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  • Büsching, Anton Friedrich (German geographer)

    Anton Friedrich Büsching, German geographer and educator who helped develop a scientific basis for the study of geography by stressing statistics rather than descriptive writing. Büsching was director (1766–93) of the Gymnasium zum Grauen Kloster in Berlin, where he made significant contributions

  • Buschmann, Christian Friedrich Ludwig (German inventor)

    accordion: Many credit C. Friedrich L. Buschmann, whose Hand?oline was patented in Berlin in 1822, as the inventor of the accordion, while others give the distinction to Cyril Demian of Vienna, who patented his Accordion in 1829, thus coining the name. A modification of the Hand?oline, Demian’s invention…

  • Buschulte, Wilhelm (German artist)

    stained glass: 20th century: Matthew’s Church (1966–67) in Leverkusen; Wilhelm Buschulte’s unusually rich colour harmonies in his cycle of nave windows for the Cathedral of Essen (1964) and the choir of the Church of SS. Peter and Paul (1967) in Wegsburg, near M?nchengladbach; and Johannes Schreiter’s almost monochromatic Abstract Expressionist windows for the Church…

  • Busemann, Adolf (engineer)

    biplane: In the mid-1930s Adolf Busemann proposed the supersonic biplane, having a quite narrow gap (space between wings) in which expansion waves and shock waves would interact to reduce drag (the “shape drag” due to the thickness of the airfoil sections). A biplane having one much smaller wing (usually…

  • Busembaum, Hermann (German theologian)

    Hermann Busenbaum, Jesuit moral theologian. Busenbaum entered the Society of Jesus in 1619 and was later appointed rector of the colleges of Hildesheim and Münster. His celebrated book Medulla Theologiae Moralis, Facili ac Perspicua Methodo Resolvens Casus Conscientiae ex Variis Probatisque

  • Busenbaum, Hermann (German theologian)

    Hermann Busenbaum, Jesuit moral theologian. Busenbaum entered the Society of Jesus in 1619 and was later appointed rector of the colleges of Hildesheim and Münster. His celebrated book Medulla Theologiae Moralis, Facili ac Perspicua Methodo Resolvens Casus Conscientiae ex Variis Probatisque

  • Busenello, Gian Francesco (Italian poet)

    opera: Monteverdi: Gian Francesco Busenello’s libretto brought a new note of realism into opera, particularly in the subtle portrayal of human character, which Monteverdi translated into music with an extraordinary nuance and flexibility of style, depicting a wide range of human emotions. In a prologue and three…

  • Busey, Brooke (American writer and producer)
  • Bush (album by Snoop Dogg)

    Snoop Dogg: …the funk and R&amp;B release Bush (2015), produced by Pharrell Williams. Snoop returned to rap for Neva Left (2017) and followed up with a double album of gospel music, Snoop Dogg Presents Bible of Love (2018).

  • bush (plant)

    shrub: …it may be called a bush. Intermediate between shrubs and trees are arborescences, or treelike shrubs, from 3 to 6 m tall. Trees are generally defined as woody plants more than 6 m tall, having a dominant stem, or trunk, and a definite crown shape. These distinctions are not reliable,…

  • Bush at War (work by Woodward)

    Bob Woodward: Bush at War (2002) profiled the personalities who shaped the American military response in Afghanistan, while Plan of Attack (2004) covered the period leading up to the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. (See Iraq War.) State of Denial (2006), a departure from the generally complimentary tone…

  • bush baby (primate)

    Bush baby, (family Galagidae), any of several species of small attractive arboreal primates native to sub-Saharan Africa. They are gray, brown, or reddish to yellowish brown, with large eyes and ears, long hind legs, soft, woolly fur, and long tails. Bush babies are also characterized by the long

  • Bush Ballads and Galloping Rhymes (poetry by Gordon)

    Australian literature: The century after settlement: “The Sick Stockrider” from his Bush Ballads and Galloping Rhymes (1870) was a general favourite, much admired and much recited. It conveyed a sense of comradeship, mapped a world by a bushman’s kind of detail, and exhibited a stoic sentimentalism that was exactly to colonial taste. Henry Kendall, a poet…

  • bush bear (primate)

    Potto, (Perodicticus potto), slow-moving tropical African primate. The potto is a nocturnal tree dweller found in rainforests from Sierra Leone eastward to Uganda. It has a strong grip and clings tightly to branches, but when necessary it can also move quickly through the branches with a smooth

  • bush bluestem (plant)

    bluestem: virginicus), and bushy beardgrass, or bush bluestem (A. glomeratus), are coarse grasses, unsuitable for forage, that grow in poor soils in eastern and southern North America.

  • bush chinquapin (plant)
  • bush clover (plant)

    Lespedeza, (genus Lespedeza), genus of about 40 species of plants in the pea family (Fabaceae). All lespedezas are adapted to warm humid climates and are native to North America, tropical and East Asia, and Australia. A number of species are useful as forage and green manure crops, and some are

  • bush coleus (plant)

    coleus: Bush coleus, or blue Plectranthus (P. thyrsoideus, formerly C. thyrsoideus), from Central Africa, reaches a height of one metre and produces sprays of bright blue flowers. The leaves have distinctive venation and are often green with white borders.

  • bush cricket (insect)

    Katydid, (family Tettigoniidae), any of about 6,000 predominantly nocturnal insects that are related to crickets (the two groups are in the suborder Ensifera, order Orthoptera) and are noted for their mating calls. Katydids are also known for their large hind legs and extremely long threadlike

  • bush dog (canine)

    Bush dog, (Speothos venaticus), small, stocky carnivore of the family Canidae found in the forests and savannas of Central and South America. The bush dog is a rare species, and its numbers are declining as a result of the destruction of its natural habitat. The bush dog has short legs and long

  • bush elephant (mammal)

    proboscidean: …related to one another than African elephants (genus Loxodonta) are to either. Molecular studies have corroborated the morphological studies that have long suggested this. A 2010 study using mitochondrial DNA suggests that African elephants diverged from the Asian elephant-mammoth line between 4.2 million and 9 million years ago and then…

  • bush germander (plant)

    germander: Bush germander (T. fruticans), a shrub growing to 1.5 metres (5 feet), has scattered pale blue to lilac flowers and lance-shaped leaves. It is native on hillsides of coastal Europe.

  • bush honeysuckle (plant)

    Bush honeysuckle, (genus Diervilla), genus of three species of low shrubs belonging to the family Caprifoliaceae (formerly Diervillaceae), native to eastern North America. They are frequently confused with the closely related Tatarian honeysuckle (Lonicera tatarica) and other cultivated members of

  • bush hyrax (mammal)

    hyrax: The bush hyraxes (Heterohyrax) and the rock hyrax (Procavia capensis) are terrestrial animals that live in groups among rocks and are active by day. The tree hyraxes (Dendrohyrax) are arboreal, solitary, and nocturnal. All are primarily vegetarian.

  • bush morning glory (plant)

    Ipomoea: Major species: Bush morning glory (I. leptophylla), with tuberous roots and erect branches, grows up to about 120 cm (47 inches) tall and bears 7.5-cm (3-inch) purple or pink flowers. It is native to central North America.

  • bush muhly (plant)

    muhly: Bush muhly (Muhlenbergia porteri) is so palatable to browsing animals that it is rarely found where livestock has access to it. Several species, including pink muhlygrass, or hairawn muhly (M. capillaris), are grown as garden ornamentals.

  • bush okra (plant)

    Tossa jute, (Corchorus olitorius), annual herbaceous plant in the mallow family (Malvaceae), cultivated as a source of jute fibre and for its edible leaves. Tossa jute is grown throughout tropical Asia and Africa, and its mucilaginous leaves and young stems are commonly eaten as a vegetable similar

  • bush pig (mammal)

    Bush pig, (Potamochoerus porcus), African member of the family Suidae (order Artiodactyla), resembling a hog but with long body hair and tassels of hair on its ears. The bush pig lives in groups, or sounders, of about 4 to 20 animals in forests and scrub regions south of the Sahara. It is

  • bush poppy (plant)

    Tree poppy, (Dendromecon rigida), shrub or small tree of the poppy family (Papaveraceae), native to chaparral areas of southern California and northwestern Mexico. The related island tree poppy (Dendromecon harfordii), endemic to the Channel Islands off the southern California coast, reaches a

  • bush roller chain (chain drive)

    chain: A roller chain is a development of the block chain in which the block is replaced by two side plates, a pair of bushings, and rollers. (See Figure 3.) This type of chain is used on bicycles and is adaptable to many other needs, from small-strand…

  • Bush Studies (work by Baynton)

    Australian literature: Nationalism and expansion: Barbara Baynton’s stories in Bush Studies (1902) subvert the persistent “matey” ethos, suggesting instead the darkly disturbing side of bush experience. Christopher Brennan, in such volumes as Poems 1913 (1913), virtually ignored local preoccupations in his Symbolist poetry; he tapped instead the deep sources of spiritual restlessness, particularly through…

  • Bush v. Gore (law case)

    Bush v. Gore, case in which, on December 12, 2000, the Supreme Court of the United States reversed a Florida Supreme Court request for a selective manual recount of that state’s U.S. presidential election ballots. The 5–4 decision effectively awarded Florida’s 25 votes in the electoral college—and

  • Bush v. Vera (law case)

    Sandra Day O'Connor: …grounds other than race” (Bush v. Vera [1996]), and sided with the Court’s more liberal members in upholding the configuration of a congressional district in North Carolina created on the basis of variables including but not limited to race (Easley v. Cromartie [2001]).

  • Bush, Barbara (American first lady)

    Barbara Bush, American first lady (1989–93), wife of George H.W. Bush, 41st president of the United States, and mother of George W. Bush, 43rd president of the United States. One of the most popular first ladies, she was noted for her charitable and humanitarian efforts. Barbara Pierce was the

  • Bush, Catherine (British singer and songwriter)

    Kate Bush, British singer and songwriter whose imaginative and inventive art rock—marked by theatrical sensuality, textural experimentation, and allusive subject matter—made her one of the most successful and influential female musicians in Britain in the late 20th century. Bush was the youngest

  • Bush, George H. W. (president of United States)

    George H.W. Bush, politician and businessman who was vice president of the United States (1981–89) and the 41st president of the United States (1989–93). As president, Bush assembled a multinational force to compel the withdrawal of Iraq from Kuwait in the Persian Gulf War. Bush was the son of

  • Bush, George Herbert Walker (president of United States)

    George H.W. Bush, politician and businessman who was vice president of the United States (1981–89) and the 41st president of the United States (1989–93). As president, Bush assembled a multinational force to compel the withdrawal of Iraq from Kuwait in the Persian Gulf War. Bush was the son of

  • Bush, George W. (president of United States)

    George W. Bush, 43rd president of the United States (2001–09), who led his country’s response to the September 11 terrorist attacks in 2001 and initiated the Iraq War in 2003. Narrowly winning the electoral college vote in 2000 over Vice Pres. Al Gore in one of the closest and most-controversial

  • Bush, George Walker (president of United States)

    George W. Bush, 43rd president of the United States (2001–09), who led his country’s response to the September 11 terrorist attacks in 2001 and initiated the Iraq War in 2003. Narrowly winning the electoral college vote in 2000 over Vice Pres. Al Gore in one of the closest and most-controversial

  • Bush, Iraq, and the World

    From the moment that the first explosions lit up the night sky over Baghdad, this war was personal. Four huge bombs and about 40 cruise missiles slammed into a heavily fortified VIP compound near the Tigris River. The opening salvo was intended not just to inspire “shock and awe” among the Iraqi

  • Bush, Jeb (American politician)

    Jeb Bush, American politician who was governor of Florida (1999–2007) and who later sought the Republican Party nomination for president in 2016. Bush was born into a political family. His paternal grandfather, Prescott S. Bush, was a U.S. senator, and both his father and his elder brother—George

  • Bush, John Ellis (American politician)

    Jeb Bush, American politician who was governor of Florida (1999–2007) and who later sought the Republican Party nomination for president in 2016. Bush was born into a political family. His paternal grandfather, Prescott S. Bush, was a U.S. senator, and both his father and his elder brother—George

  • Bush, Kate (British singer and songwriter)

    Kate Bush, British singer and songwriter whose imaginative and inventive art rock—marked by theatrical sensuality, textural experimentation, and allusive subject matter—made her one of the most successful and influential female musicians in Britain in the late 20th century. Bush was the youngest

  • Bush, Laura Welch (American first lady)

    Laura Welch Bush, American first lady (2001–09), the wife of George W. Bush, 43rd president of the United States. Laura Welch was the only child of Harold Welch, a home builder, and Jenna Hawkins Welch. Her parents placed a high priority on Laura’s education and fostered her interest in reading.

  • Bush, Margaret Berenice (American civil rights activist and attorney)

    Margaret Bush Wilson, (Margaret Berenice Bush), American civil rights activist and attorney (born Jan. 30, 1919, St. Louis, Mo.—died Aug. 11, 2009, St. Louis), served (1975–83) as the first African American female chair of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) board

  • Bush, Prescott S. (American businessman and politician)

    Prescott S. Bush, American investment banker, politician, and patriarch of a family that created a Republican political dynasty. Bush represented Connecticut in the U.S. Senate from 1952 to 1963. His son George H.W. Bush and grandson George W. Bush were, respectively, the 41st and 43rd U.S.

  • Bush, Prescott Sheldon (American businessman and politician)

    Prescott S. Bush, American investment banker, politician, and patriarch of a family that created a Republican political dynasty. Bush represented Connecticut in the U.S. Senate from 1952 to 1963. His son George H.W. Bush and grandson George W. Bush were, respectively, the 41st and 43rd U.S.

  • Bush, The (poem by O’Dowd)

    Bernard Patrick O'Dowd: His later work included The Bush (1912), a long poem about the Australian nation; Alma Venus! and Other Verses (1921), social satire in verse; and The Poems: Collected Edition (1941).

  • Bush, Vannevar (American engineer)

    Vannevar Bush, American electrical engineer and administrator who developed the Differential Analyzer and oversaw government mobilization of scientific research during World War II. The son of a Universalist minister, Bush received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics from Tufts

  • Bush-Rangers: A Play in Five Acts, and Other Poems, The (work by Harpur)

    Charles Harpur: …1853, his second book, The Bush-Rangers: A Play in Five Acts, and Other Poems, appeared. Though the play is considered a failure, the poems are ranked among his best. In 1858 he was appointed gold commissioner at Araluen, a post he held for seven years. A collection of his work,…

  • bush-shrike (bird)

    Bush-shrike, any of certain African shrike

  • Būshahr (Iran)

    Bandar-e Būshehr, port city and capital of Būshehr province, southwestern Iran. It lies near the head of the Persian Gulf at the northern end of a flat and narrow peninsula that is connected with the mainland by tidal marshes. Bandar-e Būshehr rose to prominence during the reign of Nādir Shāh when

  • Bushati family (Albanian rulers)

    Albania: The nature of Turkish rule: …generations of pashas of the Bushati family, who dominated most of northern Albania from 1757 to 1831, and Ali Pa?a Tepelen? of Janina (now Ioánnina, Greece), a brigand-turned-despot who ruled over southern Albania and northern Greece from 1788 to 1822. Those pashas created separate states within the Ottoman state until…

  • bushbaby (primate)

    Bush baby, (family Galagidae), any of several species of small attractive arboreal primates native to sub-Saharan Africa. They are gray, brown, or reddish to yellowish brown, with large eyes and ears, long hind legs, soft, woolly fur, and long tails. Bush babies are also characterized by the long

  • bushbuck (mammal)

    Bushbuck, (Tragelaphus scriptus), African antelope of the family Bovidae (order Artiodactyla), found in sub-Saharan forests and brush. It is nocturnal, shy, and usually solitary. The bushbuck stands about 1 m (39 inches) at the shoulder and ranges in colour from reddish brown to almost black, d

  • bushcricket (insect)

    Katydid, (family Tettigoniidae), any of about 6,000 predominantly nocturnal insects that are related to crickets (the two groups are in the suborder Ensifera, order Orthoptera) and are noted for their mating calls. Katydids are also known for their large hind legs and extremely long threadlike

  • Būshehr (Iran)

    Bandar-e Būshehr, port city and capital of Būshehr province, southwestern Iran. It lies near the head of the Persian Gulf at the northern end of a flat and narrow peninsula that is connected with the mainland by tidal marshes. Bandar-e Būshehr rose to prominence during the reign of Nādir Shāh when

  • Būshehr (province, Iran)

    Būshehr, coastal region, southwestern Iran, bordering the Persian Gulf on the west and bounded by the regions of Hormozgān and Fārs on the southeast and east and Khūzestān on the northwest. Inland the region is part of the Zagros Mountains and consists of fingers of upland within a plateau. The

  • bushel (measurement)

    Bushel, unit of capacity in the British Imperial and the United States Customary systems of measurement. In the British system the units of liquid and dry capacity are the same, and since 1824 a bushel has been defined as 8 imperial gallons, or 2,219.36 cubic inches (36,375.31 cubic cm). In the

  • Bushell’s case (law case)

    William Penn: Quaker leadership and political activism: …also known as the “Bushell’s Case,” stands as a landmark in English legal history, having established beyond question the independence of the jury. A firsthand account of the trial, which was a vivid courtroom drama, was published in The People’s Ancient and Just Liberties Asserted (1670).

  • bushfire

    Victoria: Federation and the state of Victoria: …1997 to 2008 and extensive bushfires in 2002–03. In February 2009 a heat wave combined with dry conditions and strong winds to fuel wildfires that not only killed some 200 people but also obliterated several small towns to the northeast of Melbourne; it was the deadliest bushfire incident in the…

  • bushi (Japanese warrior)

    Samurai, member of the Japanese warrior caste. The term samurai was originally used to denote the aristocratic warriors (bushi), but it came to apply to all the members of the warrior class that rose to power in the 12th century and dominated the Japanese government until the Meiji Restoration in

  • Bushidō (Japanese history)

    Bushidō, (Japanese: “Way of the Warrior”) the code of conduct of the samurai, or bushi (warrior), class of premodern Japan. In the mid-19th century, however, the precepts of Bushidō were made the basis of ethical training for the whole society, with the emperor replacing the feudal lord, or daimyo,

  • Bushir (Iran)

    Bandar-e Būshehr, port city and capital of Būshehr province, southwestern Iran. It lies near the head of the Persian Gulf at the northern end of a flat and narrow peninsula that is connected with the mainland by tidal marshes. Bandar-e Būshehr rose to prominence during the reign of Nādir Shāh when

  • Bushire (Iran)

    Bandar-e Būshehr, port city and capital of Būshehr province, southwestern Iran. It lies near the head of the Persian Gulf at the northern end of a flat and narrow peninsula that is connected with the mainland by tidal marshes. Bandar-e Būshehr rose to prominence during the reign of Nādir Shāh when

  • bushland (plants)

    Africa: Cape shrub, bush, and thicket: …considerable enclaves of true evergreen bushland, which have reverted to shrubland (fynbos). Sclerophyllous foliage and proteas abound. Although grassy tracts occur on the mountains, they are characteristically unusual lower down. Beyond the Cape Ranges, fynbos grades into karoo.

  • Bushman languages

    Bushman languages, loose grouping of languages that confusingly have been considered to be a separate group within the Khoisan languages. The term Bushman as it is used to describe certain southern African hunter-gatherers is somewhat controversial because it is perceived as racist. The name San is

  • bushman’s clock (bird)

    Kookaburra, (species Dacelo novaeguineae), eastern Australian bird of the kingfisher family (Alcedinidae), whose call sounds like fiendish laughter. This gray-brown, woodland-dwelling bird reaches a length of 43 cm (17 inches), with an 8- to 10-cm (3.2- to 4-inch) beak. In its native habitat it

  • Bushman, Francis X. (American actor)

    Francis X. Bushman, American actor who in his heyday was advertised as “the Handsomest Man in the World.” Though his father wanted him to be a doctor, Bushman was bitten by the acting bug in childhood and played walk-on roles in various Baltimore stock companies. In 1903 he won a local strongman’s

  • Bushman, Francis Xavier (American actor)

    Francis X. Bushman, American actor who in his heyday was advertised as “the Handsomest Man in the World.” Though his father wanted him to be a doctor, Bushman was bitten by the acting bug in childhood and played walk-on roles in various Baltimore stock companies. In 1903 he won a local strongman’s

  • Bushmanland (historical region, Namibia)

    Boesmanland, historic region in northeastern Namibia traditionally inhabited by the San (Bushmen). A part of the northwestern Kalahari (desert), Boesmanland is a semiarid region having deep, permeable sand beds with a vegetational cover consisting of perennial grasses, low-lying shrubs, and t

  • bushmaster (snake)

    Bushmaster, (genus Lachesis), the longest venomous snake in the New World, found in scrublands and forests from the Amazon River basin north to Costa Rica. Three species of bushmaster (L. muta, L. stenophrys, and L. melanocephala) are known to exist, and they normally measure about 1.8 metres (6

  • Bushmaster Firearms (American company)

    Beltway sniper attacks: …slain victims brought suits against Bushmaster Firearms, the manufacturer of the rifle used in the attacks, and the Tacoma, Washington, gun store from which the rifle had been stolen. While not admitting fault, Bushmaster and the gun store reached a $2.5 million settlement with the plaintiffs. The National Rifle Association…

  • bushmeat (food)

    conservation: Human use: …is the widespread trade in bushmeat, which is essentially everything that can be hunted—from mice to chimpanzees and gorillas—and is especially prevalent in West and Central Africa. Yet other species are harvested for body parts, such as tiger bones and rhino horns, which are used in Asian medicines. A wide…

  • Bushmen (people)

    San, an indigenous people of southern Africa, related to the Khoekhoe (Khoikhoi). They live chiefly in Botswana, Namibia, and southeastern Angola. Bushmen is an Anglicization of boesman, the Dutch and Afrikaner name for them; saan (plural) or saa (singular) is the Nama word for “bush dweller(s),”

  • bushmen’s carnival (sport)

    Bushmen’s carnival, exhibition and contest of cattle herding and related skills, the Australian equivalent of the U.S. rodeo. Bushmen’s carnivals have been held in one form or another since the early days of cattle breeding in Australia, but they increased in popularity and took on a more American

  • Bushnell, Candace (American author)

    Sex and the City: Based on Candace Bushnell’s best-selling book of the same name and created by Darren Star (Beverly Hills, 90210 [1990–2000] and Melrose Place [1992–99]), Sex and the City takes a candid and comical look at the lives and loves of four Manhattan career women in their 30s and…

  • Bushnell, David (American inventor)

    David Bushnell, U.S. inventor, renowned as the father of the submarine. Graduated from Yale in 1775, at the outbreak of the American Revolution, he went to Saybrook, where he built a unique turtle-shaped vessel designed to be propelled under water by an operator who turned its propeller by hand.

  • Bushnell, Horace (American theologian)

    Horace Bushnell, Congregational minister and controversial theologian, sometimes called “the father of American religious liberalism.” He grew up in the rural surroundings of New Preston, Connecticut, joined the Congregational Church in 1821, and in 1823 entered Yale with plans to become a

  • Bushnell, John (English sculptor)

    Western sculpture: England: …1660 the uncomprehending borrowings of John Bushnell from Bernini serve only to make his figures look ludicrous. The most distinguished English-born sculptor of the second half of the 17th century was Edward Pierce, in whose rare busts is to be found something of Bernini’s vigour and intensity. But the general…

  • Bushnell, Nolan (American electrical engineer)

    electronic game: From chess to Spacewar! to Pong: …an electrical engineering student named Nolan Bushnell. After graduating in 1968, Bushnell moved to Silicon Valley to work for the Ampex Corporation. Bushnell had worked at an amusement park during college and after playing Spacewar! he dreamed of filling entertainment arcades with such electronic games. Together with one of his…

  • Bushongo (people)

    Kuba: …kingdom, ruled by the central Bushongo group, which emerged about 1600. The kingdom is a federation of chiefdoms, each ruled by a chief and two or three councils that represent the general population and noble clans. The ruling Bushongo chief is king by divine right. Uniting factors include bonds of…

  • bushpig (mammal)

    Bush pig, (Potamochoerus porcus), African member of the family Suidae (order Artiodactyla), resembling a hog but with long body hair and tassels of hair on its ears. The bush pig lives in groups, or sounders, of about 4 to 20 animals in forests and scrub regions south of the Sahara. It is

  • bushranger (Australian bandit)

    Bushranger, any of the bandits of the Australian bush, or outback, who harassed the settlers, miners, and Aborigines of the frontier in the late 18th and 19th centuries and whose exploits figure prominently in Australian history and folklore. Acting individually or in small bands, these variants

  • bushranging film (film genre)

    Australia: Film: …development of two genres: the bushranging film, as exemplified by The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906), which depicted the life of Ned Kelly; and the “backblocks” farce, a genre that satirized farming families of the era. The most significant film of the silent era was The Sentimental Bloke (1919),…

  • Bushrod Island (island, Liberia)

    Monrovia: Bushrod Island contains the artificial harbour and free port of Monrovia, the only such port in West Africa. As the national centre of commerce and transportation, it attracted petroleum, paint, tuna, pharmaceutical, and cement enterprises. Prominent buildings have included the Capitol (1958), the Executive Mansion…

  • bushtit (bird)

    Bushtit, (Psaltriparus minimus), gray bird of western North America, belonging to the songbird family Aegithalidae (order Passeriformes). The common bushtit is 11 cm (4.5 inches) long and ranges from British Columbia to Guatemala. This tiny, drab bird is common in oak scrub, chaparral, pi?on, and

  • Bushveld (region, Africa)

    Bushveld, natural region in southern Africa, at an elevation of about 2,500–4,000 feet (800–1,200 metres). Centred in Limpopo province, South Africa, it extends into northern KwaZulu-Natal province, Swaziland, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Botswana. The bushveld (“thornbush field”) is characterized by

  • bushveld (plants)

    Africa: Cape shrub, bush, and thicket: …considerable enclaves of true evergreen bushland, which have reverted to shrubland (fynbos). Sclerophyllous foliage and proteas abound. Although grassy tracts occur on the mountains, they are characteristically unusual lower down. Beyond the Cape Ranges, fynbos grades into karoo.

  • Bushveld Complex (geological formation, South Africa)

    Africa: The Precambrian: …2 billion years ago the Bushveld Complex—which is one of the largest differentiated igneous bodies on Earth, containing major deposits of platinum, chromium, and vanadium—was emplaced in the northern Kaapvaal craton. The middle part of the early Proterozoic was dominated by powerful orogenic (mountain-building) processes that gave rise to fold…

  • bushveld vegetation (plants)

    Africa: Cape shrub, bush, and thicket: …considerable enclaves of true evergreen bushland, which have reverted to shrubland (fynbos). Sclerophyllous foliage and proteas abound. Although grassy tracts occur on the mountains, they are characteristically unusual lower down. Beyond the Cape Ranges, fynbos grades into karoo.

  • Bushwhacked Piano, The (novel by McGuane)

    Thomas McGuane: …three novels—The Sporting Club (1969), The Bushwhacked Piano (1971), and Ninety-two in the Shade (1973)—present the central plot and theme of his early fiction: a man, usually from a secure family, exiles himself from American society (which he despises for its materialism and triviality), removes himself to an isolated locale,…

  • bushy beardgrass (plant)

    bluestem: virginicus), and bushy beardgrass, or bush bluestem (A. glomeratus), are coarse grasses, unsuitable for forage, that grow in poor soils in eastern and southern North America.

  • bushy-backed sea slug (gastropod)

    nudibranch: …cold northern seas is the bushy-backed sea slug (Dendronotus frondosus), named for its stalked, lacy cerata. Occurring worldwide in warm seas are the blue sea slug (Glaucus marina, or G. atlanticus) and the doridacean nudibranchs such as Doris and Glossodoris. See gastropod.

  • bushy-tailed cloud rat (rodent)

    cloud rat: …genus Phloeomys (two species), whereas bushy-tailed cloud rats are classified in the genus Crateromys (four species).

  • bushy-tailed jird (rodent)

    gerbil: Natural history: The bushy-tailed jird (Sekeetamys calurus) of northeastern Africa and adjacent Asia has an extremely bushy tail tipped with white. Depending on the species, gerbils’ tails may be much longer than the head and body, about the same length, or shorter. Their fur is soft and dense,…

  • bushy-tailed opossum (marsupial)

    woolly opossum: …black-shouldered opossum (Caluromysiops irrupta), the bushy-tailed opossum (Glironia venusta), and three species of true woolly opossums (genus Caluromys). The black-shouldered opossum is found only in southeastern Peru and adjacent Brazil. The bushy-tailed opossum is rare, known from only 25 specimens and a few records based on photographs from widely scattered…

  • bushy-tailed possum (marsupial)

    woolly opossum: …black-shouldered opossum (Caluromysiops irrupta), the bushy-tailed opossum (Glironia venusta), and three species of true woolly opossums (genus Caluromys). The black-shouldered opossum is found only in southeastern Peru and adjacent Brazil. The bushy-tailed opossum is rare, known from only 25 specimens and a few records based on photographs from widely scattered…

  • bushy-tailed woodrat (rodent)

    woodrat: The bushy-tailed woodrat (Neotoma cinerea), often called a packrat, is among the largest and most common woodrats, weighing up to 600 grams (about 1.3 pounds) and having a body length of up to 25 cm (nearly 10 inches). Its slightly shorter tail is longhaired and bushy,…

  • Busi, Aldo (Italian author)

    Italian literature: Fiction at the turn of the 21st century: …20th century was the outrageous Aldo Busi, author of Seminario sulla gioventù (1984; Seminar on Youth) and the pertly titled Vita standard di un venditore provvisorio di collant (1985; Standard Life of a Temporary Pantyhose Salesman). Two of the most disinterested and earnestly reflective of the younger writers were Sebastiano…

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