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  • Bar?ī?ā (legendary Islamic ascetic)

    Bar?ī?ā, in Islāmic legend, an ascetic who succumbed to the devil’s temptations and denied God. Bar?ī?ā, a saintly recluse, is given care of a sick woman by her three brothers, who are going on a journey. At the devil’s suggestion Bar?ī?ā seduces the woman. When he discovers that she has

  • Barska Konfederacja (Polish history)

    Confederation of Bar, league of Polish nobles and gentry that was formed to defend the liberties of the nobility within the Roman Catholic Church and the independence of Poland from Russian encroachment. Its activities precipitated a civil war, foreign intervention, and the First Partition of

  • barsman (Zoroastrianism)

    ancient Iran: Zoroastrianism: …carried in his hand the barsman (barsom), or bundle of sacred grass. His mouth was covered to prevent the sacred fire from being polluted by his breath. The practice of animal sacrifice, abhorred by the modern followers of Zoroaster, is attested for the Sāsānian period at least as late as…

  • barsom (Zoroastrianism)

    ancient Iran: Zoroastrianism: …carried in his hand the barsman (barsom), or bundle of sacred grass. His mouth was covered to prevent the sacred fire from being polluted by his breath. The practice of animal sacrifice, abhorred by the modern followers of Zoroaster, is attested for the Sāsānian period at least as late as…

  • Barss (racehorse)

    harness racing: Early history.: From his stallion Barss came the Orlov trotter that became the foundation of Russian trotting stock.

  • barstool (furniture)

    stool: …was the development of the barstool, a high stool (with or without arms and back) usually fixed to a central post and used in bars and cocktail lounges.

  • Barstovian Stage (geology)

    Barstovian Stage, uppermost major division of the Miocene Epoch (23 million to 5.3 million years ago) in North America. The Barstovian Stage follows the Hemingfordian Stage and precedes the Clarendonian Stage of the Pliocene Epoch. It was named for exposures studied near Barstow, Calif. The

  • Barstow (California, United States)

    Barstow, city, San Bernardino county, south-central California, U.S. Located in the Mojave Desert, the city lies at a junction of pioneer trails. It was founded in 1880 during a silver-mining rush and was first called Fishpond and then Waterman Junction. It was renamed in 1886 to honour William

  • Barstow, Stan (British novelist)

    Stan Barstow, English novelist who was noted for his unsentimental depiction of working-class life. Barstow grew up in a working-class environment and held a job in the engineering industry until 1962, when the enormous success of his first book, A Kind of Loving (1960; film 1962; stage play 1970)

  • Barstow, Stanley (British novelist)

    Stan Barstow, English novelist who was noted for his unsentimental depiction of working-class life. Barstow grew up in a working-class environment and held a job in the engineering industry until 1962, when the enormous success of his first book, A Kind of Loving (1960; film 1962; stage play 1970)

  • Barsuki (work by Leonov)

    Leonid Maksimovich Leonov: …epic first novel, Barsuki (The Badgers), which he followed with Vor (1927; The Thief), a pessimistic tale set in the Moscow criminal underworld.

  • Barsumas (Christian theologian)

    Nestorianism: Under the influence of Barsumas, the metropolitan of Nisibis, the Persian Church acknowledged Theodore of Mopsuestia, the chief Nestorian theological authority, as guardian of right faith, in February 486. This position was reaffirmed under the patriarch Babai (497–502), and since that time the church has been Nestorian.

  • BART (transit system, California, United States)

    San Francisco: Transportation: …interurban rapid-transit system known as BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit), which began operating in 1972. With service between San Francisco and surrounding communities through an underwater tube more than 3.6 miles (5.8 km) long, BART was the first system of its sort—part subway and part elevated—to be built in half…

  • Bart’s (hospital, London, United Kingdom)

    Saint Bartholomew’s Hospital, oldest hospital in London. It lies just southeast of the Central Markets in the Smithfield area of the City of London. It was founded in 1123 by the Augustinian monk Rahere, who also founded the adjacent priory (the surviving part of which is now the church of Saint

  • Bart, Jean (French military officer)

    Jean Bart, French privateer and naval officer, renowned for his skillful and daring achievements in the wars of Louis XIV. Descended from a family of fishermen and privateers, Bart entered naval service first under the Dutch admiral Michiel de Ruyter, but when war broke out between the French and

  • Bart, Lily (fictional character)

    Lily Bart, fictional character, a beautiful impoverished woman in Edith Wharton’s novel The House of Mirth (1905). Tenuously associated with the upper-class New York society of the turn of the century, Lily is an orphan with no money of her own, and she lives by the values she has been taught since

  • Bart, Lionel (British composer)

    Lionel Bart, (Lionel Begleiter), British composer, lyricist, and playwright who helped revive the British stage musical with such shows as Lock Up Your Daughters (1959), Fings Ain’t Wot They Used t’Be (1959), and especially Oliver! (1960), his greatest success; he also wrote a number of hit songs,

  • Bartali, Gino (Italian cyclist)

    Gino Bartali, Italian cyclist (born July 18, 1914, Ponte a Ema, near Florence, Italy—died May 5, 2000, Ponte a Ema), became a national hero and helped unite Italy during a period of political upheaval when he won the 1948 Tour de France 10 years after he had first won cycling’s premier event; d

  • Bartas, Guillaume de Salluste, seigneur du (French poet)

    Guillaume de Salluste, seigneur du Bartas, author of La Semaine (1578), an influential poem about the creation of the world. Though he tried to avoid participating in the Wars of Religion, du Bartas was an ardent Huguenot and a trusted counsellor of Henry of Navarre. His aim was to use the new

  • Bartel, Paul (American actor and director)

    Paul Bartel, American director, screenwriter, and actor (born Aug. 6, 1938, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died May 13, 2000, New York, N.Y.), was perhaps best remembered for creating and starring in the black comedy Eating Raoul (1982), a cult classic that featured Paul and Mary Bland, a married couple who m

  • Bartenstein, Johann Christoph, Freiherr von (Austrian statesman)

    Johann Christoph, baron von Bartenstein, Austrian statesman and trusted counsellor of Emperor Charles VI. He created the political system that was based upon the Pragmatic Sanction; it was intended to guarantee the peaceful accession of Charles VI’s daughter Maria Theresa to the entire Habsburg

  • barter (trade)

    Barter, the direct exchange of goods or services—without an intervening medium of exchange or money—either according to established rates of exchange or by bargaining. It is considered the oldest form of commerce. Barter is common among traditional societies, particularly in those communities with

  • Barter (island, Canada)

    Beaufort Sea: …mouth—Herschel (7 sq mi) and Barter (5 sq mi). Very small islands and banks are found in the Mackenzie River Delta.

  • Barter Theatre (theatre, Abingdon, Virginia, United States)

    Virginia: Cultural life: The Barter Theatre was founded by actor Robert Porterfield in 1933 in the tiny southwestern town of Abingdon; its original charge for admission was produce, handicrafts, or whatever the prospective viewer could afford. Dozens of art galleries are located throughout Virginia. There are several ballet companies,…

  • Bartered Bride, The (opera by Smetana)

    Max Ophüls: …were Die verkaufte Braut (1932; The Bartered Bride), regarded as one of the best film adaptations of an opera, and Liebelei (1932; “Love Affair”), a bittersweet love story set in Vienna. Both films included several of Ophüls’s trademark elements: lavish settings fitted with ornate and glistening decor, elaborate camera movement,…

  • Barth, Heinrich (German geographer and explorer)

    Heinrich Barth, German geographer and one of the great explorers of Africa. Educated in the classics at the University of Berlin, Barth was a competent linguist who was fluent in French, Spanish, Italian, English, and Arabic. He traveled the Mediterranean coastal areas that are now part of Tunisia

  • Barth, Jean (French military officer)

    Jean Bart, French privateer and naval officer, renowned for his skillful and daring achievements in the wars of Louis XIV. Descended from a family of fishermen and privateers, Bart entered naval service first under the Dutch admiral Michiel de Ruyter, but when war broke out between the French and

  • Barth, John (American writer)

    John Barth, American writer best known for novels that combine philosophical depth and complexity with biting satire and boisterous, frequently bawdy humour. Much of Barth’s writing is concerned with the seeming impossibility of choosing the right action in a world that has no absolute values.

  • Barth, John Simmons (American writer)

    John Barth, American writer best known for novels that combine philosophical depth and complexity with biting satire and boisterous, frequently bawdy humour. Much of Barth’s writing is concerned with the seeming impossibility of choosing the right action in a world that has no absolute values.

  • Barth, Karl (Swiss theologian)

    Karl Barth, Swiss Protestant theologian, probably the most influential of the 20th century. Closely supported by his lifelong friend and colleague, the theologian Eduard Thurneysen, he initiated a radical change in Protestant thought, stressing the “wholly otherness of God” over the

  • Barth, Paul (German philosopher and sociologist)

    Paul Barth, German philosopher and sociologist who considered society as an organization in which progress is determined by the power of ideas. Barth was professor of philosophy and education in Leipzig from 1897. His Philosophy of History of Hegel and the Hegelians (1896) and his broad Philosophy

  • Barthé, James Richmond (American sculptor)

    Richmond Barthé, American sculptor who was a vital participant in the Harlem Renaissance. Barthé was born to parents of African, French, and Native American descent. At age 23 he went to Chicago, where he studied art at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1924 to 1928. He began as a painter but, at

  • Barthé, Richmond (American sculptor)

    Richmond Barthé, American sculptor who was a vital participant in the Harlem Renaissance. Barthé was born to parents of African, French, and Native American descent. At age 23 he went to Chicago, where he studied art at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1924 to 1928. He began as a painter but, at

  • Barthélemy, Jean-Jacques (French archaeologist)

    Jean-Jacques Barthélemy, French archaeologist and author whose novel about ancient Greece was one of the most widely read books in 19th-century France. Barthélemy studied theology with the Jesuits and became an abbé, but, feeling that he lacked a religious vocation, he went to Paris, where he

  • Barthélemy-Saint-Hilaire, Jules (French philosopher, statesman, and journalist)

    Jules Barthélemy-Saint-Hilaire, French politician, journalist, and scholar. Barthélemy-Saint-Hilaire worked briefly for the Ministry of Finance (1825–28) before becoming a journalist. In 1838 he became professor of ancient philosophy at the Collège de France. Following the Revolution of 1848, he

  • Barthelme, Donald (American writer)

    Donald Barthelme, American short-story writer known for his modernist “collages,” which are marked by technical experimentation and a kind of melancholy gaiety. A one-time journalist, Barthelme was managing editor of Location, an art and literature review, and director (1961–62) of the Contemporary

  • Barthelme, Frederick (American writer)

    Frederick Barthelme, American writer of short stories and novels featuring characters who are shaped by the impersonal suburban environments in which they live. Barthelme’s father was an architect and his mother a teacher. Several of his brothers also became writers, most notably Donald Barthelme.

  • Barthema, Lodovico di (Italian adventurer)

    Lodovico de Varthema, intrepid Italian traveler and adventurer whose account of his Middle Eastern and Asiatic wanderings was widely circulated throughout Europe and earned him high fame in his own lifetime. He made significant discoveries (especially in Arabia) and made many valuable observations

  • Barthes, Roland Gérard (French critic)

    Roland Barthes, French essayist and social and literary critic whose writings on semiotics, the formal study of symbols and signs pioneered by Ferdinand de Saussure, helped establish structuralism and the New Criticism as leading intellectual movements. Barthes studied at the University of Paris,

  • Barthold, Wilhelm (Russian anthropologist)

    Vasily Vladimirovich Bartold, Russian anthropologist who made valuable contributions to the study of the social and cultural history of Islam and of the Tajik Iranians and literate Turkic peoples of Central Asia. Bartold joined the faculty of the University of St. Petersburg in 1901 and for the

  • Bartholdi, Frédéric-Auguste (French sculptor)

    Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, French sculptor of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor. Bartholdi trained to be an architect in Alsace and Paris and then studied painting with Ary Scheffer and sculpture with Antoine Etex and J.-F. Soitoux. He toured the Middle East in 1856 with several

  • Bartholin’s gland (anatomy)

    animal reproductive system: Accessory glands: …males, the most prominent being Bartholin’s glands and prostates. Bartholin’s (bulbovestibular) glands are homologues of the bulbourethral glands of males. One pair usually opens into the urinogenital sinus or, in primates, into a shallow vestibule at the opening of the vagina. Prostates develop as buds from the urethra in many…

  • Bartholin, Caspar Berthelsen (Danish physician and theologian)

    Caspar Berthelsen Bartholin, Danish physician and theologian who wrote one of the most widely read Renaissance manuals of anatomy. At the University of Padua (1608–10) Bartholin conducted anatomical studies under the famed Italian anatomist Hieronymus Fabricius ab Aquapendente. These formed the

  • Bartholin, Erasmus (Danish physician and physicist)

    Erasmus Bartholin, Danish physician, mathematician, and physicist who discovered the optical phenomenon of double refraction. While professor of medicine (1657–98) at the University of Copenhagen, Bartholin observed that images seen through Icelandic feldspar (calcite) were doubled and that, when

  • Bartholin, Thomas (Danish anatomist and mathematician)

    Thomas Bartholin, Danish anatomist and mathematician who was first to describe fully the entire human lymphatic system (1652). He and his elder brother, Erasmus Bartholin, were the sons of the eminent anatomist Caspar Bartholin. A student of the Dutch school of anatomists, Bartholin supported the

  • Bartholinus, Caspar Berthelsen (Danish physician and theologian)

    Caspar Berthelsen Bartholin, Danish physician and theologian who wrote one of the most widely read Renaissance manuals of anatomy. At the University of Padua (1608–10) Bartholin conducted anatomical studies under the famed Italian anatomist Hieronymus Fabricius ab Aquapendente. These formed the

  • Bartholinus, Erasmus (Danish physician and physicist)

    Erasmus Bartholin, Danish physician, mathematician, and physicist who discovered the optical phenomenon of double refraction. While professor of medicine (1657–98) at the University of Copenhagen, Bartholin observed that images seen through Icelandic feldspar (calcite) were doubled and that, when

  • Bartholinus, Thomas (Danish anatomist and mathematician)

    Thomas Bartholin, Danish anatomist and mathematician who was first to describe fully the entire human lymphatic system (1652). He and his elder brother, Erasmus Bartholin, were the sons of the eminent anatomist Caspar Bartholin. A student of the Dutch school of anatomists, Bartholin supported the

  • Bartholomaeus Anglicus (Franciscan encyclopaedist)

    Bartholomaeus Anglicus, Franciscan encyclopaedist who was long famous for his encyclopaedia, De proprietatibus rerum (“On the Properties of Things”). Bartholomaeus lectured in divinity at the University of Paris and became a Franciscan about 1225. Though primarily interested in Scripture and

  • Bartholom?ussee (lake, Germany)

    K?nigssee, lake, in Bavaria Land (state), southern Germany. It lies just south of the town of Berchtesgaden, in a deep cut that is surrounded by sheer limestone mountains, within the Berchtesgaden National Park. K?nigssee is one of the most picturesque lakes in the Berchtesgadener Alps. It is 5

  • Bartholomé, Albert (French sculptor)

    Albert Bartholomé, sculptor whose works, particularly his funerary art, made him one of the best known of modern French sculptors. Bartholomé began his career as a painter, studying briefly at the Académie des Beaux-Arts. Wanting to prepare a monument to his dead wife, he turned to sculpture in

  • Bartholomé, Paul-Albert (French sculptor)

    Albert Bartholomé, sculptor whose works, particularly his funerary art, made him one of the best known of modern French sculptors. Bartholomé began his career as a painter, studying briefly at the Académie des Beaux-Arts. Wanting to prepare a monument to his dead wife, he turned to sculpture in

  • Bartholomew Amidei, Saint (Italian friar)

    Seven Holy Founders: John Bonagiunta, Benedict dell’Antella, Bartholomew Amidei, Gerard Sostegni, and Ricoverus Uguccione. Formally Ordo Fratrum Servorum Sanctae Mariae (“Order of Friar Servants of St. Mary”), the order is a Roman Catholic congregation of mendicant friars dedicated to apostolic work.

  • Bartholomew Fair (play by Jonson)

    Ben Jonson: His plays and achievement: …favour: Volpone, The Alchemist, and Bartholomew Fair especially have been staged with striking success.

  • Bartholomew I (Eastern Orthodox patriarch)

    Bartholomew I, 270th ecumenical patriarch of the Eastern Orthodox church from 1991. After graduating from the patriarchal Seminary of Halki, located near Istanbul, Archontonis was ordained a priest and went on to earn a doctorate in canon law from the Pontifical Institute in Rome. He also studied

  • Bartholomew the Englishman (Franciscan encyclopaedist)

    Bartholomaeus Anglicus, Franciscan encyclopaedist who was long famous for his encyclopaedia, De proprietatibus rerum (“On the Properties of Things”). Bartholomaeus lectured in divinity at the University of Paris and became a Franciscan about 1225. Though primarily interested in Scripture and

  • Bartholomew, Dave (American musician and record producer)

    Fats Domino: …in 1949 was discovered by Dave Bartholomew—the bandleader, songwriter, and record producer who helped bring New Orleans’s J&amp;M Studio to prominence and who became Domino’s exclusive arranger. Domino’s first recording, “The Fat Man” (1950), became the first of a series of rhythm-and-blues hits that sold 500,000 to 1,000,000 copies. His…

  • Bartholomew, Freddie (British-born American actor)

    Freddie Bartholomew, child actor who epitomized Hollywood’s vision of a proper little English boy in such Depression-era films as Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936) and Captains Courageous (1937). Bartholomew was reared by his aunt, Millicent Bartholomew, who found small stage and screen roles for him

  • Bartholomew, Frederick Llewellyn (British-born American actor)

    Freddie Bartholomew, child actor who epitomized Hollywood’s vision of a proper little English boy in such Depression-era films as Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936) and Captains Courageous (1937). Bartholomew was reared by his aunt, Millicent Bartholomew, who found small stage and screen roles for him

  • Bartholomew, Harry Guy (English publisher)

    history of publishing: Great Britain: … was revived by its editor, Harry Bartholomew, to become a true working-class paper with a radical political voice, although the winning of new readers—circulation eventually topped four million—was mostly due to the shameless use of the techniques of yellow journalism.

  • Bartholomew, John (Scottish cartographer and publisher [1831–1893])

    John Bartholomew and Son: In 1856 his son John Bartholomew (1831–93), the well-known Scottish cartographer, assumed control of the management, and the company developed into a larger, more prosperous business and acquired its own printing press (1860). He was succeeded by his son John George Bartholomew (1860–1920). After 1890 production was devoted mainly…

  • Bartholomew, John (Scottish publisher [1805–1861])

    John Bartholomew and Son: …was established in 1826 by John Bartholomew (1805–61). It originally published such diverse items as checkbooks, election literature, and maps. In 1856 his son John Bartholomew (1831–93), the well-known Scottish cartographer, assumed control of the management, and the company developed into a larger, more prosperous business and acquired its own…

  • Bartholomew, John George (Scottish cartographer and publisher)

    John George Bartholomew, cartographer and map and atlas publisher who improved the standards of British cartography and introduced into Great Britain the use of contours and systematic colour layering to show relief. The eldest son of the Edinburgh map publisher John Bartholomew (1831–93), he

  • Bartholomew, Robert (American sociologist)

    dancing plague of 1518: American sociologist Robert Bartholomew posited that the dancers were adherents of heretical sects, dancing to attract divine favour. The most widely accepted theory was that of American medical historian John Waller, who laid out in several papers his reasons for believing that the dancing plague was a…

  • Bartholomew, Saint (Christian Apostle)

    Saint Bartholomew, ; Western feast day August 24; date varies in Eastern churches), one of the Twelve Apostles. Apart from the mentions of him in four of the Apostle lists (Mark 3:18, Matt. 10:3, Luke 6:14, and Acts 1:13), nothing is known about him from the New Testament. Bartholomew is a family

  • Barthou, Jean-Louis (French statesman)

    Louis Barthou, French premier (1913), conservative statesman, and long-time colleague of Raymond Poincaré. He was assassinated with King Alexander of Yugoslavia during the latter’s visit to France in 1934. Trained as a lawyer and first elected a deputy in 1889, Barthou filled various posts in

  • Barthou, Louis (French statesman)

    Louis Barthou, French premier (1913), conservative statesman, and long-time colleague of Raymond Poincaré. He was assassinated with King Alexander of Yugoslavia during the latter’s visit to France in 1934. Trained as a lawyer and first elected a deputy in 1889, Barthou filled various posts in

  • Bartica (Guyana)

    Bartica, town, north-central Guyana, in tropical rainforests in which the Essequibo, Mazaruni, and Cuyuni rivers meet. A small commercial centre, Bartica is situated at the head of the Essequibo River, 50 miles (80 km) inland from the Atlantic Ocean, and it is linked by air with Georgetown, the

  • Bartik, Betty Jean Jennings (American computer software pioneer)

    Jean Bartik, (Betty Jean Jennings Bartik), American computer software pioneer (born Dec. 27, 1924, near Stanberry, Mo.—died March 23, 2011, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.), played an instrumental role in programming ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer), the world’s first all-electronic digital

  • Bartik, Jean (American computer software pioneer)

    Jean Bartik, (Betty Jean Jennings Bartik), American computer software pioneer (born Dec. 27, 1924, near Stanberry, Mo.—died March 23, 2011, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.), played an instrumental role in programming ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer), the world’s first all-electronic digital

  • Bartisch, Georg (German physician)

    ophthalmology: Georg Bartisch, a German physician who wrote on eye diseases in the 16th century, is sometimes credited with founding the medical practice of ophthalmology. Many important eye operations were first developed by oculists, as, for example, the surgical correction of strabismus, first performed in 1738.…

  • Bartkey, Walter (American educator)

    The decision to use the atomic bomb: Scientists and the atomic bomb: …along with two prestigious colleagues, Walter Bartkey, a dean of the University of Chicago, and Harold Urey, director of the project’s research in gaseous diffusion at Columbia University, sought a meeting with Truman but were diverted to Byrnes, who received them with polite skepticism. As he listened to them argue…

  • Bartkowski, Steve (American football player)

    Atlanta Falcons: …NFL draft to select quarterback Steve Bartkowski, who would go on to set franchise records in virtually every major passing category. Bartkowski led the Falcons to their first postseason berth in 1978, and in 1980 he teamed with running back William Andrews to form a high-powered offense that propelled Atlanta…

  • Bartle Frere, Mount (mountain, Queensland, Australia)

    Mount Bartle Frere, mountain in Bellenden-Ker Range, northeastern Queensland, Australia. It is the highest point in the state and rises to 5,287 ft (1,611 m) in an area reserved as a national park. Its slopes have the climate of a rain forest and provide cover for a variety of tropical plants,

  • Bartleby the Scrivener (short story by Melville)

    Bartleby the Scrivener, short story by Herman Melville, published anonymously in 1853 in Putnam’s Monthly Magazine. It was collected in his 1856 volume The Piazza Tales. Melville wrote “Bartleby” at a time when his career seemed to be in ruins, and the story reflects his pessimism. The narrator, a

  • Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street (short story by Melville)

    Bartleby the Scrivener, short story by Herman Melville, published anonymously in 1853 in Putnam’s Monthly Magazine. It was collected in his 1856 volume The Piazza Tales. Melville wrote “Bartleby” at a time when his career seemed to be in ruins, and the story reflects his pessimism. The narrator, a

  • Bartlesville (Oklahoma, United States)

    Bartlesville, city, seat (1907) of Washington county, northeastern Oklahoma, U.S., on the Caney River. It was settled in the 1870s around Jacob Bartles’s trading post. Growth was spurred by the discovery of oil in 1897 and the arrival of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad in 1899. A replica

  • Bartlett Deep (trench, Caribbean Sea)

    Cayman Trench, submarine trench on the floor of the western Caribbean Sea between Jamaica and the Cayman Islands. It extends from the Windward Passage at the southeastern tip of Cuba toward Guatemala. The relatively narrow trough trends east-northeast to west-southwest and has a maximum depth of

  • Bartlett pear (fruit)

    pear: …widely grown pear variety is Williams’ Bon Chrétien, known in the United States as Bartlett. In the United States and Canada, varieties such as Beurré Bosc, D’Anjou, and Winter Nelis are grown. A highly popular variety in England and the Netherlands is Conference. Common Italian varieties include Curato, Coscia, and…

  • Bartlett Trough (trench, Caribbean Sea)

    Cayman Trench, submarine trench on the floor of the western Caribbean Sea between Jamaica and the Cayman Islands. It extends from the Windward Passage at the southeastern tip of Cuba toward Guatemala. The relatively narrow trough trends east-northeast to west-southwest and has a maximum depth of

  • Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations (work by Bartlett)

    Justin Kaplan: As general editor for Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations (1992), he preferred more-contemporary quotes, including ones by filmmaker Woody Allen (“It’s not that I’m afraid to die. I just don’t want to be there when it happens.”) and Kermit the Frog (“It’s not that easy bein’ green.”) as well as one attributed…

  • Bartlett’s test (mathematics)

    Bartlett’s test, in statistics, a test to ascertain if multiple samples have the same variance (the square of the sample’s standard deviation). The test, which is a standard tool in analysis of variance (ANOVA) computer programs, can be used when a single measurable variable is involved, such as

  • Bartlett’s test for homogeneity of variance (mathematics)

    Bartlett’s test, in statistics, a test to ascertain if multiple samples have the same variance (the square of the sample’s standard deviation). The test, which is a standard tool in analysis of variance (ANOVA) computer programs, can be used when a single measurable variable is involved, such as

  • Bartlett, Caroline Julia (American minister)

    Caroline Julia Bartlett Crane, American minister who, after a productive career in Christian social service, undertook a second successful profession in urban sanitation. Caroline Bartlett grew up in Hudson, Wisconsin, and in Hamilton, Illinois. She graduated from Carthage College in nearby

  • Bartlett, Frederic (British psychologist)

    Frederic Bartlett, British psychologist best known for his studies of memory. Through his long association with University of Cambridge, Bartlett strongly influenced British psychological method, emphasizing a descriptive, or case study, approach over more statistical techniques. In 1922 he became

  • Bartlett, Frederic C. (British psychologist)

    Frederic Bartlett, British psychologist best known for his studies of memory. Through his long association with University of Cambridge, Bartlett strongly influenced British psychological method, emphasizing a descriptive, or case study, approach over more statistical techniques. In 1922 he became

  • Bartlett, John (American editor)

    John Bartlett, American bookseller and editor best known for his Familiar Quotations. At the age of 16, Bartlett became an employee of the Harvard University bookstore, where he became so versed in book knowledge that the advice “Ask John Bartlett” became common on the Harvard campus. Eventually he

  • Bartlett, John Russell (American bibliographer)

    John Russell Bartlett, bibliographer who made his greatest contribution to linguistics with his pioneer work, Dictionary of Americanisms: A Glossary of Words and Phrases, Usually Regarded as Peculiar to the United States (1848). It went through four editions and was translated into Dutch and

  • Bartlett, Joseph M. (American frontiersman)

    Clinton: The original settler, Joseph M. Bartlett, operated a trading store for Native Americans in the 1830s and in 1836 named the site New York. The Iowa Land Company purchased the townsite in 1855 and renamed it for DeWitt Clinton, former governor of New York. Clinton annexed the town…

  • Bartlett, Maurice Stevenson (British statistician)

    Bartlett's test: …introduced by the English statistician Maurice Stevenson Bartlett in 1937.

  • Bartlett, Neil (British chemist)

    xenon: Compounds: …until 1962, when British chemist Neil Bartlett produced the first noble-gas compound, a yellow-orange solid that can best be formulated as a mixture of [XeF+][PtF6?], [XeF+][Pt2F11?], and PtF5. Xenon has the most extensive chemistry in Group 18 and exhibits the oxidation states + 1 2 , +2, +4, +6, and…

  • Bartlett, Sir Frederic Charles (British psychologist)

    Frederic Bartlett, British psychologist best known for his studies of memory. Through his long association with University of Cambridge, Bartlett strongly influenced British psychological method, emphasizing a descriptive, or case study, approach over more statistical techniques. In 1922 he became

  • Bartley, Robert LeRoy (American journalist)

    Robert LeRoy Bartley, American journalist (born Oct. 12, 1937, Marshall, Minn.—died Dec. 10, 2003, New York, N.Y.), served as the editor of The Wall Street Journal’s editorial page for three of his nearly four decades with that paper and in that post was an avid champion of supply-side economics a

  • Bartman incident (baseball history)

    Chicago Cubs: …near the stands (the so-called Bartman incident). The Cubs ended up losing the game—and the series.

  • Bartmannkrug (stoneware jug)

    Bartmannkrug, type of 16th-century German jug, characterized by a round belly and a mask of a bearded man applied in relief to the neck. This salt-glazed stoneware jug is associated particularly with Cologne and Frechen, where it was manufactured in considerable numbers. It was sometimes called a

  • Bartók Béla (Hungarian composer)

    Béla Bartók, Hungarian composer, pianist, ethnomusicologist, and teacher, noted for the Hungarian flavour of his major musical works, which include orchestral works, string quartets, piano solos, several stage works, a cantata, and a number of settings of folk songs for voice and piano. Bartók

  • Bartók String Quartet (Hungarian music group)

    Bartók String Quartet, Hungarian musical ensemble that is one of the world’s most renowned string quartets. It was founded in 1957 as the Komlós Quartet by graduates of the College of Musical Arts in Budapest: first violinist Péter Komlós, second violinist Sándor Devich, violist Géza Németh, and

  • Bartók, Béla (Hungarian composer)

    Béla Bartók, Hungarian composer, pianist, ethnomusicologist, and teacher, noted for the Hungarian flavour of his major musical works, which include orchestral works, string quartets, piano solos, several stage works, a cantata, and a number of settings of folk songs for voice and piano. Bartók

  • Bartol, Vladimir (Slovene author)

    Alamut: …novel written by Slovenian writer Vladimir Bartol, published in 1938. The novel and its famed maxim—"Nothing is an absolute reality, all is permitted," later recast by William Burroughs as "Nothing is true, everything is permitted" in his novel The Naked Lunch—inspired the popular video game series and action-adventure franchise called…

  • Bartold, Vasily Vladimirovich (Russian anthropologist)

    Vasily Vladimirovich Bartold, Russian anthropologist who made valuable contributions to the study of the social and cultural history of Islam and of the Tajik Iranians and literate Turkic peoples of Central Asia. Bartold joined the faculty of the University of St. Petersburg in 1901 and for the

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