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  • Brooke, Sir Charles Vyner de Windt (Sarawak raja)

    Malaysia: The impact of British rule: …state on to his son, Charles Vyner de Windt Brooke, in 1917. Vyner Brooke reigned until 1946, furthering the pattern of personal rule established by his father and by his great-uncle, Sir James Brooke. Economic incentives attracted Chinese immigrants, and by 1939 the Chinese accounted for about one-fourth of the…

  • Brooke, Sir James (British trader)

    Brooke Raj: Sir James Brooke (b. April 29, 1803, Secrore, near Benares, India—d. June 11, 1868, Burrator, Devon, Eng.), first visited the Eastern Archipelago on an unsuccessful trading trip in 1834, after an early career that included military service with the British East India Company and participation…

  • Brookes, James H. (American clergyman)

    Christian fundamentalism: Origins: …1872, the conference continued under James H. Brookes (1830–97), a St. Louis, Missouri, Presbyterian minister and editor of the influential millennial periodical The Truth. Other early millennial leaders included George C. Needham (1840–1902), a Baptist evangelist; William J. Erdman (1834–1923), a Presbyterian minister noted for his skill as a biblical…

  • Brookes, Norman (Australian athlete)

    tennis: The early 20th century: The new star was Norman Brookes, the first in a long line of Australian champions and the first left-hander to reach the top. He won at Wimbledon in 1907 and again on his next visit, in 1914. He and his doubles partner, Tony Wilding of New Zealand, wrested the…

  • Brookes, William Penny (British physician)

    Pierre, baron de Coubertin: …1890 Coubertin met English educator William Penny Brookes, who had organized British Olympic Games as early as 1866. Brookes introduced Coubertin to the efforts that he and others had made to resurrect the Olympic Games. Brookes’s passion for an international Olympic festival inspired Coubertin to take up the cause and…

  • Brookesia micra (chameleon)

    chameleon: …hand, the world’s shortest chameleon, Brookesia micra, has a maximum length of 29 mm (about 1 inch). Most chameleons, however, are 17–25 cm (7–10 inches) long. The body is laterally compressed, the tail is sometimes curled, and the bulged eyes move independently of one another. Also, some chameleons possess helmet-shaped…

  • Brookfield (Illinois, United States)

    Brookfield, village, Cook county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. Located on Salt Creek, it is a residential suburb of Chicago, located about 12 miles (20 km) west of downtown. Settlement of the area began in 1888–89, when Samuel Eberly Gross, a land promoter originally from Pennsylvania, began

  • Brookfield Zoo (zoo, Brookfield, Illinois, United States)

    Brookfield Zoo, zoo located in Brookfield, Illinois, U.S., a western suburb of Chicago. Brookfield Zoo, opened in 1934, is known for its extensive use of open-air, unbarred enclosures. It is owned by the Forest Preserve District of Cook County and is operated by the Chicago Zoological Society.

  • Brookhaven National Laboratory (research centre, Upton, New York, United States)

    antimatter: …Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, used a billion collisions between gold ions to create 18 instances of the heaviest antiatom, the nucleus of antihelium-4, which consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons. Since antihelium-4 is produced so rarely in nuclear collisions, its detection…

  • Brookings (Oregon, United States)

    Brookings, city, Curry county, Oregon, U.S., on the Pacific Ocean coast at the mouth of the Chetco River, 6 miles (10 km) north of the California state line. Across the river to the south lies the city of Harbor. The region’s earliest known inhabitants were Athabascan-speaking Chetco (Cheti)

  • Brookings (South Dakota, United States)

    Brookings, city, seat of Brookings county, eastern South Dakota, U.S. It lies in the Big Sioux River valley, about 55 miles (90 km) north of Sioux Falls and 15 miles (25 km) west of the Minnesota border. Sioux Indians were living in the area when fur traders arrived in the 18th and the early 19th

  • Brookings Institution (American research institution)

    Brookings Institution, research institute, not-for-profit, founded in Washington, D.C., in 1927 by the merchant, manufacturer, and philanthropist Robert S. Brookings and devoted to public service through research and education in the social sciences, particularly in economics, government, and

  • Brookings, Robert S. (American philanthropist)

    Robert S. Brookings, American businessman and philanthropist who helped establish the Brookings Institution at Washington, D.C. Brookings entered a St. Louis, Missouri, woodenware company at the age of 17. Four years later he and his brother opened their own woodenware firm and during the next 25

  • Brookings, Robert Somers (American philanthropist)

    Robert S. Brookings, American businessman and philanthropist who helped establish the Brookings Institution at Washington, D.C. Brookings entered a St. Louis, Missouri, woodenware company at the age of 17. Four years later he and his brother opened their own woodenware firm and during the next 25

  • Brookins, Walter (American aviator)

    stunt flying: …stars of the team being Walter Brookins, Arch Hoxsey (died 1910), and Ralph Johnstone (died 1910). Brookins was famous for his spiral dives and steep turns employing 90 degrees of bank (i.e., with wings perpendicular to the ground).

  • brookite (mineral)

    Brookite, one of three minerals composed of titanium dioxide (TiO2) (see also rutile; anatase). It typically occurs as brown, metallic crystals in veins in gneiss and schist; it is also found in placer deposits and, less commonly, in zones of contact metamorphism. It is widespread in veins in the

  • Brookland (neighborhood, Washington, District of Columbia, United States)

    Washington, D.C.: Northeast: Brookland, named after the estate of Col. Jehiel Brooks that formerly occupied the site, was developed between 1887 and 1901. Located in Brookland are the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception (dedicated in 1959), the Franciscan Monastery (dedicated in 1899), and the Catholic University of America…

  • Brookland (borough, New York City, New York, United States)

    Brooklyn, one of the five boroughs of New York City, southwestern Long Island, southeastern New York, U.S., coextensive with Kings county. It is separated from Manhattan by the East River and is bordered by the Upper and Lower New York bays (west), the Atlantic Ocean (south), and the borough of

  • Brooklands (British racetrack)

    automobile racing: Speedway racing: …was constructed in 1906 at Brooklands, near Weybridge, Surrey, England. The track was a 4.45 km circuit, 30 m (100 ft) wide, with two curves banked to a height of 8.5 m. Sprint, relay, endurance, and handicap races were run at Brooklands, as well as long-distance runs (1,600 km) in…

  • Brookline (Massachusetts, United States)

    Brookline, town (township), an exclave of Norfolk county, eastern Massachusetts, U.S. It lies between Suffolk and Middlesex counties and is almost surrounded by Boston. Settled in 1638 as part of Boston, it was called Muddy River until incorporated as a town of Suffolk county in 1705. Named for a

  • Brookline (borough, New York City, New York, United States)

    Brooklyn, one of the five boroughs of New York City, southwestern Long Island, southeastern New York, U.S., coextensive with Kings county. It is separated from Manhattan by the East River and is bordered by the Upper and Lower New York bays (west), the Atlantic Ocean (south), and the borough of

  • Brooklyn (novel by Tóibín)

    Colm Tóibín: In 2009 he released Brooklyn, a best seller that was adapted into a critically acclaimed film (2015) with a screenplay by Nick Hornby. Among Tóibín’s later novels are The Testament of Mary (2012), which was short-listed for the Man Booker Prize and adapted for the stage, and Nora Webster…

  • Brooklyn (film by Crowley [2015])

    Colm Tóibín: …adapted into a critically acclaimed film (2015) with a screenplay by Nick Hornby. Among Tóibín’s later novels are The Testament of Mary (2012), which was short-listed for the Man Booker Prize and adapted for the stage, and Nora Webster (2014). House of Names (2017) centres on Clytemnestra of Greek mythology.

  • Brooklyn (California, United States)

    Oakland: History: …town of Clinton (later named Brooklyn). In 1851 Horace W. Carpentier started a trans-bay ferry service to San Francisco and acquired a town site (1852) to the west of Brooklyn, naming it Oakland for the oak trees on the grassy plain. Carpentier and his associates extended the area and incorporated…

  • Brooklyn (borough, New York City, New York, United States)

    Brooklyn, one of the five boroughs of New York City, southwestern Long Island, southeastern New York, U.S., coextensive with Kings county. It is separated from Manhattan by the East River and is bordered by the Upper and Lower New York bays (west), the Atlantic Ocean (south), and the borough of

  • Brooklyn Academy of Music (arts centre, New York City, New York, United States)

    Merce Cunningham: …mark Cunningham’s 90th birthday, the Brooklyn Academy of Music premiered his new and last work, Nearly Ninety, in April 2009. His career was the subject of the documentary Cunningham (2019).

  • Brooklyn Botanic Garden and Arboretum (garden, New York City, New York, United States)

    Brooklyn Botanic Garden and Arboretum, botanical garden founded in 1911 in Brooklyn, N.Y., municipally owned and privately operated (by the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences). It maintains an extensive and widely emulated program of public education. The 50-acre (20-hectare) area in Brooklyn

  • Brooklyn Bridegrooms (American baseball team)

    Los Angeles Dodgers, American professional baseball team based in Los Angeles that plays in the National League (NL). The team has won six World Series titles and 23 NL pennants. Founded in 1883, the Dodgers were originally based in Brooklyn, New York, and were known as the Atlantics. The team

  • Brooklyn Bridge (bridge, New York City, New York, United States)

    Brooklyn Bridge, suspension bridge spanning the East River from Brooklyn to Manhattan in New York City. A brilliant feat of 19th-century engineering, the Brooklyn Bridge was the first bridge to use steel for cable wire, and during its construction explosives were used inside a pneumatic caisson for

  • Brooklyn Children’s Museum (museum, New York City, New York, United States)

    Brooklyn Children’s Museum, educational institution in Brooklyn, N.Y., established in 1899 as the world’s first children’s museum. The museum was originally a part of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, founded in 1823. In 1977 the Children’s Museum opened in a building in Crown Heights,

  • Brooklyn Dodgers (American baseball team)

    Los Angeles Dodgers, American professional baseball team based in Los Angeles that plays in the National League (NL). The team has won six World Series titles and 23 NL pennants. Founded in 1883, the Dodgers were originally based in Brooklyn, New York, and were known as the Atlantics. The team

  • Brooklyn Heights (district, New York City, New York, United States)

    New York City: Brooklyn: …first modern commuter suburb, and Brooklyn Heights was transformed into a wealthy residential community. Modern-day entrepreneurs have restored ferry service across the East River, and the esplanade along the heights rewards visitors with an unrivaled view of Manhattan’s shore and skyline.

  • Brooklyn Heights, Battle of (American history [1776])

    Battle of Long Island, also known as the Battle of Brooklyn or the Battle of Brooklyn Heights, (August 27–29, 1776), in the American Revolution, successful British action in Brooklyn, New York, against the American Continental Army and the first major battle of the war since the American

  • Brooklyn Museum of Art (museum, New York City, New York, United States)

    Brooklyn Museum, art institution in Brooklyn, New York, that pioneered in public education in art and community participation and service. The first section of the museum was opened in 1897. It added wings and special facilities over the years, and in 1923 it became the first museum in the United

  • Brooklyn Nets (American basketball team)

    Brooklyn Nets, American professional basketball team based in Brooklyn, New York, that plays in the Eastern Conference of the National Basketball Association (NBA). As a member of the American Basketball Association (ABA), the Nets won two championships (1974, 1976). The franchise was founded in

  • Brooklyn Robins (American baseball team)

    Los Angeles Dodgers, American professional baseball team based in Los Angeles that plays in the National League (NL). The team has won six World Series titles and 23 NL pennants. Founded in 1883, the Dodgers were originally based in Brooklyn, New York, and were known as the Atlantics. The team

  • Brooklyn Superbas (American baseball team)

    Los Angeles Dodgers, American professional baseball team based in Los Angeles that plays in the National League (NL). The team has won six World Series titles and 23 NL pennants. Founded in 1883, the Dodgers were originally based in Brooklyn, New York, and were known as the Atlantics. The team

  • Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (American baseball team)

    Los Angeles Dodgers, American professional baseball team based in Los Angeles that plays in the National League (NL). The team has won six World Series titles and 23 NL pennants. Founded in 1883, the Dodgers were originally based in Brooklyn, New York, and were known as the Atlantics. The team

  • Brooklyn’s Finest (film by Fuqua [2009])

    Richard Gere: …Swank), and the crime drama Brooklyn’s Finest (2009). He also appeared in the thriller Arbitrage (2012), in which he starred as a scandal-plagued venture capitalist, and the unsettling drama The Benefactor (2015), in which he played a wealthy drug addict who wheedles and bribes his way into the lives of…

  • Brooklyn, Battle of (American history [1776])

    Battle of Long Island, also known as the Battle of Brooklyn or the Battle of Brooklyn Heights, (August 27–29, 1776), in the American Revolution, successful British action in Brooklyn, New York, against the American Continental Army and the first major battle of the war since the American

  • Brookmeyer, Bob (American musician)

    Maria Schneider: …composer-arranger and noted trombone player Bob Brookmeyer, one of her most-significant mentors, who gave her the opportunity to write for such ensembles as the Thad Jones–Mel Lewis Orchestra and for groups at such renowned venues as the Village Vanguard jazz club in New York City’s Greenwich Village. During that time…

  • Brookner, Anita (British author)

    Anita Brookner, English art historian and author who presented a bleak view of life in her fiction, much of which deals with the loneliness experienced by middle-aged women who meet romantically unsuitable men and feel a growing sense of alienation from society. Brookner was a master of character

  • Brooks (United States territory, Pacific Ocean)

    Midway Islands, unincorporated territory of the United States in the central Pacific Ocean, 1,300 miles (2,100 km) northwest of Honolulu. Near the western end of the Hawaiian archipelago, it comprises a coral atoll with a circumference of 15 miles (24 km) enclosing two main islands—Eastern (Green)

  • Brooks (city, Alberta, Canada)

    Brooks, city, southern Alberta, Canada. It is located on the Trans-Canada Highway, 116 miles (187 km) southeast of Calgary and 67 miles (108 km) northwest of Medicine Hat. The community originated in the late 19th century as a Canadian Pacific Railway flag stop for cattle shipping and was named for

  • Brooks & Dunn (American music duo)

    Brooks & Dunn, popular American country music duo who became a fixture in the genre in the early 1990s. The band comprised Leon Eric (“Kix”) Brooks (b. May 12, 1955, Shreveport, Louisiana, U.S.) and Ronnie Gene Dunn (b. June 1, 1953, Coleman, Texas, U.S.). By age six Brooks was playing the ukulele;

  • Brooks Range (mountains, Alaska, United States)

    Brooks Range, northernmost extension of the Rocky Mountains in northern Alaska, U.S. Named for the geologist Alfred H. Brooks, the entire range is within the Arctic Circle. It is separated from the Alaska Range (south) by the plains and tablelands of the Yukon and Porcupine river systems. The

  • Brooks, Albert (American actor, comedian, writer, and director)

    Albert Brooks, American actor, comedian, writer, and director who was best known for his comedies. Brooks was the son of a radio comedian and grew up in Beverly Hills, where his childhood friends included Rob Reiner, son of comedy icon Carl Reiner. He studied drama at Carnegie Tech (now Carnegie

  • Brooks, Brian (American dancer)

    Wendy Whelan: …selected four cutting-edge dance makers—Brian Brooks, Kyle Abraham, Joshua Beamish, and Alejandro Cerrudo—to choreograph duets that each then performed with her. Whelan appeared in 2015 with longtime partner and former NYCB principal Jock Soto in Hagoromo, a Noh-based program that combined opera with choreography by David Neumann and puppetry…

  • Brooks, Cleanth (American critic and educator)

    Cleanth Brooks, American teacher and critic whose work was important in establishing the New Criticism, which stressed close reading and structural analysis of literature. Educated at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., and at Tulane University, New Orleans, Brooks was a Rhodes scholar (Exeter

  • Brooks, David (American journalist and commentator)

    David Brooks, Canadian-born American journalist and cultural and political commentator. Considered a moderate conservative, he was best known as an op-ed columnist (since 2003) for The New York Times and as a political analyst (since 2004) for PBS NewsHour, a television news program on the U.S.

  • Brooks, Derrick (American football player)

    Derrick Brooks, American gridiron football player who, in his 14-year career with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL), established himself as one of the greatest linebackers in the history of the sport. Brooks was a standout safety in high school and was recruited to play

  • Brooks, Derrick Dewan (American football player)

    Derrick Brooks, American gridiron football player who, in his 14-year career with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL), established himself as one of the greatest linebackers in the history of the sport. Brooks was a standout safety in high school and was recruited to play

  • Brooks, Dolores (American singer)

    the Crystals: Girard was replaced by Dolores ("La La") Brooks(b. 1946, Brooklyn) in 1962.

  • Brooks, Elmore (American musician)

    Elmore James, American blues singer-guitarist noted for the urgent intensity of his singing and guitar playing. Known as the “King of the Slide Guitar,” he was a significant influence on the development of rock music. Born into a sharecropping family, James played guitar in his teens and toured the

  • Brooks, Fred (American computer scientist)

    Fred Brooks, American computer scientist and winner of the 1999 A.M. Turing Award, the highest honour in computer science, for his “landmark contributions to computer architecture, operating systems, and software engineering.” Brooks received a bachelor’s degree (1953) in physics from Duke

  • Brooks, Frederick Phillips, Jr. (American computer scientist)

    Fred Brooks, American computer scientist and winner of the 1999 A.M. Turing Award, the highest honour in computer science, for his “landmark contributions to computer architecture, operating systems, and software engineering.” Brooks received a bachelor’s degree (1953) in physics from Duke

  • Brooks, Garth (American singer-songwriter)

    Garth Brooks, American country music singer-songwriter whose crossover appeal to the pop market made him the top-selling solo artist of all time. Brooks was born into a musical family; his mother had a brief recording career with Capitol Records in the 1950s. He initially exhibited little interest

  • Brooks, Gwendolyn (American poet and educator)

    Gwendolyn Brooks, American poet whose works deal with the everyday life of urban blacks. She was the first African American poet to win the Pulitzer Prize (1950), and in 1968 she was named the poet laureate of Illinois. Brooks graduated from Wilson Junior College in Chicago in 1936. Her early

  • Brooks, Gwendolyn Elizabeth (American poet and educator)

    Gwendolyn Brooks, American poet whose works deal with the everyday life of urban blacks. She was the first African American poet to win the Pulitzer Prize (1950), and in 1968 she was named the poet laureate of Illinois. Brooks graduated from Wilson Junior College in Chicago in 1936. Her early

  • Brooks, Herb (American ice hockey player)

    Herbert Paul Brooks, (“Herb”), American ice hockey player and coach (born Aug. 5, 1937, St. Paul, Minn.—died Aug. 11, 2003, near Forest Lake, Minn.), guided the U.S. men’s ice hockey team to one of the greatest upsets in sports as it defeated the U.S.S.R. en route to capturing the gold medal at t

  • Brooks, Herbert Paul (American ice hockey player)

    Herbert Paul Brooks, (“Herb”), American ice hockey player and coach (born Aug. 5, 1937, St. Paul, Minn.—died Aug. 11, 2003, near Forest Lake, Minn.), guided the U.S. men’s ice hockey team to one of the greatest upsets in sports as it defeated the U.S.S.R. en route to capturing the gold medal at t

  • Brooks, James L. (American screenwriter, director, and producer)

    James L. Brooks, American screenwriter, director, and producer who was active in both television and film and was especially known for character-driven ensemble work that blended warm humour with genuine dramatic sentiment. Brooks grew up in New Jersey. After dropping out of New York University, he

  • Brooks, James Lawrence (American screenwriter, director, and producer)

    James L. Brooks, American screenwriter, director, and producer who was active in both television and film and was especially known for character-driven ensemble work that blended warm humour with genuine dramatic sentiment. Brooks grew up in New Jersey. After dropping out of New York University, he

  • Brooks, Joseph (American composer, director, and producer)
  • Brooks, La La (American singer)

    the Crystals: Girard was replaced by Dolores ("La La") Brooks(b. 1946, Brooklyn) in 1962.

  • Brooks, Leon Eric Kix (American musician)

    Brooks &amp; Dunn: The band comprised Leon Eric (“Kix”) Brooks (b. May 12, 1955, Shreveport, Louisiana, U.S.) and Ronnie Gene Dunn (b. June 1, 1953, Coleman, Texas, U.S.).

  • Brooks, Louise (American actress)

    Louise Brooks, American motion-picture actress who was noted for her seemingly effortless incarnation of corrupt sensuality in silent-picture roles during the 1920s. Brooks was the daughter of a lawyer. She danced with the Denishawn company in 1922–24 and appeared in Florenz Ziegfeld’s Follies on

  • Brooks, Maria Gowen (American poet)

    Maria Gowen Brooks, American poet whose work, though admired for a time, represented a florid and grandiose style not greatly appreciated since. Abigail Gowen grew up in a prosperous and cultured family. After the death of her father in 1809, she came under the guardianship of John Brooks, a Boston

  • Brooks, Mary Abigail Gowen (American poet)

    Maria Gowen Brooks, American poet whose work, though admired for a time, represented a florid and grandiose style not greatly appreciated since. Abigail Gowen grew up in a prosperous and cultured family. After the death of her father in 1809, she came under the guardianship of John Brooks, a Boston

  • Brooks, Mel (American director, producer, screenwriter, and actor)

    Mel Brooks, American film and television director, producer, writer, and actor whose motion pictures elevated outrageousness and vulgarity to high comic art. Brooks was an accomplished mimic, pianist, and drummer by the time he graduated from high school and enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1944. As

  • Brooks, Phillips (American clergyman)

    Phillips Brooks, American Episcopal clergyman renowned as a preacher. A member of a wealthy old Brahmin family of New England, Brooks attended Harvard University (1851–55) and taught briefly at the Boston Latin School before attending the Episcopal Seminary at Alexandria, Va., being ordained there

  • Brooks, Ray (British actor)

    The Knack…and How to Get It: …begs his housemate Tolen (Ray Brooks), who has the knack of bedding any woman he wants, to give him advice on how to do the same. Conflict arises when Colin finally meets his dream girl, Nancy (Rita Tushingham), whom his pal attempts to seduce. Although initially perceived as innocent,…

  • Brooks, Rebekah (British media executive)

    United Kingdom: News of the World hacking scandal: …resulted in the resignation of Rebekah Brooks, the politically powerful chief executive officer of News International, and in the withdrawal of Murdoch’s bid to buy a controlling share of the BSkyB satellite television channel. It also brought about the convening of a number of special parliamentary hearings and commissions.

  • Brooks, Richard (American writer and director)

    Richard Brooks, American screenwriter and director whose best-known movies were adaptations of literary works, notably Blackboard Jungle (1955), Elmer Gantry (1960), and In Cold Blood (1967). After attending Temple University in Philadelphia, Brooks began his writing career as a sports journalist

  • Brooks, Rodney Allen (Australian-American scientist)

    Rodney Brooks, Australian computer scientist, artificial intelligence scientist, and designer of mobile autonomous robots. While attending Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia, where he received bachelor’s (1975) and master’s degrees (1978) in pure mathematics, Brooks was given access

  • Brooks, Romaine Goddard (American painter)

    Romaine Goddard Brooks, American painter who, in her gray-shaded portraits, penetrated and distilled her subjects’ personalities to an often disturbing degree. Born to wealthy American parents, Beatrice Romaine Goddard had a very unhappy childhood. Her mother doted on a paranoid and mentally

  • Brooks, Van Wyck (American critic)

    Van Wyck Brooks, American critic, biographer, and literary historian, whose “Finders and Makers” series traces American literary history in rich biographical detail from 1800 to 1915. Brooks grew up in the wealthy suburb of Plainfield. Graduating from Harvard in 1907, Brooks went to England, where,

  • Brooks, William Keith (American zoologist)

    William Keith Brooks, American zoologist known for his research on the anatomy and embryology of marine animals, especially the tunicates, crustaceans (e.g., crayfish), and mollusks (notably the oyster). In his acceptance of evolution, he remained in the tradition of 19th-century descriptive

  • Brooks-Randolph, Angie Elisabeth (Liberian jurist and diplomat)

    Angie Elisabeth Brooks-Randolph, Liberian jurist and diplomat (born Aug. 24, 1928, Virginia, Montserrado county, Liberia—died Sept. 9, 2007, Houston, Texas), became (1969) the second woman president of the UN General Assembly. After receiving a bachelor’s degree (1949) from Shaw University,

  • Brookwood (cemetery, Woking, England, United Kingdom)

    cemetery: …largest 19th-century projects was England’s Brookwood, organized by the London Necropolis Company. It had a private railway station in London and two in the cemetery, its own telegraphic address, and special areas for different religions, nationalities, social organizations, and professions. Perhaps the most famous of the type is California’s Forest…

  • broom (plant)

    Broom, (genus Cytisus), genus of several shrubs or small trees of the pea family (Fabaceae), native to temperate regions of Europe and western Asia. Some broom species are cultivated as ornamentals for their attractive flowers. English, or Scotch, broom (Cytisus scoparius) is a shrub with bright

  • broom (utensil)

    curling: …use of a brush, or broom, to sweep the ice in front of the sliding stone. This is a tradition carried over from the days when curling was played outdoors on frozen lakes; it was necessary to clear the snow to provide a path for the oncoming rock. Sweeping is…

  • broom moss (plant)

    Broom moss, (Dicranum scoparium), the most common species of the wind-blown moss genus Dicranum. This species occurs from Alaska to California and also in the southeastern United States, as well as in Mexico, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. Dicranum is in the family Dicranaceae in the subclass

  • Broom of the System, The (novel by Wallace)

    David Foster Wallace: …his highly regarded debut novel, The Broom of the System (1987), was published. He later taught creative writing at Illinois State University and at Pomona College. He received a MacArthur Foundation fellowship grant in 1997.

  • broom sedge (plant)

    bluestem: Broom sedge, or yellow bluestem (A. virginicus), and bushy beardgrass, or bush bluestem (A. glomeratus), are coarse grasses, unsuitable for forage, that grow in poor soils in eastern and southern North America.

  • Broom, Robert (South African paleontologist)

    Australopithecus: Australopithecus africanus: Robert Broom and his team collected hundreds of specimens beginning in 1936. At first Broom simply bought fossils, but in 1946 he began excavating, aided by a crew of skillful workers. Excavation continues to this day. Sterkfontein is one of the richest sources of information…

  • broomcorn (plant)

    Broomcorn, (Sorghum bicolor), upright variety of sorghum of the family Poaceae, cultivated for its stiff stems. The seeds of broomcorn are borne on the ends of long straight branches. When harvested and dried, these stiff bristles are processed and bound to form broom heads and brushes and are also

  • broomcorn millet (plant)

    broomcorn: …also the common name of Panicum miliaceum, a type of millet.

  • Broome (county, New York, United States)

    Broome, county, south-central New York state, U.S., comprising a hilly upland region bordered by Pennsylvania to the south. It is drained principally by the Susquehanna River (which crosses the southern part of the county twice) and by the Tioughnioga, Otselic, and Chenango rivers. Parklands are

  • Broome (Western Australia, Australia)

    Broome, town and port, northern Western Australia, on the north shore of Roebuck Bay, an inlet of the Indian Ocean. It is situated on the Great Northern Highway to Perth (1,390 miles [2,240 km] southwest). The region of the coast including Broome was explored in 1688 and 1699 by the English

  • Broome of Broome, Baron Denton of Denton, Viscount (British field marshal)

    Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener, British field marshal, imperial administrator, conqueror of the Sudan, commander in chief during the South African War, and (perhaps his most important role) secretary of state for war at the beginning of World War I (1914–18). At that time he

  • Broome, John (American writer)

    Green Lantern: …Julius Schwartz, along with writer John Broome and artist Gil Kane, ushered the Green Lantern into the so-called “Silver Age” of comics. The new Green Lantern premiered in Showcase no. 22 (October 1959), with a new history. Test pilot Hal Jordan chances upon the crashed spaceship of an emerald-garbed, red-skinned…

  • Broome, Lady (British author)

    Lady Mary Anne Barker, writer best known for her book Station Life in New Zealand (1870), a lively account of life in colonial New Zealand. Stewart was educated in England, and at age 21 she married George R. Barker, then a captain of the Royal Artillery. He was knighted for his military service in

  • Broome, William (British scholar and poet)

    William Broome, British scholar and poet, best known as a collaborator with Alexander Pope and Elijah Fenton in a project to translate Homer’s Odyssey, of which Broome translated books 2, 6, 8, 11, 12, 16, 18, and 23. He seems to have undertaken the work mainly to add lustre to his reputation, but

  • broomrape (plant)

    Broomrape, (genus Orobanche), genus of about 150 species of parasiticannual or perennial herbs (family Orobanchaceae). Broomrapes produce little or no chlorophyll; instead, they draw nourishment from the roots of other plants by means of small suckers called haustoria. Most species are primarily

  • broomrape family (plant family)

    Lamiales: Orobanchaceae: Orobanchaceae, the broomrape family, is also considerably expanded from its former delimitation. Instead of about 15 genera and 210 species of entirely parasitic plants (holoparasites, with no chlorophyll), the family now includes 99 genera and some 2,060 species under APG III. These additional groups…

  • Broonzy, Big Bill (American musician)

    Big Bill Broonzy, American blues singer and guitarist who represented a tradition of itinerant folk blues. Broonzy maintained that he was born in 1893 in Scott, Mississippi, but some sources suggest that he was born in 1903 near Lake Dick, Arkansas. In any case, Broonzy grew up in Arkansas. He

  • Broonzy, William Lee Conley (American musician)

    Big Bill Broonzy, American blues singer and guitarist who represented a tradition of itinerant folk blues. Broonzy maintained that he was born in 1893 in Scott, Mississippi, but some sources suggest that he was born in 1903 near Lake Dick, Arkansas. In any case, Broonzy grew up in Arkansas. He

  • Brophy, Brigid (British writer)

    Brigid Brophy, English writer whose satiric, witty novels explore the psychology of sex. She also wrote plays and nonfiction that reflect her interests in psychoanalysis, art, opera, and sexual liberation. The daughter of the novelist John Brophy, she began writing at an early age. Her first novel,

  • Brophy, Brigid Antonia (British writer)

    Brigid Brophy, English writer whose satiric, witty novels explore the psychology of sex. She also wrote plays and nonfiction that reflect her interests in psychoanalysis, art, opera, and sexual liberation. The daughter of the novelist John Brophy, she began writing at an early age. Her first novel,

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