B.S.,

  • Bloomer Girls (American sports teams)

    baseball: Women in baseball: …barnstorming teams known as “Bloomer Girls” were formed in various parts of the United States and took on amateur and semiprofessional teams that included both men and women.

  • Bloomer, Amelia (American social reformer)

    Amelia Bloomer, American reformer who campaigned for temperance and women’s rights. Amelia Jenks was educated in a local school and for several years thereafter taught school and was a private tutor. In 1840 she married Dexter C. Bloomer, a Quaker newspaper editor of Seneca county, through whom she

  • Bloomer, Amelia Jenks (American social reformer)

    Amelia Bloomer, American reformer who campaigned for temperance and women’s rights. Amelia Jenks was educated in a local school and for several years thereafter taught school and was a private tutor. In 1840 she married Dexter C. Bloomer, a Quaker newspaper editor of Seneca county, through whom she

  • Bloomer, Elizabeth Anne (first lady of the United States)

    Betty Ford, American first lady (1974–77)—the wife of Gerald Ford, 38th president of the United States—and founder of the Betty Ford Center, a facility dedicated to helping people recover from drug and alcohol dependence. She was noted for her strong opinions on public issues and her candour

  • bloomers (clothing)

    Bloomers, “rational dress” for women advocated by Amelia Jenks Bloomer in the early 1850s. The entire costume, called the “Bloomer costume” or simply “bloomers,” consisted of a short jacket, a skirt extending below the knee, and loose “Turkish” trousers, gathered at the ankles. The innovation

  • Bloomers, The (work by Sternheim)

    Carl Sternheim: …first play, Die Hose (The Underpants), was published and performed in 1911 under the title Der Riese (“The Giant”) because the Berlin police had forbidden the original title on the grounds of gross immorality. It has as its main character Theobald Maske. He and others of the Maske family…

  • bloomery furnace (metallurgy)

    iron processing: History: Another design, the high bloomery furnace, had a taller shaft and evolved into the 3-metre- (10-foot-) high Stückofen, which produced blooms so large they had to be removed through a front opening in the furnace.

  • bloomery process (metallurgy)

    Bloomery process, Process for iron smelting. In ancient times, smelting involved creating a bed of red-hot charcoal in a furnace to which iron ore mixed with more charcoal was added. The ore was chemically reduced (see oxidation-reduction), but, because primitive furnaces could not reach the

  • Bloomfield (New Jersey, United States)

    Bloomfield, township (town), Essex county, northern New Jersey, U.S. It is a northwestern suburb of Newark. Settled in 1660 by Puritans, it was known as Wardsesson (then a ward of Newark) until 1796, when it was renamed for the American Revolutionary general Joseph Bloomfield. During the revolution

  • Bloomfield (Connecticut, United States)

    Bloomfield, town (township), Hartford county, north-central Connecticut, U.S., just northwest of Hartford. The site, drained by Wash Brook and the Farmington River, was settled about 1660, and the parish of Wintonbury was organized in 1736 from parts of Windsor, Farmington, and Simsbury. In 1835

  • Bloomfield Center (Michigan, United States)

    Bloomfield Hills, city, Oakland county, southeastern Michigan, U.S. It lies just southeast of Pontiac and northwest of Detroit. The site was settled in 1819 by Amasa Bagley and was known as Bagley’s Corners and Bloomfield Center until the present name was adopted in the 1890s. A farming community

  • Bloomfield Hills (Michigan, United States)

    Bloomfield Hills, city, Oakland county, southeastern Michigan, U.S. It lies just southeast of Pontiac and northwest of Detroit. The site was settled in 1819 by Amasa Bagley and was known as Bagley’s Corners and Bloomfield Center until the present name was adopted in the 1890s. A farming community

  • Bloomfield, Leonard (American linguist)

    Leonard Bloomfield, American linguist whose book Language (1933) was one of the most important general treatments of linguistic science in the first half of the 20th century and almost alone determined the subsequent course of linguistics in the United States. Bloomfield was educated at Harvard

  • Bloomfield, Mike (American musician)

    blues: Influence: …such American rock musicians as Mike Bloomfield, Paul Butterfield, and the Allman Brothers Band.

  • Bloomfield, Robert (English poet)

    Robert Bloomfield, shoemaker-poet who achieved brief fame with poems describing the English countryside. Born in rural Suffolk but thought too frail to work on the land, Bloomfield was sent to London at age 15 to be apprenticed to a shoemaker. His poem The Farmer’s Boy (1800), written in couplets,

  • Bloomfieldian linguistics

    Kenneth L. Pike: …and differs, in part, from Bloomfieldian linguistics in that semantic as well as syntactic function is used in identifying tagmemes. Pike later applied tagmemics to matrix of field theory and English rhetoric.

  • Bloomgarden, Kermit (American producer)

    Kermit Bloomgarden, American producer of dramatic and musical plays that were commercially and critically successful. Bloomgarden graduated in 1926 from New York University and practiced as a certified public accountant for several years before assuming a managerial position with the theatrical

  • blooming (physics)

    surface analysis: Blooming: Spatial resolution for surface mapping is limited for several techniques by an intrinsic effect, called blooming, that results from scattering of charged particles in solids. When a beam of highly focused, high-energy charged particles such as electrons strikes a solid and penetrates the surface,…

  • blooming (chemical reaction)

    meat processing: Oxidation state of iron: …colour in a process called blooming. Blooming is the result of oxygen binding to the iron atom (in this state the myoglobin molecule is called oxymyoglobin). After several days of exposure to air, the iron atom of myoglobin becomes oxidized and loses its ability to bind oxygen (the myoglobin molecule…

  • Blooming (mural by Murray)

    Elizabeth Murray: …New York City subway system: Blooming (1996), at 59th Street and Lexington Avenue, Manhattan, and Stream (2001), at Queens’s 23rd Street–Ely Avenue station. She was a recipient of the MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant in 1999.

  • Blooming Grove (Illinois, United States)

    Bloomington, city, seat (1830) of McLean county, central Illinois, U.S. It is adjacent to Normal (north), about halfway between Chicago and St. Louis, Missouri. The site was settled in 1822 and was known as Keg Grove and later as Blooming Grove for the area’s wildflowers. In 1831 the town was laid

  • Bloomingdale Papers, The (work by Carruth)

    Hayden Carruth: …long poem later published as The Bloomingdale Papers (1975), which was viewed by some critics to be more valuable as a psychiatric document than as a literary one. In it, Carruth uses elements of psychiatric confinement—such as the hospital routines and psychotic interludes—to examine the human condition. Brothers, I Loved…

  • Bloomington (Illinois, United States)

    Bloomington, city, seat (1830) of McLean county, central Illinois, U.S. It is adjacent to Normal (north), about halfway between Chicago and St. Louis, Missouri. The site was settled in 1822 and was known as Keg Grove and later as Blooming Grove for the area’s wildflowers. In 1831 the town was laid

  • Bloomington (Minnesota, United States)

    Bloomington, city, Hennepin county, southeastern Minnesota, U.S. It is a suburb of Minneapolis, located south of the city, and lies on the Minnesota River. Sioux Indians lived there when settlers first arrived. It was settled in 1843 by Peter and Louisa Quinn, who taught farming techniques to the

  • Bloomington (Indiana, United States)

    Bloomington, city, seat (1818) of Monroe county, southern Indiana, U.S. It lies 48 miles (77 km) south-southwest of Indianapolis. Laid out in 1818, it is in the centre of the Indiana limestone belt, and extensive stone quarries and mills are nearby. Indiana University (1820), a major element in the

  • Bloomsburg (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Bloomsburg, town, seat (1846) of Columbia county, east-central Pennsylvania, U.S., on the Susquehanna River and Fishing Creek, 40 miles (64 km) southwest of Wilkes-Barre. Susquehannock (Susquehanna) peoples inhabited the area when settlers began arriving in the mid-18th century. The settlement was

  • Bloomsbury (neighbourhood, London, United Kingdom)

    Bloomsbury, residential and academic area in the borough of Camden, London. Bloomsbury is the site of the main administrative buildings of the University of London (notably the imposing Senate House), as well as the British Museum and the British Medical Association. Also located there are the

  • Bloomsbury group (English artists circle)

    Bloomsbury group, name given to a coterie of English writers, philosophers, and artists who frequently met between about 1907 and 1930 at the houses of Clive and Vanessa Bell and of Vanessa’s brother and sister Adrian and Virginia Stephen (later Virginia Woolf) in the Bloomsbury district of London,

  • Bloor Street (street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada)
  • Bloor, Ella Reeve (American political organizer and writer)

    Ella Reeve Bloor, American political organizer and writer who was active as an American socialist and communist, both as a candidate for public office and in labour actions in several industries. Ella Reeve grew up in Bridgeton, New Jersey. After her marriage to Lucien Ware in 1881 or 1882 (they

  • Blooteling, Abraham (Dutch artist)

    printmaking: The Netherlands: Abraham Blooteling, a pupil of van Dalen II, was also a fine portrait engraver. His major contribution, however, was in the development of the new technique of mezzotint—specifically, the invention of the rocker, the tool used in the technique. He also introduced the mezzotint into…

  • Blore Heath, battle of (England [1459])

    Wars of the Roses: Competing claims to the throne and the beginning of civil war: The Yorkists were successful at Blore Heath (September 23) but were scattered after a skirmish at Ludford Bridge (October 12). York fled to Ireland, and the Lancastrians, in a packed parliament at Coventry (November 1459), obtained a judicial condemnation of their opponents and executed those on whom they could lay…

  • Blore, Chuck (American broadcaster)

    Chuck Blore and “Color Radio”: By the time Chuck Blore switched on “Color Radio” in Los Angeles, on KFWB in January 1958, Top 40 had been around for several years. It was Blore, however, who gave it a polish that elevated his stations—and those that imitated them—beyond the ultimately limited…

  • Blos, Peter (American psychoanalyst)

    Peter Blos, German-born American child psychoanalyst who was known as "Mr. Adolescence" as a result of his research into the problems of teenagers and his theories describing their struggles between wanting to break free of their parents and desiring to remain dependent (b. Feb. 2, 1904--d. June

  • Blosius, Franciscus Ludovicus (French monk)

    Franciscus Ludovicus Blosius, Benedictine monastic reformer and mystical writer. Of noble birth, he was a page at the court of the future emperor Charles V and received his early education from the future pope Adrian VI. In 1520 he entered the Benedictine Order at Liessies, becoming abbot in 1530.

  • Blossfeldt, Karl (German photographer)

    Karl Blossfeldt, German photographer known best for his stark close-up portraits of plants, twigs, seeds, leaves, and other flora. In 1881 Blossfeldt began his studies as an apprentice at the Art Ironworks and Foundry in M?gdesprung, Germany, where he studied sculpture and iron casting. He then

  • blossom-end rot (plant pathology)

    plant disease: Adverse environment: Blossom-end rot of tomato and pepper is prevalent when soil moisture and temperature levels fluctuate widely and calcium is low.

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