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  • Beloved, The (dance by Horton and Lewitzky)

    Lester Horton: …Wilde’s one-act play Salomé; and The Beloved (all 1948), based on a newspaper article about a man who suspected his wife of infidelity and beat her to death with a Bible. The Beloved, co-choreographed with Lewitzky, is widely regarded to be a classic example of modern dance and one of…

  • Belovezh Forest (forest, Eastern Europe)

    Belovezhskaya Forest, forest in western Belarus and eastern Poland. One of the largest surviving areas of primeval mixed forest (pine, beech, oak, alder, and spruce) in Europe, it occupies more than 460 square miles (1,200 square km). The Belovezhskaya Forest is located near the headwaters of the

  • Belovezhskaya Forest (forest, Eastern Europe)

    Belovezhskaya Forest, forest in western Belarus and eastern Poland. One of the largest surviving areas of primeval mixed forest (pine, beech, oak, alder, and spruce) in Europe, it occupies more than 460 square miles (1,200 square km). The Belovezhskaya Forest is located near the headwaters of the

  • Belovezhskaya Forest Nature Reserve (forest, Eastern Europe)

    Belovezhskaya Forest, forest in western Belarus and eastern Poland. One of the largest surviving areas of primeval mixed forest (pine, beech, oak, alder, and spruce) in Europe, it occupies more than 460 square miles (1,200 square km). The Belovezhskaya Forest is located near the headwaters of the

  • Belovo (Russia)

    Belovo, city, western Kemerovo oblast (region), southwest-central Siberia, Russia. It lies on the small Bachat River. Belovo was incorporated in 1930 and developed as an important coal-mining city of the Kuznetsk Coal Basin. A large zinc works, built in 1931, uses concentrated ore from eastern

  • Below, Otto von (Austrian military officer)

    Battle of Caporetto: Clashes on the Isonzo: …the Fourteenth German Army under Otto von Below, with Krafft as chief of staff and guiding light. These troops were to penetrate the mountain barrier of the Julian Alps at the northeastern corner of the Venetian salient on a line running from the Rombon-Bovec region southeastward past Tolmino, with Caporetto…

  • Beloye Lake (lake, Russia)

    Russia: Lakes: …these reach considerable size, notably Beloye (White) Lake and Lakes Top, Vyg, and Ilmen, each occupying more than 400 square miles (1,000 square km) in the European northwest, and Lake Chany (770 square miles [1,990 square km]) in southwestern Siberia.

  • Beloye More (sea, Arctic Ocean)

    White Sea, an almost landlocked extension of the Arctic Ocean indenting the shores of northwestern Russia. It is connected to the more northerly Barents Sea by a long, narrow strait known as the Gorlo (“Throat”). The boundary between the two seas runs along a line joining Cape Kanin Nos and Cape

  • Belper (England, United Kingdom)

    Belper, town (parish), Amber Valley district, administrative and historic county of Derbyshire, central England. It lies on the east bank of the River Derwent. Belper is probably a corruption of Beaurepair, the name given to his hunting seat (and variously spelled) by Edmund Crouchback, earl of

  • Belre?u?u (Chaldean priest and author)

    Berosus, Chaldean priest of Bel in Babylon who wrote a work in three books (in Greek) on the history and culture of Babylonia dedicated to Antiochus I (c. 324–261 bc). It was widely used by later Greek compilers, whose versions in turn were quoted by religious historians such as Eusebius of

  • Belsen (concentration camp, Germany)

    Bergen-Belsen, Nazi German concentration camp near the villages of Bergen and Belsen, about 10 miles (16 km) northwest of Celle, Germany. It was established in 1943 on part of the site of a prisoner-of-war camp and was originally intended as a detention camp for Jews who were to be exchanged for

  • Belsen, Beast of (Nazi commander)

    Josef Kramer, German commander of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp (1944–45), notorious for his cruelty. Joining the Nazi Party on Dec. 1, 1931, Kramer volunteered for the SS the following year. He served at various camps, including Auschwitz, Mauthausen, and Dachau, and commanded Birkenau

  • Belshazzar (king of Babylonia)

    Belshazzar, coregent of Babylon who was killed at the capture of the city by the Persians. Belshazzar had been known only from the biblical Book of Daniel (chapters 5, 7–8) and from Xenophon’s Cyropaedia until 1854, when references to him were found in Babylonian cuneiform inscriptions. Though he

  • Belso Somogy (region, Hungary)

    Somogy: …a forested flatland known as Belso Somogy (“Inner Somogy”).

  • belt (polychaete anatomy)

    beard worm: Form and function: …pair of parallel ridges called belts; these have rows of small platelets containing minute teeth. One part of the metasome, in front of the belts, has a groove bordered by low folds.

  • belt (clothing accessory)

    girdle: …of dress than the term belt, although strictly speaking this is not a point of distinction between them.

  • Belt and Road Initiative (Asian development project)
  • belt apparatus (machine)

    high-pressure phenomena: Large-volume apparatuses: The belt apparatus, invented in 1954 by the scientist Tracy Hall of the General Electric Company for use in the company’s diamond-making program, incorporates features of both opposed-anvil and piston-cylinder designs. Two highly tapered pistonlike anvils compress a sample that is confined in a torus, much…

  • Belt Basin (geology)

    North America: 1.6 to 1.3 billion years ago: The Belt Basin, centred in Idaho and western Montana, contains large base-metal ore bodies embedded in sediments up to 12 miles (19 km) thick. It originated as an enclosed basin floored by highly stretched continental crust or trapped oceanic crust, which is analogous to the structure…

  • belt buckle (jewelry)

    jewelry: Western European: …Gothic style is a silver belt buckle from Sweden (Historical Museum, Stockholm). Modeled in high relief on the buckle plate is a gentleman on horseback approaching a lady followed by his servant. The three-lobed buckle ring is modeled in a complex design that includes a seated person and a man…

  • belt conveyor (mechanical device)

    conveyor: Belt conveyors of fabric, rubber, plastic, leather, or metal are driven by a power-operated roll mounted underneath or at one end of the conveyor. The belt forms a continuous loop and is supported either on rollers, for heavy loads, or on a metal slider pan…

  • belt drive (mechanics)

    Belt drive, in machinery, a pair of pulleys attached to usually parallel shafts and connected by an encircling flexible belt (band) that can serve to transmit and modify rotary motion from one shaft to the other. Most belt drives consist of flat leather, rubber, or fabric belts running on

  • belt freezer

    food preservation: Industrial freezers: …freezers, including air-blast tunnel freezers, belt freezers, fluidized-bed freezers, plate freezers, and cryogenic freezers.

  • belt hook (ornament)

    jewelry: Chinese: …is better represented by the belt hooks (said to have been adopted from the nomads of inner Asia) that were probably worn by both men and women. They were mostly made of bronze, with fine cast ornaments usually of abstracted dragon and bird heads. These belt hooks were inlaid with…

  • belt sander (tool)

    sander: …sanders: the disk sander, the belt sander, and the orbital sander. In the disk sander an abrasive disk is attached to a shaft that is driven by bevel gears to rotate about an axis at right angles to the motor shaft. The belt sander has endless cloth or paper belts…

  • Belt Series (geology)

    Belt Series, major division of late Precambrian rocks in North America (the Precambrian lasted from 3.8 billion to 540 million years ago). The series was named for prominent exposures in the Belt Range in southwestern Montana. The thickness of Beltian rocks, which extend northward into Canada,

  • belt-and-jacket wrestling (sport)

    wrestling: …of wrestling contest are the belt-and-jacket, catch-hold, and loose styles, all of which appear to have originated in antiquity. Belt-and-jacket styles of wrestling are those in which the clothing of the wrestlers provides the principal means of taking a grip on the opponent. In many cases this is no more…

  • Beltaine (ancient Celtic festival)

    Beltane, festival held on the first day of May in Ireland and Scotland, celebrating the beginning of summer and open pasturing. Beltane is first mentioned in a glossary attributed to Cormac, bishop of Cashel and king of Munster, who was killed in 908. Cormac describes how cattle were driven between

  • Beltane (ancient Celtic festival)

    Beltane, festival held on the first day of May in Ireland and Scotland, celebrating the beginning of summer and open pasturing. Beltane is first mentioned in a glossary attributed to Cormac, bishop of Cashel and king of Munster, who was killed in 908. Cormac describes how cattle were driven between

  • belted kingfisher (bird)

    kingfisher: …are river dwellers, like the belted kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon), the only widespread North American species. This handsome crested bird flies off over the water when disturbed, uttering a loud rattling call. It is about 30 cm (12 inches) long and is bluish gray above and across the breast and white…

  • belted sandfish (fish)

    sea bass: Certain species, such as the belted sandfish (Serranellus subligarius) of Florida, are hermaphroditic (male and female reproductive organs in one animal). Others, such as the groupers, may mature as one sex and later change to the other.

  • belted tire

    tire: Pneumatic tire structures: In a bias-ply belted tire, another set of cords overlies the bias-laid ones. This extra set of cords, called a belt, is typically made of fibreglass. A radial-ply belted tire also has a belt running around the entire tire, but the cords are typically made of steel wire-mesh,…

  • Belter, Johann Heinrich (American cabinetmaker)

    John Henry Belter, cabinetmaker and designer known for his superb Victorian Rococo pieces. Belter served as a cabinetmaker’s apprentice in Württemberg (now in Germany), where he was trained in the Black Forest tradition of rich carving so admired during the 19th century. Settling in New York City

  • Belter, John Henry (American cabinetmaker)

    John Henry Belter, cabinetmaker and designer known for his superb Victorian Rococo pieces. Belter served as a cabinetmaker’s apprentice in Württemberg (now in Germany), where he was trained in the Black Forest tradition of rich carving so admired during the 19th century. Settling in New York City

  • Beltian Geosyncline (geology)

    Beltian Geosyncline, a linear trough in the Earth’s crust in which rocks of Precambrian age (about 4 billion to 542 million years ago) were deposited in the Northern Rocky Mountain region. The rocks consist of limestones, shales, and sandstones and attain total thicknesses as great as 10,600

  • Beltine (ancient Celtic festival)

    Beltane, festival held on the first day of May in Ireland and Scotland, celebrating the beginning of summer and open pasturing. Beltane is first mentioned in a glossary attributed to Cormac, bishop of Cashel and king of Munster, who was killed in 908. Cormac describes how cattle were driven between

  • Beltir (people)

    Khakass: The Beltir (meaning “river-mouth people”), famed as trappers and as smiths, have also become farmers and stockbreeders. The Koybal, not a tribe in the ethnographic sense but a territorial group, have retained their Kacha language but assumed the Russian peasant way of life. In the late…

  • Belton, Michael J. (American astronomer)

    Chiron: …American astronomers Karen Meech and Michael Belton detected a fuzzy luminous cloud around Chiron. Such a cloud, termed a coma, is a distinguishing feature of comets and consists of gases and entrained dust escaping from the cometary nucleus when sunlight causes its ices to sublimate. Given Chiron’s large distance from…

  • Beltracchi, Wolfgang (German art forger)

    Wolfgang Beltracchi, German art forger notorious for tricking the international art world into buying highly convincing paintings he created in the style of Expressionist, Surrealist, and Cubist artists such as Max Ernst, Max Pechstein, Georges Braque, Heinrich Campendonk, Johannes Molzahn, Kees

  • Beltrami, Eugenio (Italian mathematician)

    Eugenio Beltrami, Italian mathematician known for his description of non-Euclidean geometry and for his theories of surfaces of constant curvature. Following his studies at the University of Pavia (1853–56) and later in Milan, Beltrami was invited to join the faculty at the University of Bologna in

  • Beltrán Alcayaga, María Lucia (Mexican singer)

    Lola Beltrán, (MARíA LUCIA BELTRáN ALCAYAGA), Mexican singer (born 1931?, Sinaloa, Mexico—died March 24, 1996, Mexico City, Mexico), infused mariachi ballads with such drama, emotion, and style that she came to be known as Lola la Grande, the queen of mariachi. Her regal bearing was enhanced by e

  • Beltrán, Lola (Mexican singer)

    Lola Beltrán, (MARíA LUCIA BELTRáN ALCAYAGA), Mexican singer (born 1931?, Sinaloa, Mexico—died March 24, 1996, Mexico City, Mexico), infused mariachi ballads with such drama, emotion, and style that she came to be known as Lola la Grande, the queen of mariachi. Her regal bearing was enhanced by e

  • Beltrán, Manuela (Colombian rebel)

    Comunero Rebellion: …Spanish government, insurgents led by Manuela Beltrán in Socorro, Colombia, sparked a revolt that soon spread to neighbouring towns north of Bogotá. The rebels, in addition to demanding the cancellation of taxes, urged such wide-ranging reforms as protection of Indian lands and an increase in the number of Creoles appointed…

  • Beltrán, Pedro Gerado (Peruvian economist, diplomat, and publisher)

    Pedro Gerado Beltrán, Peruvian economist, diplomat, and publisher whose brief term as prime minister and minister of finance (1959–61) stabilized the Peruvian economy. A graduate of the London School of Economics (1918), Beltrán was the longtime owner (1934–74) and publisher of the influential Lima

  • Beltraneja, La (Spanish infanta)

    Spain: Castile and León, 1252–1479: …the legitimacy of the infanta Joan, who they declared was the child of the queen and of the king’s most recent favourite, Beltrán de la Cueva. Because of that account, the young girl was derided as “La Beltraneja.” Henry IV repudiated her and recognized his sister Isabella as heir to…

  • Belts (Moldova)

    B?l?i, city, northern Moldova, on the Raut (Reut) River. It dates to the 15th century. B?l?i is a major railway junction and the centre of the rich agricultural B?l?i Steppe. Most industries are concerned with processing farm produce, notably flour milling, sugar refining, and wine making, but

  • Beltsy (Moldova)

    B?l?i, city, northern Moldova, on the Raut (Reut) River. It dates to the 15th century. B?l?i is a major railway junction and the centre of the rich agricultural B?l?i Steppe. Most industries are concerned with processing farm produce, notably flour milling, sugar refining, and wine making, but

  • Beltway sniper attacks (United States history)

    Beltway sniper attacks, shooting spree in the Washington, D.C., area that killed 10 people and injured 3 over a three-week period in October 2002. The shooters, John Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo, chose targets seemingly at random and brought daily life in the area to a virtual standstill. The

  • Belu’u er a Belau

    Palau, country in the western Pacific Ocean. It consists of some 340 coral and volcanic islands perched on the Kyushu-Palau Ridge. The Palau (also spelled Belau or Pelew) archipelago lies in the southwest corner of Micronesia, with Guam 830 miles (1,330 km) to the northeast, New Guinea 400 miles

  • Beluch (people)

    Baloch, group of tribes speaking the Balochi language and estimated at about five million inhabitants in the province of Balochistān in Pakistan and also neighbouring areas of Iran and Afghanistan. In Pakistan the Baloch people are divided into two groups, the Sulaimani and the Makrani, separated

  • Belucha, Mount (mountain, Russia)

    Mount Belukha, one of the Katun Mountains, a series of snowcapped peaks in Russia. The highest mountain in the Russian portion of the Altai Mountains, Belukha reaches a height of 14,783 feet (4,506 m) in one of its twin peaks. Glaciers cover some 27 square miles (70 square km) of its surface; the

  • Beluchi language

    Balochi language, one of the oldest living languages of the Indo-Iranian group of the Indo-European languages. A West Iranian language, Balochi is spoken by about five million people as a first or second language in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, India, and Baloch diaspora communities. Balochi is

  • beluga (whale)

    Beluga, (Delphinapterus leucas), a small, toothed whale found mainly in the coastal waters of the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas but also in rivers and deep offshore waters. It is an extremely vocal cetacean and thus has also been referred to as the “canary of the sea.” This whale can also

  • beluga (fish)

    Hausen, large species of sturgeon

  • beluga caviar (food)

    caviar: …which the eggs are taken: beluga, the largest, is black or gray; the smaller osetrova grayish, gray-green, or brown; sevruga, the smallest, is greenish black. The rarest caviar, made from the golden eggs of the sterlet, was formerly reserved for the table of the tsar; more recently it found its…

  • Belukha, Gora (mountain, Russia)

    Mount Belukha, one of the Katun Mountains, a series of snowcapped peaks in Russia. The highest mountain in the Russian portion of the Altai Mountains, Belukha reaches a height of 14,783 feet (4,506 m) in one of its twin peaks. Glaciers cover some 27 square miles (70 square km) of its surface; the

  • Belukha, Mount (mountain, Russia)

    Mount Belukha, one of the Katun Mountains, a series of snowcapped peaks in Russia. The highest mountain in the Russian portion of the Altai Mountains, Belukha reaches a height of 14,783 feet (4,506 m) in one of its twin peaks. Glaciers cover some 27 square miles (70 square km) of its surface; the

  • Belur Math (temple, India)

    Ramakrishna: …of the mission is in Belur Math, a monastery near Kolkata. The Ramakrishna Order also played an important role in the spread of Hindu ideas and practices in the West, particularly in the United States.

  • Belváros (district, Budapest, Hungary)

    Budapest: Pest: …heart of Pest is the Belváros (Inner Town), an irregular pentagon with its longest side running parallel to the Danube; only traces of the original town walls remain. The district accommodates offices, parts of the Loránd E?tv?s University, and shops. The Váci utca, a narrow street turned pedestrian thoroughfare, is…

  • Belvárosi plébániatemplom (church, Budapest, Hungary)

    Budapest: Pest: The Inner Town Parish Church (Belvárosi plébániatemplom) is the oldest building in Pest. Rebuilt in the Baroque style in the 18th century, as were many other churches in Pest and Buda, the church had been the most impressive of medieval Pest. St. Stephen’s Crown, the symbol…

  • belvedere (architecture)

    Belvedere, (Italian: “beautiful view”), architectural structure built in an elevated position to provide lighting and ventilation and to command a fine view. Roofed but open on one or more sides, a belvedere may be located in the upper part of a building or may stand as a separate structure. It

  • Belvedere Castle (castle, Weimar, Germany)

    Weimar: …Palace (1767), Weimar Castle (1790–1803), Belvedere Castle (1724–32), Tiefurt Castle, and the Church of Saints Peter and Paul (with an altarpiece by Lucas Cranach the Elder and his son), sometimes called the Herder Church for its association with the critic and theologian Johann Gottfried von Herder. Between 1919 and 1925…

  • Belvedere court (courtyard, Vatican City, Europe)

    Donato Bramante: Roman period: …the immense courtyard of the Belvedere, extending the nucleus of the older Vatican palaces to the north and connecting them with the pre-existing villa of Innocent VIII. Many aspects of the complex were conceived on Classical models; for example, the Doric, Ionic, Corinthian arrangement of orders for the three-level lower…

  • Belvedere cypress (plant)

    Bassia: Summer cypress, sometimes called Belvedere cypress (Kochia scoparia), is a widely grown annual that was formerly placed in the genus Bassia. One variety, known as firebush or burning bush, is a globe-shaped subshrub with narrow hairy leaves that turn purplish red in autumn; it is…

  • Belvedere Palace (palace, Rome, Italy)

    Andrea Mantegna: Years as court painter in Mantua: …his private chapel in the Belvedere Palace in Rome (destroyed 1780), which Mantegna carried out in 1488–90.

  • Belvedere Palace (palace, Vienna, Austria)

    Vienna: Layout and architecture: Another noble structure is the Belvedere, which is actually two Baroque palaces at either end of a terraced garden. It was built by Hildebrandt for the soldier and statesman Prince Eugene of Savoy. The Lower Belvedere (1714–16) was a summer garden palace, and the Upper (1721–24) was designed as a…

  • Belvedere Torso (Greek sculpture)

    Belvedere Torso, Hellenistic sculpture fragment of a male nude (5 feet 2 58 inches [1.59 m] high) in the Vatican Museum; the work is signed by the Athenian sculptor Apollonius the son of Nestor and was long thought to be a 1st-century-bc original. It is now believed that Apollonius copied a

  • Belvedere villa (villa, Vatican City, Europe)

    Western architecture: High Renaissance in Italy (1495–1520): …to the church and the Belvedere villa of Innocent VIII on the hill above the palace. Bramante gave the new court a neo-antique flavour recalling the imperial palaces on the hills of Rome and the hippodromus on the Palatine. Terraced up the hillside on three levels joined by monumental stairs,…

  • Belvidere (Illinois, United States)

    Belvidere, city, seat (1837) of Boone county, northern Illinois, U.S. It lies on the Kishwaukee River, about 75 miles (120 km) northwest of downtown Chicago. The area was settled in 1835 and was originally named Elysian Fields. The city was founded in 1836 and renamed Belvidere (Latin: “Beautiful

  • Belviq (drug)

    obesity: Treatment of obesity: Two of them are Belviq (lorcaserin hydrochloride) and Qsymia (phentermine and topiramate). Belviq decreases obese individuals’ cravings for carbohydrate-rich foods by stimulating the release of serotonin, which normally is triggered by carbohydrate intake. Qsymia leverages the weight-loss side effects of topiramate, an

  • Bely Gorod (fort, Moscow, Russia)

    Bely Gorod, fortress and settlement comprising the third defense belt around Moscow, which joined the Kremlin and Kitay-gorod on the left bank of the Moskva River. Built between 1585 and 1593 of stone walls, the fortifications of Bely Gorod were important in providing defense for the Moscow

  • Bely, Andrey (Russian poet)

    Andrey Bely, leading theorist and poet of Russian Symbolism, a literary school deriving from the Modernist movement in western European art and literature and an indigenous Eastern Orthodox spirituality, expressing mystical and abstract ideals through allegories from life and nature. Reared in an

  • Belyayev, Pavel (Soviet cosmonaut)

    Pavel Belyayev, cosmonaut who served as the commander of the Voskhod 2 spacecraft during the Soviet Union’s eighth crewed space mission, launched March 18, 1965, the flight on which Aleksei Leonov, Belyayev’s copilot, became the first astronaut to walk in space. Belyayev began training as a fighter

  • Belyayev, Pavel Ivanovich (Soviet cosmonaut)

    Pavel Belyayev, cosmonaut who served as the commander of the Voskhod 2 spacecraft during the Soviet Union’s eighth crewed space mission, launched March 18, 1965, the flight on which Aleksei Leonov, Belyayev’s copilot, became the first astronaut to walk in space. Belyayev began training as a fighter

  • Belyi Gorod (fort, Moscow, Russia)

    Bely Gorod, fortress and settlement comprising the third defense belt around Moscow, which joined the Kremlin and Kitay-gorod on the left bank of the Moskva River. Built between 1585 and 1593 of stone walls, the fortifications of Bely Gorod were important in providing defense for the Moscow

  • Be??ec (Poland)

    Belzec: …and near the village of Be??ec along the Lublin-Lviv railway line in the Lublin province of German-occupied Poland. At the extermination camp—one of the most gruesome sites of the Holocaust—the Nazis killed at least 600,000 Jews.

  • Belzec (concentration camp, Poland)

    Belzec, Nazi German complex of concentration camps and an extermination camp in and near the village of Be??ec along the Lublin-Lviv railway line in the Lublin province of German-occupied Poland. At the extermination camp—one of the most gruesome sites of the Holocaust—the Nazis killed at least

  • Be??ec (concentration camp, Poland)

    Belzec, Nazi German complex of concentration camps and an extermination camp in and near the village of Be??ec along the Lublin-Lviv railway line in the Lublin province of German-occupied Poland. At the extermination camp—one of the most gruesome sites of the Holocaust—the Nazis killed at least

  • Belzoni, Giovanni Battista (Italian archaeologist)

    Giovanni Battista Belzoni, excavator of Egyptian archaeological sites. Originally planning to join a religious order, Belzoni went to England in 1803 where he turned his powerful six-foot seven-inch physique to earning a living as a circus strong man. He also exhibited models of hydraulic engines

  • Bem Sex-Role Inventory (psychology)

    Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI), test used to measure an individual’s femininity and masculinity. The Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI) is one of the most widely used tools in research on gender roles. In 1974 American psychologist Sandra L. Bem, a proponent of androgyny theory, recognized that an

  • Bem, Józef Zachariasz (Polish general)

    Józef Zachariasz Bem, Polish army general whose military feats in Transylvania and the region of Banat made him a hero of the Hungarian Revolution of 1848–49. He was the author of treatises on artillery, mathematics, and history. Educated at the Warsaw Military School, he distinguished himself with

  • Bem, Sandra L. (American psychologist)

    Bem Sex-Role Inventory: Construction of the BSRI: In 1974 American psychologist Sandra L. Bem, a proponent of androgyny theory, recognized that an individual could express both feminine and masculine characteristics and constructed a sex-role inventory. Bem intended her inventory to represent two fully independent scales of culturally defined masculinity and culturally defined femininity.

  • Bema (Manichaean festival)

    ceremonial object: Sacred furniture and related objects: …the 3rd century ce), the Bēma Feast was centred on the exaltation of a reconstructed pulpit (bema), which symbolically represented the rostrum from which Mani spread his teachings. Another important element of sacred furniture is the lectern, on which is placed one or more sacred books (from which one of…

  • bema (architecture)

    Bema, (Greek bēma, “step”), raised platform; in antiquity it was probably made of stone, but in modern times it is usually a rectangular wooden platform approached by steps. Originally used in Athens as a tribunal from which orators addressed the citizens as well as the courts of law, the bema

  • Bemba (people)

    Bemba, Bantu-speaking people inhabiting the northeastern plateau of Zambia and neighbouring areas of Congo (Kinshasa) and Zimbabwe. The Bantu language of the Bemba has become the lingua franca of Zambia. The people practice shifting cultivation, pollarding the forest trees and planting the staple,

  • Bemba, Jean-Pierre (Congolese politician)

    Democratic Republic of the Congo: The Democratic Republic of the Congo: Notable opposition figures Jean-Pierre Bemba and Mo?se Katumbi were not part of that group, as Bemba had been disqualified by the electoral commission over International Criminal Court charges and Katumbi had been blocked from returning to the country after time away and hence was not able to register…

  • Bembé, Carl August (German architect)

    industrial design: Origins of modern design: Germany and Europe: …in the 1930s Gropius protégé Carl August Bembé designed motorboats for Maybach, a company that built internal-combustion engines for airplanes and boats and automobiles for the German car manufacturers Opel and Adler.

  • Bemberg rayon (textile)

    rayon: …process for making fibres from cuprammonium rayon. This material was based on the Swiss chemist Matthias Eduard Schweizer’s discovery in 1857 that cellulose could be dissolved in a solution of copper salts and ammonia and, after extrusion, be regenerated in a coagulating bath. In 1908 the German textile firm J.-P.…

  • Bemberg, Maria Luisa (Argentine director)

    Maria Luisa Bemberg, Argentine motion-picture director (born April 14, 1922, Buenos Aires, Arg.—died May 7, 1995, Buenos Aires), challenged tradition when she embarked on a directing career after expressing disappointment at the way her semiautobiographical screenplays were interpreted by male d

  • Bembicini (insect)

    Sand wasp, (tribe Bembicini), any of a group of wasps in the subfamily Bembicinae (family Crabronidae, order Hymenoptera) that are solitary, stout-bodied insects about 2 to 2.5 cm (about 0.8 to 1 inch) long. The horse-guard (Bembix carolina) of the southern United States often hunts for flies

  • bembismo (literary term)

    Pietro Bembo: …influential and became known as bembismo. A collected edition of his Italian poems, Rime, appeared in 1530. His other vernacular works include Gli Asolani (1505), dialogues on platonic love, the systemization of which influenced Ludovico Ariosto, Baldassare Castiglione, and Torquato Tasso; and Prose della volgar lingua (1525;

  • Bembix carolina (insect)

    sand wasp: The horse-guard (Bembix carolina) of the southern United States often hunts for flies around horses. It is about 2.5 cm in length and is black with yellow or yellowish green markings. Microbembex monodonta is found along the seashore. Many sand wasps are black with white, yellow,…

  • Bembo (typeface)

    typography: Mechanical composition: …17th-century French letter (see above); Bembo, after an Aldine roman; Centaur, an adaptation of Rogers’ foundry face; and Baskerville and Bell, based upon English models. Italics included Arrighi, a version of the letter used by the 16th-century papal writing master and printer (see above). Among the modern faces whose design…

  • Bembo, Pietro (Italian cardinal and writer)

    Pietro Bembo, Renaissance cardinal who wrote one of the earliest Italian grammars and assisted in establishing the Italian literary language. Of an aristocratic family, Bembo was educated principally by his father, a man of great authority in the Venetian republic. In 1513 the son became secretary

  • Bembridae (fish)

    scorpaeniform: Annotated classification: Family Bembridae (deepwater flatheads) Small bottom fishes living on the continental shelf at depths of from about 150 to 650 metres (about 500 to 2,100 feet), with large, depressed heads and subcyclindrical bodies. Length to about 30 cm (12 inches). 5 genera, 11 species. Suborder Hexagrammoidei Moderate-sized,…

  • Bemelmans, Ludwig (American author)

    children's literature: Peaks and plateaus (1865–1940): …and other delightful books; and Ludwig Bemelmans, with Madeline (1939) and its sequels. Other distinguished names in the important and growing picture-book field were Marjorie Flack, Hardie Gramatky, James Daugherty, the d’Aulaires, and Virginia Lee Burton.

  • Bement, Alon (American educator)

    Georgia O'Keeffe: Early years: …Charlottesville, which was taught by Alon Bement of Teachers College, Columbia University, in New York City. Bement acquainted her with the then-revolutionary thinking of his colleague at Teachers College, artist and art educator Arthur Wesley Dow. Dow believed in the Modernist idea that the subject of artists’ work should be…

  • Bement, Arden L., Jr. (American metallurgical engineer and science administrator)

    Arden L. Bement, Jr., American metallurgical engineer who served as director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) from 2004 to 2010. Bement attended the Colorado School of Mines, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in metallurgical engineering (1954). He went on to earn a master’s degree (1959)

  • Bement, Arden Lee, Jr. (American metallurgical engineer and science administrator)

    Arden L. Bement, Jr., American metallurgical engineer who served as director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) from 2004 to 2010. Bement attended the Colorado School of Mines, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in metallurgical engineering (1954). He went on to earn a master’s degree (1959)

  • Bemer, Robert William (American computer programmer)

    Robert William Bemer, American computer programmer (born Feb. 8, 1920, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.—died June 22, 2004, Possum Kingdom Lake, Texas), was instrumental in helping to develop ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange), a system that, upon becoming operational in 1963, g

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