<var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"><listing id="79jxb"></listing></video></cite><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem></span></cite><cite id="79jxb"><noframes id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><cite id="79jxb"></cite></span></cite><var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<menuitem id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></menuitem><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Bolsheviki (Russian political faction)

    Bolshevik, (Russian: “One of the Majority”) member of a wing of the Russian Social-Democratic Workers’ Party, which, led by Vladimir Lenin, seized control of the government in Russia (October 1917) and became the dominant political power. The group originated at the party’s second congress (1903)

  • Bolshiye Barsuki Desert (desert, Kazakhstan)

    Kazakhstan: Relief: …amounts of sand form the Greater Barsuki and Aral Karakum deserts near the Aral Sea, the broad Betpaqdala Desert of the interior, and the Muyunkum and Kyzylkum deserts in the south. Most of these desert regions support slight vegetative cover fed by subterranean groundwater.

  • Bolshoi Ballet (Russian ballet company)

    Bolshoi Ballet, (Russian: “Great Ballet”), leading ballet company of Russia (and the Soviet Union), famous for elaborately staged productions of the classics and children’s ballets that preserve the traditions of 19th-century classical dance. The Bolshoi Ballet took that name in 1825, when the n

  • Bolshoi Dvorets (building, Pushkin, Russia)

    Pushkin: Catherine I commissioned the palace (1717–23); it was later enlarged (1743–48) and rebuilt (1752–57) in the Russian Baroque style by Bartolomeo Francesco Rastrelli. The palace and its park, also laid out by Rastrelli, were considerably embellished under Catherine II (the Great) by the Scottish architect Charles Cameron. Deliberately gutted…

  • Bolshoi Opera Studio

    Konstantin Stanislavsky: Early influences: …undertook the guidance of the Bolshoi Opera Studio, which was later named for him. There he staged Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin in 1922, which was acclaimed as a major reform in opera.

  • Bolshoi Theatre (Russian theatrical company)

    Bolshoi Theatre, leading theatre company for ballet and opera in Russia. The original group, which was made up of several smaller troupes, was organized in Moscow in the mid-1770s, performing primarily at the mansion of Count R.I. Vorontsov. In 1780 the first permanent theatre building in Moscow

  • Bolshoy Ballet (Russian ballet company)

    Bolshoi Ballet, (Russian: “Great Ballet”), leading ballet company of Russia (and the Soviet Union), famous for elaborately staged productions of the classics and children’s ballets that preserve the traditions of 19th-century classical dance. The Bolshoi Ballet took that name in 1825, when the n

  • Bolshoy Kavkaz (mountains, Eurasia)

    Greater Caucasus, major range of the Caucasus (q.v.) Mountains, extending west-east for about 750 miles (1,200 km) from the Taman Peninsula on the Black Sea to the Ab?eron Peninsula on the Caspian S

  • Bolshoy Salym (river, Russia)

    Ob River: Physiography: …(left), the Lyamin (right), the Great Salym (left), the Nazym (right), and finally, at Khanty-Mansiysk, the Irtysh (left). In its course through the taiga, the middle Ob has a minimal gradient, a valley broadening to 18 to 30 miles (29 to 48 km) wide, and a correspondingly broadening floodplain—12 to…

  • Bolshoy Teatr (Russian theatrical company)

    Bolshoi Theatre, leading theatre company for ballet and opera in Russia. The original group, which was made up of several smaller troupes, was organized in Moscow in the mid-1770s, performing primarily at the mansion of Count R.I. Vorontsov. In 1780 the first permanent theatre building in Moscow

  • Bolshoy Tokmak (Kyrgyzstan)

    Tokmak, city, northern Kyrgyzstan, on the Chu River. Originally an early 19th-century fort, it became a district town after capture by the Russians in 1867, a status it lost to Pishpek (now Bishkek) in 1878. It was made a town again in 1927, and industrial development followed the construction of

  • Bolshoy Yenisey River (river, Russia)

    Yenisey River: Physical features: …the confluence of its headstreams—the Great (Bolshoy) Yenisey, or By-Khem, which rises on the Eastern Sayan Mountains of Tyva, and the Little (Maly) Yenisey, or Ka-Khem, which rises in the Darhad?n Bowl of Mongolia. From the confluence the Yenisey River runs for 2,167 miles (3,487 km), mainly along the border…

  • Bolshoy Yugan (river, Russia)

    Ob River: Physiography: …tributaries: the Tromyegan (right), the Great (Bolshoy) Yugan (left), the Lyamin (right), the Great Salym (left), the Nazym (right), and finally, at Khanty-Mansiysk, the Irtysh (left). In its course through the taiga, the middle Ob has a minimal gradient, a valley broadening to 18 to 30 miles (29 to 48…

  • Bolshoye Shchuchye, Lake (lake, Russia)

    Ural Mountains: Drainage: …the deepest of them being Lake Bolshoye Shchuchye, at 446 feet (136 metres) deep. Medicinal muds are common in a number of the lakes, such as Moltayevo, and spas and sanatoriums have been established.

  • bolson (landform)

    Bolson, (from Spanish bolsón, “large purse”), a semiarid, flat-floored desert valley or depression, usually centred on a playa or salt pan and entirely surrounded by hills or mountains. It is a type of basin characteristic of basin-and-range terrain. The term is usually applied only to certain

  • Bolsón de Mapimí (basin, Mexico)

    Mapimí Basin, enclosed depression in northern Mexico. Situated in the arid Mesa del Norte and averaging 3,000 feet (900 metres) in elevation, it is structurally similar to the Basin and Range Province in the United States. Although once considered unreclaimable desert, with irrigation it supports

  • Bolsonaro, Jair (president of Brazil)

    Jair Bolsonaro, Brazilian politician who was elected president of Brazil in October 2018. A right-wing nationalist, law-and-order advocate, and former army captain who expressed admiration for the military government that ruled Brazil from 1964 to 1985, Bolsonaro came into office on a wave of

  • Bolsonaro, Jair Messias (president of Brazil)

    Jair Bolsonaro, Brazilian politician who was elected president of Brazil in October 2018. A right-wing nationalist, law-and-order advocate, and former army captain who expressed admiration for the military government that ruled Brazil from 1964 to 1985, Bolsonaro came into office on a wave of

  • Bolsover (England, United Kingdom)

    Bolsover, town and district, administrative and historic county of Derbyshire, England. The district takes its name from the principal town in an area of agricultural land interspersed with small coal-mining settlements. The district’s administrative headquarters are in Bolsover town. One of

  • Bolsover (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Bolsover: district, administrative and historic county of Derbyshire, England. The district takes its name from the principal town in an area of agricultural land interspersed with small coal-mining settlements.

  • Bolsover, Thomas (English inventor)

    Thomas Boulsover, English inventor of fused plating, or “old Sheffield plate.” After an apprenticeship in Sheffield, Boulsover became a member of the Cutlers Company, i.e., a full-fledged craftsman, in 1727. In 1743, while repairing a copper and silver knife handle, he discovered that the two

  • bolt (fastener)

    Bolt, mechanical fastener that is usually used with a nut for connecting two or more parts. A bolted joint can be readily disassembled and reassembled; for this reason bolts or screw fasteners are used to a greater extent than any other type of mechanical fastener and have played an important part

  • bolt (weapon)

    military technology: The crossbow: This was because crossbow bolts were short and heavy, with a flat base to absorb the initial impact of the string. The flat base and relatively crude leather fins (crossbow bolts were produced in volume and were not as carefully finished as arrows) were aerodynamically inefficient, so that velocity…

  • bolt action (breech mechanism)

    Bolt action, type of breech mechanism that was the key to the development of the truly effective repeating rifle. The mechanism combines the firing pin, a spring, and an extractor, all housed in a locking breechblock. The spring-loaded firing pin slides back and forth inside the bolt, which itself

  • Bolt Beranek & Newman (American company)

    ARPANET: Roots of a network: …network, and in January 1969 Bolt, Beranek, and Newman (BBN) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, won the $1 million contract.

  • Bolt, Robert (English playwright and screenwriter)

    Robert Bolt, English screenwriter and dramatist noted for his epic screenplays. Bolt began work in 1941 for an insurance company, attended Victoria University of Manchester in 1943, and then served in the Royal Air Force and the army during World War II. After earning a B.A. in history at

  • Bolt, Robert Oxton (English playwright and screenwriter)

    Robert Bolt, English screenwriter and dramatist noted for his epic screenplays. Bolt began work in 1941 for an insurance company, attended Victoria University of Manchester in 1943, and then served in the Royal Air Force and the army during World War II. After earning a B.A. in history at

  • Bolt, Usain (Jamaican athlete)

    Usain Bolt, Jamaican sprinter who won gold medals in the 100-metre and 200-metre races in an unprecedented three straight Olympic Games and is widely considered the greatest sprinter of all time. Bolt, the son of grocers in Jamaica’s rural Trelawny parish, excelled as a cricket fast bowler in his

  • Bolt, Usain St. Leo (Jamaican athlete)

    Usain Bolt, Jamaican sprinter who won gold medals in the 100-metre and 200-metre races in an unprecedented three straight Olympic Games and is widely considered the greatest sprinter of all time. Bolt, the son of grocers in Jamaica’s rural Trelawny parish, excelled as a cricket fast bowler in his

  • Bolte, Sir Henry (Australian politician)

    Victoria: Federation and the state of Victoria: …by the Liberal Party under Sir Henry Bolte—a shrewd, earthy, and assertive leader and the state’s most successful 20th-century politician. His administration coincided with a lengthy period of general Australian prosperity symbolized by Melbourne’s hosting of the 1956 Olympic Games, the exploitation of Bass Strait oil and natural gas, the…

  • Bolten, Joshua (American politician)

    executive privilege: Executive privilege in law and practice: …White House Chief of Staff Joshua Bolten refused to respond to a congressional subpoena concerning the firing of several federal prosecutors alleged to have been unsupportive of Bush administration policies. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ordered Miers and Bolten to comply. (Miers subsequently was deposed…

  • bolting (agriculture)

    vegetable farming: Temperature: Premature seeding, or bolting, is an undesirable condition that is sometimes seen in fields of cabbage, celery, lettuce, onion, and spinach. The condition occurs when the plant goes into the seeding stage before the edible portion reaches a marketable size. Bolting is attributed to either…

  • Bolton (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Bolton: metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, historic county of Lancashire, England. The town of Bolton is at the hub of the borough, which lies in the northwest of the Manchester metropolitan area and rises in the north to the Pennine foothills.

  • Bolton (England, United Kingdom)

    Bolton, town and metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, historic county of Lancashire, England. The town of Bolton is at the hub of the borough, which lies in the northwest of the Manchester metropolitan area and rises in the north to the Pennine foothills. By the 16th

  • Bolton, Charles E. (American robber)

    Black Bart, California hooded robber believed to have held up some 28 stagecoaches from 1875 to 1883. Twice he left verse for the occasion, signed “Black Bart,” the more famous being: “I’ve labored long and hard for bread/ For honor and for riches/ But on my corns too long you’ve tred/ You fine

  • Bolton, Duchess of (English actress)

    Lavinia Fenton, English actress and colourful social figure who created the role of Polly Peachum in John Gay’s masterwork, The Beggar’s Opera. Fenton was probably the daughter of a naval lieutenant named Beswick, but she bore the name of her mother’s husband. She began as a street singer near her

  • Bolton, Edmund (English author and historian)

    Edmund Bolton, English historian, antiquarian, and poet whose lyrics are among the best in the miscellany Englands Helicon (1600), a widely known anthology of late 16th-century lyric and pastoral poetry. Bolton was educated at Cambridge and the Inner Temple, London. He obtained a minor position at

  • Bolton, Guy (American writer)

    Guy Bolton, American playwright and librettist perhaps best known for his witty and articulate librettos, on which he collaborated with such notables as P.G. Wodehouse, George Middleton, and Fred Thompson. The son of American parents, Bolton studied architecture before he began writing plays.

  • Bolton, Guy Reginald (American writer)

    Guy Bolton, American playwright and librettist perhaps best known for his witty and articulate librettos, on which he collaborated with such notables as P.G. Wodehouse, George Middleton, and Fred Thompson. The son of American parents, Bolton studied architecture before he began writing plays.

  • Bolton, Herbert Eugene (American historian)

    Herbert Eugene Bolton, American historian and educator, one of the first scholars to stress the importance of a hemispheric rather than a national concept of the Americas. Bolton received his Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 1899 and began teaching medieval history in 1901 at the

  • Bolton, John Gatenby (Australian astronomer)

    John Gatenby Bolton, British-born Australian astronomer (born June 5, 1922, Sheffield, England—died July 6, 1993, Buderim, Queensland, Australia), was a pioneer in the field of radio astronomy and director (1961-71) of the Australian National Radio Astronomy Observatory, where the 64-m (210-ft) P

  • Bolton, John R. (United States government official)

    John R. Bolton, American government official who served as national security adviser (2018–19) to U.S. Pres. Donald Trump. Bolton previously was the interim U.S. ambassador to the United Nations (2005–06). Bolton was educated at Yale University (B.A., 1970; J.D., 1974), and much of his subsequent

  • Bolton, John Robert (United States government official)

    John R. Bolton, American government official who served as national security adviser (2018–19) to U.S. Pres. Donald Trump. Bolton previously was the interim U.S. ambassador to the United Nations (2005–06). Bolton was educated at Yale University (B.A., 1970; J.D., 1974), and much of his subsequent

  • Boltwood, Bertram Borden (American chemist and physicist)

    Bertram Borden Boltwood, American chemist and physicist whose work on the radioactive decay of uranium and thorium was important in the development of the theory of isotopes. Boltwood was a member of the Yale faculty from 1897 until 1900, when he established a consulting firm of mining engineers

  • Boltysh crater (impact crater, Ukraine)

    dinosaur: The asteroid theory: …to 5,000 years, appears at Boltysh in Ukraine. Its existence raises the possibility that the K–T boundary event resulted from multiple extraterrestrial impacts.

  • Boltzmann constant (physics)

    Boltzmann constant, (symbol k), a fundamental constant of physics occurring in nearly every statistical formulation of both classical and quantum physics. The constant is named after Ludwig Boltzmann, a 19th-century Austrian physicist, who substantially contributed to the foundation and development

  • Boltzmann distribution law (chemistry)

    Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution law, a description of the statistical distribution of the energies of the molecules of a classical gas. This distribution was first set forth by the Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell in 1859, on the basis of probabilistic arguments, and gave the distribution of

  • Boltzmann equation (physics)

    gas: Boltzmann equation: The simple mean free path description of gas transport coefficients accounts for the major observed phenomena, but it is quantitatively unsatisfactory with respect to two major points: the values of numerical constants such as a, a′, a″, and a12 and the description of…

  • Boltzmann transport equation (physics)

    gas: Boltzmann equation: The simple mean free path description of gas transport coefficients accounts for the major observed phenomena, but it is quantitatively unsatisfactory with respect to two major points: the values of numerical constants such as a, a′, a″, and a12 and the description of…

  • Boltzmann, Ludwig (Austrian physicist)

    Ludwig Boltzmann, physicist whose greatest achievement was in the development of statistical mechanics, which explains and predicts how the properties of atoms (such as mass, charge, and structure) determine the visible properties of matter (such as viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion).

  • Boltzmann, Ludwig Eduard (Austrian physicist)

    Ludwig Boltzmann, physicist whose greatest achievement was in the development of statistical mechanics, which explains and predicts how the properties of atoms (such as mass, charge, and structure) determine the visible properties of matter (such as viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion).

  • Bolu (Turkey)

    Bolu, city, northwestern Turkey. It is situated at 2,434 feet (742 metres) above sea level on the southern slopes of a bare hill. The region was once part of the Hittite empire and became the kingdom of Bithynia in the 5th century bce. At nearby Eskihisar are ruins of the ancient Bithynium, a

  • Bolu Mountains (mountains, Turkey)

    Turkey: The northern folded zone: …four main ridges: the Küre, Bolu, Ilgaz, and K?ro?lu mountains. East of the Ye?il the system is higher, narrower, and steeper. Less than 50 miles from the coast, peaks rise to more than 10,000 feet (3,000 metres), with a maximum elevation of 12,917 feet (3,937 metres) in the Ka?kar range.…

  • Bólu-Hjálmar (Icelandic poet)

    Hjálmar Jónsson, Icelandic folk poet who was noted for his mastery of the rímur (shorter poetic narratives) and for his brilliant use of satire. Born out of wedlock to a servant girl and a farmhand, Jónsson had little formal education, but he soon became an avid reader of the sagas and Eddas.

  • bolus (biology)

    Bolus, food that has been chewed and mixed in the mouth with saliva. Chewing helps to reduce food particles to a size readily swallowed; saliva adds digestive enzymes, water, and mucus that help chemically to reduce food particles, hydrate them for taste, and lubricate them for easy swallowing. The

  • Bolyai, Farkas (Hungarian mathematician and writer)

    János Bolyai: …of his father, the mathematician Farkas Bolyai. He also became an accomplished violinist at an early age and later was renowned as a superb swordsman. He studied at the Royal Engineering College in Vienna (1818–22) and served in the army engineering corps (1822–33).

  • Bolyai, János (Hungarian mathematician)

    János Bolyai, Hungarian mathematician and one of the founders of non-Euclidean geometry— a geometry that differs from Euclidean geometry in its definition of parallel lines. The discovery of a consistent alternative geometry that might correspond to the structure of the universe helped to free

  • Bolza, Oskar (German mathematician)

    Oskar Bolza, German mathematician and educator who was particularly noted for his work on the reduction of hyperelliptic to elliptic integrals and for his original contributions to the calculus of variations. Bolza studied at the University of Berlin and received his doctoral degree in 1886 at the

  • Bolza, problem of (mathematics)

    Oskar Bolza: …variational problem known as the problem of Bolza, which combines the earlier problems of J.-L. Lagrange and C.G.A. Mayer into a generalized statement. Bolza’s later lectures on his function theory and integral equations were collected by William V. Lovitt and published in 1924 as Linear Integral Equations.

  • Bolzano (province, Italy)

    Trentino–Alto Adige/Südtirol: …comprising the province (provinces) of Bolzano-Bozen (north) and Trento (south). Historically, the region includes the area of the medieval ecclesiastical principalities of Trento (Trent) and Bressanone (Brixen), which were later contested between the counts of Tirol and Venice. Passing to Italy after World War I

  • Bolzano (Italy)

    Bolzano, city, Trentino–Alto Adige regione, northern Italy. The city lies at the juncture of the Talvera (Talfer) and Isarco (Eisack) rivers just northeast of their confluence with the Adige (Etsch), north of Trento. It is surrounded on three sides by mountains and opens to the south onto a

  • Bolzano process (metallurgy)

    magnesium processing: Thermal reduction: In the Bolzano process, dolomite-ferrosilicon briquettes are stacked on a special charge support system through which internal electric heating is conducted to the charge. A complete reaction takes 20 to 24 hours at 1,200 °C below 400 pascals.

  • Bolzano, Bernhard (Bohemian mathematician and theologian)

    Bernhard Bolzano, Bohemian mathematician and theologian who provided a more detailed proof for the binomial theorem in 1816 and suggested the means of distinguishing between finite and infinite classes. Bolzano graduated from the University of Prague as an ordained priest in 1805 and was

  • Bolzano-Bozen (province, Italy)

    Trentino–Alto Adige/Südtirol: …comprising the province (provinces) of Bolzano-Bozen (north) and Trento (south). Historically, the region includes the area of the medieval ecclesiastical principalities of Trento (Trent) and Bressanone (Brixen), which were later contested between the counts of Tirol and Venice. Passing to Italy after World War I

  • Bolzano-Weierstrass property (mathematics)

    compactness: Compact sets also have the Bolzano-Weierstrass property, which means that for every infinite subset there is at least one point around which the other points of the set accumulate. In Euclidean space, the converse is also true; that is, a set having the Bolzano-Weierstrass property is compact.

  • Bom Jesus de Matozinhos (church, Congonhas, Brazil)

    Congonhas: …dominated by the Sanctuary of Bom Jesus do Congonhas (1773), which comprises a church, several small chapels, and 18th-century-style gardens; it was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1985. The churchyard is renowned for its impressive soapstone statues of the 12 Old Testament prophets, carved by Ant?nio Francisco Lisboa…

  • Bom Jesus do Congonhas (church, Congonhas, Brazil)

    Congonhas: …dominated by the Sanctuary of Bom Jesus do Congonhas (1773), which comprises a church, several small chapels, and 18th-century-style gardens; it was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1985. The churchyard is renowned for its impressive soapstone statues of the 12 Old Testament prophets, carved by Ant?nio Francisco Lisboa…

  • Bom Jesus do Monte (church, Braga, Portugal)

    Braga: …southeast stands the sanctuary of Bom Jesus do Monte, which is visited on Pentecost by thousands of pilgrims and is famous for its 18th-century architectural staircase. A short distance beyond it is Mount Sameiro, atop which is situated a colossal statue of the Virgin Mary. The University of Minho was…

  • Bom Jesus, Church of (church, Velha Goa, India)

    South Asian arts: European traditions and the modern period: …structures to survive is the church of Bom Jesus, which was begun in 1594 and completed in 1605.

  • Bom-Crioulo: The Black Man and the Cabin Boy (novel by Caminha)

    Brazilian literature: Emergence of the republic: Bom-Crioulo: The Black Man and the Cabin Boy) is a landmark naturalist text because of its black protagonist as well as its open treatment of homosexuality. With their portrayals of human passions, Caminha’s works often depict the violent and unseemly sides of urban life.

  • Bom-senso e Bom-gosto (pamphlet by Quental)

    Antero Tarquínio de Quental: His pamphlet Bom-senso e Bom-gosto (1865; “Good Sense and Good Taste”), attacking the hidebound formalism of Portuguese literature, marked the opening of a war against the older literary generation that was waged until 1871, when a series of “democratic lectures,” organized by Quental and held in the…

  • Boma (Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Boma, city and port on the Congo River estuary, southwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It lies 60 miles (100 km) from the Atlantic Ocean. One of the nation’s oldest communities, it was a trading centre and slave market before the middle of the 19th century. In 1886 Boma became the capital

  • Bomarc (missile)

    radar: Postwar progress: …the late 1950s in the Bomarc air-to-air missile.

  • Bomarzo (work by Mujica Láinez)

    Manuel Mujica Láinez: …Láinez’s masterpiece is the novel Bomarzo (1962; Eng. trans. Bomarzo), a painstaking re-creation of the life and times of Pier Francesco Orsini, one of the most powerful men of the Italian Renaissance. Mujica Láinez also wrote the libretto and program notes for the opera Bomarzo by Alberto Ginastera, which had…

  • Bomarzo (opera by Ginastera)

    Alberto Ginastera: …masterpiece is the chamber opera Bomarzo (1967), which established him as one of the leading opera composers of the 20th century. This highly dissonant score is a reworking of a cantata of the same name for narrator, male voice, and chamber orchestra, commissioned by the E.S. Coolidge Foundation at the…

  • bomb (container)

    uranium processing: Conversion and isotopic enrichment: ” Bombs charged with granular UF4 and finely divided Mg (the latter in excess) are heated to 500° to 700° C (930° to 1,300° F), at which point an exothermic (heat-producing) reaction occurs. The heat of reaction is sufficient to liquefy the conversion contents of the…

  • bomb (volcanic ejecta)

    Bomb, in volcanism, unconsolidated volcanic material that has a diameter greater than 64 mm (2.5 inches) and forms from clots of wholly or partly molten lava ejected during a volcanic eruption, partly solidifying during flight. The final shape is determined by the initial size, viscosity, and

  • bomb (weapon)

    Bomb, a container carrying an explosive charge that is fused to detonate under certain conditions (as upon impact) and that is either dropped (as from an airplane) or set into position at a given point. In military science, the term “aerial bomb” or “bomb” denotes a container dropped from an

  • bomb calorimeter (measurement device)

    calorimeter: …in widespread use, called a bomb calorimeter, basically consists of an enclosure in which the reaction takes place, surrounded by a liquid, such as water, that absorbs the heat of the reaction and thus increases in temperature. Measurement of this temperature rise and a knowledge of the weight and heat…

  • bomb ketch (ship)

    naval ship: Frigates and smaller vessels: …such as fire ships and bomb ketches. The latter, with two large mortars hurling bombs of about 200 pounds (91 kg), were developed by France in the late 1600s and were used with devastating effect against Barbary pirate ports.

  • Bomba (code-breaking machine)

    Ultra: Enigma: …over everything—including information about Rejewski’s Bomba, a machine he devised in 1938 for breaking Enigma messages—to Britain and France. In May 1940, however, a radical change to the Enigma system eliminated the loophole that Rejewski had exploited to discover the starting positions of the wheels.

  • Bomba (work by Seyfeddin)

    Omer Seyfeddin: Bomba (1935; “The Bomb”), the story of the cruel and grisly murder of a young Bulgarian socialist when he refuses to cooperate with a group of his revolutionary compatriots, is considered Seyfeddin’s masterpiece.

  • bomba (Puerto Rican dance)

    Latin American dance: Puerto Rico: …on these plantations created the bomba in the 18th century as their primary social dance; it spread throughout the island to diverse groups. The bomba resembles the Cuban rumba in its spatial pattern. The dancers create a circle that includes at least two drummers, a palitos (small sticks) player, maraca…

  • Bombacaceae (plant family)

    Bombacaceae, the bombax or kapok family of flowering trees and shrubs, in the mallow order (Malvales), comprising 27 genera. It is allied to the mallow family (Malvaceae), to which the cotton plant belongs, and is characteristic of the tropics. Bombacaceae members’ flowers are often large and

  • Bombal, María Luisa (Chilean author)

    María Luisa Bombal, Chilean novelist and short-story writer whose innovative stories feature heroines who create fantasy worlds in order to escape from unfulfilling love relationships and restricted social roles. Her surreal narrative style influenced many later proponents of magic realism. Bombal,

  • Bombala River (river, New South Wales, Australia)

    Snowy River: are the Eucumbene, Thredbo, and Bombala rivers in New South Wales and the Buchan in Victoria.

  • bombard (weapon)

    military technology: Terminology and classification: …efficient wrought-iron cannon were called bombards or lombards, a term that continued in use well into the 16th century. The term basilisk, the name of a mythical dragonlike beast of withering gaze and flaming breath, was applied to early “long” cannon capable of firing cast-iron projectiles, but, early cannon terminology…

  • bombard (musical instrument)

    Bombarde, double-reed wind instrument belonging to the oboe or shawm family. It has a wooden body ranging from 10 to 20 inches (25 to 50 cm), usually with six finger holes and one or two keyed holes along its front, a cane reed, and a wide, flaring metal bell. The instrument is held in a position

  • bombarde (musical instrument)

    Bombarde, double-reed wind instrument belonging to the oboe or shawm family. It has a wooden body ranging from 10 to 20 inches (25 to 50 cm), usually with six finger holes and one or two keyed holes along its front, a cane reed, and a wide, flaring metal bell. The instrument is held in a position

  • bombardier beetle

    coleopteran: Protection: The so-called bombardier beetles of the Carabidae have the property of secreting a foul-smelling defensive fluid from the anal end of the body. In some cases this fluid volatilizes explosively into a gas at high temperature when it comes into contact with the air; it acts as…

  • Bombardier Inc. (Canadian company)

    Bombardier Inc., Canadian manufacturer of aircraft, rail transportation equipment and systems, and motorized consumer products. The company adopted its present name in 1978 and entered the aerospace field in 1986. Headquarters are in Montreal. Bombardier’s aerospace segment focuses on the design,

  • bombasine (textile)

    Bombazine, textile, usually black in colour, with a silk warp and worsted weft, or filling, woven in either plain or twill weave. Cheaper grades are woven with a rayon warp and worsted or cotton weft. Bombazine was originally made exclusively of silk and in a variety of colours, but the usual c

  • Bombax (plant genus)

    bombax cotton: …of various trees of the Bombax genus of the Malvaceae family; the plants grow in tropical countries and are cultivated in the West Indies and Brazil. The seed floss’s individual fibres, soft and ranging from pale yellow to brown in colour, are about 0.5 to 3.25 cm (0.25 to 1.25…

  • Bombax ceiba (plant)

    bombax cotton: 2 inches) in length, and B. ceiba, with fibres about 1 to 1.5 cm (0.4 to 0.6 inch) long, both growing in tropical areas of the Western Hemisphere, where the floss is sometimes called ceiba cotton or paina limpa. In southern Asia and Africa the fibres of B. malabarica, called…

  • bombax cotton (plant fibre)

    Bombax cotton, seed floss of various trees of the Bombax genus of the Malvaceae family; the plants grow in tropical countries and are cultivated in the West Indies and Brazil. The seed floss’s individual fibres, soft and ranging from pale yellow to brown in colour, are about 0.5 to 3.25 cm (0.25 to

  • bombax family (plant family)

    Bombacaceae, the bombax or kapok family of flowering trees and shrubs, in the mallow order (Malvales), comprising 27 genera. It is allied to the mallow family (Malvaceae), to which the cotton plant belongs, and is characteristic of the tropics. Bombacaceae members’ flowers are often large and

  • Bombax malabarica (tree)

    kapok: …the simal cotton tree (Bombax malabarica), native to India, has many of the qualities of the Java type but is more brownish yellow in colour and less resilient. Immersed in water, it supports only 10 to 15 times its own weight.

  • Bombax septenatum (plant)

    bombax cotton: &gt;Bombax septenatum, yielding the strongest and longest fibres, ranging from 2 to 3 cm (0.8 to 1.2 inches) in length, and B. ceiba, with fibres about 1 to 1.5 cm (0.4 to 0.6 inch) long, both growing in tropical areas of the Western Hemisphere, where…

  • Bombay (film by Ratnam [1995])

    Mani Ratnam: Bombay (1995) depicted the 1992–93 sectarian riots that rocked the title metropolis following the demolition of the Babri Masjid (“Mosque of Bābur”) in Ayodhya by Hindu nationalists. In his first Hindi-language movie, Dil se.. (1998), a radio reporter falls in love with a woman trained…

  • Bombay (India)

    Mumbai, city, capital of Maharashtra state, southwestern India. It is the country’s financial and commercial centre and its principal port on the Arabian Sea. Located on Maharashtra’s coast, Mumbai is India’s most-populous city, and it is one of the largest and most densely populated urban areas in

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
91国产福利在线观看