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  • guinea worm disease (pathology)

    Guinea worm disease, infection in humans caused by a parasite known as the guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis). The disease’s alternate name, dracunculiasis, is Latin for “affliction with little dragons,” which adequately describes the burning pain associated with the infection. Historically a

  • Guinea yam (plant)

    yam: Guinea yam (D. rotundata) and yellow Guinea yam (D. cayenensis) are the main yam species grown in West Africa. Lesser yam (D. esculenta), grown on the subcontinent of India, in southern Vietnam, and on South Pacific islands, is one of the tastiest yams. Chinese yam…

  • Guinea, Equatorial

    Equatorial Guinea, country located on the west coast of Africa. It consists of Río Muni (also known as Continental Equatorial Guinea), on the continent, and five islands (known collectively as insular Equatorial Guinea): Bioko (formerly Fernando Po), Corisco, Great Elobey (Elobey Grande), Little

  • Guinea, flag of

    vertically striped red-yellow-green national flag. It has a width-to-length ratio of 2 to 3.When Charles de Gaulle reorganized the government and constitution of France in 1958, French colonies were offered the options of independence or autonomous status in partnership with France. Guinea alone of

  • Guinea, Gulf of (gulf, Atlantic Ocean)

    Gulf of Guinea, part of the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean off the western African coast, extending westward from Cap López, near the Equator, to Cape Palmas at longitude 7° west. Its major tributaries include the Volta and Niger rivers. The coastline of the Gulf of Guinea forms part of the

  • Guinea, history of

    Guinea: History: Hunting and gathering populations occupied the area of what is now Guinea about 30,000 years ago, and farming has been practiced there for about 3,000 years. About 900 ce the Susu and Malinke (Maninka) began to encroach on the Baga

  • Guinea, House of (Portuguese trade company)

    House of India, 15th-century Portuguese establishment that managed the trade in products from overseas colonies. It was called House of Guinea because it began by processing products from Guinea. Originally housed in a warehouse at Lagos in southern Portugal, it was reestablished in Lisbon with the

  • Guinea, People’s Revolutionary Republic of

    Guinea, country of western Africa, located on the Atlantic coast. Three of western Africa’s major rivers—the Gambia, the Niger, and the Sénégal—rise in Guinea. Natural resources are plentiful: in addition to its hydroelectric potential, Guinea possesses a large portion of the world’s bauxite

  • Guinea, Republic of

    Guinea, country of western Africa, located on the Atlantic coast. Three of western Africa’s major rivers—the Gambia, the Niger, and the Sénégal—rise in Guinea. Natural resources are plentiful: in addition to its hydroelectric potential, Guinea possesses a large portion of the world’s bauxite

  • Guinea-Bissau

    Guinea-Bissau, country of western Africa. Situated on the Atlantic coast, the predominantly low-lying country is slightly hilly farther inland. The name Guinea remains a source of debate; it is perhaps a corruption of an Amazigh (Berber) word meaning “land of the blacks.” The country also uses the

  • Guinea-Bissau, flag of

    national flag consisting of two horizontal stripes of yellow and green and, at the hoist, a vertical red stripe with a black star. The flag has a width-to-length ratio of approximately 1 to 2.The African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC) found ready support in those

  • Guinea-Bissau, history of

    Guinea-Bissau: History: The precolonial history of Guinea-Bissau has not been fully documented in the archaeological record. The area has been occupied for at least a millennium, first by hunters and gatherers and later by decentralized animist agriculturalists who used iron implements for their rice…

  • Guinea-Bissau, Republic of

    Guinea-Bissau, country of western Africa. Situated on the Atlantic coast, the predominantly low-lying country is slightly hilly farther inland. The name Guinea remains a source of debate; it is perhaps a corruption of an Amazigh (Berber) word meaning “land of the blacks.” The country also uses the

  • Guinée, République de

    Guinea, country of western Africa, located on the Atlantic coast. Three of western Africa’s major rivers—the Gambia, the Niger, and the Sénégal—rise in Guinea. Natural resources are plentiful: in addition to its hydroelectric potential, Guinea possesses a large portion of the world’s bauxite

  • Guinegate, Battle of (Europe [1479])

    Maximilian I: Territorial expansion: …defeating the French at the Battle of Guinegate in 1479. There Maximilian’s military innovation saved him. French armies consisted primarily of the prized and formidable Swiss Reisl?ufer, mercenary units that have survived in the modern era as the Swiss Guards. Maximilian recruited these elite pikemen to train his German forces,…

  • Gu?nes (France)

    Field of Cloth of Gold: …were erected for Henry at Gu?nes and for Francis at Ardres. Henry’s palace covered nearly 2.5 acres (1 hectare) and was sumptuously decorated; it contained a great hall and a spacious chapel; and, outside, a gilt fountain spouted claret, hippocras (spiced wine), and water through separate runlets.

  • Güines (Cuba)

    Güines, city, west-central Cuba. It lies about 35 miles (55 km) southeast of Havana. The city is situated in a fertile agricultural region where irrigation facilitates the growing of sugarcane, tobacco, and various fruits and vegetables for which the region is known; cattle also are raised. Cigar

  • Güines, Tatá (Cuban percussionist)

    Tatá Güines, (Federico Arístides Soto Alejo), Cuban percussionist (born June 30, 1930, Güines, Cuba—died Feb. 4, 2008, Havana, Cuba), was hailed as the King of the Congas and Golden Hands, winning accolades for popularizing Afro-Cuban rhythms worldwide with his fiery drumming. After performing with

  • Guinevere (legendary queen of Britain)

    Guinevere, wife of Arthur, legendary king of Britain, best known in Arthurian romance through the love that his knight Sir Lancelot bore for her. In early Welsh literature, one Gwenhwyvar was “the first lady of this island”; in Geoffrey of Monmouth’s inventive Historia regum Britanniae (early 12th

  • Guiney, Louise Imogen (American poet and essayist)

    Louise Imogen Guiney, American poet and essayist, a popular and respected figure in the Boston literary circle of her day. Guiney was educated at Elmhurst, a convent school in Providence, Rhode Island. To help support her family she began contributing to various newspapers and magazines. Her poems,

  • Guingamp (France)

    Guingamp, town, C?tes-d’Armor département, Brittany région, northwestern France. It lies on the right bank of the Trieux River east-northeast of Brest, the first Breton-speaking town on the road from Paris to Brest. An important market town which in the Middle Ages was the capital of the countship,

  • Guinizelli, Guido (Italian poet)

    Dante: Dante’s intellectual development and public career: …poetic figure behind Dante was Guido Guinizelli, the poet most responsible for altering the prevailing local, or “municipal,” kind of poetry. Guinizelli’s verse provided what Cavalcanti and Dante were looking for—a remarkable sense of joy contained in a refined and lucid aesthetic. What increased the appeal of his poetry was…

  • Guinness (Irish company)

    Guinness, former company, incorporated in 1886 as Arthur Guinness Son & Co. Ltd., best known as the brewer of a distinctive dark and creamy stout. In 1997 the company merged with Grand Metropolitan PLC to form Diageo PLC. Guinness remains a brand of that company, which is headquartered in London.

  • Guinness Book of Records, The (record book)

    Guinness: …1955 the company began publishing The Guinness Book of Records, originally conceived to help settle trivia disputes in pubs; the property was sold in 2001.

  • Guinness PLC (Irish company)

    Guinness, former company, incorporated in 1886 as Arthur Guinness Son & Co. Ltd., best known as the brewer of a distinctive dark and creamy stout. In 1997 the company merged with Grand Metropolitan PLC to form Diageo PLC. Guinness remains a brand of that company, which is headquartered in London.

  • Guinness, Alec (British actor)

    Alec Guinness, British actor famous for the variety and excellence of his stage and screen characterizations. Tall and unremarkable in appearance, he played a great range of characters throughout his long career. His trademarks were subtle but telling facial expressions and exquisitely nuanced

  • Guinness, Arthur (Irish brewer)

    Guinness: Guinness was founded when Arthur Guinness bought a small brewery in Dublin in 1759. At first the brewery produced a variety of ales and beers, but in 1799 it was decided to concentrate exclusively on porter, a dark beer with a rich head. The beer, later known as stout,…

  • Guinness, Sir Alec (British actor)

    Alec Guinness, British actor famous for the variety and excellence of his stage and screen characterizations. Tall and unremarkable in appearance, he played a great range of characters throughout his long career. His trademarks were subtle but telling facial expressions and exquisitely nuanced

  • Guinness, Sir Benjamin Lee, 1st Baronet (Irish brewer)

    Sir Benjamin Lee Guinness, 1st Baronet, Irish brewer and first lord mayor of Dublin under the reformed corporation (1851), whose brewery became one of the largest in the world. In 1855 Guinness assumed control of the brewing business, Arthur Guinness & Sons, started by his grandfather, Arthur

  • Guino, Richard (French artist)

    Pierre-Auguste Renoir: Later years: …with the assistance of young Richard Guino. Since Renoir was no longer able to do sculpture himself, Guino became, about 1913, the skillful instrument who willingly followed his directions. He yielded before the personality of Renoir and succeeded so well that the works have all the qualities of Renoir’s style.

  • guinomi-de (ceramic ware)

    Ki Seto ware: …a glossy chartreuse yellow (guinomi-de, or kikuzara-de), fired at a relatively high temperature, and a soft dull-glazed pure yellow (ayame-de, or aburage-de), fired at low heat.

  • Guinzburg, Thomas Henry (American editor and publisher)

    Thomas Henry Guinzburg, American editor and publisher (born March 30, 1926, New York, N.Y.—died Sept. 8, 2010, New York City), cofounded (1953) the literary magazine The Paris Review, which helped to launch the careers of such up-and-coming novelists as Jack Kerouac and Mona Simpson. Guinzburg

  • Guiot (Proven?al poet)

    Wolfram von Eschenbach: …Kyot (also spelled Kiot and Guiot). The story of the ignorant and naive Parzival, who sets out on his adventures without even knowing his own name, employs the classic fairy-tale motif of “the guileless fool” who, through innocence and artlessness, reaches a goal denied to wiser men. Wolfram uses Parzival’s…

  • guipure d’art (lace)

    Filet lace, (from French filet, “network”), knotted netting, either square or diamond mesh, that has been stretched on a frame and embroidered, usually with cloth or darning stitch. Of ancient origin, it was called opus araneum in the 14th century, lacis in the 16th, and in the 19th filet guipure

  • Guipúzcoa (province, Spain)

    Guipúzcoa, province, in the autonomous Basque Country, northern Spain. The smallest of the Spanish provinces, it is situated on the Bay of Biscay between Vizcaya (Biscay) province and the French frontier. With álava and Vizcaya, it became one of the three component provinces of the autonomous

  • Guipúzcoa Company (Spanish trading company)

    Compa?ía Guipuzcoana, (Spanish: “Guipúzcoa Company”) trading concern chartered by the Spanish crown in 1728, with a monopoly on trade between Spain and Venezuela. It was one of a number of companies for colonial trade established under the 18th-century Bourbon kings, and it was the only one that

  • Guipuzcoana, Compa?ía (Spanish trading company)

    Compa?ía Guipuzcoana, (Spanish: “Guipúzcoa Company”) trading concern chartered by the Spanish crown in 1728, with a monopoly on trade between Spain and Venezuela. It was one of a number of companies for colonial trade established under the 18th-century Bourbon kings, and it was the only one that

  • guira (bird)

    Guira, (Guira guira), bird of eastern tropical South America in the cuckoo family, Cuculidae. It is 40 cm (16 inches) long, with gray-brown streaked body, short frowsy crest, and a thinner bill than that of its close relatives, the anis. Guiras live in small flocks in grasslands and feed on

  • Güira de Melena (Cuba)

    Güira de Melena, city, west-central Cuba. It lies about 20 miles (32 km) south-southwest of Havana. The city is situated in a fertile agricultural and livestock-raising region known primarily for tobacco, although potatoes and bananas, pineapples, and other tropical fruits are also cultivated. The

  • Guira guira (bird)

    Guira, (Guira guira), bird of eastern tropical South America in the cuckoo family, Cuculidae. It is 40 cm (16 inches) long, with gray-brown streaked body, short frowsy crest, and a thinner bill than that of its close relatives, the anis. Guiras live in small flocks in grasslands and feed on

  • Güiraldes, Ricardo (Argentine writer)

    Ricardo Güiraldes, Argentine novelist and poet best remembered for his novel Don Segundo Sombra (1926). This work is a poetic interpretation of the Argentinian gaucho, the free-spirited vagabond cattle herder of the pampas (grasslands), and it has become a classic work of Spanish American

  • Guiraud, Ernest (French composer)

    Georges Bizet: …was accompanied by his friend Ernest Guiraud, who was to be responsible for popularizing Bizet’s work after his death. In spite of very decided opinions, Bizet was still immature in his outlook on life (youthfully cynical, for instance, in his attitude toward women) and was plagued by an artistic conscience…

  • Guiraud, Pierre (literary critic)

    Fran?ois Villon: Poetry: ” The critic Pierre Guiraud sees the poems as codes that, when broken, reveal the satire of a Burgundian cleric against a corps of judges and attorneys in Paris.

  • Guirgevo, Truce of (Europe [1790])

    United Kingdom: William Pitt the Younger: …and prestige by negotiating a peace between Austria and Turkey. In 1784 he passed his own India Act, creating a board of control regulating Indian affairs and the East India Company. The board’s members were nominated by the king from among the privy councillors. Finally, in 1791 the Canada Constitutional…

  • guiro (musical instrument)

    percussion instrument: The Americas: …gourd with natural handle, called guiro, is another African American instrument. Notched turtle carapaces are scraped in the Caribbean. The jawbone of a horse, mule, or donkey, with its teeth left in, is played throughout the Americas; its use among coastal Peruvians of African descent goes back to the 18th…

  • Guisan, Henri (Swiss military leader)

    Henri Guisan, Swiss military leader and national hero; he was commander in chief of the Swiss Army during World War II. Guisan was educated at Swiss and foreign universities and graduated with a degree in agriculture. At the age of 30 he achieved the rank of captain in the Swiss Army (1904). After

  • guisaro (plant)
  • Guiscard, Robert (duke of Apulia)

    Robert, Norman adventurer who settled in Apulia, in southern Italy, about 1047 and became duke of Apulia (1059). He eventually extended Norman rule over Naples, Calabria, and Sicily and laid the foundations of the kingdom of Sicily. Robert was born into a family of knights. Arriving in Apulia, in

  • Guiscard, Roger (count of Sicily)

    Roger I, count of Sicily from 1072. He was the last son of the second marriage of Tancred of Hauteville. Roger went to Italy in 1057 to aid his brother Robert Guiscard in his conquest of Calabria from the Byzantines (1060). They began the conquest of Sicily from various Muslim rulers in 1061 with t

  • Guiscardo, Roberto (duke of Apulia)

    Robert, Norman adventurer who settled in Apulia, in southern Italy, about 1047 and became duke of Apulia (1059). He eventually extended Norman rule over Naples, Calabria, and Sicily and laid the foundations of the kingdom of Sicily. Robert was born into a family of knights. Arriving in Apulia, in

  • Guise, Charles de Lorraine, 4e duc de (French noble)

    Charles de Lorraine, 4e duke de Guise, duke of Guise who lived through the rapid decline in the family’s power. On the day of the assassination of his father, Henri, the 3rd duke (Dec. 23, 1588), Charles was arrested and transferred to the Chateau of Tours, in which he was imprisoned for three

  • Guise, Claude de Lorraine, 1er duc de (French noble)

    Claude de Lorraine, 1st duke de Guise, count and later (from 1527) duke of Guise, the first of the great members of the House of Guise. He was brought up at the French court and on April 18, 1513, married Antoinette de Bourbon (1493–1583), daughter of Fran?ois, comte de Vend?me. In 1515 he fought

  • Guise, Fran?ois de Lorraine, 2e duc de (French noble)

    Fran?ois de Lorraine, 2e duc de Guise, the greatest figure produced by the House of Guise, a man of action, a political intriguer, a soldier loved by his men and feared by his enemies. He was generally loyal to the French crown and served it well. As comte d’Aumale he fought in Francis I’s army and

  • Guise, Fran?ois de Lorraine, 2e duc de, duc d’Aumale, prince de Joinville (French noble)

    Fran?ois de Lorraine, 2e duc de Guise, the greatest figure produced by the House of Guise, a man of action, a political intriguer, a soldier loved by his men and feared by his enemies. He was generally loyal to the French crown and served it well. As comte d’Aumale he fought in Francis I’s army and

  • Guise, Henri I de Lorraine, 3e duc de (French noble)

    Henri I de Lorraine, 3e duc de Guise, popular duke of Guise, the acknowledged chief of the Catholic party and the Holy League during the French Wars of Religion. Henri de Lorraine was 13 years old at the death of his father, Fran?ois, the 2nd duke (1563), and grew up under the domination of a

  • Guise, Henri II de Lorraine, 5e duc de (French noble)

    Henri II de Lorraine, 5e duke de Guise, duke of Guise whose multiple attempts to revive the family’s power came to naught. Henri had already succeeded to the archbishopric of Rheims, a family benefice, when the death of his elder brother Charles, the 4th duke, made him head of the family, and in

  • Guise, house of (French family)

    House of Guise, Noble French Roman Catholic family that played a major role in French politics during the Reformation. Claude de Lorraine (1496–1550) was created the 1st duke de Guise in 1527 for his service to Francis I in the defense of France. Claude’s sons Fran?ois, 2nd duke de Guise, and

  • Guise, Louis d’Armagnac, comte de (French duke)

    Louis d’Armagnac, duc de Nemours, third son of Jacques d’Armagnac, duc de Nemours, and last of the ducal House of Armagnac. The duchy of Nemours and all other honours forfeited by his father were restored to Louis’s elder brother, Jean d’Armagnac, by acts of 1484 and 1492. Louis inherited the duchy

  • Guise, Louis I de Lorraine, 1er cardinal de (French cardinal)

    Louis I de Lorraine, cardinal de Guise, brother of Fran?ois, 2nd duc de Guise. Named bishop of Troyes (1545) and of Albi (1550), he became in 1553 “cardinal de Guise”—to distinguish him from his brother, the eminent Charles, cardinal de Lorraine (q.v.). Unlike his brothers, he preferred the easy

  • Guise, Louis II de Lorraine, 2e cardinal de (French cardinal)

    Louis II de Lorraine, 2e cardinal de Guise, brother of Henri de Lorraine, 3rd duc de Guise, whom he supported vigorously in the War of the Three Henrys (Henry III, Henry of Navarre, Henry of Guise). Guise became cardinal in 1574 and archbishop of Reims in 1583 and had an active and bloody role in

  • Guise, Louis III de Lorraine, 3e cardinal de (French cardinal)

    Louis III de Lorraine, 3e cardinal de Guise, last of the cardinals of the House of Guise, brother of Charles, 4th duc de Guise. In 1605 Guise became archbishop of Reims and in 1615 cardinal de Guise, but he was scarcely given to the religious life. He formed a long-lived liaison with Charlotte des

  • Guisewite, Cathy (American cartoonist)

    Cathy Guisewite, American cartoonist who created the long-running comic strip Cathy (1976–2010). Guisewite graduated from the University of Michigan with a B.A. in English in 1972. Both of her parents worked in the advertising business, and she initially followed them into that field. She found

  • guitar (musical instrument)

    Guitar, plucked stringed musical instrument that probably originated in Spain early in the 16th century, deriving from the guitarra latina, a late-medieval instrument with a waisted body and four strings. The early guitar was narrower and deeper than the modern guitar, with a less pronounced waist.

  • Guitar Hero (electronic game series)

    Guitar Hero, popular electronic game series developed and released by American companies RedOctane, Harmonix Music Systems, and Activision (now Activision Blizzard) in 2005. Utilizing a controller modeled after a guitar, Guitar Hero allows users to play an expansive collection of popular

  • Guitar Town (album by Earle)

    Steve Earle: …debut album as a performer, Guitar Town (1986), won praise from critics and was a commercial success, with both its title track and “Goodbye’s All We Got Left” reaching the Top Ten on the country music chart.

  • Guitarero (painting by Manet)

    édouard Manet: Early life and works: …Salon of 1861, Manet exhibited Spanish Singer (1860), dubbed “Guitarero” by the French man of letters Théophile Gautier, who praised it enthusiastically in the periodical Le Moniteur universel.

  • guitarfish (fish)

    Guitarfish, an order (Rhinobatiformes) of fish closely related to the rays. The order contains some 47 to 50 species arranged in three families (Platyrhinidae, Rhinobatidae, and Rhynchobatidae). Guitarfish have a flattened forebody with pectoral fins fused to the sides of the head. The hindbody

  • guitarra latina (musical instrument)

    gittern: …medieval stringed musical instruments, the guitarra latina and the guitarra morisca. The latter was also known as the guitarra saracenica.

  • guitarra morisca (musical instrument)

    gittern: …the guitarra latina and the guitarra morisca. The latter was also known as the guitarra saracenica.

  • guitarra saracenica (musical instrument)

    gittern: …the guitarra latina and the guitarra morisca. The latter was also known as the guitarra saracenica.

  • guitarrón (musical instrument)

    mariachi: …in the Spanish Renaissance; the guitarrón, a large, fretless six-string bass guitar; a standard six-string acoustic guitar; and violins and trumpets, which usually play the melody. Trumpets were not added until the early 20th century, but they are now more or less an essential element. Mariachi music initially consisted of…

  • Guiteau, Charles J. (American assassin)

    James A. Garfield: Assassination: , by Charles J. Guiteau, a disappointed office seeker with messianic visions. The first shot only grazed Garfield’s arm, but the second bullet pierced his back and lodged behind his pancreas. (In a letter dated November 1880, Garfield had written, “Assassination can be no more guarded against…

  • GUITK (Soviet detention camps)

    Gulag: …a new body, GUITK (Glavnoye Upravleniye Ispravitelno-Trudovykh Kolony, or “Chief Administration of Corrective Labour Colonies”).

  • Guitry, Alexandre-Georges (French dramatist)

    Sacha Guitry, prodigious French playwright, director, and screenwriter who often acted in his own productions Sacha, the son of the actor Lucien Guitry, achieved his first theatrical success with Nono (1905). This was followed by Chez les Zoaques (1906), Petite Hollande (1908), Le Scandale de Monte

  • Guitry, Lucien Germain (French actor)

    Lucien Guitry, French actor noted for his combination of broad range and economy of effect. Immediately after leaving the Conservatoire Guitry appeared as Armand in La Dame aux camélias (1878). His style of acting, sparing in gesture and theatrical effects, at first surprised, rather than pleased,

  • Guitry, Sacha (French dramatist)

    Sacha Guitry, prodigious French playwright, director, and screenwriter who often acted in his own productions Sacha, the son of the actor Lucien Guitry, achieved his first theatrical success with Nono (1905). This was followed by Chez les Zoaques (1906), Petite Hollande (1908), Le Scandale de Monte

  • Guittone d’Arezzo (Italian poet)

    Guittone d’Arezzo, founder of the Tuscan school of courtly poetry. Knowledge of Guittone’s life comes mainly from his writings. Born near Arezzo, he travelled for commercial reasons, being an exile from Arezzo after 1256 for his Guelf sympathies. Guittone became the centre of an admiring circle

  • Guiyang (China)

    Guiyang, city and capital of Guizhou sheng (province), China. It is situated in the central part of Guizhou on the Nanming River, a headstream of the Wu River, which eventually joins the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) at Fuling in Chongqing municipality. Guiyang is a natural route centre, with

  • Guízar Tolentino, Federico Arturo (Mexican actor)

    Tito Guízar, (Federico Arturo Guízar Tolentino), Mexican actor who paved the way in Hollywood for Mexican performers as the first of the singing charros, the guitar-playing cowboys who wore broad-brimmed sombreros and bolero jackets; he had in 1936 ushered in the charro genre in Mexico, with Allá

  • Guízar, Tito (Mexican actor)

    Tito Guízar, (Federico Arturo Guízar Tolentino), Mexican actor who paved the way in Hollywood for Mexican performers as the first of the singing charros, the guitar-playing cowboys who wore broad-brimmed sombreros and bolero jackets; he had in 1936 ushered in the charro genre in Mexico, with Allá

  • Guizhou (province, China)

    Guizhou, sheng (province) of southwestern China. It is bounded to the north by Sichuan province and Chongqing municipality, to the east by Hunan province, to the south by the Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi, and to the west by Yunnan province. Guizhou measures more than 350 miles (560 km) from

  • Guizhou Plateau (plateau, China)

    Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau, highland region comprising the northern part of Yunnan province and the western part of Guizhou province, south-central China. Yunnan is more distinctly a plateau with areas of rolling uplands, precipitous folded and fault-block mountain ranges, and deep, river-cut gorges.

  • Guizot, Fran?ois (French politician and historian)

    Fran?ois Guizot, French political figure and historian who, as leader of the conservative constitutional monarchists during the July Monarchy (1830–48), was the dominant minister in France. Guizot’s father was executed by the National Convention in 1794, and Guizot went into exile with his mother.

  • Guizot, Fran?ois-Pierre-Guillaume (French politician and historian)

    Fran?ois Guizot, French political figure and historian who, as leader of the conservative constitutional monarchists during the July Monarchy (1830–48), was the dominant minister in France. Guizot’s father was executed by the National Convention in 1794, and Guizot went into exile with his mother.

  • Gujarat (state, India)

    Gujarat, state of India, located on the country’s western coast, on the Arabian Sea. It encompasses the entire Kathiawar Peninsula (Saurashtra) as well as the surrounding area on the mainland. The state is bounded primarily by Pakistan to the northwest and by the Indian states of Rajasthan to the

  • Gujarat (Pakistan)

    Gujrat, city, northeastern Punjab province, Pakistan. The city lies just north of the Chenab River and is connected with Lahore and Peshawar via the Grand Trunk Road. The present city, which lies on the site of a succession of earlier cities, developed around the fort built by the Mughal emperor

  • Gujarat Plains (plains, India)

    Gujarat Plains, vast plains area of central Gujarat state, western India. The plains extend over about 12,800 square miles (33,000 square km) and are bounded by the desert fringe of Rajasthan state to the north, the hills of eastern Gujarat to the east, the Arabian Sea to the south, and the

  • Gujarāt woodwork

    Gujarāt woodwork, architectural carving executed in the state of Gujarāt in India. Gujarāt was the chief centre of wood carving in India from at least the 15th century. Even when stone as a building material was handled with great ease and confidence, the people of Gujarāt continued to use wood

  • Gujarati language

    Gujarati language, Indo-Aryan member of the Indo-Iranian group of Indo-European languages. Gujarati is officially recognized in the Indian constitution and is spoken by more than 46 million people. Most of these reside in the Indian state of Gujarat, though there are significant diaspora

  • Gujarati literature

    Gujarati literature, literature of the Gujarati language, a major tongue of India. The oldest examples of Gujarati literature date from the writings of the 12th-century Jain scholar and saint Hemachandra. The language had fully developed by the late 12th century. There are works extant from the

  • Gujari (people)

    Himalayas: People: …Kashmir and the Gaddi and Gujari, who live in the hilly areas of the Lesser Himalayas. Traditionally, the Gaddi are a hill people; they possess large flocks of sheep and herds of goats and go down with them from their snowy abode in the Outer Himalayas only in winter, returning…

  • Gujari language

    South Asian arts: Urdu: …of Urdu, variously known as Gujari, Hindawi, and Dakhani, show more affinity with eastern Punjabi and Haryani than with Khari Boli, which provides the grammatical structure of standard modern Urdu. The reasons for putting together the literary products of these dialects, forming a continuous tradition with those in Urdu, are…

  • gūji (Shintō priest)

    shinshoku: …rank of shinshoku is the gūji (chief priest). In large shrines he generally has serving under him the gon-gūji (associate chief priest), negi (priest, or senior priest), and gon-negi ( junior priest).

  • Gujin tushu jicheng (Chinese encyclopaedia)

    encyclopaedia: China: In 1726 the huge Gujin tushu jicheng (“Collection of Pictures and Writings”) was published by order of the emperor. Edited by the scholar Chen Menglei, it filled more than 750,000 pages and attempted to embody the whole of the Chinese cultural heritage.

  • Gujral doctrine (Indian politics)

    Inder Kumar Gujral: …who is remembered for the Gujral Doctrine, a policy grounded on India’s unilaterally reaching out diplomatically to its neighbours without the expectation of reciprocity.

  • Gujral, Inder Kumar (prime minister of India)

    Inder Kumar Gujral, Indian politician who served briefly as prime minister of India from April 21, 1997, to March 19, 1998, and who is remembered for the Gujral Doctrine, a policy grounded on India’s unilaterally reaching out diplomatically to its neighbours without the expectation of reciprocity.

  • Gujranwala (Pakistan)

    Gujranwala, city, northeastern Punjab province, northeastern Pakistan. The city is connected by rail and the Grand Trunk Road with Peshawar and Lahore. An agricultural marketing centre (grains, melons, sugarcane), it is also a commercial and industrial centre, manufacturing ceramics, iron safes,

  • Gujrat (Pakistan)

    Gujrat, city, northeastern Punjab province, Pakistan. The city lies just north of the Chenab River and is connected with Lahore and Peshawar via the Grand Trunk Road. The present city, which lies on the site of a succession of earlier cities, developed around the fort built by the Mughal emperor

  • Gujrat, Battle of (Second Sikh War)

    Battle of Gujrat, (Feb. 21, 1849), engagement between the Sikh army of Sher Singh and a British-Indian army led by Hugh Gough, 1st Baron (later 1st Viscount) Gough, at Gujrat (now in Pakistan). It was the last and decisive battle in the Second Sikh War (1848–49), leading to the British annexation

  • Gukanshō (work by Jien)

    Jien: …In his great work, the Gukanshō (literally, “Jottings of a Fool”)—completed about 1220—he attempted to analyze the facts of Japanese history.

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