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  • Berdichev (Ukraine)

    Berdychiv, city, northwestern Ukraine. Founded in 1482 as a Lithuanian fortress, Berdychiv was Polish from 1569 until 1793. The 16th-century fortress walls survive, as does the Roman Catholic church in which the French novelist Honoré de Balzac married Eveline Hanska, a wealthy Polish widow, in

  • Berdichevsky, Micah Joseph (Russian author)

    Micah Joseph Berdichevsky, author of works in Hebrew, German, and Yiddish. His impassioned writings, perhaps more than those of any other Jewish author, bear poignant witness to the “rent in the heart” of 19th-century Jews torn between tradition and assimilation. He was also the author of enduring

  • Berdsk (Russia)

    Berdsk, city, Novosibirsk oblast (province), central Russia. It lies along the Novosibirsk Reservoir just south of Novosibirsk city. Founded at the beginning of the 18th century as a fortress, it became a city in 1944. Berdsk’s industrial activities include flour milling and radio production. It is

  • Berdyansk (Ukraine)

    Berdyansk, city and port, southeastern Ukraine. It lies along the Berdyansk Gulf of the Sea of Azov. Founded in 1827, the city is a holiday and health resort. Its industries have included engineering, oil processing, flour milling, and fishing. Pop. (2001) 121,692; (2005 est.)

  • Berdyayev, Nikolay Aleksandrovich (Russian philosopher)

    Nikolay Aleksandrovich Berdyayev, religious thinker, philosopher, and Marxist who became a critic of Russian implementation of Karl Marx’s views and a leading representative of Christian existentialism, a school of philosophy that stresses examination of the human condition within a Christian

  • Berdychiv (Ukraine)

    Berdychiv, city, northwestern Ukraine. Founded in 1482 as a Lithuanian fortress, Berdychiv was Polish from 1569 until 1793. The 16th-century fortress walls survive, as does the Roman Catholic church in which the French novelist Honoré de Balzac married Eveline Hanska, a wealthy Polish widow, in

  • Berdymukhammedov, Gurbanguly (president of Turkmenistan)

    Gurbanguly Berdymukhammedov, Turkmen dentist and politician who became president of Turkmenistan in 2006. Berdymukhammedov was the grandson of a distinguished local schoolteacher. In 1979 he graduated from the dental faculty of the Turkmen State Medical Institute and started work as a dentist in an

  • Berea (Kentucky, United States)

    Berea, city, Madison county, central Kentucky, U.S., near the Cumberland Mountains, 14 miles (23 km) south of Richmond. The history of the city is centred on Berea College, founded by abolitionists in 1855 and one of the most highly regarded private colleges in the South. The school gives each

  • Berea College (college, Berea, Kentucky, United States)

    Berea College v. Kentucky: Since its founding in 1855, Berea College had educated both African American and white students in a nondiscriminatory manner. However, in 1904, the Kentucky legislature passed the Day Law, which prohibited African American and white students from receiving an education at the same school or in schools that were located…

  • Berea College v. Kentucky (United States law case [1908])

    Berea College v. Kentucky, legal case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on November 9, 1908, upheld (7–2) a Kentucky state law that prohibited individuals and corporations from operating schools that taught both African American and white students. Although the majority ruling did not endorse racial

  • Berea Mission (mission, Lesotho)

    Teyateyaneng: Berea Mission (named for a Greek town where St. Paul found converts of remarkable zeal), which was maintained for 50 years by an Anglican missionary, William Wrenford, is a historical monument southwest of the village. Pop. (2006 prelim.) 21,949.

  • Berecci, Bartolommeo (Italian architect)

    Western architecture: Eastern Europe: …della Lore and continued by Bartolommeo Berecci of Florence. It presents a blend of local Gothic and 15th-century Italian architecture. The great courtyard has three stories of loggias; the two lower ones, with semicircular arches on squat Ionic columns, suggest the new style, but the much taller upper story, with…

  • Berechiah ha-Nakdan (Hebrew author)

    Judaism: Major medieval Hebrew collections: …Mishle shu?alim (“Fox Fables”) of Berechiah ha-Nakdan (“the Punctuator”), who may have lived in England near the end of the 12th century. About half of these tales recur in Marie de France’s Ysopet, and only one of them is of specifically Jewish origin. Berechiah’s work was translated into Latin and…

  • Bérégovoy, Pierre (French prime minister)

    Pierre Bérégovoy, French politician, prime minister from April 1992 to March 1993. In 1941, at the age of 15, Bérégovoy left school to work as a machinist. He later worked for the national railways and joined the French Resistance. In 1950 he took a job at Gaz de France, the national gas utility.

  • Bérégovoy, Pierre Eugène (French prime minister)

    Pierre Bérégovoy, French politician, prime minister from April 1992 to March 1993. In 1941, at the age of 15, Bérégovoy left school to work as a machinist. He later worked for the national railways and joined the French Resistance. In 1950 he took a job at Gaz de France, the national gas utility.

  • Bereguardo Canal (canal, Italy)

    Bereguardo Canal, historic canal in Lombardy, Italy, the first canal in Europe to use a series of pound locks (locks with gates at both ends) to overcome a large change in elevation. The Bereguardo Canal was one of a series of canals built around Milan in the 15th century that resulted in important

  • Bereguardo, Naviglio di (canal, Italy)

    Bereguardo Canal, historic canal in Lombardy, Italy, the first canal in Europe to use a series of pound locks (locks with gates at both ends) to overcome a large change in elevation. The Bereguardo Canal was one of a series of canals built around Milan in the 15th century that resulted in important

  • Berelson, Bernard (American behavioral scientist)

    two-step flow model of communication: …in 1948 by Paul Lazarsfeld, Bernard Berelson, and Hazel Gaudet in the book The People’s Choice, after research into voters’ decision-making processes during the 1940 U.S. presidential election. It stipulates that mass media content first reaches “opinion leaders,” people who are active media users and who collect, interpret, and diffuse…

  • Berendrecht (lock, Antwerp, Belgium)

    Antwerp: The city layout: …1860; and the 1,640-foot (500-metre) Berendrecht was, when it opened in 1988, the largest lock in the world. Left-bank port and industrial facilities have access to the Schelde via the Kallo lock.

  • Berengar (king and emperor of Italy)

    Berengar, son of Eberhard, Frankish margrave of Friuli, king of Italy from 888 (as Berengar I), and Holy Roman emperor from 915. He was the founder of a line of princes of the 9th–11th century who in popular Italian histories are ranked incorrectly as national kings. Through his mother Gisela he

  • Berengar I (king and emperor of Italy)

    Berengar, son of Eberhard, Frankish margrave of Friuli, king of Italy from 888 (as Berengar I), and Holy Roman emperor from 915. He was the founder of a line of princes of the 9th–11th century who in popular Italian histories are ranked incorrectly as national kings. Through his mother Gisela he

  • Berengar II (king of Italy)

    Berengar II, grandson of Berengar I and king of Italy from 950 to 952. Berengar was important in the career of the German king and Holy Roman emperor Otto I the Great. For several months in 951 he held captive Adelaide, the daughter and widow of kings of Italy; she escaped and married Otto, who

  • Berengar of Tours (French theologian)

    Berengar Of Tours, theologian principally remembered for his leadership of the losing side in the crucial eucharistic controversy of the 11th century. Having studied under the celebrated Fulbert at Chartres, Berengar returned to Tours after 1029 and became canon of its cathedral and head of the

  • Berengaria (ship)

    ship: Passenger liners in the 20th century: … Imperator became the Cunard Line’s Berengaria; and the Bismarck became the White Star Line’s Majestic. That war severely cut traffic, although ships were used for troop transport. By eliminating German competition and seizing their great ships, the Western Allies returned to competing among themselves.

  • Berengaria of Navarre (queen of England)

    Richard I: Sicily: …Cyprus, Richard married (May 12) Berengaria of Navarre.

  • Berengario da Carpi, Giacomo (Italian physician)

    Giacomo Berengario da Carpi, Italian physician and anatomist who was the first to describe the heart valves. He also was one of the first to illustrate medical works with drawings from nature. Berengario was a professor at the University of Bologna from 1502 to 1527. While there he became known for

  • Berengario, duca e marchese del Friuli (king and emperor of Italy)

    Berengar, son of Eberhard, Frankish margrave of Friuli, king of Italy from 888 (as Berengar I), and Holy Roman emperor from 915. He was the founder of a line of princes of the 9th–11th century who in popular Italian histories are ranked incorrectly as national kings. Through his mother Gisela he

  • Berengario, marchese d’Ivrea (king of Italy)

    Berengar II, grandson of Berengar I and king of Italy from 950 to 952. Berengar was important in the career of the German king and Holy Roman emperor Otto I the Great. For several months in 951 he held captive Adelaide, the daughter and widow of kings of Italy; she escaped and married Otto, who

  • Berengarius (French theologian)

    Berengar Of Tours, theologian principally remembered for his leadership of the losing side in the crucial eucharistic controversy of the 11th century. Having studied under the celebrated Fulbert at Chartres, Berengar returned to Tours after 1029 and became canon of its cathedral and head of the

  • Bérenger de Tours (French theologian)

    Berengar Of Tours, theologian principally remembered for his leadership of the losing side in the crucial eucharistic controversy of the 11th century. Having studied under the celebrated Fulbert at Chartres, Berengar returned to Tours after 1029 and became canon of its cathedral and head of the

  • Bérenger, Alphonse-Marie (French jurist)

    Alphonse-Marie Bérenger, French magistrate and parliamentarian, distinguished for his role in the reform of law and legal procedure based on humanitarian principles. Appointed judge in Grenoble in 1808, Bérenger had a successful career in the magistracy during Napoleon’s First Empire and served as

  • Bérenger, Alphonse-Marie-Marcellin-Thomas (French jurist)

    Alphonse-Marie Bérenger, French magistrate and parliamentarian, distinguished for his role in the reform of law and legal procedure based on humanitarian principles. Appointed judge in Grenoble in 1808, Bérenger had a successful career in the magistracy during Napoleon’s First Empire and served as

  • Berenger, Tom (American actor)

    Platoon: Barnes (Tom Berenger), a tough, experienced, and merciless fighter, and Sgt. Elias (Willem Dafoe), who is likewise tough and experienced but who strives to hold fast to his moral centre. Shortly, Elias’s squad, consisting largely of green recruits, is sent out on patrol. When night falls,…

  • Berenguer Ramon I (count of Provence)

    Ramon Berenguer III: …younger son, Berenguer Ramon (as Berenguer Ramon I of Provence, reigning 1131–44); and the rest of the lands, the most important ones, went to the elder son, Ramon Berenguer IV.

  • Berenguer Ramon I (count of Barcelona)

    Ramon Berenguer I: His father, Berenguer Ramon I (reigned 1018–35), divided and bequeathed his lands among his three sons. However, San? (or Sancho) in 1049 and Guillem (or William) in 1054 renounced their inheritances in their eldest brother’s favour, thus reuniting the lands. Ramon Berenguer I also expanded his domain…

  • Berenguer Ramon II (count of Barcelona)

    El Cid: Conquest of Valencia: This was done when Berenguer Ramón II was humiliatingly defeated at Tébar, near Teruel (May 1090). During the next years the Cid gradually tightened his control over Valencia and its ruler, al-Qādir, now his tributary. His moment of destiny came in October 1092 when the qā?ī (chief magistrate), Ibn…

  • Berenguer, Dámaso, conde de Xauen (Spanish statesman)

    Dámaso Berenguer, count de Xauen, Spanish general who served briefly as prime minister (January 1930–February 1931) before the establishment of the Second Republic. Berenguer entered the army in 1889, served in Cuba and Morocco, and was promoted to general in 1909. He was minister of war in 1918

  • Bérénice (play by Racine)

    Bérénice, tragic drama in five acts by Jean Racine, performed in 1670 and published in 1671. It is loosely based upon events following the death of the Roman emperor Vespasian in the 1st century ce. Bérénice is the story of a love triangle. Titus, who is to become the new emperor, and his friend

  • Berenice (daughter of Ptolemy II)

    Berenice, daughter of Ptolemy II Philadelphus and Arsinoe I of Egypt. She was married to the Seleucid ruler Antiochus II Theos, supplanting his first wife, Laodice, whose children she persuaded him to bar from the succession to the throne in favour of her own. Laodice, however, persuaded Antiochus

  • Berenice (Libya)

    Benghazi, city and major seaport of northeastern Libya, on the Gulf of Sidra. It was founded by the Greeks of Cyrenaica as Hesperides (Euesperides) and received from the Egyptian pharaoh Ptolemy III the additional name of Berenice in honour of his wife. After the 3rd century ce it superseded Cyrene

  • Berenice (Roman aristocrat)

    Berenice, lover of the Roman emperor Titus and a participant in the events leading up to the fall of Jerusalem. The eldest daughter of the Judaean tetrarch Herod Agrippa I by his wife Cypros, Berenice was married at age 13, but her husband died without consummating the marriage. She then married

  • Berenice I (queen of Egypt)

    Berenice I, queen of ancient Egypt, wife of Ptolemy I Soter, and mother of Arsinoe II and Ptolemy II Philadelphus. Berenice arrived in Egypt in the retinue of Eurydice, Ptolemy’s second queen, whom he married as part of a political agreement with her father, Antipater of Macedonia. About 317

  • Berenice II (queen of Egypt)

    Berenice II, daughter of Magas, king of Cyrene (in modern Libya), whose marriage to Ptolemy III Euergetes reunited her country with Egypt. Magas’ queen, who favoured an alliance with the Seleucid dynasty of Syria, tried to thwart the marriage by summoning Demetrius the Fair, a Macedonian prince, as

  • Berenice III (queen of Egypt)

    Berenice III, queen of Egypt, daughter of Ptolemy IX, the most strong-willed member of the royal family. She ruled during a period of violent civil strife. Daughter of either Cleopatra Selene or Cleopatra IV, Berenice first married her uncle, Ptolemy X, sometime before 101. After the death in 101

  • Berenice IV (Egyptian ruler)

    Berenice IV, eldest daughter of Ptolemy XII Auletes of Egypt, sister of the great Cleopatra VII, and ruler of Egypt during her father’s absence in 58–55. She was executed by him after his return. Ptolemy, driven from Egypt by the threat of popular insurrection in 58, went to Rome. When his queen

  • Berenson, Bernard (American art critic)

    Bernard Berenson, American art critic, especially of Italian Renaissance art. Reared in Boston, Berenson was educated at Harvard University, from which he was graduated in 1887. His first book, The Venetian Painters of the Renaissance (1894), displayed a concise writing style. He was also endowed

  • Berenson, Bernhard (American art critic)

    Bernard Berenson, American art critic, especially of Italian Renaissance art. Reared in Boston, Berenson was educated at Harvard University, from which he was graduated in 1887. His first book, The Venetian Painters of the Renaissance (1894), displayed a concise writing style. He was also endowed

  • Berenson, Senda (American educator)

    Senda Berenson, American educator and sportswoman who created and successfully promoted a form of women’s basketball played in schools for nearly three-quarters of a century. The Valvrojenski family immigrated to the United States in 1875, adopting the name Berenson and settling in Boston. Senda’s

  • Berenstain, Jan (American author)

    Jan Berenstain, (Janice Marian Grant), American writer of children’s stories (born July 26, 1923, Philadelphia, Pa.—died Feb. 24, 2012, Solebury, Pa.), was the coauthor with her husband, Stan (and, after his death in 2005, with their son Michael), of some 300 books that feature the everyday lives

  • Berenstain, Stan (American author)

    Stan Berenstain, (Stanley Melvin Berenstain), American children’s writer (born Sept. 29, 1923, Philadelphia, Pa.—died Nov. 26, 2005, Doylestown, Pa.), was the coauthor with his wife, Janice, of more than 250 books featuring the Berenstain Bears, beginning in 1962 with The Big Honey Hunt. The l

  • Berenstain, Stanley Melvin (American author)

    Stan Berenstain, (Stanley Melvin Berenstain), American children’s writer (born Sept. 29, 1923, Philadelphia, Pa.—died Nov. 26, 2005, Doylestown, Pa.), was the coauthor with his wife, Janice, of more than 250 books featuring the Berenstain Bears, beginning in 1962 with The Big Honey Hunt. The l

  • Berent, Wac?aw (Polish novelist)

    Wac?aw Berent, novelist and essayist whose fiction is notable for its expression of historical and philosophical issues. Born to an affluent merchant family, Berent studied in Zürich, Switzerland, and Munich, Germany, where he concentrated on the natural sciences. Ideologically related to the Young

  • Beresford, Bruce (Australian director, screenwriter, and producer)

    Bruce Beresford, Australian film and stage director, screenwriter, and producer who specialized in small-budget character-driven dramas. Beresford began making short films as a student at the University of Sydney, from which he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1964. He then went to London, where he

  • Beresford, Charles William de la Poer Beresford, 1st Baron (British admiral and politician)

    Charles William de la Poer Beresford, 1st Baron Beresford, British admiral and, intermittently, Conservative member of Parliament who frequently and outspokenly criticized Admiralty policy. Second son of the 4th Marquess of Waterford, Beresford distinguished himself as commander of the gunboat

  • Beresford, Elisabeth (British author)

    Elisabeth Beresford , British children’s writer (born Aug. 6, 1926, Paris, France—died Dec. 24, 2010, Alderney, Channel Islands), created the Wombles, a community of furry, long-nosed burrowing creatures who live peacefully under the parkland of London’s Wimbledon Common, emerging secretly to clean

  • Beresford, Jack (British athlete)

    Jack Beresford, English sculler and oarsman who accumulated an outstanding record in the Olympics and at the Henley Royal Regatta. During World War I, Beresford was wounded in France in 1918. He then returned to London and joined his father’s furniture-manufacturing business. As a member of the

  • Beresford, John (British politician)

    John Beresford, political leader in the struggle to preserve the political monopoly of the Protestant landowning aristocracy in Ireland. He was once called “king of Ireland” because of his great wealth and control of a vast political patronage. Beresford served as a member of the privy councils of

  • Beresford, William Carr Beresford, Viscount, Baron Beresford of Albuera and Dungarvan, Duke de Elvas (British general)

    William Carr Beresford, Viscount Beresford, British general and Portuguese marshal prominent in the (Iberian) Peninsular War of 1808–14. For his costly victory over the French at La Albuera, Spain, on May 16, 1811, he was subjected to harsh criticism in Great Britain. An illegitimate son of the 2nd

  • Bereshit (Old Testament)

    Genesis, the first book of the Bible. Its name derives from the opening words: “In the beginning….” Genesis narrates the primeval history of the world (chapters 1–11) and the patriarchal history of the Israelite people (chapters 12–50). The primeval history includes the familiar stories of the

  • Beresteczko, Battle of (Poland [1651])

    Battle of Beresteczko, (June 28–30, 1651), military engagement in which the king of Poland, John Casimir (reigned 1648–68), inflicted a severe defeat upon the rebel Cossack leader Bohdan Khmelnytsky. In 1648 Khmelnytsky organized an insurrection among the Zaporozhian Cossacks, who lived along the

  • Berestye (Belarus)

    Brest, city and administrative centre of Brest oblast (region), southwestern Belarus, on the right bank of the western Bug River. First mentioned in 1019 as Berestye, it passed to Lithuania in 1319 and later to Poland. In 1795 Russia acquired Brest, although it reverted to Poland from 1919 to 1939.

  • Beretta nine-millimetre pistol (firearm)

    small arm: Self-loaders: …Beretta, given the NATO designation M9, reflected post-1970 trends such as large-capacity magazines (15 shots in the Beretta), double-action triggers (which could snap the hammer without its having to be cocked manually or automatically), and ambidextrous safety levers.

  • Beretta SpA (Italian company)

    Beretta SpA, Italian-based manufacturer of sporting, military, and personal firearms, one of the world’s oldest industrial enterprises. It has affiliates in France, Greece, and the United States. Headquarters are in Gardone Val Trompia, near Milan, Italy. The founder of the business, Bartolomeo

  • Beretta, Bartolomeo (Italian manufacturer)

    Beretta SpA: The founder of the business, Bartolomeo Beretta, was known as a maestro da canne, or master gun-barrel maker, for the republic of Venice as early as 1526. His son Giovannino inherited his father’s work in Gardone Val Trompia, and thereafter the family business was handed down over the centuries in…

  • Beretta, Pietro (Italian manufacturer [1870-1957])

    Beretta SpA: Another Pietro Beretta (1870–1957) introduced modern production techniques and more than trebled the company’s factory space. By the late 20th century the company was being directed by 12th and 13th generations of the Beretta family.

  • Beretta, Pietro (Italian manufacturer [1791-1853])

    Beretta SpA: Pietro Beretta (1791–1853), after furnishing gun barrels for Napoleon’s conquering armies, decided after the peace of 1815 to turn to the manufacture of whole weapons and diversified into sporting guns. Another Pietro Beretta (1870–1957) introduced modern production techniques and more than trebled the company’s factory…

  • Berezhnaya, Yelena (Russian figure skater)

    Salt Lake City 2002 Olympic Winter Games: …program, scored lower than Russians Yelena Berezhnaya and Anton Sikharulidze, who had made several errors in their performance. After the competition, a judge admitted that she had been coerced into voting for the Russian pair by a skating official but later recanted her story. The resulting uproar from the public…

  • Berezil Theatre (theatre, Kharkiv, Ukraine)

    Ukraine: Theatre and motion pictures: The Berezil Theatre (1922–33) in Kharkiv, under the artistic director Les Kurbas, was the most distinguished troupe. Preeminent among the playwrights was Mykola Kulish, whose Patetychna Sonata (“Sonata Pathétique”) combined Expressionist techniques with the forms of the Ukrainian vertep. From the mid-1930s, however, the theatre in…

  • Berezina River (river, Belarus)

    Byarezina River, river in Belarus, a tributary of the Dnieper, which it joins near Rechytsa. Its 381-mile (613-km) length drains 9,450 square miles (24,500 square km). It rises north of the Minsk Elevation and flows south-southeast in a meandering course through a swampy forested basin. It is

  • Berezniki (Russia)

    Berezniki, city, Perm oblast (province), west-central Russia. It is situated on the left bank of the Kama River at the head of the Kama Reservoir. Huge local deposits of salt and potassium have resulted in the city’s development as one of the largest chemical centres of Russia, producing

  • Berezovsky, Boris (Russian entrepreneur)

    Boris Berezovsky, Russian entrepreneur who was among Russia’s famed “oligarchs,” the post-Soviet group who made their fortunes in the chaotic last years of the U.S.S.R. and parlayed their wealth into political power in the new, capitalist Russia. Berezovsky was the only son of a nurse and a

  • Berezovsky, Boris Abramovich (Russian entrepreneur)

    Boris Berezovsky, Russian entrepreneur who was among Russia’s famed “oligarchs,” the post-Soviet group who made their fortunes in the chaotic last years of the U.S.S.R. and parlayed their wealth into political power in the new, capitalist Russia. Berezovsky was the only son of a nurse and a

  • Berg (former duchy, Germany)

    Berg, former duchy of the Holy Roman Empire, on the right bank of the Rhine, now in the administrative districts of Düsseldorf and Cologne in Germany. In the 11th century the counts of Berg came into possession of Westphalian lands east of Cologne. From 1161 these were divided between the senior

  • Berg cypress (plant)

    African cypress: The Berg cypress, or sapree-wood (W. nodiflora), is a shrub that grows to about 2 to 4 metres (6.5 to 13 feet) high. Mulanje cedar can reach 45 metres (148 feet) in height; it was once the most valuable timber tree of the genus, though it…

  • Berg Isel, Battle of (Austria and Bavaria)

    Andreas Hofer: …so decisively at the second Battle of Berg Isel near Innsbruck (August 1809) that they were forced to leave the province. He then styled himself commander in chief of the Tirol and established an administration with the acquiescence of the Austrian emperor Francis I. In the Treaty of Sch?nbrunn (October…

  • Berg, Alban (Austrian composer)

    Alban Berg, Austrian composer who wrote atonal and 12-tone compositions that remained true to late 19th-century Romanticism. He composed orchestral music (including Five Orchestral Songs, 1912), chamber music, songs, and two groundbreaking operas, Wozzeck (1925) and Lulu (1937). Apart from a few

  • Berg, David (American cartoonist)

    David Berg, American cartoonist and writer (born June 12, 1920, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died May 16, 2002, Marina del Rey, Calif.), began contributing to Mad magazine in 1956 and in 1961 introduced the monthly “The Lighter Side of …” strip, which in 365 issues featured his own self-caricature (named Roger K

  • Berg, David (American religious leader)

    The Family International: …out of the ministry of David Berg (1919–94) to the hippies who had gathered in Huntington Beach, California, in the late 1960s. It teaches a message of Christian love based on scripture and Berg’s prophecies. The focus of the first anticult organization—the Parents’ Committee to Free Our Children from the…

  • Berg, Eugene Leander (American actor and dancer)

    Gene Nelson, (EUGENE LEANDER BERG), U.S. actor-dancer best remembered for his role as Will Parker in the motion picture musical Oklahoma! (b. March 24, 1920--d. Sept. 16,

  • Berg, Gertrude (American actress, producer, and screenwriter)

    Gertrude Berg, American actor, producer, and screenwriter whose immensely popular situation comedy about the Goldberg family ran in various radio, television, stage, and film versions between 1929 and 1953. In December 1918, while enrolled in a playwriting extension course at Columbia University,

  • Berg, Gunnar (Norwegian artist)

    Svolv?r: Gunnar Berg (1863–93), a native of the Lofoten group, painted memorable scenes of the everyday life of the local fisherfolk; one of his best-known works hangs in Svolv?r’s town hall. Pop. (2004 est.) 4,157.

  • Berg, Heinrich von (German mystic)

    Heinrich Suso, one of the chief German mystics and leaders of the Friends of God (Gottesfreunde), a circle of devout ascetic Rhinelanders who opposed contemporary evils and aimed for a close association with God. Of noble birth, Suso joined the Dominicans in Constance, where five years later he

  • Berg, Lev Simonovich (Russian zoologist)

    Lev Simonovich Berg, geographer and zoologist who established the foundations of limnology in Russia with his systematic studies on the physical, chemical, and biological conditions of fresh waters, particularly of lakes. Important, too, was his work in ichthyology, which yielded much useful data

  • Berg, Maria (American religious leader)

    The Family International: …was succeeded by his wife, Maria. The following year she introduced the Love Charter, a constitution spelling out rights and responsibilities for Family members. In 2004 the organization adopted its present name. At the start of the 21st century, The Family International had about 10,000 members in more than 90…

  • Berg, Mary Georgene (American businesswoman)

    Mary Wells Lawrence, American businesswoman who made a mark in advertising during an age when men dominated the field. She cofounded the Wells Rich Greene (WRG) advertising agency, which became noted for its campaigns for Alka Seltzer (“Plop, Plop, Fizz, Fizz”), the Ford Motor Company (“Quality Is

  • Berg, Max (German architect)

    Max Berg, architect of the German Expressionist school noted for the huge reinforced concrete dome of his Jahrhunderthalle (1911–13; Centennial Hall) in Breslau (now Wroc?aw, Poland), designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006. Berg studied at Technical University in Berlin. He was city

  • Berg, Patricia Jane (American golfer)

    Patty Berg, American golfer, winner of more than 80 tournaments, including a record 15 major women’s championships, and first president of the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA). Berg began playing golf at the age of 13 and soon showed a remarkable talent for the game. In 1935 she won the

  • Berg, Patty (American golfer)

    Patty Berg, American golfer, winner of more than 80 tournaments, including a record 15 major women’s championships, and first president of the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA). Berg began playing golf at the age of 13 and soon showed a remarkable talent for the game. In 1935 she won the

  • Berg, Paul (American biochemist)

    Paul Berg, American biochemist whose development of recombinant DNA techniques won him a share (with Walter Gilbert and Frederick Sanger) of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1980. After graduating from Pennsylvania State College (later renamed Pennsylvania State University) in 1948 and taking a

  • Bergama (Turkey)

    Bergama, town, ?zmir ili (province), western Turkey, 50 miles (80 km) north of the city of ?zmir (Smyrna). It shares the site of ancient Pergamum, of which there are extensive ruins remaining. The modern town lies over the remains of the Roman city, while the remains of the ancient Greek city with

  • Bergama carpet

    Bergama carpet, any of several types of village floor coverings handwoven in the vicinity of Bergama, western Turkey, or brought there for market from the interior of the country. Although most Bergama carpets date from the 19th and 20th centuries, rare examples survive from the 17th century. The

  • bergamasca (dance)

    Bergamasca, lusty 16th-century dance depicting the reputedly awkward manners of the inhabitants of Bergamo, in northern Italy, where the dance supposedly originated. It was performed as a circle courtship dance for couples: men circled forward and women backward until the melody changed; partners

  • Bergamo (Italy)

    Bergamo, city, Lombardia (Lombardy) region, northern Italy, in the southern foothills of the Alps between the Brembo and Serio rivers, northeast of Milan. Originally the centre of the Orobi tribe, it became a Roman town (Bergomum) in 196 bc. Rebuilt after destruction by Attila the Hun, it was later

  • bergamot (herb)

    Bergamot, one of several fragrant herbs of the genus Monarda (family Lamiaceae) or the fruit of the bergamot orange (Citrus ×aurantium). The bergamot herbs and the bergamot orange have a similar characteristic floral fragrance and are commonly used in perfumes and as a flavouring. The bergamot

  • bergamot orange (fruit)

    essential oil: Methods of production: mandarin, tangerine, bergamot, and grapefruit. Much oil is produced as a by-product of the concentrated-citrus-juice industry.

  • bergamot pear (fruit)
  • Berganza, Teresa (Spanish opera singer)

    Teresa Berganza, Spanish mezzo-soprano, known for her performance of coloratura roles in the operas of Gioacchino Rossini and W.A. Mozart and for her concert singing. Berganza studied at the Madrid Conservatory. In 1955 she made her debut in Madrid as a concert singer and toured Spain, Portugal,

  • Bergbom, Kaarlo (Finnish theatre owner)

    Kaarlo Bergbom, activist in the struggle to enhance Finnish-language institutions, and founder-director of the first stable Finnish-language theatre, the Finnish National Theatre. Bergbom, himself the author of a romantic tragedy, directed the first performance of Aleksis Kivi’s one-act biblical

  • Bergdahl, Bowe (United States sergeant)

    Barack Obama: Taking heat and taking the lead: …by the Obama administration for Bowe Bergdahl, a U.S. Army sergeant who had been a captive of the Taliban in Afghanistan since 2009. The exchange was initially hailed as a victory for the administration, but it quickly became controversial. Some Republicans argued that the administration had given up too much…

  • Bergdama (people)

    Bergdama, a seminomadic people of mountainous central Namibia. They speak a Khoisan (click) language, but culturally they are more like the peoples of central and western Africa, though their origin is obscure. When first encountered by Europeans, in the 17th and 18th centuries, many of the

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