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  • Bucking the Sarge (work by Curtis)

    Christopher Paul Curtis: Bucking the Sarge (2004), a modern-day fairy tale set in a poor urban neighbourhood, is narrated by a teenaged boy whose mother, a selfish slumlord, is called “the Sarge.” Mr. Chickee’s Funny Money (2005) details the adventures of Steven Carter, an overachieving seven-year-old who aspires…

  • Buckingham (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Bristol, borough (town), Bucks county, southeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., on the Delaware River, just northeast of Philadelphia. The settlement was laid out in 1697 as Buckingham near the site of William Penn’s home and was renamed in about 1700 for Bristol, England. It served as the Bucks county

  • Buckingham and Normanby, John Sheffield, 1st Duke of (British statesman and author)

    John Sheffield, 1st duke of Buckingham and Normanby, English statesman, patron of the poet John Dryden, and author of poetic essays in heroic couplets. The son of Edmund, 2nd earl of Mulgrave, he succeeded to the title on his father’s death in 1658. He served under Charles II and was a favourite

  • Buckingham and Normanby, John Sheffield, 1st Duke of, 3rd Earl of Mulgrave (British statesman and author)

    John Sheffield, 1st duke of Buckingham and Normanby, English statesman, patron of the poet John Dryden, and author of poetic essays in heroic couplets. The son of Edmund, 2nd earl of Mulgrave, he succeeded to the title on his father’s death in 1658. He served under Charles II and was a favourite

  • Buckingham Canal (canal, India)

    Kommamur Canal, canal in eastern Andhra Pradesh state and northeastern Tamil Nādu state, southeastern India. It was constructed section by section between 1806 and 1882 along the backwaters of the Coromandel Coast, which extends for a distance of 680 miles (1,100 km) from Cape Comorin northward t

  • Buckingham Fountain (fountain, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Chicago: City layout: …of the world’s largest fountains—Clarence Buckingham Memorial Fountain (dedicated 1927), which graces Grant Park just east of downtown. Beginning in the 1960s, Chicago acquired contemporary sculptures by Alexander Calder, Claes Oldenburg, Henry Moore, Marc Chagall, Richard Hunt, and others. The most famous is the Pablo Picasso sculpture

  • Buckingham Palace (palace, Westminster, London, United Kingdom)

    Buckingham Palace, palace and London residence of the British sovereign. It is situated within the borough of Westminster. The palace takes its name from the house built (c. 1705) for John Sheffield, duke of Buckingham. It was bought in 1762 by George III for his wife, Queen Charlotte, and became

  • Buckingham, Duke of (fictional character in “Richard III”)

    Richard III: …is ably assisted by the Duke of Buckingham, who readily persuades Cardinal Bourchier to remove the young Duke of York from the protection of sanctuary and place him and his brother under their uncle’s “protection” in the Tower. Buckingham further arranges for and later explains away the hurried execution of…

  • Buckingham, Duke of (fictional character in “Henry VIII”)

    Henry VIII: As the play opens, the duke of Buckingham, having denounced Cardinal Wolsey, lord chancellor to King Henry VIII, for corruption and treason, is himself arrested, along with his son-in-law, Lord Abergavenny. Despite the king’s reservations and Queen Katharine’s entreaties for justice and truth, Buckingham is convicted as a traitor on…

  • Buckingham, Earl of (English statesman)

    George Villiers, 1st duke of Buckingham, royal favourite and statesman who virtually ruled England during the last years of King James I and the first years of the reign of Charles I. Buckingham was extremely unpopular, and the failure of his aggressive, erratic foreign policy increased the

  • Buckingham, Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of (British noble)

    Edward Stafford, 3rd duke of Buckingham, eldest son of Henry Stafford, the 2nd duke, succeeding to the title in 1485, after the attainder had been removed, two years after the execution of his father. On the accession of Henry VIII Buckingham began to play an important role in political affairs

  • Buckingham, George Nugent Temple Grenville, 1st Marquess of (British statesman)

    George Nugent Temple Grenville, 1st marquess of Buckingham, George Grenville’s second son, created (1784) the marquess of Buckingham (the town). He made his mark as lord lieutenant of Ireland. Educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, Temple was member of Parliament for Buckinghamshire from 1774

  • Buckingham, George Villiers, 1st Duke of (English statesman)

    George Villiers, 1st duke of Buckingham, royal favourite and statesman who virtually ruled England during the last years of King James I and the first years of the reign of Charles I. Buckingham was extremely unpopular, and the failure of his aggressive, erratic foreign policy increased the

  • Buckingham, George Villiers, 2nd Duke of (English politician)

    George Villiers, 2nd duke of Buckingham, English politician, a leading member of King Charles II’s inner circle of ministers known as the Cabal. Although he was brilliant and colourful, Buckingham’s pleasure-seeking, capricious personality prevented him from exercising a decisive influence in King

  • Buckingham, Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of (English noble)

    Henry Stafford, 2nd duke of Buckingham, a leading supporter, and later opponent, of King Richard III. He was a Lancastrian descendant of King Edward III, and a number of his forebears had been killed fighting the Yorkists in the Wars of the Roses (1455–85). In 1460 he succeeded his grandfather as

  • Buckingham, Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of (English noble)

    Humphrey Stafford, 1st duke of Buckingham, Lancastrian prominent in the Hundred Years’ War in France and the Wars of the Roses in England. He became 6th Earl of Stafford when only a year old, his father having died in battle. He was knighted by Henry V in 1421 and then, under Henry VI, served

  • Buckingham, Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of, Earl of Stafford, Earl of Buckingham, Baron Stafford, Comte de Perche (English noble)

    Humphrey Stafford, 1st duke of Buckingham, Lancastrian prominent in the Hundred Years’ War in France and the Wars of the Roses in England. He became 6th Earl of Stafford when only a year old, his father having died in battle. He was knighted by Henry V in 1421 and then, under Henry VI, served

  • Buckingham, Lindsey (American musician)

    Fleetwood Mac: ), and Lindsey Buckingham (b. October 3, 1947, Palo Alto, California).

  • Buckingham, Marquess of (English statesman)

    George Villiers, 1st duke of Buckingham, royal favourite and statesman who virtually ruled England during the last years of King James I and the first years of the reign of Charles I. Buckingham was extremely unpopular, and the failure of his aggressive, erratic foreign policy increased the

  • Buckinghamshire (county, England, United Kingdom)

    Buckinghamshire, administrative, geographic, and historic county of southern England. It stretches from the River Thames in the south and the outskirts of London in the southeast across the ridge of chalk upland known as the Chiltern Hills, thence across the fertile Vale of Aylesbury and a low

  • Buckinghamshire Election Case (law case)

    United Kingdom: Finance and politics: …the Commons led to the Buckinghamshire Election Case (1604). The Commons reversed a decision by the lord chancellor and ordered Francis Goodwin, an outlaw, to be seated in the House of Commons. James clumsily intervened in the proceedings, stating that the privileges of the Commons had been granted by the…

  • Buckinghamshire lace

    Buckinghamshire lace, bobbin lace made in the English East Midlands from the end of the 16th century. It was referred to by William Shakespeare in Twelfth Night (c. 1600–02), in which Orsino mentions “the free maids that weave their thread with bones” (Act II, scene 4). Bucks may originally have

  • Buckland Abbey (historical site, Devon, England, United Kingdom)

    West Devon: The 13th-century Buckland Abbey south of Tavistock was lived in by the families of Sir Richard Grenville and Sir Francis Drake, both famous seafarers, and contains a maritime history museum. The austere granite Castle Drogo on the northeastern edge of Dartmoor is Great Britain’s last private home…

  • Buckland, Jonny (British musician)

    Coldplay: …1977, Exeter, England) and guitarist Jonny Buckland (b. September 11, 1977, London). The band was later filled out with fellow students Guy Berryman (b. April 12, 1978, Kirkcaldy, Scotland) on bass and Will Champion (b. July 31, 1978, Southampton, England), a guitarist who later switched to drums. Coldplay penetrated the…

  • Buckland, William (British geologist)

    William Buckland, pioneer geologist and minister, known for his effort to reconcile geological discoveries with the Bible and antievolutionary theories. He disclaimed the theory of fluvial processes and held the biblical Deluge to be the agent of all erosion and sedimentation upon the Earth. He did

  • buckle (clothing)

    Buckle, clasp or catch, particularly for fastening the ends of a belt; or a clasplike ornament, especially for shoes. The belt buckle was often used by the people of ancient Greece and ancient Rome as well as by those in northern Europe, and it became the object of special care on the part of

  • Buckle, Henry Thomas (British historian)

    probability and statistics: A new kind of regularity: …1857, when the English historian Henry Thomas Buckle recited his favourite examples of statistical law to support an uncompromising determinism in his immensely successful History of Civilization in England. Interestingly, probability had been linked to deterministic arguments from very early in its history, at least since the time of Jakob…

  • buckler fibula (ornament)

    jewelry: Teutonic: …of fibula was the so-called buckler variety, with a fan head, arched bridge, and flat or molded foot, with pierced work in various shapes. Equally common were disk fibulae, either flat or with concentric embossing, while S-shaped fibulae and belt buckles were rarer.

  • Buckler, Against Adversitie, A (work by Vair)

    Guillaume du Vair: A Buckler, Against Adversitie, 1622). In this work he put forward an amalgam of Stoicism and Christianity that was well calculated to appeal to readers in a France torn apart by civil war. Philosophers such as Justus Lipsius had already attempted to fuse Christian and Stoic…

  • Buckles, Frank Woodruff (American serviceman)

    Frank Woodruff Buckles, American serviceman (born Feb. 1, 1901, near Bethany, Mo.—died Feb. 27, 2011, near Charles Town, W.Va.), was the last surviving American veteran of World War I. On Aug. 14, 1917, Buckles, then a 16-year-old farm boy, went to Oklahoma City and enlisted in the army after lying

  • Buckley v. Valeo (law case)

    Buckley v. Valeo, legal case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on January 30, 1976, struck down provisions of the 1971 Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA)—as amended in 1974—that had imposed limits on various types of expenditures by or on behalf of candidates for federal office. The ruling

  • Buckley, Bill (American editor)

    William F. Buckley, Jr., versatile American editor, author, and conservative gadfly who became an important intellectual influence in conservative politics. The oil fortune amassed by Buckley’s immigrant grandfather enabled the boy to be reared in comfortable circumstances in France, England, and

  • Buckley, James L. (United States senator)

    Buckley v. Valeo: Background: James L. Buckley of New York filed suit in U.S. district court alleging, among other claims, that FECA’s contribution and expenditure limitations violated the First Amendment guarantee of freedom of speech. The district court certified (requested resolution of) the constitutional questions to the U.S. Court…

  • Buckley, Jeff (American musician)

    Jeff Buckley, American folk, rock, and pop singer and songwriter whose multioctave voice was compared to that of his father, the late Tim Buckley; through his one full album, Grace, two minialbums, and performances on other artists’ albums as well as in concert, he attracted a devoted i

  • Buckley, Jeffrey Scott (American musician)

    Jeff Buckley, American folk, rock, and pop singer and songwriter whose multioctave voice was compared to that of his father, the late Tim Buckley; through his one full album, Grace, two minialbums, and performances on other artists’ albums as well as in concert, he attracted a devoted i

  • Buckley, Reginald (British author)

    Rutland Boughton: With Reginald Buckley, his partner in the Glastonbury scheme, he published a book, The Music Drama of the Future (1908).

  • Buckley, Tim (American musician)

    Jackson Browne: …the Velvet Underground and for Tim Buckley. He was first noticed as a songwriter, and his compositions were recorded by performers such as Tom Rush, the Byrds, and Linda Ronstadt before he recorded his eponymous debut album in 1972 (featuring the Top Ten hit “Doctor My Eyes”). Part of a…

  • Buckley, William F., Jr. (American editor)

    William F. Buckley, Jr., versatile American editor, author, and conservative gadfly who became an important intellectual influence in conservative politics. The oil fortune amassed by Buckley’s immigrant grandfather enabled the boy to be reared in comfortable circumstances in France, England, and

  • Buckley, William Frank, Jr. (American editor)

    William F. Buckley, Jr., versatile American editor, author, and conservative gadfly who became an important intellectual influence in conservative politics. The oil fortune amassed by Buckley’s immigrant grandfather enabled the boy to be reared in comfortable circumstances in France, England, and

  • buckling (mechanics)

    Buckling, Mode of failure under compression of a structural component that is thin (see shell structure) or much longer than wide (e.g., post, column, leg bone). Leonhard Euler first worked out in 1757 the theory of why such members buckle. The definition by Thomas Young of the elastic modulus

  • buckminsterfullerene (carbon cluster)

    carbon: Properties and uses: Spheroidal, closed-cage fullerenes are called buckerminsterfullerenes, or “buckyballs,” and cylindrical fullerenes are called nanotubes. A fourth form, called Q-carbon, is crystalline and magnetic. Yet another form, called amorphous carbon, has no crystalline structure. Other forms—such as carbon black, charcoal, lampblack, coal, and

  • Bucknell University (university, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Bucknell University, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. Bachelor’s and master’s degree programs are available in sciences, arts, business, engineering, and education. Students can study abroad through the university’s programs in Africa, Asia,

  • Bucknell, Barry (British television host)

    Robert Barraby Bucknell, (“Barry”), British television-show host (born Jan. 26, 1912, London, Eng.—died Feb. 21, 2003, St. Mawes, Cornwall, Eng.), inspired do-it-yourself fans with his popular home-renovation shows in the 1950s and ’60s. Bucknell was invited to appear on the BBC television p

  • Bucknell, Robert Barraby (British television host)

    Robert Barraby Bucknell, (“Barry”), British television-show host (born Jan. 26, 1912, London, Eng.—died Feb. 21, 2003, St. Mawes, Cornwall, Eng.), inspired do-it-yourself fans with his popular home-renovation shows in the 1950s and ’60s. Bucknell was invited to appear on the BBC television p

  • Buckner, Bill (American baseball player)

    New York Mets: …best remembered for first baseman Bill Buckner’s error in the 10th inning of game six that allowed the Mets to steal an improbable victory and then go on to claim the championship with another comeback win in game seven.

  • Buckner, Simon Bolivar (United States general)

    Simon Bolivar Buckner, Confederate general during the U.S. Civil War (1861–65) and governor of Kentucky (1887–91). A graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., Buckner served in the Mexican War (1846–48) and thereafter at various army posts until 1855, when he resigned his

  • Buckner, Simon Bolivar, Jr. (United States general)

    Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr., U.S. Army general in World War II who climaxed his career of more than 41 years by leading the successful invasion of the Japanese-held Ryukyu Islands in the Pacific Ocean (1945). The only son of the Confederate Civil War general of the same name, Buckner was

  • Bucks (county, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Bucks, county, southeastern Pennsylvania, U.S., bordered to the east by New Jersey (the Delaware River constituting the boundary). It consists of piedmont terrain surrounded by the cities of Allentown, Pa., Trenton, N.J., and Philadelphia, Pa. In addition to the Delaware, the county is drained by

  • Bucks lace

    Buckinghamshire lace, bobbin lace made in the English East Midlands from the end of the 16th century. It was referred to by William Shakespeare in Twelfth Night (c. 1600–02), in which Orsino mentions “the free maids that weave their thread with bones” (Act II, scene 4). Bucks may originally have

  • buckthorn (plant genus)

    Buckthorn, any of about 100 species of shrubs or trees belonging to the genus Rhamnus, family Rhamnaceae, native to temperate areas in the Northern Hemisphere. The cascara buckthorn (R. purshiana) is the source of cascara sagrada, a cathartic drug. The common, or European, buckthorn (R.

  • buckthorn family (plant family)

    Rosales: Characteristic morphological features: Members of Rhamnaceae, or the buckthorn family, are characterized by woodiness, stamens (male) alternating with sepals (opposite petals, when present), a disk of tissue developing under or around the ovary, and joined bases of flower parts that form a cup (hypanthium) surrounding the ovary. The Rhamnaceae family…

  • buckwheat (plant)

    Buckwheat, (Fagopyrum esculentum), herbaceous plant of the family Polygonaceae and its edible seeds. Buckwheat is a staple pseudograin crop in some parts of eastern Europe, where the hulled kernels, or groats, are prepared as kasha, cooked and served much like rice. While buckwheat flour is

  • buckwheat tree (plant)

    Buckwheat tree, (Cliftonia monophylla), evergreen shrub or small tree of the family Cyrillaceae, native to southern North America. It grows to about 15 m (50 feet) tall and has oblong or lance-shaped leaves about 4–5 cm (1.5–2 inches) long. Its fragrant white or pinkish flowers, about 1 cm across,

  • buckwheat-note hymnal (music)

    Shape-note hymnal, American hymnal incorporating many folk hymns and utilizing a special musical notation. The seven-note scale was sung not to the syllables do–re–mi–fa–sol–la–ti but to a four-syllable system carried with them by early English colonists: fa–sol–la–fa–sol–la–mi. Differently s

  • buckyball (carbon cluster)

    carbon: Properties and uses: Spheroidal, closed-cage fullerenes are called buckerminsterfullerenes, or “buckyballs,” and cylindrical fullerenes are called nanotubes. A fourth form, called Q-carbon, is crystalline and magnetic. Yet another form, called amorphous carbon, has no crystalline structure. Other forms—such as carbon black, charcoal, lampblack, coal, and

  • buckytube (chemical compound)

    Carbon nanotube, nanoscale hollow tubes composed of carbon atoms. The cylindrical carbon molecules feature high aspect ratios (length-to-diameter values) typically above 103, with diameters from about 1 nanometer up to tens of nanometers and lengths up to millimeters. This unique one-dimensional

  • bucolic literature

    Pastoral literature, class of literature that presents the society of shepherds as free from the complexity and corruption of city life. Many of the idylls written in its name are far remote from the realities of any life, rustic or urban. Among the writers who have used the pastoral convention

  • Bucolics (work by Virgil)

    Corydon: …name appears notably in Virgil’s Eclogues, a collection of 10 unconnected pastoral poems composed between 42 and 37 bce. In the second eclogue, the shepherd Corydon bewails his unrequited love for the boy Alexis. In the seventh, Corydon and Thyrsis, two Arcadian herdsmen, engage in a singing match. The name…

  • Bucolicum carmen (work by Boccaccio)

    Giovanni Boccaccio: Petrarch and Boccaccio’s mature years.: His Bucolicum carmen (1351–66), a series of allegorical eclogues (short pastoral poems) on contemporary events, follows classical models on lines already indicated by Dante and Petrarch. His other Latin works include De claris mulieribus (1360–74; Concerning Famous Women), a collection of biographies of famous women; and…

  • Bucorvus (bird)

    coraciiform: Locomotion and feeding: The ground hornbills (Bucorvus species) exhibit a definite social organization when foraging. Three or four members of a group searching for insects and other small animals on the ground may keep near each other, with the result that prey frightened into activity by one bird may…

  • Bucov, Emilian (Moldavian author)

    Moldova: The arts: …early prose and poetry of Emilian Bucov and Andrei Lupan, who followed the principles of Socialist Realism; later they and younger writers diversified their techniques and subject matter. Perhaps the most outstanding modern writer is the dramatist and novelist Ion Dru?a. His novel Balade de campie (1963; “Ballads of the…

  • Bucovina (region, Europe)

    Bukovina, eastern European territory consisting of a segment of the northeastern Carpathian Mountains and the adjoining plain, divided in modern times (after 1947) between Romania and Ukraine. Settled by both Ukrainians (Ruthenians) and Romanians (Moldavians), the region became an integral part of

  • bucranium (decorative arts)

    Bucranium, decorative motif representing an ox killed in religious sacrifice. The motif originated in a ceremony wherein an ox’s head was hung from the wooden beams supporting the temple roof; this scene was later represented, in stone, on the frieze, or stone lintels, above the columns in Doric

  • Bucs (American baseball team)

    Pittsburgh Pirates, American professional baseball team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Sometimes referred to as the “Bucs,” the Pirates are among the oldest teams in baseball and have won the World Series five times (1909, 1925, 1960, 1971, and 1979). The team that would become the Pirates was

  • Bucs (American football team)

    Tampa Bay Buccaneers, American professional gridiron football team based in Tampa, Florida, that plays in the National Football Conference (NFC) of the National Football League (NFL). The Buccaneers won a Super Bowl title in 2003. The Buccaneers (often shortened to “Bucs”) were established in 1976,

  • Bucure?ti (national capital, Romania)

    Bucharest, city and municipality, the economic, administrative, and cultural centre of Romania. It lies in the middle of the Romanian plain, on the banks of the Dambovi?a, a small northern tributary of the Danube. Although archaeological excavations have revealed evidence of settlements dating back

  • bud (plant anatomy)

    Bud, Small lateral or terminal protuberance on the stem of a vascular plant that may develop into a flower, leaf, or shoot. Buds arise from meristem tissue. In temperate climates, trees form resting buds that are resistant to frost in preparation for winter. Flower buds are modified

  • Bud Billiken Day Parade (parade, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Bud Billiken Parade, annual public procession in Chicago, Illinois, the largest African American parade in the United States. The Bud Billiken Parade has been held the second Saturday of every August since 1929. Begun by Robert S. Abbott, founder of the Chicago Defender newspaper, the parade was

  • Bud Billiken Parade (parade, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Bud Billiken Parade, annual public procession in Chicago, Illinois, the largest African American parade in the United States. The Bud Billiken Parade has been held the second Saturday of every August since 1929. Begun by Robert S. Abbott, founder of the Chicago Defender newspaper, the parade was

  • bud grafting (horticulture)

    budding: …cnidarian species) regularly reproduce by budding.

  • bud moth (insect)

    Olethreutid moth, (subfamily Olethreutinae), any of a group of moths in the family Tortricidae (order Lepidoptera) that contains several species with economically destructive larvae. The pale caterpillars roll or tie leaves and feed on foliage, fruits, or nuts. Some examples include Cydia

  • Bud, Not Buddy (novel by Curtis)

    Christopher Paul Curtis: Curtis’s second book, Bud, Not Buddy (1999), narrated by a motherless boy who embarks on a search for his unknown father during the Great Depression, earned Curtis the Newbery Medal as well as the ALA’s Coretta Scott King Award. Bucking the Sarge (2004), a modern-day fairy tale set…

  • BUD/S (United States military program)

    Navy SEAL: Training and deployment: …enter an extremely rigorous six-month Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training program, often said to be the toughest in the U.S. military. There they undergo constant physical and mental conditioning and are trained in a host of skills, including basic water competency and swimming, underwater combat, weapons and demolitions, and navigating…

  • Buda Castle (palace, Budapest, Hungary)

    Budapest: Buda: …and crowned by the restored Buda Castle (Budai vár, commonly called the Royal Palace). In the 13th century a fortress was built on the site and was replaced by a large Baroque palace during the reign (1740–80) of Maria Theresa as queen of Hungary. The structure was destroyed or damaged…

  • Buda Chronicles (historical work)

    Chronica Hungarorum, (Latin: “Chronicle of the Hungarians”) the first book printed in Hungary, issued from the press of András Hess in Buda, now Budapest, on June 5, 1473. Hess, who was probably of German origin, dedicated the book to his patron, László Karai, provost of Buda, who had invited him

  • Buda halála (work by Arany)

    János Arany: …the first part of it, Buda halála (1864; The Death of King Buda).

  • Buda Tunnel (tunnel, Budapest, Hungary)

    Adam Clark: He also designed the Buda Tunnel at the Buda bridgehead. The square between the bridge and the tunnel is named for him and is the official point of origin of the country’s road network, with a sculptured “zero kilometre stone” in the centre.

  • Budaeus, Guglielmus (French scholar)

    Guillaume Budé, French scholar who brought about a revival of classical studies in France and helped to found the Collège de France, Paris; he was also a diplomat and royal librarian. Educated in Paris and Orléans, he became especially proficient in Greek, learning philosophy, law, theology, and

  • Budai Krónika (historical work)

    Chronica Hungarorum, (Latin: “Chronicle of the Hungarians”) the first book printed in Hungary, issued from the press of András Hess in Buda, now Budapest, on June 5, 1473. Hess, who was probably of German origin, dedicated the book to his patron, László Karai, provost of Buda, who had invited him

  • Budai vár (palace, Budapest, Hungary)

    Budapest: Buda: …and crowned by the restored Buda Castle (Budai vár, commonly called the Royal Palace). In the 13th century a fortress was built on the site and was replaced by a large Baroque palace during the reign (1740–80) of Maria Theresa as queen of Hungary. The structure was destroyed or damaged…

  • Budapest (national capital, Hungary)

    Budapest, city, capital of Hungary, and seat of Pest megye (county). The city is the political, administrative, industrial, and commercial centre of Hungary. The site has been continuously settled since prehistoric times and is now the home of about one-fifth of the country’s population. Area city,

  • Budapest Academy of Music (school and concert hall, Budapest, Hungary)

    Ferenc Erkel: …in the foundation of the Academy of Music in Budapest (1875), where he served as director and teacher of piano. He remained director until 1887, and a year later he resigned from his teaching post. Composed during this period, his opera Névtelen h?s?k (1880; “Anonymous Heroes”) was based on Hungarian…

  • Budapest Fóváros Allat-es N?vénykertje (zoo, Budapest, Hungary)

    Budapest Zoo, foremost zoological garden in Hungary. Founded in 1866, it is administered and funded by the city of Budapest. A public foundation for support was established in 1992. The main entrance and some of the pavilions are fine examples of Art Nouveau design. The zoo is home to nearly 9,000

  • Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra (Hungarian symphony orchestra)

    Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra, Hungarian symphony orchestra based in Budapest. Members of the National Theatre orchestra began giving Philharmonic Concerts in 1853, in the midst of a period of political repression in Hungary. Ferenc Erkel was the concerts’ initial conductor. He continued as music

  • Budapest University of Economic Sciences and Public Administration (university, Budapest, Hungary)

    Hungary: Higher education: …Sciences and Public Administration (renamed Corvinus University of Budapest in 2004) remained stand-alone universities.

  • Budapest University of Technology and Economics (university, Budapest, Hungary)

    Hungary: Higher education: …József University of Szeged, the Technical University of Budapest, and the Budapest University of Economic Sciences. There were also dozens of specialized schools and colleges throughout the country. In 2000 most of these specialized colleges were combined with older universities or with one another to form new “integrated universities.” The…

  • Budapest Zoo (zoo, Budapest, Hungary)

    Budapest Zoo, foremost zoological garden in Hungary. Founded in 1866, it is administered and funded by the city of Budapest. A public foundation for support was established in 1992. The main entrance and some of the pavilions are fine examples of Art Nouveau design. The zoo is home to nearly 9,000

  • Budapest Zoo and Botanical Garden (zoo, Budapest, Hungary)

    Budapest Zoo, foremost zoological garden in Hungary. Founded in 1866, it is administered and funded by the city of Budapest. A public foundation for support was established in 1992. The main entrance and some of the pavilions are fine examples of Art Nouveau design. The zoo is home to nearly 9,000

  • Budaun (India)

    Budaun, city, north-central Uttar Pradesh state, northern India. It lies near the Sot River, a tributary of the Ganges (Ganga) River, about 25 miles (40 km) southwest of Bareilly. Budaun is said to have been founded about 905 ce by Buddh, a Hindu raja. In the 13th century it was an important

  • Budd, William (English physician)

    William Budd, English physician who identified water as a source of transmission of typhoid fever. Budd began his medical training as an apprentice to his father, who was a physician. He then trained for four years in Paris with French clinician Pierre-Charles-Alexandre Louis before studying at the

  • Budd, Zola (South African-British athlete)

    Zola Budd: Collision and Controversy: It was not medal-winning heroics that made Zola Budd a household name at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. Rather, the 18-year-old Budd found herself in the unflattering glare of the spotlight after a collision with her idol—and rival—American Mary Decker (later Mary Decker Slaney).…

  • Buddenbrooks (novel by Mann)

    Buddenbrooks, novel by Thomas Mann, published in 1901 in two volumes in German as Buddenbrooks, Verfall einer Familie (“Buddenbrooks, the Decline of a Family”). The work was Mann’s first novel, and it expressed the ambivalence of his feelings about the value of the life of the artist as opposed to

  • Buddenbrooks, Verfall einer Familie (novel by Mann)

    Buddenbrooks, novel by Thomas Mann, published in 1901 in two volumes in German as Buddenbrooks, Verfall einer Familie (“Buddenbrooks, the Decline of a Family”). The work was Mann’s first novel, and it expressed the ambivalence of his feelings about the value of the life of the artist as opposed to

  • Buddh Gaya (India)

    Bodh Gaya, town, southwestern Bihar state, northeastern India. It is situated west of the Phalgu River, a tributary of the Ganges (Ganga) River. Bodh Gaya contains one of the holiest of Buddhist sites: the location where, under the sacred pipal, or Bo tree, Gautama Buddha (Prince Siddhartha)

  • Buddh Gayā, Temple of (temple, Bodh Gaya, India)

    Mahabodhi Temple, one of the holiest sites of Buddhism, marking the spot of the Buddha’s Enlightenment (Bodhi). It is located in Bodh Gaya (in central Bihar state, northeastern India) on the banks of the Niranjana River. The Mahabodhi Temple is one of the oldest brick temples in India. The original

  • buddha (Buddhist title)

    Buddhism: The life of the Buddha: In ancient India the title buddha referred to an enlightened being who has awakened from the sleep of ignorance and achieved freedom from suffering. According to the various traditions of Buddhism, buddhas have existed in the past and will exist in the future. Some Buddhists believe that there is only…

  • Buddha (founder of Buddhism)

    Buddha, (Sanskrit: “Awakened One”) the founder of Buddhism, one of the major religions and philosophical systems of southern and eastern Asia and of the world. Buddha is one of the many epithets of a teacher who lived in northern India sometime between the 6th and the 4th century before the Common

  • buddha field (Buddhist belief)

    Sukhavati, (Sanskrit: literally “Land of Bliss” or “Pure Land of Bliss”; often translated as “Pure Land”) in the Pure Land schools of Mahayana Buddhism, the Western Paradise of the Buddha Amitabha, described in the Pure Land sutras (Sukhavati-vyuha-sutras). According to followers of the Pure Land

  • Buddha of Bay Street (Canadian financier)

    Andrew Sarlos, Hungarian-born Canadian investor and philanthropist who both made and lost fortunes and came to be known as the "Buddha of Bay Street" because of his expertise and daring in deal making and playing the stock market; he shared his knowledge and his money, and he was awarded the Order

  • Buddha of Infinite Light (Buddhism)

    Amitabha, (Sanskrit: “Infinite Light”) in Mahayana Buddhism, and particularly in the so-called Pure Land sects, the great saviour buddha. As related in the Sukhavati-vyuha-sutras (the fundamental scriptures of the Pure Land sects), many ages ago a monk named Dharmakara made a number of vows, the

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