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  • Bateman, Hester (British silversmith)

    Hester Bateman, silversmith noted particularly for her domestic silver of elegant simplicity. Her husband, John Bateman, who worked in gold and silver, particularly watch chains, died in 1760. The next year she took over the family business, registering her mark at the Goldsmiths’ Hall, London.

  • Bateman, Hezekiah Linthicum (American actor)

    H.L. Bateman, actor and theatrical manager who made a great success of touring the United States and England with two of his daughters, both child actresses. Bateman made his stage debut in 1832 and acted in various repertory companies until 1849. Then he, his wife, Sidney Frances, and his two

  • Bateman, James (American actor and comedian)

    Henry Gibson, (James Bateman), American actor and comedian (born Sept. 21, 1935, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa.—died Sept. 14, 2009, Malibu, Calif.), won audiences over with his sly deadpan delivery as a placid reciter of ridiculous self-penned poetry in the 1960s television variety show Rowan &

  • Bateman, Kate (American actor)

    H.L. Bateman: …and his two eldest daughters, Kate and Ellen, aged six and four, respectively, began to tour widely as stars. Later Ellen played Richard III, Shylock, and Macbeth to Kate’s Richmond, Portia, and Lady Macbeth. In 1855 Bateman managed a St. Louis theatre and later, as Kate’s manager, moved to New…

  • Bateman, Sidney Frances (American actress and playwright)

    H.L. Bateman: Bateman made his stage debut in 1832 and acted in various repertory companies until 1849. Then he, his wife, Sidney Frances, and his two eldest daughters, Kate and Ellen, aged six and four, respectively, began to tour widely as stars. Later Ellen played Richard III,…

  • Batemans Bay (New South Wales, Australia)

    Batemans Bay, coastal town and inlet of the Tasman Sea, southeastern New South Wales, Australia. The inlet, an estuary of the Clyde River, measures 4 by 5 miles (6 by 8 km). The area was sighted in 1770 by Capt. James Cook, who named it for the captain of the ship Northumberland. The town, founded

  • Bates College (college, Lewiston, Maine, United States)

    Bates College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Lewiston, Maine, U.S. It is a liberal arts college that offers bachelor’s degree programs in literature, languages, social sciences, life and physical sciences, philosophy, and other areas. Research facilities include the

  • Bates, Clayton (American dancer)

    Clayton Bates, American tap dancer who, despite having lost a leg in an accident when he was 12 years old, enjoyed a performing career that lasted some seven decades and saw him in vaudeville, clubs, stage musicals, and motion pictures and on television, including 21 appearances on "The Ed Sullivan

  • Bates, Daisy (American civil rights leader)

    Daisy Bates, American journalist and civil rights activist who withstood economic, legal, and physical intimidation to champion racial equality, most notably in the integration of public schools in Little Rock, Arkansas. Daisy Gaston was adopted as a baby after her mother’s murder and her father’s

  • Bates, Daisy (Australian author)

    Australian literature: Nationalism and expansion: … peoples would also pass away—Daisy Bates, who lived for many years among Aboriginal people, used as the title of her book about her experiences the standard phrase The Passing of the Aborigine (1938). Aboriginal people had become the subject of anthropological interest in the work of Sir Walter Baldwin…

  • Bates, Daisy Gatson (American civil rights leader)

    Daisy Bates, American journalist and civil rights activist who withstood economic, legal, and physical intimidation to champion racial equality, most notably in the integration of public schools in Little Rock, Arkansas. Daisy Gaston was adopted as a baby after her mother’s murder and her father’s

  • Bates, Daisy Lee Gatson (American civil rights leader)

    Daisy Bates, American journalist and civil rights activist who withstood economic, legal, and physical intimidation to champion racial equality, most notably in the integration of public schools in Little Rock, Arkansas. Daisy Gaston was adopted as a baby after her mother’s murder and her father’s

  • Bates, Deacon L. J. (American musician)

    Blind Lemon Jefferson, American country blues singer, guitarist, and songwriter, one of the earliest black folk-blues singers to achieve popular success. Blind from birth and the youngest of seven children, Jefferson became an itinerant entertainer in his teens, learning a repertoire of prison

  • Bates, Edward (American politician)

    Edward Bates, lawyer and Whig politician who joined the Republican Party before the U.S. Civil War and served as Abraham Lincoln’s attorney general. Educated largely at home, Bates moved from Virginia to Missouri in 1814 and shortly thereafter began the study of law. By 1816 he was practicing law

  • Bates, Frederick (American governor)

    Meriwether Lewis: …absence empowered the territorial secretary, Frederick Bates, who undermined Lewis’s authority by setting his own regulations on trading and mining licenses and filling positions through favouritism. When Lewis arrived in Missouri, he clashed with Bates over the administration of Indian and territorial affairs, which resulted in an irreparable rift between…

  • Bates, H. E. (British author)

    H.E. Bates, English novelist and short-story writer of high reputation and wide popularity. Bates attended grammar school at Kettering; he qualified for university but did not attend because his family could not afford it. In 1921, at age 16, he joined the Northampton Chronicle as a reporter, but

  • Bates, H. W. (British naturalist and explorer)

    H.W. Bates, British naturalist and explorer whose demonstration of the operation of natural selection in animal mimicry (the imitation by a species of other life-forms or of inanimate objects) gave firm support to Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution. In 1844 Bates introduced the subject of

  • Bates, Henry Walter (British naturalist and explorer)

    H.W. Bates, British naturalist and explorer whose demonstration of the operation of natural selection in animal mimicry (the imitation by a species of other life-forms or of inanimate objects) gave firm support to Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution. In 1844 Bates introduced the subject of

  • Bates, Herbert Ernest (British author)

    H.E. Bates, English novelist and short-story writer of high reputation and wide popularity. Bates attended grammar school at Kettering; he qualified for university but did not attend because his family could not afford it. In 1921, at age 16, he joined the Northampton Chronicle as a reporter, but

  • Bates, John (English merchant)

    United Kingdom: Finance and politics: …after the judges ruled in Bate’s case (1606) that the king could make impositions on imported commodities without the consent of Parliament. Two years later, under the direction of James’s able minister Robert Cecil, earl of Salisbury, impositions were levied on an expanded list of goods, and a revised book…

  • Bates, Katharine Lee (American author)

    Katharine Lee Bates, author and educator who wrote the text of the national hymn “America the Beautiful.” She was educated at Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass., where she taught English literature from 1885 to 1925. Among her many works are The College Beautiful and Other Poems (1887), English

  • Bates, Kathleen Doyle (American actress)

    Kathy Bates, American actress of stage, screen, and television, especially known for her portrayals of strong women who act against the social milieu. She won an Academy Award for best actress for her chilling performance of an obsessed fan in Misery (1990). Bates was raised in Memphis and later

  • Bates, Kathy (American actress)

    Kathy Bates, American actress of stage, screen, and television, especially known for her portrayals of strong women who act against the social milieu. She won an Academy Award for best actress for her chilling performance of an obsessed fan in Misery (1990). Bates was raised in Memphis and later

  • Bates, Lucius Christopher (American publisher and civil rights leader)

    Lucius Christopher Bates, African American newspaper publisher and civil rights leader. Bates was the publisher of the Arkansas State Press, a weekly pro-civil rights newspaper. In 1957, after Governor Orval Faubus called out the state’s National Guard in an attempt to thwart the racial integration

  • Bates, Marston (American zoologist)

    Marston Bates, American zoologist whose studies of mosquitoes in the 1930s and ’40s contributed greatly to the epidemiology of yellow fever in northern South America. After several years of fieldwork, Bates received his Ph.D. at Harvard University in 1934. From 1937 to 1952 he served on the staff

  • Bates, Mount (mountain, Norfolk Island, Australia)

    Norfolk Island: …above sea level, rises to Mount Bates (1,047 feet [319 m]) and Mount Pitt (1,043 feet [318 m]). Kingston, in the south, is the main settlement and administrative centre. Area 13 square miles (35 square km). Population (2016) 1,748.

  • Bates, Otha Ellas (American musician)

    Bo Diddley, American singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was one of the most influential performers of rock music’s early period. He was raised mostly in Chicago by his adoptive family, from whom he took the surname McDaniel, and he recorded for the legendary blues record company Chess as Bo

  • Bates, Peg Leg (American dancer)

    Clayton Bates, American tap dancer who, despite having lost a leg in an accident when he was 12 years old, enjoyed a performing career that lasted some seven decades and saw him in vaudeville, clubs, stage musicals, and motion pictures and on television, including 21 appearances on "The Ed Sullivan

  • Bates, Sir Alan Arthur (British actor)

    Sir Alan Arthur Bates, British actor (born Feb. 17, 1934, Allestree, Derbyshire, Eng.—died Dec. 27, 2003, London, Eng.), was considered among the finest and most versatile performers of his generation. He was at home both in the works of such classical writers as William Shakespeare and Anton C

  • Bates, Sir Percy Elly, 4th Baronet (British shipowner)

    Sir Percy Elly Bates, 4th Baronet, British shipowner who was responsible for outlining the policy that led to the construction of the largest passenger ships in the world, the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth. Educated at Winchester College, Bates became an apprentice with a Liverpool shipping

  • Batesian mimicry (zoology)

    Batesian mimicry, a form of biological resemblance in which a noxious, or dangerous, organism (the model), equipped with a warning system such as conspicuous coloration, is mimicked by a harmless organism (the mimic). The mimic gains protection because predators mistake it for the model and leave

  • Bateson, Gregory (American anthropologist)

    Gregory Bateson, British-born U.S. anthropologist. Son of British biologist William Bateson, he studied anthropology at Cambridge University but soon thereafter moved to the U.S. His most important book, Naven (1936), was a groundbreaking study of cultural symbolism and ritual based on fieldwork in

  • Bateson, William (British biologist)

    William Bateson, British biologist who founded and named the science of genetics and whose experiments provided evidence basic to the modern understanding of heredity. A dedicated evolutionist, he cited embryo studies to support his contention in 1885 that chordates evolved from primitive

  • Batesville (Arkansas, United States)

    Batesville, city, seat (1821) of Independence county, north-central Arkansas, U.S., about 90 miles (145 km) northeast of Little Rock. It lies in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains on the White River. The land on which the city is built once belonged to the Osage Indians, who ceded the territory

  • batfish (fish)

    Batfish, any of about 60 species of fishes of the family Ogcocephalidae (order Lophiiformes), found in warm and temperate seas. Batfishes have broad, flat heads and slim bodies and are covered with hard lumps and spines. Some species have an elongated, upturned snout. Batfishes grow at most about

  • Batgirl (comic-book superhero)

    Batgirl, American comic-strip superhero created for DC Comics by writer Gardner Fox and artist Carmine Infantino. Batgirl first appeared in Detective Comics no. 359 (January 1967). The first teenage heroine to join Batman’s extended family was Betty Kane, niece of the costumed hero Batwoman. As

  • Bath (Maine, United States)

    Bath, city, port of entry (since 1789), seat (1854) of Sagadahoc county, southwestern Maine, U.S. The city lies along the Kennebec River near its mouth on the Atlantic coast, 36 miles (58 km) northeast of Portland. Settled about 1670 and named for the English city, it was part of Georgetown until

  • Bath (North Carolina, United States)

    Bath, town, Beaufort county, eastern North Carolina, U.S., on the Pamlico estuary. The first proprietary grant in the area (1684) embraced the town site, about 40 miles (65 km) southeast of Greenville, then occupied by a Native American village called Pamlicoe. Settled by the English (1695), it

  • bath (unit of measurement)

    Bat, in a measurement system, ancient Hebrew unit of liquid and dry capacity. Estimated at 37 litres (about 6.5 gallons) and approximately equivalent to the Greek metrētēs, the bat contained 10 omers, 1 omer being the quantity (based on tradition) of manna allotted to each Israelite for every day

  • bath (plumbing)

    Bath, process of soaking the body in water or some other aqueous matter such as mud, steam, or milk. The bath may have cleanliness or curative purposes, and it can have religious, mystical, or some other meaning (see ritual bath). The bath as an institution has a long history. Writings from

  • Bath (West Virginia, United States)

    Bath, town, seat (1820) of Morgan county, in the eastern panhandle of West Virginia, U.S., near the Potomac River. Probably the oldest spa in the nation, it was chartered in 1776 and officially named Bath for the famous English watering place; its post-office name, however, is Berkeley Springs.

  • Bath (England, United Kingdom)

    Bath, city, unitary authority of Bath and North East Somerset, historic county of Somerset, southwestern England. Bath lies astride the River Avon (Lower, or Bristol, Avon) in a natural arena of steep hills. It was built of local limestone and is one of the most elegant and architecturally

  • Bath Abbey (abbey, Bath, England, United Kingdom)

    Bath: Its 16th-century abbey church of St. Peter and St. Paul is late Perpendicular Gothic and is noted for its windows, but it is the wealth of classical Georgian buildings mounting the steep valley sides that gives Bath its distinction. The city was designated a UNESCO World Heritage…

  • Bath and North East Somerset (unitary authority, England, United Kingdom)

    Bath and North East Somerset, unitary authority, geographic and historic county of Somerset, southwestern England. It lies southeast of the city of Bristol and encompasses the city of Bath (the main administrative centre), several small urban areas between Bath and Bristol, and the countryside

  • bath chair (furniture)

    Bath chair, chair on wheels intended for use by ladies and invalids. It was devised by James Heath, of Bath, Eng., about 1750. For the next three-quarters of a century it rivaled the sedan chair and ultimately superseded it as a form of conveyance in Great Britain. The most common variety was

  • Bath Iron Works (American company)

    Bath: The Bath Iron Works (founded 1833 and the city’s main economic asset) has been building ships since 1889, reaching peak naval production during the world wars. Inc. city, 1847. Pop. (2000) 9,266; (2010) 8,514.

  • Bath of Mary (alchemy)

    Christianity: Renaissance magic and science: …the crucible containing the so-called Bath of Mary, whose amniotic fluids dissolved all impurities. This dissolution prepared one for rebirth as a perfect being. All matter was redeemed by immersion in the fluids of the womb where Jesus assumed the flesh. Mystical union with Christ’s death and physical regression to…

  • Bath of the Nymphs (work by Girardon)

    Fran?ois Girardon: …are the relief of the Bath of the Nymphs (1668–70), perhaps inspired by Jean Goujon’s Fontaine des Innocents, and The Rape of Persephone (1677–79; pedestal completed 1699), in which he challenges comparison with Giambologna’s Rape of the Sabines. The effect of this group is marred by its present situation in…

  • Bath school disaster (school bombings, Bath Township, Michigan, United States [1927])

    Bath school disaster, pair of bombings on May 18, 1927, of Bath Consolidated School in Bath Township, Michigan, U.S., that killed 38 schoolchildren. The perpetrator, Andrew Kehoe, also killed five adults in addition to himself in the worst school massacre in American history. Kehoe spent months

  • Bath, Henry Frederick Thynne, 6th Marquess of (British nobleman)

    Henry Frederick Thynne, 6th marquess of Bath, British nobleman who in 1949 turned Longleat House, his financially distressed family’s 16th-century home, into a tourist attraction, setting a precedent that was followed by a number of his peers. In the 1960s he introduced African wildlife in a safari

  • Bath, The Most Honourable Order of the (British knighthood)

    The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, order of British knighthood established by King George I in 1725, conferred as a reward either for military service or for exemplary civilian merit. Like most chivalric orders, it has antecedents that reach far before the actual date of its founding. Bathing

  • Bath, Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of (British politician)

    Thomas Thynne, 1st marquess of Bath, politician who, as 3rd Viscount Weymouth, held important office in the British government during two critical periods in the reign of George III. Although he was an outstanding orator, his dissolute habits (gambling and heavy drinking), indolence, and

  • Bath, Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of, Viscount Weymouth, Baron Thynne of Warmister (British politician)

    Thomas Thynne, 1st marquess of Bath, politician who, as 3rd Viscount Weymouth, held important office in the British government during two critical periods in the reign of George III. Although he was an outstanding orator, his dissolute habits (gambling and heavy drinking), indolence, and

  • Bath, William Pulteney, 1st Earl of (British politician)

    William Pulteney, 1st earl of Bath, English Whig politician who became prominent in the opposition to Sir Robert Walpole (first lord of the treasury and chancellor of the Exchequer, 1721–42), after being staunchly loyal to him for 12 years, up to 1717. Pulteney was himself three times in a position

  • Bath, William Pulteney, 1st Earl of, Viscount Pulteney of Wrington, Baron of Hedon (British politician)

    William Pulteney, 1st earl of Bath, English Whig politician who became prominent in the opposition to Sir Robert Walpole (first lord of the treasury and chancellor of the Exchequer, 1721–42), after being staunchly loyal to him for 12 years, up to 1717. Pulteney was himself three times in a position

  • Batha Museum (museum, Fès, Morocco)

    Morocco: Cultural institutions: The Batha Museum, located in Fès and housed in a former 19th-century royal residence, specializes in historical Moroccan art and has an excellent collection of native ceramics. The Ouda?a Museum (founded 1915; also known as the Museum of Moroccan Art) is located near Rabat’s Ouda?a Casbah.…

  • Bathari (language)

    South Arabian languages: Sha?rī (E?kalī; Jibbali), ?arsūsī, and Ba??arī on the Arabian shore of the Indian Ocean and Soqo?rī on Socotra. ?arsūsī has been influenced by Arabic, a northern Arabian language, to a greater extent than have the other dialects. These languages lack a tradition of writing, and thus almost nothing is known…

  • Bathe, Lady de (British actress)

    Lillie Langtry, British beauty and actress, known as the Jersey Lily. She was the daughter of the dean of Jersey. In 1874 she married Edward Langtry, who died in 1897, and in 1899 she married Hugo de Bathe, who became a baronet in 1907. In 1881 Langtry caused a sensation by being the first society

  • Bather (work by Falconet)

    Western sculpture: France: …of étienne-Maurice Falconet’s marble “Bather” (1757) adapt the Classic tradition to a pretty and intimate Rococo ideal that is the quintessence of 18th-century taste. This Classicism was purified by Jean-Antoine Houdon, who avoided the playful air of the Rococo boudoir in his “Diana” (c. 1777) and his marble nude…

  • Bathers (paintings by Cézanne)

    Paul Cézanne: Final years: …countless still-life images, and the Bathers series, in which he attempted to return to the classic tradition of the nude and explore his concern for its sculptural effect in relation to the landscape. He was obsessed with his work, which was time-consuming since he painted slowly.

  • Bathers on a Summer Evening (painting by Vallotton)

    Félix Vallotton: …he completed in that period, Bathers on a Summer Evening (1892–93) attracted the most attention. That large-scale composition of women of various ages and in various stages of undress was exhibited at the Salon des Indépendants in spring 1893, and it shocked the crowds with its eroticism.

  • Bathgate, Andrew James (Canadian ice hockey player)

    Andy Bathgate, (Andrew James Bathgate), Canadian ice hockey player (born Aug. 28, 1932, Winnipeg, Man.—died Feb. 26, 2016, Brampton, Ont.), possessed a lethal slap shot and an equally dangerous wrist shot and was known as a superb puck handler, skills that made him a star offensive player for the

  • Bathgate, Andy (Canadian ice hockey player)

    Andy Bathgate, (Andrew James Bathgate), Canadian ice hockey player (born Aug. 28, 1932, Winnipeg, Man.—died Feb. 26, 2016, Brampton, Ont.), possessed a lethal slap shot and an equally dangerous wrist shot and was known as a superb puck handler, skills that made him a star offensive player for the

  • Bathhouse Row (resort, Arkansas, United States)

    Hot Springs: …along Central Avenue (also called Bathhouse Row) located on the southwestern slope of Hot Springs Mountain. Water from the hot springs flows at a rate of 850,000 gallons (3,200,000 litres) per day, with an average temperature of 143 °F (62 °C). Originally each of the bathhouses along Bathhouse Row had…

  • Bathhouse, The (work by Mayakovsky)

    Vladimir Mayakovsky: 30, 1930; The Bathhouse), a satire of bureaucratic stupidity and opportunism under Joseph Stalin.

  • Bathiat, Arlette-Léonie (French actress)

    Arletty, French actress with a distinguished international reputation for her film characterizations. Arletty worked for a time in a factory and as a secretary before becoming an artist’s model and chorus girl. In 1920 she joined the Théatre des Capucines and appeared there in innumerable revues a

  • Bathinda (India)

    Bathinda, city, southwest-central Punjab state, northwestern India. It is situated in the Malwa Plains on the Bathinda Branch Canal (which joins the Sutlej River to the northeast). Bathinda is a major rail hub, with lines converging on it from other Indian states and from nearby Pakistan. It is a

  • bathing (animal behaviour)

    anseriform: Behaviour: Bathing movements include dipping the head, beating the wings on the surface and, at high intensity, actual diving or somersaulting through the water. Sleep often follows such maintenance activities, the bill being turned and placed under the scapular (shoulder) feathers. Bathing is often a communal…

  • Bathing Beauty (film by Sidney [1944])

    George Sidney: Bathing Beauty and Anchors Aweigh: …production earned him another musical, Bathing Beauty (1944), which was Esther Williams’s first starring vehicle. Featuring a spectacular water finale and a fine comedic performance by Skelton, the film was a major success and launched a string of swimming musicals.

  • bathing suit (garment)

    Swimsuit, garment designed for wearing while swimming. Sea bathing became popular in the mid-19th century when railroads first made it possible for people to get to the beach for their vacations. The first swimsuits concealed most of the body: women wore bloomers, black stockings, and a dress with

  • Bathing the Red Horse (painting by Petrov-Vodkin)

    Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin: …Group, he presented his painting Bathing the Red Horse (1912), which immediately became famous. His peers saw it on one hand as being “a hymn to Apollo” and on the other as a presaging of a future cataclysm and renewal of the world. (World War I was to break out…

  • batholith (geology)

    Batholith, large body of igneous rock formed beneath the Earth’s surface by the intrusion and solidification of magma. It is commonly composed of coarse-grained rocks (e.g., granite or granodiorite) with a surface exposure of 100 square km (40 square miles) or larger. A batholith has an irregular

  • Bathonian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Bathonian Stage, third of the four divisions of the Middle Jurassic Series, representing all rocks formed worldwide during the Bathonian Age, which occurred between 168.3 million and 166.1 million years ago during the Jurassic Period. The Bathonian Stage overlies the Bajocian Stage and underlies

  • Báthory Erzsébet (Hungarian countess)

    Elizabeth Báthory, Hungarian countess who purportedly tortured and murdered hundreds of young women in the 16th and 17th centuries. Báthory was born into prominent Protestant nobility in Hungary. Her family controlled Transylvania, and her uncle, Stephen Báthory, was king of Poland. She was raised

  • Báthory, Elizabeth (Hungarian countess)

    Elizabeth Báthory, Hungarian countess who purportedly tortured and murdered hundreds of young women in the 16th and 17th centuries. Báthory was born into prominent Protestant nobility in Hungary. Her family controlled Transylvania, and her uncle, Stephen Báthory, was king of Poland. She was raised

  • Báthory, Gábor (prince of Transylvania)

    Gábor Bethlen: …Transylvania and supported his successor, Gábor Báthory. Differences between Bethlen and Báthory, however, forced Bethlen to take refuge with the Turks. The Ottoman sultan Ahmed I, suzerain of Transylvania, provided Bethlen with an army and proclaimed him prince of Transylvania. When Báthory was driven from power, Bethlen was proclaimed prince…

  • Báthory, Sigismund (prince of Transylvania)

    Sigismund Báthory, prince of Transylvania whose unpopular anti-Turkish policy led to civil war. The son of Christopher Báthory (prince of Transylvania, 1575–81) and nephew of Stephen (István Báthory, king of Poland, 1575–86), Sigismund succeeded his father in 1581 and actually assumed control of

  • Báthory, Stephen (king of Poland)

    Stephen Báthory, prince of Transylvania (1571–76) and king of Poland (1575–86) who successfully opposed the Habsburg candidate for the Polish throne, defended Poland’s eastern Baltic provinces against Russian incursion, and attempted to form a great state from Poland, Muscovy, and Transylvania. The

  • Báthory, Zsigmond (prince of Transylvania)

    Sigismund Báthory, prince of Transylvania whose unpopular anti-Turkish policy led to civil war. The son of Christopher Báthory (prince of Transylvania, 1575–81) and nephew of Stephen (István Báthory, king of Poland, 1575–86), Sigismund succeeded his father in 1581 and actually assumed control of

  • bathos (literature)

    Bathos, (from Greek bathys, “deep”), unsuccessful, and therefore ludicrous, attempt to portray pathos in art, i.e., to evoke pity, sympathy, or sorrow. The term was first used in this sense by Alexander Pope in his treatise Peri Bathous; or, The Art of Sinking in Poetry (1728). Bathos may result

  • Bathos, The (engraving by Hogarth)

    William Hogarth: Return to prints: …executed an engraving sardonically titled Tailpiece, or The Bathos, in which he sombrely depicted the demise of his own artistic world. In a sense it was prophetic, for, as the 19th-century English painter John Constable rightly remarked, “Hogarth has no school, nor has he ever been imitated with tolerable success.”…

  • bathroom

    construction: Plumbing: …of water is in the bathroom, which typically includes a bathtub of cast iron or pressed steel with a ceramic porcelain coating (although fibre-glass-reinforced resin is also used), a ceramic lavatory, and a ceramic tank-type water closet. The bath and lavatory are supplied with hot and cold water through faucets…

  • Bathsheba (biblical figure)

    Bathsheba, in the Hebrew Bible (2 Samuel 11, 12; 1 Kings 1, 2), wife of Uriah the Hittite; she later became one of the wives of King David and the mother of King Solomon. Bathsheba was a daughter of Eliam and was probably of noble birth. A beautiful woman, she became pregnant after David saw her

  • Bathurst (New Brunswick, Canada)

    Bathurst, city in Gloucester county, northeastern New Brunswick, Canada. It lies at the mouth of the Nepisiguit River, on Bathurst Harbour, a southern arm of Nepisiguit Bay. The original French settlement, founded in 1619, was called Nepisiguit and then St. Peters. After 1755 the British displaced

  • Bathurst (national capital, The Gambia)

    Banjul, city, capital, and Atlantic port of The Gambia, on St. Mary’s Island, near the mouth of the Gambia River. It is the country’s largest city. It was founded in 1816, when the British Colonial Office ordered Captain Alexander Grant to establish a military post on the river to suppress the

  • Bathurst (New South Wales, Australia)

    Bathurst, city, east-central New South Wales, Australia. It lies on the south bank of the Macquarie River, west of the Blue Mountains. The city was founded in 1815 and named for Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst, then secretary for war and the colonies, and it is the oldest settlement west of the

  • Bathurst Island (island, Canada)

    Bathurst Island, one of the Parry Islands in the Baffin region, Nunavut territory, northern Canada, between the islands of Cornwallis (east) and Melville (west) and north of Parry Channel. Bathurst Island is 160 miles (260 km) long and 50–100 miles (80–160 km) wide and has an area of 6,194 square

  • Bathurst Island (island, Northern Territory, Australia)

    Bathurst Island, island in the Timor Sea, Northern Territory, Australia. It is separated from Melville Island to the east by Apsley Strait and from the mainland by Beagle Gulf. Melville and Bathurst are administered jointly as the Tiwi Islands. The islands are located approximately 50 miles (80 km)

  • Bathurst of Bathurst, Allen Bathurst, 1st Earl, Baron Bathurst of Battlesden (British statesman)

    Allen Bathurst, 1st Earl Bathurst, British statesman and Tory politician. Educated at Trinity College, Oxford, Bathurst became member of Parliament for Cirencester in 1705 and held the seat until 1712, when he was one of 12 Tories raised to the peerage, becoming Baron Bathurst. He defended Francis

  • Bathurst of Bathurst, Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl, Baron Bathurst of Battlesden, Lord Apsley, Baron of Apsley (British statesman)

    Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst, statesman, eldest surviving son of the 1st Earl Bathurst, whose title he inherited in 1775. Educated at Balliol College, Oxford, Bathurst was called to the bar and in 1745 became king’s counsel. As member of Parliament for Cirencester from 1735 to 1754, he was at

  • Bathurst of Bathurst, Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl, Baron Bathurst of Battlesden, Lord Apsley, Baron of Apsley (British statesman)

    Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst, British statesman, elder son of the 2nd Earl Bathurst, who was a prominent Tory in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Bathurst was member of Parliament for Cirencester from 1783 until he succeeded to the earldom in 1794. Mainly as a result of his friendship

  • Bathurst of Battlesden, Allen Bathurst, Baron (British statesman)

    Allen Bathurst, 1st Earl Bathurst, British statesman and Tory politician. Educated at Trinity College, Oxford, Bathurst became member of Parliament for Cirencester in 1705 and held the seat until 1712, when he was one of 12 Tories raised to the peerage, becoming Baron Bathurst. He defended Francis

  • Bathurst, Allen (British statesman)

    Allen Bathurst, 1st Earl Bathurst, British statesman and Tory politician. Educated at Trinity College, Oxford, Bathurst became member of Parliament for Cirencester in 1705 and held the seat until 1712, when he was one of 12 Tories raised to the peerage, becoming Baron Bathurst. He defended Francis

  • Bathurst, Allen Bathurst, 1st Earl (British statesman)

    Allen Bathurst, 1st Earl Bathurst, British statesman and Tory politician. Educated at Trinity College, Oxford, Bathurst became member of Parliament for Cirencester in 1705 and held the seat until 1712, when he was one of 12 Tories raised to the peerage, becoming Baron Bathurst. He defended Francis

  • Bathurst, Henry (British statesman)

    Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst, British statesman, elder son of the 2nd Earl Bathurst, who was a prominent Tory in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Bathurst was member of Parliament for Cirencester from 1783 until he succeeded to the earldom in 1794. Mainly as a result of his friendship

  • Bathurst, Henry (British statesman)

    Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst, statesman, eldest surviving son of the 1st Earl Bathurst, whose title he inherited in 1775. Educated at Balliol College, Oxford, Bathurst was called to the bar and in 1745 became king’s counsel. As member of Parliament for Cirencester from 1735 to 1754, he was at

  • Bathurst, Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl (British statesman)

    Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst, statesman, eldest surviving son of the 1st Earl Bathurst, whose title he inherited in 1775. Educated at Balliol College, Oxford, Bathurst was called to the bar and in 1745 became king’s counsel. As member of Parliament for Cirencester from 1735 to 1754, he was at

  • Bathurst, Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl (British statesman)

    Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst, British statesman, elder son of the 2nd Earl Bathurst, who was a prominent Tory in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Bathurst was member of Parliament for Cirencester from 1783 until he succeeded to the earldom in 1794. Mainly as a result of his friendship

  • Bathurst, Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl, Baron Bathurst of Battlesden, Lord Apsley, Baron of Apsley (British statesman)

    Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst, British statesman, elder son of the 2nd Earl Bathurst, who was a prominent Tory in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Bathurst was member of Parliament for Cirencester from 1783 until he succeeded to the earldom in 1794. Mainly as a result of his friendship

  • Bathurst, Henry, 2nd Earl, Baron Bathurst of Battlesden, Lord Apsley, Baron of Apsley (British statesman)

    Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst, statesman, eldest surviving son of the 1st Earl Bathurst, whose title he inherited in 1775. Educated at Balliol College, Oxford, Bathurst was called to the bar and in 1745 became king’s counsel. As member of Parliament for Cirencester from 1735 to 1754, he was at

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