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  • Buddha Purnima (Buddhist festival)

    Uttarakhand: Festivals: Within the Buddhist tradition, Buddha Purnima is a major festival commemorating the birth, enlightenment, and death of the Buddha; it usually takes place in April or May. Mahavira Jayanti, the principal Jain celebration, honours the birth of Mahavira, the great reformer of the Jain monastic community. The birthday of…

  • Buddha’s birthday (Buddhist holiday)

    Buddhism: Anniversaries: …events of the Buddha’s life—his birth, enlightenment, and entrance into final nirvana (parinibbana)—are commemorated in all Buddhist countries but not everywhere on the same day. In Theravada countries the three events are all observed together on Vesak, the full moon day of the sixth lunar month (Vesakha), which usually occurs…

  • Buddha’s hand citron (plant and fruit)

    pottery: China: The “Buddha’s hand” citron, a fruit with fingerlike appendages, is a symbol of wealth, and each month and season is represented by a flower or plant. The bagua, consisting of eight sets of three lines, broken and unbroken in different combinations, represent natural forces. They are…

  • Buddhacarita (poetry by Ashvaghosa)

    Buddhacarita, poetic narrative of the life of the Buddha by the Sanskrit poet Ashvaghosha, one of the finest examples of Buddhist literature. The author, who lived in northern India in the 1st–2nd century ce, created a loving account of the Buddha’s life and teachings, one that—in contrast to other

  • Buddhacarita-kavya-sutra (poetry by Ashvaghosa)

    Buddhacarita, poetic narrative of the life of the Buddha by the Sanskrit poet Ashvaghosha, one of the finest examples of Buddhist literature. The author, who lived in northern India in the 1st–2nd century ce, created a loving account of the Buddha’s life and teachings, one that—in contrast to other

  • Buddhacharita (poetry by Ashvaghosa)

    Buddhacarita, poetic narrative of the life of the Buddha by the Sanskrit poet Ashvaghosha, one of the finest examples of Buddhist literature. The author, who lived in northern India in the 1st–2nd century ce, created a loving account of the Buddha’s life and teachings, one that—in contrast to other

  • Buddhadatta (Buddhist scholar)

    Abhidhammavatara: …by the poet and scholar Buddhadatta in the region of the Kaveri River, in southern India.

  • Buddhaghosa (Buddhist scholar)

    Buddhaghosa, Indian Buddhist scholar, famous for his Visuddhimagga (Pali: “The Path of Purification”), a summary of current Buddhist doctrines. Scholars do not agree about Buddhaghosa’s birthplace, but it is known that he traveled to Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka, where he discovered many Sinhalese

  • Buddhagho?a (Buddhist scholar)

    Buddhaghosa, Indian Buddhist scholar, famous for his Visuddhimagga (Pali: “The Path of Purification”), a summary of current Buddhist doctrines. Scholars do not agree about Buddhaghosa’s birthplace, but it is known that he traveled to Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka, where he discovered many Sinhalese

  • Buddhaghosha (Buddhist scholar)

    Buddhaghosa, Indian Buddhist scholar, famous for his Visuddhimagga (Pali: “The Path of Purification”), a summary of current Buddhist doctrines. Scholars do not agree about Buddhaghosa’s birthplace, but it is known that he traveled to Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka, where he discovered many Sinhalese

  • Buddhahood (religion)

    Nirvana, (Sanskrit: “becoming extinguished” or “blowing out”) in Indian religious thought, the supreme goal of certain meditation disciplines. Although it occurs in the literatures of a number of ancient Indian traditions, the Sanskrit term nirvana is most commonly associated with Buddhism, in

  • Buddhajayantī (Buddhist festival)

    ceremonial object: Lighting devices: …Gaya, in India, for the Buddhajayanti (the commemoration of the Buddha’s 2,500th birthday) in 1958—are composed of thousands of small brass lamps in the form of footed cups filled with ghee, in which a cotton wick is soaked.

  • Buddhaketi, Smim Htaw (king of Pegu)

    Binnya Dala: In 1747 Binnya Dala succeeded Smim Htaw Buddhaketi, who had seven years earlier been set up as king of the Mon in the new capital of Pegu after their successful revolt against the Burmans. Binnya Dala, who was his predecessor’s chief minister and a more capable military leader, made numerous…

  • Buddhapālita (Buddhist scholar)

    Buddhapālita, the founder of the Prāsa?gika school of Buddhism, mainly distinguished by its method of argumentation, similar to the Socratic dialogue. Buddhapālita wrote one of the early commentaries on the Akutobhaya (“The Safe One”) by the famous monk Nāgārjuna. Today, however, both the

  • Buddhavachana (Buddhist literature)

    Buddhism: The cultural context: …Vajrayana traditions have accepted as Buddhavachana (“the word of the Buddha”) many other sutras and tantras, along with extensive treatises and commentaries based on these texts. Consequently, from the first sermon of the Buddha at Sarnath to the most recent derivations, there is an indisputable continuity—a development or metamorphosis around…

  • Buddhavamsa (Buddhist literature)

    Khuddaka Nikaya: Buddhavamsa (“History of the Buddhas”), a narrative in verse in which the Buddha tells of the lives of the preceding 24 buddhas. (Earlier works know of only the last six of these.) The Buddha himself, in former lives, knew and worshiped each of them, and…

  • Buddhāvata?saka-sūtra (Buddhist text)

    Avatamsaka-sutra, voluminous Mahayana Buddhist text that some consider the most sublime revelation of the Buddha’s teachings. Scholars value the text for its revelations about the evolution of thought from early Buddhism to fully developed Mahayana. The sutra speaks of the deeds of the Buddha and

  • buddhayāna (Buddhism)

    Buddhism: Tiantai/Tendai: …of the one way, the buddhayana, and the aim for all is to become a buddha.

  • buddhi (Indian philosophy)

    Indian philosophy: The nature, origin, and structure of the world (prakriti): …follows: prakriti → mahat or buddhi (intelligence) → ahamkara (ego-sense) → manas (mind) → five tanmatras (the sense data: colour, sound, smell, touch, and taste) → five sense organs → five organs of action (tongue, hands, feet, organs of evacuation and of reproduction) → five gross elements (ether, air, light,…

  • Buddhism (religion)

    Buddhism, religion and philosophy that developed from the teachings of the Buddha (Sanskrit: “Awakened One”), a teacher who lived in northern India between the mid-6th and mid-4th centuries bce (before the Common Era). Spreading from India to Central and Southeast Asia, China, Korea, and Japan,

  • Buddhist Bible, A (work by Goddard)

    Jack Kerouac: Sketching, poetry, and Buddhism: …second edition (1938) of his A Buddhist Bible. Kerouac began his genre-defying Some of the Dharma in 1953 as reader’s notes on A Buddhist Bible, and the work grew into a massive compilation of spiritual material, meditations, prayers, haiku, and musings on the teaching of Buddha. In an attempt to…

  • Buddhist council (Buddhism)

    Buddhist council, any of several assemblies convened in the centuries following the death of the Buddha to recite approved texts of scriptures and to settle doctrinal disputes. Little reliable evidence of the historicity of the councils exists, and not all councils are recognized by all the

  • Buddhist Council, Sixth

    Sixth Buddhist Council, assembly convened in Rangoon, Burma (now Yangon, Myanmar), from May 1954 to May 1956 to commemorate the 2,500th anniversary (according to the chronology of the Theravada branch of Buddhism) of the Buddha’s parinibbana (entrance into final nibbana [Sanskrit: “nirvana”]). The

  • Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit language

    Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit language, Middle Indo-Aryan literary language, a Prākrit dialect heavily infiltrated with Sanskrit, in which the texts of the northern Buddhist scriptures were written. It was developed before the Christian era; its Sanskrit influence originated in the Mahāyāna Buddhists’

  • Buddhist Institute (Cambodian institution)

    Khmer literature: French influence: …were involved in establishing the Buddhist Institute as a centre for the preservation and development of Cambodian national culture. The Buddhist Institute quickly became the main publisher in the country, bringing to readers works that had, until then, often been available only on palm-leaf manuscripts; its journal, Kambujasuriya, played a…

  • Buddhist Liberal Democratic Party (political party, Cambodia)

    Cambodia: Vietnamese intervention: …National Liberation Front (renamed the Buddhist Liberal Democratic Party in 1992) under the leadership of Son Sann (a former prime minister). Those groups were supported financially by foreign powers, including the United States, who were eager to oppose Vietnam. Thousands of Cambodians continued to enter Thailand in the 1980s, and…

  • Buddhist Logic (work by Shcherbatskoy)

    Fyodor Ippolitovich Shcherbatskoy: …important work was the influential Buddhist Logic, 2 vol. (1930–32).

  • Buddhist meditation

    Buddhist meditation, the practice of mental concentration leading ultimately through a succession of stages to the final goal of spiritual freedom, nirvana. Meditation occupies a central place in Buddhism and, in its highest stages, combines the discipline of progressively increased introversion

  • budding (horticulture)

    budding: …cnidarian species) regularly reproduce by budding.

  • budding (reproduction)

    Budding, in biology, a form of asexual reproduction in which a new individual develops from some generative anatomical point of the parent organism. In some species buds may be produced from almost any point of the body, but in many cases budding is restricted to specialized areas. The initial

  • budding bacteria (biology)

    Budding bacterium, any of a group of bacteria that reproduce by budding. Each bacterium divides following unequal cell growth; the mother cell is retained, and a new daughter cell is formed. (Binary fission, in which two equal daughter cells are produced from the unilateral growth and division of

  • budding bacterium (biology)

    Budding bacterium, any of a group of bacteria that reproduce by budding. Each bacterium divides following unequal cell growth; the mother cell is retained, and a new daughter cell is formed. (Binary fission, in which two equal daughter cells are produced from the unilateral growth and division of

  • Buddleja (plant)

    Butterfly bush, (genus Buddleja), any of more than 100 species of plants constituting the genus Buddleja (family Scrophulariaceae), native to tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Primarily trees or shrubs, most species of Buddleja have hairy leaves and clusters of purple, pink, white,

  • Buddleja davidii (plant)

    lilac: …family Rhamnaceae are known as summer lilacs, a term also applied to the butterfly bush of the family Buddlejaceae.

  • Buddy Holly (song by Cuomo)

    Spike Jonze: …1994 video for Weezer’s “Buddy Holly,” which features the band in 1950s attire performing as if in a scene from the American television show Happy Days.

  • Buddy Holly Story, The (film by Rash [1978])
  • Buddy, Buddy (film by Wilder [1981])

    Billy Wilder: Last films: …time in his final film, Buddy Buddy (1981), adapted by Wilder and Diamond from the French farce L’Emmerdeur (A Pain in the A—; 1973).

  • Bude Canal (canal, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom)

    canals and inland waterways: Technological development: …Hobbacott Down plane of the Bude Canal in Cornwall. Vertical lifts counterweighted by water were also used; a set of seven was built on the Grand Western Canal; while at Anderton in Cheshire a lift was later converted to electrical power and was still operating in the 20th century. The…

  • Budé, Guillaume (French scholar)

    Guillaume Budé, French scholar who brought about a revival of classical studies in France and helped to found the Collège de France, Paris; he was also a diplomat and royal librarian. Educated in Paris and Orléans, he became especially proficient in Greek, learning philosophy, law, theology, and

  • Büdel, Herbert Louis (German geologist)

    valley: Types of valleys: …climatic geomorphologists Herbert Louis and Julius Büdel. In areas of rapid uplift and intense fluvial action such as tropical mountains, Kerbtal (German for “notched valley”) forms occur. These are characterized by steep, knife-edge ridges and valley slopes meeting in a V-shape. Where slopes are steep but a broad valley floor…

  • Büdel, Julius (German geographer)

    morphogenetic region: …classification was first proposed by Julius Büdel, the German geographer, in 1945. The morphogenetic concept asserts that, under a particular climatic regime, certain geomorphic processes will predominate and produce a characteristic topographic expression. Proponents of the concept say that climatic controls outweigh rock type as a landform factor because the…

  • Budenholzer, Mike (American basketball coach)

    Milwaukee Bucks: Milwaukee hired Mike Budenholzer, a defensive-minded coach, during the off-season, and he quickly transformed the Bucks into one of the best-coached teams in the NBA, leading them to the best record in the league in 2018–19. During the playoffs the team advanced to the conference finals for…

  • Budenny, Semyon Mikhaylovich (Soviet general and politician)

    Semyon Mikhaylovich Budenny, Red Army officer who played a prominent role in the Russian Civil War (1918–20) and later became a marshal of the Soviet Union. Having come from a poor peasant family, Budenny began his military career in the Imperial Russian Army in 1903 in East Asia. Later he took

  • Buderim (Queensland, Australia)

    Buderim, town, southeastern Queensland, Australia. It is situated on the Sunshine Coast on a volcanic plateau, about 62 miles (100 km) north of Brisbane by the Bruce Highway. The area was inhabited by Aboriginal Kabbi Kabbi (Gubbi Gubbi) people when first contact with Europeans was made in the

  • Budetlyanstvo (art movement)

    Cubo-Futurism, Russian avant-garde art movement in the 1910s that emerged as an offshoot of European Futurism and Cubism. The term Cubo-Futurism was first used in 1913 by an art critic regarding the poetry of members of the Hylaea group (Russian Gileya), which included such writers as Velimir

  • Budge Budge (India)

    Budge Budge, town, southeastern West Bengal state, northeastern India, on the left bank of the Hugli (Hooghly) River. Connected by road and rail with Alipore and Kolkata (Calcutta), it is a jute- and cotton-milling centre and serves as the oil depot for Kolkata. A major boot and shoe factory is

  • Budge, Don (American tennis player)

    Don Budge, American tennis player who was the first to win the Grand Slam—i.e., the four major singles championships, Australia, France, Great Britain, and the United States—in one year (1938). Budge was active in sports as a boy but was not particularly interested in tennis. In the first

  • Budge, John Donald (American tennis player)

    Don Budge, American tennis player who was the first to win the Grand Slam—i.e., the four major singles championships, Australia, France, Great Britain, and the United States—in one year (1938). Budge was active in sports as a boy but was not particularly interested in tennis. In the first

  • Budge, Sir Ernest Alfred Thompson Wallis (British curator)

    Sir Wallis Budge, curator (1894–1924) of Egyptian and Assyrian antiquities at the British Museum, London, for which he collected vast numbers of cuneiform tablets, Egyptian papyri, and Greek, Coptic, Arabic, Syriac, and Ethiopic manuscripts. He entered the museum’s service in 1883 and subsequently

  • Budge, Sir Wallis (British curator)

    Sir Wallis Budge, curator (1894–1924) of Egyptian and Assyrian antiquities at the British Museum, London, for which he collected vast numbers of cuneiform tablets, Egyptian papyri, and Greek, Coptic, Arabic, Syriac, and Ethiopic manuscripts. He entered the museum’s service in 1883 and subsequently

  • Budgell, Eustace (English author)

    Eustace Budgell, English writer who, apart from Joseph Addison and Richard Steele, was the principal contributor to The Spectator. Thirty-seven papers (those marked with an X) are attributed to him. In 1710 Addison, his cousin, then secretary to the lord lieutenant of Ireland, offered Budgell a

  • budgerigar (bird)

    Budgerigar, popular species of parakeet

  • budget (economics)

    accounting: Budgetary planning: The first major component of internal accounting systems for management’s use is the company’s system for establishing budgetary plans and setting performance standards. The setting of performance standards (see below Performance reporting) also requires a system for measuring actual results and

  • Budget Control Act (United States [2011])

    Barack Obama: The 2012 election: …nonmilitary programs required by the Budget Control Act of 2011, which came to be known as sequestration. Although the president and the speaker of the House were unable to reach a workable compromise, Biden and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell cobbled together a last-minute agreement that passed the Senate 89–8…

  • budget policy

    Government budget, forecast by a government of its expenditures and revenues for a specific period of time. In national finance, the period covered by a budget is usually a year, known as a financial or fiscal year, which may or may not correspond with the calendar year. The word budget is derived

  • budgetary autonomy (government)

    Budgetary autonomy, degree of independence enjoyed by a public entity in the management of its finances. Most commonly, the budget refers to the central government as a consolidated institution in which the executive, legislative, and judicial branches follow accepted procedures to manage income

  • budgetary planning (economics)

    accounting: Budgetary planning: The first major component of internal accounting systems for management’s use is the company’s system for establishing budgetary plans and setting performance standards. The setting of performance standards (see below Performance reporting) also requires a system for measuring actual results and

  • budgetary planning

    Government budget, forecast by a government of its expenditures and revenues for a specific period of time. In national finance, the period covered by a budget is usually a year, known as a financial or fiscal year, which may or may not correspond with the calendar year. The word budget is derived

  • Budi Utomo (Indonesian political organization)

    Budi Utomo, (Indonesian: “Noble Endeavour”) the first Indonesian nationalist organization. It was founded on May 20, 1908, a day now designated by the Indonesian government as the Day of National Awakening. Budi Utomo originated through the efforts of Mas Wahidin Sudirohusodo (1852–1917), a

  • Budissin (Germany)

    Bautzen, city, Saxony Land (state), eastern Germany. It lies in the Oberlausitz (Upper Lusatia) region, on a granite elevation above the Spree River. Bautzen was originally the Slavic settlement of Budissin (Budy?in), and the Peace of Bautzen was concluded there in 1018 between the German king

  • Budker, Gersh Itskovich (Soviet physicist)

    Gersh Itskovich Budker, Soviet physicist who developed new methods of particle acceleration in high-energy physics. Budker graduated from Moscow State University in 1941 and served in air defense during World War II. In 1945 he started working in Laboratory #2 (subsequently renamed the Kurchatov

  • Budny, Szymon (Polish scholar)

    biblical literature: Slavic versions: …was prepared by the Hebraist Szymon Budny (Nieswicz, 1570–82), and another revision, primarily executed by Daniel Miko?ajewski and Jan Turnowski (the “Danzig Bible”) in 1632, became the official version of all Evangelical churches in Poland. This edition was burned by the Catholics, and it subsequently had to be printed in…

  • Budong (Buddha)

    Fudō Myō-ō, in Japanese Buddhist mythology, the fierce form of the Buddha Vairocana, and the most important of the Myō-ō class of deities. See

  • Budorcas taxicolor (mammal)

    Takin, (Budorcas taxicolor), heavily built, hoofed mammal of Southeast Asia, belonging to the family Bovidae (order Artiodactyla). The takin lives singly or in small herds in the mountains, usually below the timberline. Robust and short-legged, it can move about quickly and easily over difficult

  • Budorcas taxicolor bedfordi (mammal)

    takin: The golden takin (B. t. bedfordi) inhabits the Qin Mountains in south Shaanxi province, China; its coat is golden in colour, and it may have been the “golden fleece” of Greek mythology. The Mishmi takin (B. t. taxicolor) lives in the border area between Tibet, Myanmar,…

  • Budorcas taxicolor taxicolor (mammal)

    takin: The Mishmi takin (B. t. taxicolor) lives in the border area between Tibet, Myanmar, Bhutan, and India. The Sichuan takin (B. t. tibetana) lives in eastern Tibet and in the Sichuan, Gansu, and Yunnan provinces of China. White’s, or Bhutan, takin (B. t. whitei) inhabits Bhutan,…

  • Budovec, Václav (Bohemian religious leader)

    Czechoslovak history: The Counter-Reformation and Protestant rebellion: …under the leadership of Lord Václav Budovec, a prominent member of the Unitas Fratrum. Meanwhile, dissatisfaction with Rudolf’s regime was growing rapidly in other Habsburg domains as well. His younger brother, Matthias, made contacts with the Austrian and Hungarian opposition; the Moravian estates, headed by Karel the Elder of ?erotín,…

  • Budu (people)

    Ituri Forest: The Pygmies: …Sua are associated with the Budu (Babudu) on the western edge of the Ituri, near Wamba; and the Aka, of whom few remain, are found with the Mangbetu in the northwest. The Efe have the broadest distribution, extending across the northern and eastern portions of the Ituri, and are associated…

  • Budukh language

    Caucasian languages: The Lezgian languages: …than 1,000); Kryz (about 6,000); Budukh (about 2,000); Khinalug (about 1,500); and Udi (about 3,700). The majority of Lezgi languages are spoken in southern Dagestan, but some of them (Kryz, Budukh, Khinalug, Udi) are spoken chiefly in Azerbaijan; and one village of Udi speakers is located in Georgia. It is…

  • Buduma (people)

    Lake Chad: Settlement history: The Yedina (Buduma) established themselves among the inaccessible islands and along the marshy northern shore of Lake Chad, and the Kuri did the same in inaccessible areas along the eastern margin of the lake.

  • Budva (Montenegro)

    Montenegro: The arts: The old town of Budva was of particular importance until it was destroyed in an earthquake in 1979; since rebuilt, it now serves as a beach resort and amusement park.

  • Budweis (Czech Republic)

    ?eské Budějovice, city, southern Czech Republic. It is a regional cultural and industrial centre lying amid lakes at the confluence of the Vltava (Moldau) and Mal?e rivers. Founded and fortified in 1265 by the Bohemian king Otakar II, the city is rich in medieval architecture and has one of the

  • Budweiser (American beer)

    August Anheuser Busch, Jr.: …with the beer wagons of Budweiser, Anheuser-Busch’s main brand. Grant’s Farm, the Busch family estate near St. Louis, was converted into a 281-acre (114-hectare) historical site and wildlife preserve.

  • Budy?in (Germany)

    Bautzen, city, Saxony Land (state), eastern Germany. It lies in the Oberlausitz (Upper Lusatia) region, on a granite elevation above the Spree River. Bautzen was originally the Slavic settlement of Budissin (Budy?in), and the Peace of Bautzen was concluded there in 1018 between the German king

  • Budytes flavus (bird)

    migration: Origin and evolution of migration: The yellow wagtail (Motacilla flava) and the wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) settled in Alaska; they migrate annually into other parts of the Western Hemisphere but spend their winters in the warm regions of southeastern Asia and even Africa, probably following the migratory route of their ancestors. A…

  • Budzhak Plain (plain, Moldova)

    Moldova: Relief: In the south, the extensive Bugeac Plain is broken by numerous ravines and gullies, while, in the east, left-bank Moldova includes spurs of the Volyn-Podolsk Upland cut into by tributaries of the Dniester.

  • Buea (Cameroon)

    Buea, town located in southwestern Cameroon. It is situated at an elevation of 3,000 feet (900 metres) above sea level and is located on the southeast slope of Mount Cameroon. Buea was the capital of German Kamerun from 1902 to 1916. Several historic sites of the early mission and colonial periods

  • Buell, Don Carlos (United States general)

    Don Carlos Buell, Union general in the American Civil War. Buell graduated from West Point in 1841 and was a company officer of infantry in the Seminole War of 1841–42 and the Mexican War. From 1848 to 1861 he acted chiefly as assistant adjutant general. On the outbreak of the Civil War he was

  • Buell, Sarah Josepha (American author)

    Sarah Josepha Hale, American writer who, as the first female editor of a magazine, shaped many of the attitudes and thoughts of women of her period. Sarah Josepha Buell married David Hale in 1813, and with him she had five children. Left in financial straits by her husband’s death in 1822, she

  • Buen Retiro Palace (palace, Madrid, Spain)

    Spain: The Golden Age in architecture and painting: …in the Baroque style, the Buen Retiro Palace just outside Madrid, has not survived (for a discussion of the fine porcelain manufactured there later, see Buen Retiro ware). Built in the 1630s, in the middle of the Thirty Years’ War, at a time when Spain’s military fortunes were beginning to…

  • Buen Retiro ware

    Buen Retiro ware, porcelain manufactured at the royal residence of Buen Retiro, outside Madrid, from 1760 to about 1808, by Capodimonte potters. When Charles III of Naples, who had founded Capodimonte in 1743, succeeded to the Spanish throne as Charles III, he removed his own potters, molds,

  • Buen Retiro, Parque del (park, Madrid, Spain)

    Retiro Park, the main park of Madrid, Spain. Originally called the Parque del Buen Retiro, or “Pleasant Retreat Park,” it now covers approximately 350 acres (142 hectares). It was planned in the 1550s and redesigned on the instructions of Gaspar de Guzmán, conde-duque de Olivares (chief minister to

  • Buena Park (California, United States)

    Buena Park, city, Orange county, southern California, U.S. The site known as Buena Plaza was originally part of the Rancho Los Coyotes. The city was laid out and named Buena Park in 1887 by James A. Whitaker, a Chicago grocer who, intending to build a cattle ranch, bought nearly 700 acres (280

  • Buena Vista (Illinois, United States)

    DeKalb, city, DeKalb county, north-central Illinois, U.S. It lies on the south branch of the Kishwaukee River, about 60 miles (100 km) west of Chicago. Founded in 1837, it was called Buena Vista and then Huntley’s Grove (for city founder Russell Huntley of New York) until the 1850s, when it was

  • Buena Vista Social Club (album)

    Ry Cooder: …a week in Havana recording The Buena Vista Social Club (1997).

  • Buena Vista Social Club (film by Wenders)

    Cuba: Music and dance: …as well as the subsequent film documentary (1999), introduced listeners throughout the world to those genres and revived the careers of such once-popular artists as Ibrahim Ferrer, Rubén González, and Omara Portuondo. Classical music is of relatively minor importance in Cuba, but there is a National Symphony Orchestra that also…

  • Buena Vista, Battle of (Mexican-American War [1847])

    Battle of Buena Vista, (Feb. 22–23, 1847), battle fought near Monterrey, Mex., in the Mexican-American War (1846–48), the war between the United States and Mexico. A U.S. army of about 5,000 men under General Zachary Taylor had invaded northeastern Mexico, taking Monterrey and Saltillo. General

  • buenas conciencias, Las (work by Fuentes)

    Carlos Fuentes: …novel Las buenas conciencias (1959; The Good Conscience) emphasizes the moral compromises that mark the transition from a rural economy to a complex middle-class urban one. Aura (1962) is a novella that successfully fuses reality and fantasy. La muerte de Artemio Cruz (1962; The Death of Artemio Cruz), which presents…

  • Buenaventura (Colombia)

    Buenaventura, port of Valle del Cauca departamento, western Colombia, on Cascajal Island, where the Dagua River reaches Buenaventura Bay. Although founded in 1540, it remained relatively unimportant because of the warm, humid climate and poor transportation. In the 1930s inland connections were

  • Buenaventura (lake, Utah, United States)

    Great Salt Lake, lake in northern Utah, U.S., the largest inland body of salt water in the Western Hemisphere and one of the most saline inland bodies of water in the world. The lake is fed by the Bear, Weber, and Jordan rivers and has no outlet. The lake has fluctuated greatly in size, depending

  • Buenaventura, Fort (fort, Ogden, Utah, United States)

    Ogden: …as a settlement developed around Fort Buenaventura, a log stockade with an irrigated garden built in 1845 by Miles M. Goodyear and purchased by the Mormons in 1847; Goodyear’s cabin is preserved. First known as Brown’s Fort, it was laid out in 1850 by the Mormon leader Brigham Young and…

  • Buendía family (fictional characters)

    Buendía family, fictional founders of Macondo, the South American town that is the setting of the novel One Hundred Years of Solitude (originally in Spanish, 1967) by Gabriel García Márquez. Seven generations later they are also the last inhabitants of the isolated village. Many years before the

  • Buen? River (river, Balkan peninsula)

    Lake Scutari: The Bojana River flows out at the lake’s southern end to the Adriatic. Around the lakeshore are many small villages that are noted for their old monasteries and fortresses. The Albanian town of Shkod?r (Skadar) is at the southern end of the lake.

  • Bueno, Maria (Brazilian tennis player)

    Maria Bueno, Brazilian tennis player who won 19 Grand Slam titles, 7 of which were in singles events. She had particular success at Wimbledon and United States championships (the latter held at Forest Hills, New York), where she won a combined 16 titles. Bueno began playing tennis at about the age

  • Bueno, Maria Ester Audion (Brazilian tennis player)

    Maria Bueno, Brazilian tennis player who won 19 Grand Slam titles, 7 of which were in singles events. She had particular success at Wimbledon and United States championships (the latter held at Forest Hills, New York), where she won a combined 16 titles. Bueno began playing tennis at about the age

  • Bueno, Rodrigo Alejandro (Argentine singer)

    Rodrigo Alejandro Bueno, Argentine singer (born May 24, 1973, Rosario, Arg.—died June 24, 2000, Berazategui, near Buenos Aires, Arg.), was known simply as “Rodrigo” or popularly as “El Potro” (“the Stallion”); his popularity in cuarteto, a form of music popular with working-class and poor A

  • Buenoa (insect genus)

    backswimmer: The genus Buenoa, which usually floats or swims some distance below the surface, appears reddish or pinkish in colour because of the pigment (hemoglobin) contained in certain cells.

  • Buenos Aires (national capital, Argentina)

    Buenos Aires, city and capital of Argentina. The city is coextensive with the Federal District (Distrito Federal) and is situated on the shore of the Río de la Plata, 150 miles (240 km) from the Atlantic Ocean. Buenos Aires is one of Latin America’s most important ports and most populous cities, as

  • Buenos Aires (province, Argentina)

    Buenos Aires, provincia (province), eastern Argentina. It lies south of the Paraná River and southeast of the Río de la Plata (which forms the border with Uruguay) and extends westward from the Atlantic Ocean to include the major part of the humid Argentine Pampas, a vast grass-covered plain. The

  • Buenos Aires Affair, The (work by Puig)

    Manuel Puig: The Buenos Aires Affair (1973) is a detective novel describing the psychopathic behaviour of characters who are sexually repressed. Kiss of the Spider Woman is a novel told in dialogues between a middle-aged homosexual and a younger revolutionary who are detained in the same jail…

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