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  • Benson, Sir Frank Robert (British actor)

    Sir Frank Benson, British actor-manager whose touring company and acting school were important influences on contemporary theatre. While at New College, Oxford, Benson produced Agamemnon, the first play to be performed there in the original Greek. In 1882 he made his first professional appearance

  • Benson, Tom (American businessman)

    New Orleans Pelicans: …the Hornets were sold to Tom Benson, owner of the New Orleans Saints, in 2012. Looking to cement ties with its home city, the franchise changed its name from the Hornets (which was a reference to the “hornet’s nest” of American rebels in Charlotte during the American Revolution) to the…

  • Bensonville (Liberia)

    Bensonville, city, northwestern Liberia. Bensonville is a marketing and commercial centre for the surrounding agricultural area. Prior to the outbreak of civil war in the 1990s, its industrial activity included the production of milled rice, sawn wood, soap, plastics, paints, furniture and

  • bent (plant)

    Bentgrass, (genus Agrostis), genus of about 150–200 species of annual and perennial grasses in the family Poaceae. Bentgrasses are distributed in temperate and cool parts of the world and at high altitudes in subtropical and tropical areas; at least 40 species are found in North America. Some are

  • bent mussel (mollusk)

    mussel: The hooked, or bent, mussel (M. recurvus), from New England to the Caribbean, attains lengths of about 4 cm and is greenish brown to purplish black. The scorched mussel (M. exustus), from North Carolina to the Caribbean, is bluish gray and about 2.5 cm long.

  • Bent Pyramid (pyramid, Dahshūr, Egypt)

    pyramid: …the Bent, Blunted, False, or Rhomboidal Pyramid, which stands at Dahshūr a short distance south of ?aqqārah, marks an advance in development toward the strictly pyramidal tomb. Built by Snefru, of the 4th dynasty, it is 188 square metres (2,024 square feet) at the base and approximately 98 metres (322…

  • bent sandwich compound

    organometallic compound: Cyclic polyene ligands: …closely related set of so-called bent sandwich compounds, in which the Cp rings are not parallel, are important in the organometallic chemistry of the early and middle d-block elements and the f-block elements (lanthanoids and actinoids). The Schrock carbene Ta(η5-C5H5)2(CH3)(CH2), shown above, is one such example. Bent sandwich compounds are

  • Bent, Charles (American pioneer)

    Charles Bent, fur-trading pioneer who became civil governor for the United States of the newly captured province of New Mexico. After moving from Charleston, Va., to Marietta, Ohio, in 1805, the Bent family settled in St. Louis the following year. Charles and his brother William developed an

  • Bent, James Theodore (British archaeologist)

    James Theodore Bent, British explorer and archaeologist who excavated the ruined Zimbabwe (dzimbahwe; i.e., stone houses, or chiefs’ graves) in the land of the Shona people of eastern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe Rhodesia). Bent first travelled to islands of the Aegean and, in 1890, to southern Turkey

  • Benteen, Frederick W. (United States military officer)

    Battle of the Little Bighorn: Frederick W. Benteen to the south to cut off the flight of any Indians in that direction, and took five companies under his personal command to attack the village from the north. That tactic proved to be disastrous. In fragmenting his regiment, Custer had left…

  • Benten (Japanese mythology)

    Benten, (Japanese: Divinity of the Reasoning Faculty), in Japanese mythology, one of the Shichi-fuku-jin (Seven Gods of Luck); the Buddhist patron goddess of literature and music, of wealth, and of femininity. She is generally associated with the sea; many of her shrines are located near it, and s

  • bentgrass (plant)

    Bentgrass, (genus Agrostis), genus of about 150–200 species of annual and perennial grasses in the family Poaceae. Bentgrasses are distributed in temperate and cool parts of the world and at high altitudes in subtropical and tropical areas; at least 40 species are found in North America. Some are

  • Bentham (essay by Mill)

    John Stuart Mill: Public life and writing: The twin essays on Bentham and Coleridge show Mill’s powers at their splendid best and indicate very clearly the new spirit that he tried to breathe into English radicalism.

  • Bentham, George (British botanist)

    George Bentham, British botanist whose classification of seed plants (Spermatophyta), based on an exhaustive study of all known species, served as a foundation for modern systems of vascular plant taxonomy. Impressed by the French naturalist Pyrame de Candolle’s analytic tables of French flora,

  • Bentham, Jeremy (British philosopher and economist)

    Jeremy Bentham, English philosopher, economist, and theoretical jurist, the earliest and chief expounder of utilitarianism. At the age of four, Bentham, the son of an attorney, is said to have read eagerly and to have begun the study of Latin. Much of his childhood was spent happily at his two

  • Bentham, Sir Samuel (British engineer)

    Sir Samuel Bentham, British engineer, naval architect, and navy official in Russia (1780–91) and England (from 1795) who was an early advocate of explosive-shell weapons for warships. Bentham led Russian vessels fitted with shell guns to victory over a larger Turkish force (June 7, 1788). As

  • benthic division (oceanography)

    lake: Shore erosion and coastal features: …the littoral shelf from the benthos (bottom) zone in the central part of the lake is called the step-off by some limnologists.

  • benthic environment (oceanography)

    lake: Shore erosion and coastal features: …the littoral shelf from the benthos (bottom) zone in the central part of the lake is called the step-off by some limnologists.

  • benthic zone (oceanography)

    lake: Shore erosion and coastal features: …the littoral shelf from the benthos (bottom) zone in the central part of the lake is called the step-off by some limnologists.

  • benthos (biology)

    Benthos, the assemblage of organisms inhabiting the seafloor. Benthic epifauna live upon the seafloor or upon bottom objects; the so-called infauna live within the sediments of the seafloor. By far the best-studied benthos are the macrobenthos, those forms larger than 1 mm (0.04 inch), which are

  • Benti (Guinea)

    Benti, town and seaport, western Guinea, western Africa. It lies at the head of the estuary of the Mélikhouré (Melacorée) River, 10 miles (16 km) upstream from the Atlantic coast. Important for the export of bananas (second only to Conakry), its port can accommodate oceangoing vessels of 21-foot (

  • Benti-Bulgarelli, Marianna (Italian opera singer)

    Pietro Metastasio: …taken by the prima donna Marianna Benti-Bulgarelli, called La Romanina, who became enamoured of the poet. In her salon Metastasio formed his lifelong friendship with the castrato male soprano Carlo Farinelli and came to know such composers as Nicola Porpora (from whom he took music lessons), Domenico Sarro, and Leonardo…

  • Bentinck (island, Australia)

    Wellesley Islands: Bentinck (59 square miles) and Sweers (6 square miles) are the largest of the southern islands.

  • Bentinck, Lord George (British politician)

    Lord George Bentinck, British politician who in 1846–47 articulately led the protective-tariff advocates who opposed the free-trade policy of Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel. The second son of the 4th Duke of Portland, Bentinck served in the army before entering (1828) the House of Commons.

  • Bentinck, Lord William (British government official)

    Lord William Bentinck, British governor-general of Bengal (1828–33) and of India (1833–35). An aristocrat who sympathized with many of the liberal ideas of his day, he made important administrative reforms in Indian government and society. He reformed the finances, opened up judicial posts to

  • Bentinck, William Henry Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Portland (prime minister of Great Britain)

    William Henry Cavendish Bentinck, 3rd duke of Portland, British prime minister from April 2 to Dec. 19, 1783, and from March 31, 1807, to Oct. 4, 1809; on both occasions he was merely the nominal head of a government controlled by stronger political leaders. The eldest son of William, 2nd Duke of

  • Bentine, Michael (British actor)

    Michael Bentine, British comedian who was a founding member of "The Goon Show" on BBC radio and went on to such television programs as the children’s shows "The Bumblies" and "The Potties" as well as the outrageous "It’s a Square World"; he was appointed CBE in 1995 (b. Jan. 26, 1922--d. Nov. 26,

  • Bentivoglio family (Italian family)

    Bentivoglio Family, Italian family that controlled Bologna during the second half of the 15th century. Long prominent in Bolognese affairs, the Bentivogli are first recorded there in 1323. Emboldened by the power that they had gained as pro-papist Guelf chiefs in the 14th century, they made two

  • Bentivoglio, Giovanni II (Italian leader)

    Bentivoglio Family: Sante Bentivoglio established his family’s close relationship with the Sforza family of Milan, often an important ally during wars.

  • Bentivoglio, Guido (Italian historian)

    Guido Bentivoglio, Italian churchman, diplomat, and historian, whose writings give precise accounts of his diplomatic activities and of affairs in the countries he visited. Pope Paul V sent him as nuncio to Flanders (1607–15) and to France (1616–21) and created him cardinal (January 1621). Among

  • Bentivoglio, Sante (Italian leader)

    Bentivoglio Family: …Bentivogli chose as his successor Sante (1424–63), a little-known member of the family who had been reared in Florence. Nominally only a member of the Sixteen, the city’s ruling body, Sante, in fact, ruled Bologna. He reached an extremely important agreement with the papacy (Capitula, 1447) defining the extent of…

  • Bentley Motors Ltd. (British automobile manufacturer)

    Rolls-Royce PLC: In 1931 Rolls-Royce acquired Bentley Motors Ltd. (founded in 1920 by Walter Owen Bentley), a maker of fine cars, whose models thereafter gradually took on mechanical and design characteristics identical, except for minor details, to those of the Rolls-Royce line. For decades Rolls-Royce produced only the chassis and engines…

  • Bentley Subglacial Trench (trench, Antarctica)

    Antarctica: Relief: …trough to the west (Bentley Subglacial Trench). Areas that are now called “lands,” including most of Ellsworth Land and Marie Byrd Land, would be beneath the sea.

  • Bentley University (university, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States)

    Bentley University, private, coeducational institution of higher education in Waltham, Massachusetts, U.S. Although the university specializes in business-related education and training, it also offers a curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences. Master’s degree programs are available in business

  • Bentley’s Miscellany (British magazine)

    history of publishing: Literary and scientific magazines: …the New Monthly Magazine (1814–84); Bentley’s Miscellany (1837), which had Dickens as its first editor and Oliver Twist as one of its serials; and the Cornhill (1860–1975), first edited by William Thackeray and the first magazine of its kind to reach a circulation of 100,000. Finally, two rather different periodicals…

  • Bentley, Arthur F. (American political scientist)

    Arthur F. Bentley, American political scientist and philosopher known for his work in epistemology, logic, and linguistics and for his contributions to the development of a behavioral methodology of political science. Bentley received a B.A. in 1892 and a Ph.D. in 1895 from Johns Hopkins University

  • Bentley, Arthur Fisher (American political scientist)

    Arthur F. Bentley, American political scientist and philosopher known for his work in epistemology, logic, and linguistics and for his contributions to the development of a behavioral methodology of political science. Bentley received a B.A. in 1892 and a Ph.D. in 1895 from Johns Hopkins University

  • Bentley, E. C. (British author)

    E.C. Bentley, British journalist and man of letters who is remembered as the inventor of the clerihew and for his other light verse and as the author of Trent’s Last Case (1913), a classic detective story that remains a best seller. After attending St. Paul’s School in London (where he met G.K.

  • Bentley, Edmund Clerihew (British author)

    E.C. Bentley, British journalist and man of letters who is remembered as the inventor of the clerihew and for his other light verse and as the author of Trent’s Last Case (1913), a classic detective story that remains a best seller. After attending St. Paul’s School in London (where he met G.K.

  • Bentley, Eric (American critic, translator, and stage director)

    Eric Bentley, British-born American critic, translator, and stage director responsible for introducing the works of many European playwrights to the United States and known for his original, literate reviews of theatre and critical works on drama. Bentley studied at the University of Oxford (B.A.,

  • Bentley, Eric Russell (American critic, translator, and stage director)

    Eric Bentley, British-born American critic, translator, and stage director responsible for introducing the works of many European playwrights to the United States and known for his original, literate reviews of theatre and critical works on drama. Bentley studied at the University of Oxford (B.A.,

  • Bentley, Nicolas (British caricaturist)

    caricature and cartoon: England: Bateman, Nicolas Bentley, E.H. Shepard, and Osbert Lancaster. Leech was in a sense the pictorial equivalent of Thackeray (Thackeray was an excellent comic draftsman but better at getting the feel of past time with a comic flavour than at considering his contemporaries other than in words).…

  • Bentley, Richard (British scholar)

    Richard Bentley, British clergyman, one of the great figures in the history of classical scholarship, who combined wide learning with critical acuteness. Gifted with a powerful and logical mind, he was able to do much to restore ancient texts and to point the way to new developments in textual

  • Bentley, Thomas (English merchant)

    Josiah Wedgwood: …Liverpool, he met the merchant Thomas Bentley in 1762. Because his enterprise had spread from the British Isles to the Continent, Wedgwood expanded his business to the nearby Brick House (or Bell Works) factory. In 1768 Bentley became his partner in the manufacture of ornamental items that were primarily unglazed…

  • Bento Gon?alves (Brazil)

    Bento Gon?alves, city, northeastern Rio Grande do Sul estado (state), southern Brazil. Situated in the hills overlooking the Jaguari River valley, Bento Gon?alves is a commercial centre in a fertile agricultural region settled by Italians in the late 19th century. Viticulture is the primary

  • Bentol (Liberia)

    Bensonville, city, northwestern Liberia. Bensonville is a marketing and commercial centre for the surrounding agricultural area. Prior to the outbreak of civil war in the 1990s, its industrial activity included the production of milled rice, sawn wood, soap, plastics, paints, furniture and

  • Benton (Arkansas, United States)

    Benton, city, seat (1835) of Saline county, central Arkansas, U.S. It lies along the Saline River, 25 miles (40 km) southwest of Little Rock. The site, on the old Military Road (a main Missouri-Texas route), was settled about 1815 and originally called Saline. The community was later renamed in

  • Benton and Bowles (American advertising agency)

    Chester Bowles: …the successful advertising company of Benton and Bowles in 1929, selling his multimillion-dollar interest in it in 1941, when he took a position in the state wartime rationing administration under the governor of Connecticut. He became that state’s director of price administration and in the autumn of 1943 was appointed…

  • Benton Harbor (Michigan, United States)

    Benton Harbor, city, Berrien county, southwestern Michigan, U.S. It lies on Lake Michigan near the mouth of the St. Joseph River, opposite its twin city of St. Joseph, 50 miles (80 km) west-southwest of Kalamazoo. Originally called Brunson Harbor and a part of St. Joseph, it was renamed for Thomas

  • Benton v. Maryland (law case)

    Benjamin Nathan Cardozo: …the Palko ruling, holding in Benton v. Maryland that the rule against double jeopardy was so fundamental to justice as to be a requirement of due process of law.

  • Benton, Robert (American filmmaker)

    Robert Benton, American filmmaker who directed and wrote a number of acclaimed movies, including Kramer vs. Kramer (1979). Benton served in the U.S. Army in the 1950s, and during this time he painted dioramas. In 1958 he became the art director of Esquire magazine, but he switched in 1964 to the

  • Benton, Robert Douglas (American filmmaker)

    Robert Benton, American filmmaker who directed and wrote a number of acclaimed movies, including Kramer vs. Kramer (1979). Benton served in the U.S. Army in the 1950s, and during this time he painted dioramas. In 1958 he became the art director of Esquire magazine, but he switched in 1964 to the

  • Benton, Stephen Anthony (American inventor)

    Stephen Anthony Benton, American inventor (born Dec. 1, 1941, San Francisco, Calif.—died Nov. 9, 2003, Boston, Mass.), became fascinated with holograms the first time he saw one and went on to invent the rainbow hologram, the type used on credit cards, which was named the Benton hologram. He was a

  • Benton, Thomas Hart (American painter)

    Thomas Hart Benton, one of the foremost painters and muralists associated with the American Regionalists of the 1930s. The son of a member of Congress, Benton worked as a cartoonist for the Joplin (Missouri) American in 1906 and then studied at the Art Institute of Chicago. He studied at the

  • Benton, Thomas Hart (American writer and politician)

    Thomas Hart Benton, American writer and Democratic Party leader who championed agrarian interests and westward expansion during his 30-year tenure as a senator from Missouri. After military service in the War of 1812, Benton settled in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1815 and became editor of the St. Louis

  • Benton, William (United States senator and publisher)

    William Benton, American publisher of Encyclop?dia Britannica (1943–73), advertising executive, and government official. A descendant of missionaries and educators, Benton was greatly influenced by his indomitable mother—a professor’s widow, pioneer woman school superintendent, and Montana

  • Benton, William Burnett (United States senator and publisher)

    William Benton, American publisher of Encyclop?dia Britannica (1943–73), advertising executive, and government official. A descendant of missionaries and educators, Benton was greatly influenced by his indomitable mother—a professor’s widow, pioneer woman school superintendent, and Montana

  • Bentong (Malaysia)

    Bentong, town, West Malaysia. It lies on the Bentong River, northeast of Kuala Lumpur, across the Main Range. It is a commercial centre for local rubber estates and alluvial tin mines. Genting Highlands is a nearby hill resort, and Genting Pass provides a spectacular panorama of hills and valleys

  • bentonite (clay)

    Bentonite, clay formed by the alteration of minute glass particles derived from volcanic ash. It was named for Fort Benton, Mont., near which it was discovered. The formation of bentonite involves the alteration of volcanic glass to clay minerals; this requires hydration (taking up or combination

  • Bentsen, Lloyd (American politician)

    Lloyd Bentsen, American Democratic politician who was a longtime U.S. senator (1971–93) before serving as secretary of the treasury (1993–94) in the presidential administration of Bill Clinton. Bentsen was also the unsuccessful Democratic nominee for vice president in 1988, running on a ticket with

  • Bentsen, Lloyd Millard, Jr. (American politician)

    Lloyd Bentsen, American Democratic politician who was a longtime U.S. senator (1971–93) before serving as secretary of the treasury (1993–94) in the presidential administration of Bill Clinton. Bentsen was also the unsuccessful Democratic nominee for vice president in 1988, running on a ticket with

  • bentwood furniture

    Bentwood furniture, type of furniture made by bending wooden rods into the required shape after they have been heated with steam. Although this method of bending wood was used by makers of the Windsor chair in the 18th century, it was not until the 1840s that its possibilities were exploited fully.

  • Benty (Guinea)

    Benti, town and seaport, western Guinea, western Africa. It lies at the head of the estuary of the Mélikhouré (Melacorée) River, 10 miles (16 km) upstream from the Atlantic coast. Important for the export of bananas (second only to Conakry), its port can accommodate oceangoing vessels of 21-foot (

  • Benue (Nigeria)

    Benue, state, east-central Nigeria. A wooded savanna region, it is bounded on the south by Cross River, Ebonyi, and Enugu states, on the west by Kogi state, on the north by Nassawara state, and on the northeast by Taraba state. The Benue River defines the western half of Benue’s northern boundary;

  • Benue River (river, Africa)

    Benue River, river in western Africa, longest tributary of the Niger, about 673 miles (1,083 km) in length. It rises in northern Cameroon as the Bénoué at about 4,400 feet (1,340 m) and, in its first 150 miles (240 km), descends more than 2,000 feet (600 m) over many falls and rapids, the rest of

  • Benue State University (university, Makurdi, Nigeria)

    Makurdi: Makurdi is home to Benue State University, the Federal University of Agriculture, the Assemblies of God Comprehensive College, and a government craft school and is served by a hospital. The Benue state radio broadcasting service operates from the town. Makurdi is the headquarters of the Lower Benue River Basin…

  • Benue-Congo languages

    Benue-Congo languages, the largest branch of the Niger-Congo language family, in terms of the number of speakers, the number of languages, and the wide geographic spread, stretching from the Benin-Nigeria border across Nigeria and Cameroon through central Africa to eastern Africa. It includes all

  • Benveniste, Jacques (French immunologist)

    Jacques Benveniste, French immunologist (born March 12, 1935, Paris, France—died Oct. 3, 2004, Paris), was responsible for numerous advances in allergy medicine and immunology, gaining prominence as part of the research team that isolated platelet-activating factor (an important blood-clotting

  • Benvenuti, Giovanni (Italian boxer)

    Nino Benvenuti, Italian professional boxer, Olympic welterweight and world middleweight champion. Benvenuti won the Olympic welterweight title in 1960. He turned professional the following year and won his first 65 matches and the Italian middleweight championship. In 1965 he claimed both the world

  • Benvenuti, Nino (Italian boxer)

    Nino Benvenuti, Italian professional boxer, Olympic welterweight and world middleweight champion. Benvenuti won the Olympic welterweight title in 1960. He turned professional the following year and won his first 65 matches and the Italian middleweight championship. In 1965 he claimed both the world

  • Benvenuto Cellini (opera by Berlioz)

    Hector Berlioz: Mature career: An adaptation of Benvenuto Cellini’s autobiography was secured, and Berlioz finished his score in a short time. The intrigue now passed to the other side, which saw to it that the production of Benvenuto Cellini at the Opéra failed. From this blow the work itself and the composer’s…

  • Benxi (China)

    Benxi, city, southeast-central Liaoning sheng (province), northeastern China. It is situated some 45 miles (75 km) southeast of Shenyang (Mukden) on the Taizi River. From the time of the Liao dynasty (907–1125), Benxi was the centre of a small-scale iron industry, and coal began to be mined in the

  • Benxi Coal and Iron Company (company)

    Benxi: …changed its name to the Benxi Coal and Iron Company. It was efficiently managed and remained important, but it gradually became dominated by Japanese interests (its Japanese name was Honkei or Honkeiko).

  • Benxi Coal Mining Company (company)

    Benxi: …changed its name to the Benxi Coal and Iron Company. It was efficiently managed and remained important, but it gradually became dominated by Japanese interests (its Japanese name was Honkei or Honkeiko).

  • Benxihu Coal Mining Company (company)

    Benxi: …changed its name to the Benxi Coal and Iron Company. It was efficiently managed and remained important, but it gradually became dominated by Japanese interests (its Japanese name was Honkei or Honkeiko).

  • Benxihu colliery mining disaster (explosion, Benxi, Liaoning, China [1942])

    Honkeiko colliery mining disaster, deadly explosion that occurred on April 26, 1942, in a coal mine at Benxi, Liaoning province, China. The disaster killed 1,549 Chinese miners. The colliery (called Honkeiko by the Japanese and Benxihu by the Chinese) was located near Benxi Lake in the ore-rich

  • Benyon, John (British writer)

    John Wyndham, English science-fiction writer who examined the human struggle for survival when catastrophic natural phenomena suddenly invade a comfortable English setting. Educated in Derbyshire, Wyndham tried his hand at various jobs, from farming to advertising. During the mid-1920s he wrote

  • Benz (automobile)

    automobile: Development of the gasoline car: Benz ran his first car in 1885, Daimler in 1886. Although there is no reason to believe that Benz had ever seen a motor vehicle before he made his own, he and Daimler had been preceded by étienne Lenoir in France and Siegfried Marcus in Austria, in 1862 and…

  • Benz & Co. (German firm)

    automotive industry: Growth in Europe: …the merger of Daimler and Benz in 1926, after the founders of those firms had died (their bitter rivalry for the distinction of being the inventor of the gasoline automobile made any such union during their lifetimes unthinkable), and the entry of General Motors onto the German scene through the…

  • Benz, Carl (German engineer)

    Karl Benz, German mechanical engineer who designed and in 1885 built the world’s first practical automobile to be powered by an internal-combustion engine. Although the original Benz car (a three-wheeled vehicle, the Motorwagen, now preserved in Munich) first ran early in 1885, its design was not

  • Benz, Karl (German engineer)

    Karl Benz, German mechanical engineer who designed and in 1885 built the world’s first practical automobile to be powered by an internal-combustion engine. Although the original Benz car (a three-wheeled vehicle, the Motorwagen, now preserved in Munich) first ran early in 1885, its design was not

  • Benz, Karl Friedrich (German engineer)

    Karl Benz, German mechanical engineer who designed and in 1885 built the world’s first practical automobile to be powered by an internal-combustion engine. Although the original Benz car (a three-wheeled vehicle, the Motorwagen, now preserved in Munich) first ran early in 1885, its design was not

  • benz[a]pyrene (chemical compound)

    hydrocarbon: Nomenclature: Benzo[a]pyrene, for example, is present in tobacco smoke and chimney soot and is formed when meat is cooked on barbecue grills.

  • Benzaiten (Japanese mythology)

    Benten, (Japanese: Divinity of the Reasoning Faculty), in Japanese mythology, one of the Shichi-fuku-jin (Seven Gods of Luck); the Buddhist patron goddess of literature and music, of wealth, and of femininity. She is generally associated with the sea; many of her shrines are located near it, and s

  • benzaldehyde (chemical compound)

    Benzaldehyde (C6H5CHO), the simplest representative of the aromatic aldehydes, occurring naturally as the glycoside amygdalin. Prepared synthetically, it is used chiefly in the manufacture of dyes, cinnamic acid, and other organic compounds, and to some extent in perfumes and flavouring agents.

  • benzaldehyde cyanohydrin (chemical compound)

    aldehyde: Addition of carbon nucleophiles: Benzaldehyde cyanohydrin (mandelonitrile) provides an interesting example of a chemical defense mechanism in the biological world. This substance is synthesized by millipedes (Apheloria corrugata) and stored in special glands. When a millipede is threatened, the cyanohydrin is secreted from its storage gland and undergoes enzyme-catalyzed dissociation to…

  • benzaldehyde green (drug and dye)

    Malachite green, triphenylmethane dye used medicinally in dilute solution as a local antiseptic. Malachite green is effective against fungi and gram-positive bacteria. In the fish-breeding industry it has been used to control the fungus Saprolegnia, a water mold that kills the eggs and young fry.

  • Benzedrine (drug)

    amphetamine: …sulfate, marketed under the name Benzedrine, a white powder with a slightly bitter, numbing taste. Dextroamphetamine sulfate, marketed under the name Dexedrine, is the more active of the two optically isomeric forms in which amphetamine exists. Other members of the amphetamine series include methamphetamine and benzphetamine.

  • Benzelius, Eric (Swedish editor)

    biblical literature: Scandinavian versions: …another, with minor alterations by Eric Benzelius, in 1703. The altered Bible was called the Charles XII Bible because it was printed during the reign of Charles XII. In 1917 the diet of the Lutheran church published a completely fresh translation directly from modern critical editions of the Hebrew and…

  • benzene (chemical compound)

    Benzene (C6H6), simplest organic, aromatic hydrocarbon and parent compound of numerous important aromatic compounds. Benzene is a colourless liquid with a characteristic odour and is primarily used in the production of polystyrene. It is highly toxic and is a known carcinogen; exposure to it may

  • benzene 1,3-diol (chemical compound)

    Resorcinol, phenolic compound used in the manufacture of resins, plastics, dyes, medicine, and numerous other organic chemical compounds. It is produced in large quantities by sulfonating benzene with fuming sulfuric acid and fusing the resulting benzenedisulfonic acid with caustic soda. Reaction w

  • benzene 1,4-diol (chemical compound)

    Hydroquinone, colourless, crystalline organic compound formed by chemical reduction of benzoquinone. See

  • benzene hexachloride (chemical compound)

    Benzene hexachloride (BHC), any of several stereoisomers of 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane formed by the light-induced addition of chlorine to benzene. One of these isomers is an insecticide called lindane, or Gammexane. Benzene hexachloride was first prepared in 1825; the insecticidal

  • benzene ring

    hydrocarbon: Aromatic hydrocarbons: …All compounds that contain a benzene ring possess special stability and are classified as benzenoid aromatic compounds. Certain other compounds lack a benzene ring yet satisfy the criterion of special stability and are classified as nonbenzenoid aromatic compounds.

  • benzenethiol (chemical compound)

    organosulfur compound: Thiols: …oxygen compound, as, for example, thiophenol (C6H5SH), also called benzenethiol. A number of thiols are found in nature, such as cysteine and glutathione. In addition, 2-butenethiol is found in the defensive spray of the skunk, 2-propanethiol (allyl mercaptan) is found in the breath of people who have eaten garlic, and…

  • benzenoid aromatic compound

    hydrocarbon: Aromatic hydrocarbons: …stability and are classified as benzenoid aromatic compounds. Certain other compounds lack a benzene ring yet satisfy the criterion of special stability and are classified as nonbenzenoid aromatic compounds.

  • benzenol (chemistry)

    Carbolic acid, simplest member of the phenol family of organic compounds. See

  • Benzer, Seymour (American scientist)

    Seymour Benzer, American molecular biologist who developed (1955) a method for determining the detailed structure of viral genes and coined the term cistron to denote functional subunits of genes. He also did much to elucidate the nature of genetic anomalies, called nonsense mutations, in terms of

  • benzidine (chemical compound)

    Benzidine, an organic chemical belonging to the class of amines and used in making numerous dyestuffs. The azo dyes derived from benzidine are important because, unlike simpler classes of azo dyes, they become strongly fixed to cotton without a mordant. Benzidine is prepared from nitrobenzene by

  • benzimidazole (chemical compound)

    heterocyclic compound: Five- and six-membered rings with two or more heteroatoms: Benzimidazole, for example, is the name for the compound:

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