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  • Bayezid II (Ottoman sultan)

    Bayezid II, Ottoman sultan (1481–1512) who consolidated Ottoman rule in the Balkans, Anatolia, and the eastern Mediterranean and successfully opposed the ?afavīd dynasty of Persia. Bayezid II was the elder son of the sultan Mehmed II, the conqueror of Constantinople. On the death of his father in

  • Bayezid Mosque (mosque, Istanbul, Turkey)

    Islamic arts: Architecture: …the Fatih külliye (1463–70), the Bayezid Mosque (after 1491), the Selim Mosque (1522), the ?ehzade külliye (1548), and the Süleyman külliye (after 1550). The ?ehzade and Süleyman külliyes were built by Sinan, the greatest Ottoman architect, whose masterpiece is the Selim Mosque at

  • Bayezid the Just (Ottoman sultan)

    Bayezid II, Ottoman sultan (1481–1512) who consolidated Ottoman rule in the Balkans, Anatolia, and the eastern Mediterranean and successfully opposed the ?afavīd dynasty of Persia. Bayezid II was the elder son of the sultan Mehmed II, the conqueror of Constantinople. On the death of his father in

  • Bayfield Peninsula (peninsula, Wisconsin, United States)

    Apostle Islands National Lakeshore: …(19-km) strip of the adjacent Bayfield Peninsula, covering a total land area of 108 square miles (281 square km); including water, it encompasses some 720 square miles (1,865 square km). The islands are noted for high cliffs of reddish sandstone with many wave-formed arches and caverns that develop magnificent ice…

  • Bayham of Bayham Abbey, Viscount (British jurist)

    Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden, English jurist who, as chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas (1761–66), refused to enforce general warrants (naming no particular person to be arrested). As lord chancellor of Great Britain (1766–70), he opposed the government’s North American colonial policy of

  • Bay?ān Umm Rusās (Yemen)

    Al-Bay?ā?, town, south-central Yemen. It is situated on a high plateau and, until the unification of the two Yemen states in 1990, was part of North Yemen (Sanaa), though it lay near the disputed frontier with South Yemen (Aden). The town, formerly known as Bay?ān Umm Rusās, was the historic

  • Bay?ān, Sultanate of (historical state, Arabia)

    Al-Bay?ā?: …the historic capital of the sultanate of Bay?ān (Beihan), which ruled over a wide area from the lifetime of Mu?ammad (7th century ad) to the 16th century. In modern times, before delimitation of the frontier between North Yemen and South Yemen, the town and environs were considered to be part…

  • bayin (music)

    Chinese music: Classification of instruments: …important ancient system called the eight sounds (ba yin) was used to classify the many kinds of instruments played in imperial orchestras. This system was based upon the material used in the construction of the instruments, the eight being stone, earth (pottery), bamboo, metal, skin, silk, wood, and gourd. Stone…

  • Bayinnaung (king of Myanmar)

    Bayinnaung, king of the Toungoo dynasty (reigned 1551–81) in Myanmar (Burma). He unified his country and conquered the Shan States and Siam (now Thailand), making Myanmar the most powerful kingdom in mainland Southeast Asia. In 1550 a revolt broke out among the Mons of southern Myanmar, and

  • Bayit ve-Gan (Israel)

    Bat Yam, city, west-central Israel, on the Plain of Sharon and the Mediterranean coast just south of Tel Aviv–Yafo. Founded in 1926 as a suburban development called Bayit ve-Gan (Hebrew: “House and Garden”), it was abandoned during the Arab riots of 1929. Resettled, it developed as a seaside resort

  • Bayjū (Mongol commander)

    Anatolia: Seljuq expansion: …crushed by the Mongol commander Bayjū at K?se Da? between Sivas and Erzincan, and the Anatolian Seljuqs passed under Mongol suzerainty as vassals. Kay-Khusraw II fled to Antalya, leaving his minister to come to terms with the Mongols. Cilician Armenia transferred its loyalty to the Mongols, and Turkmen revolts broke…

  • Baykal, Ozero (lake, Russia)

    Lake Baikal, lake located in the southern part of eastern Siberia within the republic of Buryatia and Irkutsk oblast (province) of Russia. It is the oldest existing freshwater lake on Earth (20 million–25 million years old), as well as the deepest continental body of water, having a maximum depth

  • Baykalskoye Ozero (lake, Russia)

    Lake Baikal, lake located in the southern part of eastern Siberia within the republic of Buryatia and Irkutsk oblast (province) of Russia. It is the oldest existing freshwater lake on Earth (20 million–25 million years old), as well as the deepest continental body of water, having a maximum depth

  • Baykalsky Mountains (mountains, Russia)

    Asia: The Precambrian: …years ago and created the Baikal mountain belt.

  • Baykonur (space centre, Kazakhstan)

    Baikonur Cosmodrome, former Soviet and current Russian space centre in south-central Kazakhstan. Baikonur was a Soviet code name for the centre, but American analysts often called it Tyuratam, after the railroad station at Tyuratam (Leninsk), the nearest large city. The Baikonur Cosmodrome lies on

  • Baykonur Cosmodrome (space centre, Kazakhstan)

    Baikonur Cosmodrome, former Soviet and current Russian space centre in south-central Kazakhstan. Baikonur was a Soviet code name for the centre, but American analysts often called it Tyuratam, after the railroad station at Tyuratam (Leninsk), the nearest large city. The Baikonur Cosmodrome lies on

  • Baykonyr (space centre, Kazakhstan)

    Baikonur Cosmodrome, former Soviet and current Russian space centre in south-central Kazakhstan. Baikonur was a Soviet code name for the centre, but American analysts often called it Tyuratam, after the railroad station at Tyuratam (Leninsk), the nearest large city. The Baikonur Cosmodrome lies on

  • Bayle, Pierre (French philosopher)

    Pierre Bayle, philosopher whose Dictionnaire historique et critique (1697; “Historical and Critical Dictionary”) was roundly condemned by the French Reformed Church of Rotterdam and by the French Roman Catholic church because of its numerous annotations deliberately designed to destroy orthodox

  • Baylebridge, William (Australian writer)

    William Baylebridge, poet and short-story writer considered one of the leading writers of Australia in his day. The son of an auctioneer, he was educated in Brisbane, then at the age of 25 went to England, where he published his first booklet of verse, Songs o’ the South (1908). He also travelled

  • Bayley’s Reward (Western Australia, Australia)

    Coolgardie, town, south-central Western Australia. It was founded in 1892 with the discovery of quartz gold in the vicinity, which marked the beginning of a rush to the East Coolgardie field. Known consecutively as Gnaralbine, Bayley’s Reward, and Fly Flat, it was finally renamed Coolgardie, an

  • Bayley, Elizabeth Ann (American saint)

    St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, ; canonized 1975; feast day January 4), first native-born American to be canonized by the Roman Catholic Church. She was the founder of the Sisters of Charity, the first American religious society. Elizabeth Bayley was the daughter of a distinguished physician. She devoted

  • Bayley, James Roosevelt (American bishop)

    Seton Hall University: James Roosevelt Bayley, the first Catholic bishop of Newark, established Seton Hall College in 1856, naming it for his aunt, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, the founder of the Sisters of Charity and the first saint born in America. In 1861 he founded the Immaculate Conception…

  • Bayley, John (British scholar and literary critic)

    John Oliver Bayley, British scholar and literary critic (born March 27, 1925, Lahore, British India [now in Pakistan]—died Jan. 12, 2015, Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain), was best known for his long marriage (1956–99) to his first wife, novelist Iris Murdoch, and for the trilogy of poignant

  • Bayley, John Oliver (British scholar and literary critic)

    John Oliver Bayley, British scholar and literary critic (born March 27, 1925, Lahore, British India [now in Pakistan]—died Jan. 12, 2015, Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain), was best known for his long marriage (1956–99) to his first wife, novelist Iris Murdoch, and for the trilogy of poignant

  • Bayley, Mrs. John O. (British writer and philosopher)

    Iris Murdoch, British novelist and philosopher noted for her psychological novels that contain philosophical and comic elements. After an early childhood spent in London, Murdoch went to Badminton School, Bristol, and from 1938 to 1942 studied at Somerville College, Oxford. Between 1942 and 1944

  • Baylis, Lilian Mary (British theatrical manager)

    Lilian Mary Baylis, English theatrical manager and founder of the Old Vic as a centre of Shakespearean productions. As a child, Baylis studied the violin, and she performed in concert with her parents, who were singers. In 1890 the family moved to South Africa, where Baylis later became a music

  • Bayliss, Sir William Maddock (British physiologist)

    Sir William Maddock Bayliss, British physiologist, co-discoverer (with the British physiologist Ernest Starling) of hormones; he conducted pioneer research in major areas of physiology, biochemistry, and physical chemistry. Bayliss studied at University College, London, and Wadham College, Oxford.

  • Baylor University (university, Waco, Texas, United States)

    Baylor University, private, coeducational institution of higher learning located in Waco, Texas, U.S. Baylor, affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas, is the world’s largest Baptist university and the oldest college in Texas. The university offers about 160 bachelor’s, 75 master’s,

  • Baylor, Elgin (American basketball player)

    Elgin Baylor, American professional basketball player who is regarded as one of the game’s greatest forwards. His graceful style enabled him to score and rebound with seeming ease. Baylor, 6 feet 5 inches (1.96 metres) tall, was an All-American (1958) at Seattle University, where he played from

  • Bayly, Sir Christopher Alan (British historian)

    Sir Christopher Alan Bayly, British historian (born May 18, 1945, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, Eng.—died April 19, 2015, Chicago, Ill.), was a preeminent scholar of British imperialism and the history of South Asia, notably India during and after the British colonial period. His books The Local Roots of

  • Bayn al-Qa?rayn (street, Cairo, Egypt)

    Islamic arts: Architecture: …streets of Cairo, such as Bayn al-Qa?rayn, became galleries of architectural masterpieces. The plans of those buildings may have had to be adapted to the exigencies of the city, but their spectacular facades and minarets competed with each other for effect. From the second half of the 14th century onward,…

  • Bayne, Beverly (American actress)

    Francis X. Bushman: …and Juliet (1916), which costarred Beverly Bayne.

  • Baynes, T. S. (British scholar and editor)

    Thomas Spencer Baynes, man of letters who was editor of the ninth edition of Encyclop?dia Britannica up to and including the 11th volume and who thereafter continued the work in partnership with William Robertson Smith. Bold and progressive in his planning of the edition, Baynes used his reputation

  • Baynes, Thomas Spencer (British scholar and editor)

    Thomas Spencer Baynes, man of letters who was editor of the ninth edition of Encyclop?dia Britannica up to and including the 11th volume and who thereafter continued the work in partnership with William Robertson Smith. Bold and progressive in his planning of the edition, Baynes used his reputation

  • Baynton, Barbara (Australian author)

    Australian literature: Nationalism and expansion: Barbara Baynton’s stories in Bush Studies (1902) subvert the persistent “matey” ethos, suggesting instead the darkly disturbing side of bush experience. Christopher Brennan, in such volumes as Poems 1913 (1913), virtually ignored local preoccupations in his Symbolist poetry; he tapped instead the deep sources of…

  • Bayon, Abbé J. Le (French writer)

    Celtic literature: Prose: …as Toussaint Le Garrec and Abbé J. Le Bayon, who revived several great mystery plays—Nicolazig, Boeh er goed (“The Voice of the Blood”), Ar hent en Hadour (“In the Steps of the Sower”), and Ar en hent de Vethleem (“On the Way to Bethlehem”).

  • Bayon, the (temple, Cambodia)

    Bayon, the, Cambodian Buddhist pyramid temple constructed c. 1200 at the behest of Jayavarman VII (1181–c. 1220), who had broken with Khmer tradition and adopted Mahāyāna Buddhism. In order to conform with traditional mythology, the Khmer kings built themselves a series of artificial mountains on

  • bayonet (weapon)

    Bayonet, short, sharp-edged, sometimes pointed weapon, designed for attachment to the muzzle of a firearm and developed, according to tradition, in Bayonne, Fr., early in the 17th century. The Maréchal de Puységur described the earliest bayonets as having a straight, double-edged blade a foot long

  • Bayonne (France)

    Bayonne, town, Pyrénées-Atlantiques département, Nouvelle-Aquitaine région, southwestern France, at the confluence of the Nive with the Adour River, 5 miles (8 km) from its mouth. With Biarritz, the noted Atlantic resort, it forms an extended built-up area. As Lapurdum, it was the chief port of

  • Bayonne (New Jersey, United States)

    Bayonne, city, Hudson county, northeastern New Jersey, U.S., on a 3-mile (5-km) peninsula between Newark and Upper New York bays, adjacent to Jersey City, New Jersey, and within the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Bayonne is connected with Staten Island, New York City (south), by a

  • Bayonne Bridge (bridge, Bayonne, New Jersey, United States)

    Othmar Herman Ammann: …in charge of building the Bayonne Bridge over the Kill van Kull, N.J., the Outerbridge Crossing and Goethals Bridge across Arthur Kill, and the Lincoln Tunnel under the Hudson River. As director of engineering, he directed the building of the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge and the Triborough Bridge (later renamed the Robert…

  • bayou (waterway)

    Bayou, Still or slow-moving section of marshy water, usually a creek, secondary watercourse, or minor river that is a tributary of another river or channel. It may occur in the form of an oxbow lake. Bayous are typical of Louisiana’s Mississippi River

  • Bayou Caviar (film by Gooding, Jr. [2018])

    Cuba Gooding, Jr.: …cowrote, directed, and starred in Bayou Caviar (2018).

  • Bayou Country (album by Creedence Clearwater Revival)

    Creedence Clearwater Revival: …power of their follow-up album, Bayou Country (1969), on which John Fogerty—singing with raw, grainy fervour and drawing inspiration from the wellspring of Southern rock and roll and blues—demonstrated his mastery of the three-minute rock song. “Proud Mary,” a mythic journey down the Mississippi River of Fogerty’s imagination, was an…

  • Bayou virus (infectious agent)

    hantavirus: …hispidus); Louisiana, caused by the Bayou virus (carried by the marsh rice rat, Oryzomys palustris); Chile and Argentina, caused by the Andes virus (carried by Oligoryzomys longicaudatus, a species of pygmy rice rat); and Central America, caused by the Choclo virus (carried by Oligoryzomys

  • Bayrakdar Mustafa Pa?a (Ottoman vizier)

    ?ayn: … of Rus?uk (now in Bulgaria), Bayrakdar Mustafa Pa?a, although he failed to restore Selim III, led a successful coup and brought Selim’s nephew Mahmud II to the throne. Bayrakdar subsequently became grand vizier and convened (1808) a conference of a?yān and derebeys (“valley lords,” hereditary and virtually independent feudatories in…

  • Bayram Khān (Mughal regent)

    India: The early years: …was in the hands of Bayram Khan. Bayram’s regency was momentous in the history of India. At its end the Mughal dominion embraced the whole of the Punjab, the territory of Delhi, what are now the states of Uttar Pradesh and Uttaranchal in the north (as far as Jaunpur in…

  • Bayram Pa?a (Ottoman statesman)

    Nef?i: …many enemies at the court; Bayram Pa?a, deputy prime minister and brother-in-law of the sultan, finally secured his execution in 1635.

  • Bayram Veli, Haci (Turkish saint and mystic)

    Sinan ?eyhi: …mystic and saint Haci (Hajji) Bayram Veli of Ankara, founder of the Bayrami order of dervishes. ?eyhi also was reputedly a skilled physician. A prolific poet, he is best known for his rendition of a popular love story in Islāmic literature, Hüsrev ü ?irin (“Khosrow and Shirin”). Inspired by the…

  • Bayram Veli, Hajji (Turkish saint and mystic)

    Sinan ?eyhi: …mystic and saint Haci (Hajji) Bayram Veli of Ankara, founder of the Bayrami order of dervishes. ?eyhi also was reputedly a skilled physician. A prolific poet, he is best known for his rendition of a popular love story in Islāmic literature, Hüsrev ü ?irin (“Khosrow and Shirin”). Inspired by the…

  • Bayreuth (Germany)

    Bayreuth, city, Bavaria Land (state), east-central Germany. It lies on the Roter (Red) Main River between the Fichtelgebirge (mountainous plateau) and the Franconian Jura Mountains, northeast of Nürnberg. First mentioned in 1194, it developed around a castle of the counts of Andechs-Meran and

  • Bayrisches Meer (lake, Germany)

    Chiemsee, lake, Bavaria Land (state), southeastern Germany. It lies 1,699 feet (518 m) above sea level, between the Inn (to which it drains through the Alz) and Salzach rivers. The largest lake in Bavaria, it is 9 miles (15 km) long and 5 miles (8 km) wide, has an area of 32 square miles (82

  • Bayrut (national capital, Lebanon)

    Beirut, capital, chief port, and largest city of Lebanon. It is located on the Mediterranean coast at the foot of the Lebanon Mountains. Beirut is a city of baffling contradictions whose character blends the sophisticated and cosmopolitan with the provincial and parochial. Before 1975 Beirut was

  • Baysān (Israel)

    Bet She?an, town, northeastern Israel, principal settlement in the low ?Emeq Bet She?an (?emeq, “valley”), site of one of the oldest inhabited cities of ancient Palestine. It is about 394 ft (120 m) below sea level. Overlooking the town to the north is Tel Bet She?an (Arabic Tall al-?u?n), one of

  • Baysunqur Mīrzā (Timurid ruler)

    Herāt school: …but it was his son Baysunqur Mīrzā (died 1433) who developed it into an important centre of painting, bringing to his court artists from all over Persia and Afghanistan. The school grew in importance until 1507, when Herāt was sacked by the Uzbeks.

  • Bayswater (neighbourhood, Westminster, London, United Kingdom)

    Bayswater, neighbourhood in the Paddington district of Westminster, London. It lies west of Edgware Road and north of Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park. The name Bayswater is a derivation of Bayards Watering Place, which was first recorded in 1380. The area was largely rural and isolated until the

  • Bayt al-?ikmah (historical site, Baghdad, Iraq)

    information processing: Inventory of recorded information: The Bayt al-?ikmah (“House of Wisdom”), founded in ad 830 in Baghdad, contained a public library with a large collection of materials on a wide range of subjects, and the 10th-century library of Caliph al-?akam in Cordova, Spain, boasted more than 400,000 books.

  • Bayt al-?A?m (museum, ?amāh, Syria)

    ?amāh: The ?A?m Palace (Bayt al-?A?m), originally the residence of the governor of ?amāh (and later Damascus), As?ad Pa?a al-?A?m, was restored by the Syrian Department of Antiquities but was damaged in fighting in 1982. The perfectly preserved 18th-century residence is now a museum that houses artifacts…

  • Bayt La?m (town, West Bank)

    Bethlehem, town in the West Bank, situated in the Judaean Hills 5 miles (8 km) south of Jerusalem. According to the Gospels (Matthew 2; Luke 2), Bethlehem was the site of the Nativity of Jesus Christ. Christian theology has linked this with the belief that his birth there fulfills the Old Testament

  • Baytin (ancient city, Palestine)

    Bethel, ancient city of Palestine, located just north of Jerusalem. Originally called Luz and in modern times Baytin, Bethel was important in Old Testament times and was frequently associated with Abraham and Jacob. Excavations, carried out by the American School of Oriental Research and the

  • Baytown (Texas, United States)

    Baytown, city, Harris county, southeastern Texas, U.S., at the mouth of the San Jacinto River on Galveston Bay, 22 miles (35 km) east of Houston. The area was settled in 1822; in 1864 a Confederate shipyard was built at Goose Creek. The unincorporated community of Baytown was annexed by Pelly

  • Baytūrsyn-ul?, Ahmed (Kazakh author)

    Kazakhstan: Cultural life: (Aqmet) Baytūrsyn-ul?, editor of the influential newspaper Qazaq, led the advance of modern Kazakh writing in the early 20th century. Baytūrsyn-ul?, along with Aliqan Nūrmuhambet Bokeyqan-ul?, Mir Jaqib Duwlat-ul?, and, later, Maghjan Jumabay-ul?, represented the cream of Kazakh modernism in literature, publishing, and cultural politics in…

  • Baytūrsyn-ul?, Aqmet (Kazakh author)

    Kazakhstan: Cultural life: (Aqmet) Baytūrsyn-ul?, editor of the influential newspaper Qazaq, led the advance of modern Kazakh writing in the early 20th century. Baytūrsyn-ul?, along with Aliqan Nūrmuhambet Bokeyqan-ul?, Mir Jaqib Duwlat-ul?, and, later, Maghjan Jumabay-ul?, represented the cream of Kazakh modernism in literature, publishing, and cultural politics in…

  • Baywatch (film by Gordon [2017])

    Dwayne Johnson: In 2017 he starred in Baywatch, a comedy based on the TV series about lifeguards, and Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, which was adapted from a children’s book by Chris Van Allsburg. The next year Johnson portrayed a father who goes to great heights to save his family from a…

  • Bayyan, Khalis (American musician)

    Kool &amp; the Gang: The principal members were Khalis Bayyan (byname of Ronald Bell; b. November 1, 1951, Youngstown, Ohio, U.S.), Robert (“Kool”) Bell (b. October 8, 1950, Youngstown), Claydes Charles Smith (b. September 6, 1948, Jersey City, New Jersey—d. June 20, 2006, Maplewood, New Jersey), George (“Funky”) Brown (b. January 5, 1949,…

  • bay?ah (Islam)

    caliph: &gt;bay?ah (allegiance). In contrast, subsequent rulers of the Muslim polity instituted dynastic rule, which violated the concept of shūrā and, therefore, was largely regarded as illegitimate, although it was often grudgingly accepted in a pragmatic vein.

  • Baz, ?Abd al-Aziz ibn Abdallah ibn (Saudi Arabian cleric)

    ?Abd al-Aziz ibn Abdallah ibn Baz, Saudi Muslim cleric who as the grand mufti (from 1993) and traditionalist head of the Council of Senior Islamic Scholars (from the early 1960s) was revered by millions and exerted a powerful influence on the legal system in Saudi Arabia; the blind cleric’s

  • Baza (Spain)

    Baza, city, Granada provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Andalusia, southern Spain, at the foot of the Sierra de Baza, northeast of Granada city. The city contains the ruins of a Moorish fort (alcazaba), and the Gothic collegiate church of Santa María is on the

  • bazaar (market)

    Bazaar, originally, a public market district of a Persian town. From Persia the term spread to Arabia (the Arabic word sūq is synonymous), Turkey, and North Africa. In India it came to be applied to a single shop, and in current English usage it is applied both to a single shop or concession

  • Bazaar Malay language

    Malay language: A Malay pidgin called Bazaar Malay (m?layu pasar, “market Malay”) was widely used as a lingua franca in the East Indian archipelago and was the basis of the colonial language used in Indonesia by the Dutch. The version of Bazaar Malay used in Chinese merchant communities in Malaysia is…

  • Bazaine, Achille-Fran?ois (French marshal)

    Achille Bazaine, marshal of France who, after distinguished service during the Second Empire, was sentenced to death for his surrender of Metz and 140,000 men to the Germans on Oct. 27, 1870, during the Franco-German War. Bazaine was commissioned second lieutenant in 1833. As a colonel he led a

  • Bazalgette, Sir Joseph William (British engineer)

    Sir Joseph William Bazalgette, British civil engineer who designed the main drainage system for London. After working on projects in Northern Ireland, Bazalgette in 1842 became a consulting engineer at Westminster. Seven years later he joined the London Metropolitan Commission of Sewers, becoming

  • Bazar Duzu, Mount (mountain, Russia)

    Azerbaijan: Relief, drainage, and soils: The highest peaks are Bazardyuzyu (Bazardüzü; 14,652 feet [4,466 metres]), Shakhdag, and Tufan, all part of the Greater Caucasus range, the crest of which forms part of Azerbaijan’s northern boundary. Magnificent spurs and ridges, cut into by the deep gorges of mountain streams, make this part of Azerbaijan a…

  • Bazar Zh?raw (Kazakh poet)

    Kazakh literature: …century in the works of Bazar Zh?raw, who combined the didacticism of the zh?raw with the quick wit of the improvising aq?n. Bazar’s poetry frequently treats such issues as the types of behaviour that are appropriate to different stages of life; the responsibilities of different social classes; the opposition of…

  • Bazar-dara Range (mountain range, Tajikistan)

    Pamirs: Physiography: …Rushan on the west and Bazar-dara, or Northern Alichur, on the east. Still farther south are the Southern Alichur Range and, to the west of the latter, the Shugnan Range. The extreme southwestern Pamirs are occupied by the Shakhdarin Range, composed of north-south (Ishkashim Range) and east-west elements, rising to…

  • Bazar-Dyuzyu (mountain, Russia)

    Azerbaijan: Relief, drainage, and soils: The highest peaks are Bazardyuzyu (Bazardüzü; 14,652 feet [4,466 metres]), Shakhdag, and Tufan, all part of the Greater Caucasus range, the crest of which forms part of Azerbaijan’s northern boundary. Magnificent spurs and ridges, cut into by the deep gorges of mountain streams, make this part of Azerbaijan a…

  • Bazardüzü, Mount (mountain, Russia)

    Azerbaijan: Relief, drainage, and soils: The highest peaks are Bazardyuzyu (Bazardüzü; 14,652 feet [4,466 metres]), Shakhdag, and Tufan, all part of the Greater Caucasus range, the crest of which forms part of Azerbaijan’s northern boundary. Magnificent spurs and ridges, cut into by the deep gorges of mountain streams, make this part of Azerbaijan a…

  • Bazardyuzi, Mount (mountain, Russia)

    Azerbaijan: Relief, drainage, and soils: The highest peaks are Bazardyuzyu (Bazardüzü; 14,652 feet [4,466 metres]), Shakhdag, and Tufan, all part of the Greater Caucasus range, the crest of which forms part of Azerbaijan’s northern boundary. Magnificent spurs and ridges, cut into by the deep gorges of mountain streams, make this part of Azerbaijan a…

  • Bazardyuzyu, Mount (mountain, Russia)

    Azerbaijan: Relief, drainage, and soils: The highest peaks are Bazardyuzyu (Bazardüzü; 14,652 feet [4,466 metres]), Shakhdag, and Tufan, all part of the Greater Caucasus range, the crest of which forms part of Azerbaijan’s northern boundary. Magnificent spurs and ridges, cut into by the deep gorges of mountain streams, make this part of Azerbaijan a…

  • Bazardzhik (Bulgaria)

    Dobrich, town, northeastern Bulgaria. It lies on the road and railway line between Varna and Constan?a, Rom., and is a long-established market town. Under Turkish rule from the 15th century until 1878, the town was called Bazardzhik; after liberation it became Dobrich. While part of Romania from

  • Bāzargān, Mahdī (prime minister of Iran)

    Mehdi Bazargan, Iranian educator and politician who in 1979 became the first prime minister of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Unable to stem the tide of violent extremism under Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, he resigned after only nine months in office. Bazargan, the son of an Azerbaijani merchant,

  • Bazargan, Mehdi (prime minister of Iran)

    Mehdi Bazargan, Iranian educator and politician who in 1979 became the first prime minister of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Unable to stem the tide of violent extremism under Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, he resigned after only nine months in office. Bazargan, the son of an Azerbaijani merchant,

  • Bazargic (Bulgaria)

    Dobrich, town, northeastern Bulgaria. It lies on the road and railway line between Varna and Constan?a, Rom., and is a long-established market town. Under Turkish rule from the 15th century until 1878, the town was called Bazardzhik; after liberation it became Dobrich. While part of Romania from

  • Bazarov, Yevgeny (fictional character)

    Yevgeny Bazarov, fictional character, a young physician whose actions and philosophy are the focus of the novel Fathers and Sons (1862) by Ivan Turgenev. Bazarov is rude, sarcastic, and strident in his profession of faith in nothing but science. He calls himself a nihilist and rejects all

  • Bazaruto Island (island, Mozambique)

    Bazaruto Island, island, Mozambique. It is situated in the Mozambique Channel of the Indian Ocean, about 15 miles (24 km) offshore from the town of Inhassoro and 130 miles (209 km) southeast of Beira. The island is 22 miles (35 km) long and 4 miles (7 km) wide. Prior to the civil strife that

  • Bazaruto, Ilha do (island, Mozambique)

    Bazaruto Island, island, Mozambique. It is situated in the Mozambique Channel of the Indian Ocean, about 15 miles (24 km) offshore from the town of Inhassoro and 130 miles (209 km) southeast of Beira. The island is 22 miles (35 km) long and 4 miles (7 km) wide. Prior to the civil strife that

  • Baze v. Rees (law case)

    lethal injection: …a 7–2 plurality ruling (Baze v. Rees [2008]), the court upheld the constitutionality of the protocol, determining that it did not pose a “substantial” or “objectively intolerable” risk of “serious harm” to prisoners. The court also concluded that a proposed alternative method of execution, consisting solely of a large…

  • Bazeries, étienne (French cryptologist)

    cipher: In 1891 étienne Bazeries, a French cryptologist, invented a more sophisticated cipher device based on principles formulated by Thomas Jefferson of the United States nearly a century earlier. Bazeries’s so-called cylindrical cryptograph was made up of 20 numbered rotatable disks, each with a different alphabet engraved on…

  • Bazhenov, Vasily Ivanovich (Russian architect)

    Western architecture: Russia: …two leading Russian architects were Vasily Ivanovich Bazhenov and Ivan Yegorovich Starov, both of whom studied in Paris under de Wailly in the 1760s, bringing back to Russia the most-advanced Neoclassical ideas. Bazhenov designed the new Arsenal in St. Petersburg (1765) and prepared unexecuted designs for the Kamenni Ostrov Palace…

  • Bazille, Frédéric (French painter)

    Frédéric Bazille, painter who, as a friend, benefactor, and colleague of the Impressionists, played an important role during the movement’s formative years. Bazille was an unenthusiastic medical student before his wealthy parents permitted him to study painting. While a student in Paris, he met

  • Bazille, Jean-Frédéric (French painter)

    Frédéric Bazille, painter who, as a friend, benefactor, and colleague of the Impressionists, played an important role during the movement’s formative years. Bazille was an unenthusiastic medical student before his wealthy parents permitted him to study painting. While a student in Paris, he met

  • Bazin, André (French critic)

    Fran?ois Truffaut: Early works: …to the attention of critic André Bazin, doyen of the monthly avant-garde film magazine Cahiers du cinéma. After Truffaut enlisted in the military and then was imprisoned for attempting to desert, Bazin helped him secure a discharge and incorporated him into the magazine’s staff. For eight years Truffaut asserted himself…

  • Bazin, Henri-émile (French engineer)

    Henri-émile Bazin, engineer and member of the French Corps des Ponts et Chaussées (“Corps of Bridges and Highways”) whose contributions to hydraulics and fluid mechanics include the classic study of water flow in open channels. Bazin worked as an assistant to the noted hydraulic engineer H.-P.-G.

  • Bazin, Hervé (French author)

    Hervé Bazin, French author whose witty and satirical novels often focus on the problems within families and marriages. Hervé was the great-nephew of the Roman Catholic traditionalist novelist René Bazin. After solid academic training, years of family conflict, and financial and professional

  • Bazin, Marc Louis (Haitian politician)

    Marc Louis Bazin, Haitian politician (born March 6, 1932, Saint-Marc, Haiti—died June 16, 2010, Port-au-Prince, Haiti), contested Haiti’s first free presidential election in 1990, with the support of U.S. Pres. George H.W. Bush, but he was unpopular with the masses and badly lost to Jean-Bertrand

  • Bazin, René (French author)

    René Bazin, French novelist of provincial life, strongly traditionalist in outlook. His works express in simple but elegant style his love of nature, of simple virtues, and of work, especially on the land. Educated in Paris and Angers, Bazin became a professor of law at the Catholic University at

  • Bazin, René-Fran?ois-Nicolas-Marie (French author)

    René Bazin, French novelist of provincial life, strongly traditionalist in outlook. His works express in simple but elegant style his love of nature, of simple virtues, and of work, especially on the land. Educated in Paris and Angers, Bazin became a professor of law at the Catholic University at

  • Baziotes, William (American painter)

    William Baziotes, American painter who was one of the leading members of the New York Abstract Expressionist group from the late 1940s, when it became the most influential movement in international art. Baziotes studied with Leon Kroll at the National Academy of Design in New York City (1933–36)

  • Bazna, Elyesa (German spy)

    Cicero, one of the most famous spies of World War II, who worked for Nazi Germany in 1943–44 while he was employed as valet to Sir Hughe Montgomery Knatchbull-Hugessen, British ambassador to neutral Turkey from 1939. He photographed secret documents from the embassy safe and turned the films over

  • bazoo (musical instrument)

    mirliton: A common mirliton is the kazoo, in which the membrane is set in the wall of a short tube into which the player vocalizes. Tissue paper and a comb constitute a homemade mirliton. Mirlitons are also set in the walls of some flutes (e.g., the Chinese ti) and xylophone resonators…

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