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  • Gavin, James Maurice (United States general)

    James Maurice Gavin, U.S. Army commander known as “the jumping general” because he parachuted with combat troops during World War II. After graduating from the United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. (1929), Gavin was commissioned a second lieutenant of the infantry. He became a

  • Gavin, John (American actor)

    Psycho: Meanwhile, Crane’s boyfriend (John Gavin) and her sister (Vera Miles) launch a frantic search that eventually takes them to the Bates home. There they fend off an attack by Norman’s mother, who, dressed as the long-deceased Mrs. Bates, in reality is Norman. A psychiatrist later determines that Norman…

  • gaviota, La (novel by Caballero)

    Fernán Caballero: …best-known novel, La gaviota (1849; The Seagull), was an immediate success with the public. No other Spanish book of the 19th century obtained such instant and universal recognition. It describes the career of a fisherman’s daughter who marries a German physician, deserts her husband to become an opera singer, falls…

  • Gaviria Trujillo, César (president of Colombia)

    Colombia: The growth of drug trafficking and guerrilla warfare: …minister and hard-line anti-drug candidate César Gaviria Trujillo of the Liberal Party.

  • G?vle (Sweden)

    G?vle, town and port, capital of G?vleborg l?n (county), east-central Sweden, on an inlet of the Gulf of Bothnia, northwest of Stockholm. Although first mentioned in documents in the 8th century, it was not chartered until 1446. Despite several devastating fires, it grew from a fishing village into

  • G?vleborg (county, Sweden)

    G?vleborg, l?n (county), east-central Sweden, on the shores of the Gulf of Bothnia. It is composed of the traditional landskap (province) of G?strikland, most of H?lsingland, and a small part of Dalarna. Although low and level along the coast, it rises inland toward a wooded highland. The

  • gavotte (dance)

    Gavotte, lively peasants’ kissing dance that became fashionable at the 17th- and 18th-century courts of France and England. Supposedly originated by the natives of Gap (Gavots) in the southeastern French province of Dauphiné, the gavotte was danced in royal ballrooms as a round with skipping steps

  • Gavras, Konstantin (French director)

    Costa-Gavras, Greek-born naturalized French motion-picture director noted for films that have been both political arguments and entertainments (usually as mysteries or thrillers). The son of a Russian-born father and a Greek mother, Costa-Gavras left Athens in 1952 to go to Paris, where he enrolled

  • Gavrilo (Serbian clergyman)

    Gavrilo, patriarch of the Serbian Orthodox Church (1938–50), noted for his anti-Nazi stand and, later, for his limited accommodations with the Communists. Gavrilo was educated at Prizren in Serbia and at Athens and Istanbul. In 1910 he became bishop of Pe? and in 1920 metropolitan of Crnagora and

  • Gavrilovka (Kazakhstan)

    Taldyqorghan, city, southeastern Kazakhstan. It is situated on the left bank of the Karatal River and in the western foothills of the Dzungarian Alatau Range. It grew up on the site of Gavrilovka village, founded in the second half of the 19th century, and it developed particularly after the

  • Gavri?el (archangel)

    Gabriel, in the three Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—one of the archangels. Gabriel was the heavenly messenger sent to Daniel to explain the vision of the ram and the he-goat and to communicate the prediction of the Seventy Weeks. He was also employed to announce the birth of

  • Gavronsky, Helen (South African politician)

    Helen Suzman, white South African legislator (1953–89), who was an outspoken advocate for the country’s nonwhite majority. The daughter of Lithuanian Jewish immigrants, Suzman graduated (1940) from the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg with a degree in commerce. She served as a

  • Gavur Kalesi (ancient city, Turkey)

    Anatolian art and architecture: Hittite period: …this period elsewhere in Anatolia—Sirkeli, Gavur Kalesi, and Fraktin, for example—are mainly of archaeological interest. They are inferior in carving to contemporary reliefs and to those of the Iron Age, of which there is a fine example at ?vriz Harabesi in the Taurus Mountains, showing a local ruler of the…

  • Gawai Dayak (Malaysian holiday)

    Malaysia: Daily life and social customs: Sarawak, for instance, celebrates Gawai Dayak (“Dayak Festival”). Rooted in the harvest rituals and festivities (gawai) of the Iban and Bidayuh peoples, this holiday broadly honours the state’s non-Malay indigenous heritage.

  • Gawain (legendary knight)

    Gawain, hero of Arthurian legend and romance. A nephew and loyal supporter of King Arthur, Gawain appeared in the earliest Arthurian literature as a model of knightly perfection, against whom all other knights were measured. In the 12th-century Historia regum Britanniae, by Geoffrey of Monmouth,

  • Gāwān, Ma?mūd (Bahmanī statesman)

    India: Vizierate of Ma?mūd Gāwān: …personality of the period was Ma?mūd Gāwān, who was a leading administrator during the reigns of Humāyūn and his son A?mad III and was vizier (chief minister) under Mu?ammad III (reigned 1463–82). During Ma?mūd Gāwān’s ascendancy, the Bahmanī state achieved both its greatest size and greatest degree of centralization, and…

  • Gawhar Shād (queen of Persia)

    Shāh Rokh: One of his wives, Gawhar Shād, worked with the Persian architect Qavam ud-Din in the planning and construction of a series of magnificent public buildings there.

  • Gawler (South Australia, Australia)

    Gawler, town, South Australia, northeast of Adelaide. It lies at the confluence of the North and South Para rivers (which there form the Gawler River), at the western foot of the Mount Lofty Ranges. Surveyed in 1839, it was named after George Gawler, governor and resident commissioner in South

  • Gawler Block (mountain formation, Australia)

    Australia: The Western Plateau: The Gawler block, in the southeast, is complex. There are crystalline and sandstone uplands in the east, sandstone plateaus in the northeast, and, in the centre and north, the rounded Gawler Ranges built of Precambrian volcanic rocks (those older than 541 million years). Much of Eyre…

  • Gawler Ranges (mountains, South Australia, Australia)

    Gawler Ranges, mountains and hills in South Australia, extending 100 miles (160 km) east-west across the northern part of Eyre Peninsula, south of Lake Gairdner; they rise in the west as high as 1,550 feet (475 metres) at Mount Bluff. The ranges were first sighted by the English explorer Edward

  • Gawler, George (governor of South Australia, Australia)

    Gawler: …1839, it was named after George Gawler, governor and resident commissioner in South Australia (1838–41), and was proclaimed a municipality in 1857. Fast becoming a dormitory town for Adelaide 25 miles (40 km) south, it also serves as a marketing centre for a district producing wheat, fruits, sheep, dairy products,…

  • Gawra Period (archaeology)

    Tepe Gawra: …gave its name to the Gawra Period (c. 3500–c. 2900) of northern Mesopotamia. Prior to the Gawra Period, however, the site seems to have been influenced by the Ubaid culture (c. 5200–c. 3500) of southern Mesopotamia. That influence is seen, for example, in an Ubaidian-inspired temple at Gawra—the earliest example…

  • Gaxun Gobi (region, Gobi Desert)

    Gobi: Physiography: The Gaxun Gobi is bounded by the spurs of the Tien Shan to the west and the Bei Mountains to the south and rises to elevations as high as 5,000 feet (1,500 metres). It is gently corrugated, with a complex labyrinth of wide hollows separated by…

  • Gay (Iran)

    E?fahān, capital of E?fahān province and major city of western Iran. E?fahān is situated on the north bank of the Zāyandeh River at an elevation of about 5,200 feet (1,600 metres), roughly 210 miles (340 km) south of the capital city of Tehrān. E?fahān first thrived under the Seljuq Turks

  • Gay Activists Alliance (gay rights organization)

    Stonewall riots: The legacy of Stonewall: …Liberation Front (GLF) and the Gay Activists Alliance (GAA). In addition to launching numerous public demonstrations to protest the lack of civil rights for gay individuals, these organizations often resorted to such tactics as public confrontations with political officials and the disruption of public meetings to challenge and to change…

  • Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (American organization)

    GLAAD, organization created in 1985 that is devoted to countering discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in the media and promoting understanding, acceptance, and equality. Since its creation GLAAD has been integral to the increased portrayal of

  • Gay and Lesbian Pride Week

    Gay Pride, annual celebration, usually in June in the United States and sometimes at other times in other countries, of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) identity. Gay Pride commemorates the Stonewall riots, which began in the early hours of June 28, 1969, after police raided

  • Gay Desperado, The (film by Mamoulian [1936])

    Rouben Mamoulian: Films of the 1930s: …returned with the whimsical comedy The Gay Desperado (1936) and then turned to High, Wide, and Handsome (1937), a musical, with songs by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein, that was set in the oil fields of 19th-century Pennsylvania. Neither of those films was very well received, nor was Golden Boy…

  • Gay Divorcée, The (film by Sandrich [1934])

    Mark Sandrich: It was The Gay Divorcee (1934), however, that put Sandrich on the map. The first of the Fred Astaire–Ginger Rogers vehicles (they had been featured performers in Flying Down to Rio the year before), it was a huge hit and established the formula that would carry Astaire…

  • Gay Games (sports)

    sports: Gender and sports: The Gay Games, established in 1980, were created to provide an opportunity for male and female gay athletes to compete openly and to counteract negative perceptions about homosexuals.

  • Gay Hussars, The (operetta by Kálmán)

    Emmerich Kálmán: …first stage work, Tatárjárás (1908; The Gay Hussars). The strongly Hungarian tone of this piece succeeded in winning over Viennese audiences, and The Gay Hussars was performed throughout Europe and the United States.

  • Gay Liberation Front (gay rights organization)

    Stonewall riots: The legacy of Stonewall: …radical groups such as the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) and the Gay Activists Alliance (GAA). In addition to launching numerous public demonstrations to protest the lack of civil rights for gay individuals, these organizations often resorted to such tactics as public confrontations with political officials and the disruption of public…

  • gay liberation movement (political and social movement)

    Gay rights movement, civil rights movement that advocates equal rights for gay men, lesbians, bisexuals, and transsexuals; seeks to eliminate sodomy laws barring homosexual acts between consenting adults; and calls for an end to discrimination against gay men and lesbians in employment, credit

  • gay marriage

    Same-sex marriage, the practice of marriage between two men or between two women. Although same-sex marriage has been regulated through law, religion, and custom in most countries of the world, the legal and social responses have ranged from celebration on the one hand to criminalization on the

  • Gay Men’s Health Crisis (American political organization)

    homosexuality: Contemporary issues: …victims through groups such as Gay Men’s Health Crisis in New York City. Novelist and playwright Larry Kramer, who believed a more aggressive presence was needed, founded the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP), which began promoting political action, including outing, through local chapters in such cities as New…

  • Gay Pride

    Gay Pride, annual celebration, usually in June in the United States and sometimes at other times in other countries, of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) identity. Gay Pride commemorates the Stonewall riots, which began in the early hours of June 28, 1969, after police raided

  • gay rights movement (political and social movement)

    Gay rights movement, civil rights movement that advocates equal rights for gay men, lesbians, bisexuals, and transsexuals; seeks to eliminate sodomy laws barring homosexual acts between consenting adults; and calls for an end to discrimination against gay men and lesbians in employment, credit

  • Gay Science, The (work by Nietzsche)

    continental philosophy: Nietzsche: In The Gay Science, Nietzsche proclaims that

  • Gay Sisters, The (film by Rapper [1942])

    Irving Rapper: Heyday at Warner Brothers: The Gay Sisters (1942), though, was a leaden soap opera starring Barbara Stanwyck, Fitzgerald, and Nancy Coleman as wealthy siblings. Now, Voyager (1942), from an Olive Higgins Prouty novel, was a soap opera of a much higher grade. Davis had one of the defining roles…

  • Gay’s Lion Farm (farm, El Monte, California, United States)

    El Monte: …the city was home to Gay’s Lion Farm, which was established by former circus stars. The farm housed some 200 African lions (including Jackie, one of the lions that was used to introduce Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer films), and many of the lions were used in motion pictures. The city is now a…

  • Gay, Delphine (French writer)

    Alfred-Victor, count de Vigny: Youth and Romantic works.: Vigny and the writer Delphine Gay, the “muse of the country” as she was called—for her beauty as well as her literary talents—formed a striking couple before his marriage in February 1825 to Lydia Bunbury, daughter of a wealthy Englishman.

  • Gay, Jean-Baptiste-Sylvère (French politician and historian)

    Jean-Baptiste-Sylvère Gay, viscount de Martignac, French politician, magistrate, and historian who, as leader of the government in 1828–29, alienated King Charles X with his moderate policy. In 1798 Martignac was secretary to the abbé Sieyès, a publicist and Revolutionary leader. After service in

  • Gay, John (British author)

    John Gay, English poet and dramatist, chiefly remembered as the author of The Beggar’s Opera, a work distinguished by good-humoured satire and technical assurance. A member of an ancient but impoverished Devonshire family, Gay was educated at the free grammar school in Barnstaple. He was

  • Gay, John (British biblical scholar and philosopher)

    utilitarianism: Growth of classical English utilitarianism: John Gay, an English biblical scholar and philosopher, held the will of God to be the criterion of virtue, but from God’s goodness he inferred that God willed that each person should act so as to promote human happiness.

  • Gay, Jonathan (American software developer)

    Adobe Flash: …back to American software developer Jonathan Gay’s first experiments with writing programs on his Apple II computer in high school during the 1980s. Before long, Gay had written a graphics program for the Apple II using Pascal. Later, he teamed up with a local Macintosh users-group organizer, Charlie Jackson, who…

  • Gay, Marvin Pentz, Jr. (American singer and composer)

    Marvin Gaye, American soul singer-songwriter-producer who, to a large extent, ushered in the era of artist-controlled popular music of the 1970s. Gaye’s father was a storefront preacher; his mother was a domestic worker. Gaye sang in his father’s Evangelical church in Washington, D.C., and became a

  • Gay, Sophie (French author)

    Sophie Gay, French writer and grande dame who wrote romantic novels and plays about upper-class French society during the early 19th century. Gay was the daughter of a bursar to the comte de Provence (later King Louis XVIII). Her first published writings, in 1802, yielded a novel, Laure d’Estell,

  • Gay-Lussac’s law (physics)

    Charles’s law, a statement that the volume occupied by a fixed amount of gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature, if the pressure remains constant. This empirical relation was first suggested by the French physicist J.-A.-C. Charles about 1787 and was later placed on a sound

  • Gay-Lussac’s law of combining volumes (physical science)

    Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac: Searching for laws of nature: …for his law of the combining volumes of gases (1808). He had previously (1805) established that hydrogen and oxygen combine by volume in the ratio 2:1 to form water. Later experiments with boron trifluoride and ammonia produced spectacularly dense fumes and led him to investigate similar reactions, such as that…

  • Gay-Lussac, Joseph-Louis (French scientist)

    Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac, French chemist and physicist who pioneered investigations into the behaviour of gases, established new techniques for analysis, and made notable advances in applied chemistry. Gay-Lussac was the eldest son of a provincial lawyer and royal official who lost his position with

  • Gaya (India)

    Gaya, city, south-central Bihar state, northeastern India. The city lies along the Phalgu River, a tributary of the Ganges (Ganga) River. It is situated near the junction of the Gangetic Plain and the Chota Nagpur plateau and is notoriously hot in summer. Gaya has major rail, road, and air

  • gayal (mammal)

    Gayal, (Bos gaurus frontalis), a subspecies of the gaur and the largest of the wild oxen, subfamily Bovinae (family Bovidae), which is kept and utilized by the hill tribes of Assam and Myanmar (Burma). Smaller than the gaur and with shorter legs, the gayal stands 140–160 cm (55–63 inches) at the

  • Gayangos, Pascual de (Spanish author)

    William H. Prescott: Life and works: …of such overseas associates as Pascual de Gayangos, the Spanish aide who discovered manuscripts and rare books for him, Prescott made rigorous use of original sources. His critical use of historical evidence was such that he might well be called the first American scientific historian.

  • Gayatri Devi (Indian maharani, politician, and philanthropist)

    Gayatri Devi, Indian maharani, politician, and philanthropist (born May 23, 1919, London, Eng.—died July 29, 2009, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India), was admired as an icon of glamorous royalty but later emerged as an outspoken politician and social activist. Gayatri Devi grew up amid opulent wealth as

  • Gāyatrī mantra (Hindu prayer)

    Hinduism: Other private rites: …recitation of mantras, especially the Gayatri-mantra (Rigveda 3.62.10), a prayer for spiritual stimulation addressed to the Sun. The accompanying ritual includes (1) the application of marks on the forehead, characterizing the adherents of a particular religious community, (2) the presentation of offerings (water, flowers) to the Sun, and (3) meditative…

  • Gaye, Marvin (American singer and composer)

    Marvin Gaye, American soul singer-songwriter-producer who, to a large extent, ushered in the era of artist-controlled popular music of the 1970s. Gaye’s father was a storefront preacher; his mother was a domestic worker. Gaye sang in his father’s Evangelical church in Washington, D.C., and became a

  • Gaykhatu (Mongol ruler)

    Iran: The Il-Khans: …the Chinese money, failed under Gaykhatu (reigned 1291–95). Gaykhatu was followed briefly by Baydu (died 1295), who was supplanted by the greatest of the Il-Khans, Ma?mūd Ghāzān (1295–1304). Ghāzān abandoned Buddhism—the faith in which his grandfather Abagha, Hülegü’s successor (1265–82), had reared him—and adopted Islam. One of his chief ministers…

  • Gaylānī, Rashīd ?ālī al- (prime minister of Iraq)

    Rashīd ?Alī al-Gaylānī, Iraqi lawyer and politician who was prime minister of Iraq (1933, 1940–41, 1941) and one of the most celebrated political leaders of the Arab world during his time. The son of an aristocratic Sunnite family, Gaylānī studied law at Baghdad Law School. After several years of

  • Gayley, James (American metallurgist)

    James Gayley, American metallurgist who invented a device to ensure uniform humidity in the air stream going into blast furnaces. Gayley enjoyed a long career in a variety of positions with steel companies. Beginning as a chemist for the Crane Iron Company, in Pennsylvania, he had, by the age of

  • Gaylord, Frank C., II (American sculptor)

    Korean War Veterans Memorial: …19 stainless steel sculptures by Frank C. Gaylord II. They are larger-than-life-size figures (approximately 7 ft 3 in [221 cm] in height) constituting an idealized patrol of U.S. servicemen representing the army, the navy, the air force, and the Marine Corps. The figures are spread across a triangular plot of…

  • Gaylussacia (shrub)

    Huckleberry, any of several species of small fruit-bearing shrubs of the genus Gaylussacia (family Ericaceae). The plants are found throughout eastern North America and the Andes and other mountainous regions of South America. Huckleberry fruits are edible and resemble blueberries (Vaccinium

  • Gaylussacia baccata (plant)

    huckleberry: The common huckleberry (G. baccata) of the eastern United States and Canada is also called black, or high-bush, huckleberry. Dwarf huckleberry (G. dumosa) extends from Florida to Newfoundland. Box huckleberry (G. brachycera), native to the eastern and central United States, can form huge clones, some of…

  • gaylussite (mineral)

    Gaylussite, a carbonate mineral, hydrated sodium and calcium carbonate [formulated Na2Ca(CO3)2·5H2O], that precipitates from soda lakes. It has been identified in deposits at Lagunillas, Venezuela; in the eastern Gobi (desert), Mongolia; near Ragtown, Nev., U.S.; at Borax Lake, Mono Lake, and

  • Gaynor, Janet (American actress)

    Frank Borzage: …saves a homeless beauty (Janet Gaynor) from despair. It dominated the first Academy Awards with nominations for best picture, actress, screenplay adaptation, and director of a dramatic picture, winning Oscars in all but the first category. Gaynor was awarded not only for her work in 7th Heaven but also…

  • Gaynor, Mitzi (American actress, singer and dancer)

    Lloyd Bacon: Later years: Golden Girl (1951) cast Mitzi Gaynor as American Civil War-era musical star Lotta Crabtree, while The I Don’t Care Girl (1953) had Gaynor as vaudeville star Eva Tanguay, with George Jessel and Oscar Levant in support.

  • Gayō Maretan (Zoroastrianism)

    Gayōmart, in later Zoroastrian creation literature, the first man, and the progenitor of mankind. Gayōmart’s spirit, with that of the primeval ox, lived for 3,000 years during the period in which creation was only spiritual. His mere existence immobilized Ahriman, the evil spirit who wanted to

  • Gayōmart (Zoroastrianism)

    Gayōmart, in later Zoroastrian creation literature, the first man, and the progenitor of mankind. Gayōmart’s spirit, with that of the primeval ox, lived for 3,000 years during the period in which creation was only spiritual. His mere existence immobilized Ahriman, the evil spirit who wanted to

  • Gayoom, Abdulla Yameen Abdul (president of Maldives)

    Maldives: History: …in November, was won by Abdulla Yameen Abdul Gayoom, Maumoon Abdul Gayoom’s half brother, who beat Nasheed by a narrow margin. Nasheed was sentenced to 13 years in prison in 2015. He was granted permission to seek medical treatment in the U.K. in 2016, and from there he fled to…

  • Gayoom, Maumoon Abdul (president of Maldives)

    Maldives: History: …was succeeded in 1978 by Maumoon Abdul Gayoom, who was reelected to his sixth consecutive term in 2003. The Maldives became a member of the Commonwealth in 1982.

  • Gaza (African kingdom)

    Gaza, kingdom established in the highlands of the middle Sabi River in Mozambique in the 1830s by Soshangane, the Ndwandwe general who fled from Zululand after his defeat at the hands of Shaka during the Zulu-Nguni wars known as the Mfecane. Soshangane extended his control over the area between

  • Gaza (city, Gaza Strip)

    Gaza, city and principal urban centre of the Gaza Strip, southwestern Palestine. Formerly the administrative headquarters for the Israeli military forces that occupied the Gaza Strip, the city came under Palestinian control in 2005. Records exist indicating continuous habitation at the site for

  • Gaza (people)

    Nguni: …southwestern Zimbabwe, under Mzilikazi; the Gaza state in southern Mozambique, under Soshangane; the Swazi state in Swaziland, under the Dlhamini family; and a cluster of Ngoni states in Tanzania, Zambia, and Malawi, under the successors of the Ngoni leader Zwangendaba.

  • Gaza Strip (territory, Middle East)

    Gaza Strip, territory occupying 140 square miles (363 square km) along the Mediterranean Sea just northeast of the Sinai Peninsula. The Gaza Strip is unusual in being a densely settled area not recognized as a de jure part of any extant country. The first accurate census, conducted in September

  • Gaza War (Israeli and Palestinian history)

    Gaza Strip: Conflict with Israel: …of air strikes, Israeli forces initiated a ground campaign into the Gaza Strip amid calls from the international community for a cease-fire. Following more than three weeks of hostilities—in which perhaps more than 1,000 were killed and tens of thousands were left homeless—Israel and Hamas each declared a unilateral cease-fire.

  • Gaza, Battle of (World War I [1917])

    Edmund Henry Hynman Allenby, 1st Viscount Allenby: …victory over the Turks at Gaza (November 1917), which led to the capture of Jerusalem (Dec. 9, 1917). Further advances were checked by calls from France for his troops, but after receiving reinforcements he won a decisive victory at Megiddo (Sept. 19, 1918), which, followed by his capture of Damascus…

  • Gaza, Theodore (Byzantine philosopher)

    humanism: The 15th century: Theodore Gaza and John Argyropoulos contributed major translations of Aristotle. John (originally Basil) Bessarion, who became a cardinal in 1439, explored theology from a Platonic perspective and sought to resolve apparent conflicts between Platonic and Aristotelian philosophy; his large collection of

  • Gaza-Jericho Agreement (international agreement [1994])

    two-state solution: Implementation of a two-state solution: In May 1994 a deal concluded in Cairo led to Israeli withdrawal from the cities of Gaza and Jericho later that month and set up the Palestinian Authority (PA) to carry out civilian functions in those areas. The PA’s autonomous governance was extended to six other cities in 1995,…

  • Gazaca (Iran)

    Tabrīz, fourth largest city of Iran and capital of the East āz?arbāyjān province, lying about 4,485 feet (1,367 metres) above sea level in the extreme northwestern part of the country. The climate is continental: hot and dry in summer and severely cold in winter. The city lies in a valley

  • Gazala–Bir Hakeim line (World War II)

    World War II: Libya and Egypt, autumn 1941–summer 1942: …8th Army back to the Gazala–Bir Hakeim line, just west of Tobruk.

  • Gazankulu (historical region, South Africa)

    Gazankulu, former nonindependent Bantustan, northeastern Transvaal, South Africa, designated for the Shangaan and Tsonga people. It was made up of four detached portions of low veld, two of which adjoined Kruger National Park. The Tsonga people, the traditional inhabitants of the area, were joined

  • Gazargamu (Gbaya war chief)

    Gbaya: Led by Gazargamu, their war chief, the Gbaya vanquished, assimilated, or drove ahead of them the peoples that they encountered. Contemporary Gbaya subgroups, which include the Bokoto, Kara, Buli, Kaka, and Bwaka, reflect this integration of defeated peoples. The Gbaya, in turn, were attacked annually by Fulani…

  • gazebo (architecture)

    Gazebo, lookout or belvedere in the form of a turret, cupola, or garden house set on a height to give an extensive view. The name is an 18th-century joke word combining “gaze” with the Latin suffix ebo, meaning “I shall.” As a structured form, it is as old as garden history: it is the “viewing

  • gazel (Islamic literature)

    Ghazal, in Islamic literatures, genre of lyric poem, generally short and graceful in form and typically dealing with themes of love. As a genre the ghazal developed in Arabia in the late 7th century from the nasib, which itself was the often amorous prelude to the qa?īdah (ode). Two main types of

  • Gazella (mammal genus)

    gazelle: The genus Gazella was traditionally considered to contain 14 species. However, specialists in the taxonomy of the gazelle tribe (Antilopini), using genetic techniques for studying phylogenetic relationships, now believe that gazelles stem from not one but several different ancestors. Accordingly, six species, all African, have been removed…

  • Gazella arabica (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: subgutturosa), the Arabian gazelle (G. arabica; now extinct), the Saudi gazelle (G. saudiya; now extinct in the wild), the Queen of Sheba’s gazelle (G. bilkis; now extinct), and the dorcas gazelle (G. dorcas). The dorcas gazelle also ranges into North Africa. The range of the goitred gazelle…

  • Gazella bennetti (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: A sixth Asian gazelle, the Indian gazelle or chinkara (G. bennetti), survives in the deserts of India and Pakistan.

  • Gazella bilkis (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: …extinct in the wild), the Queen of Sheba’s gazelle (G. bilkis; now extinct), and the dorcas gazelle (G. dorcas). The dorcas gazelle also ranges into North Africa. The range of the goitred gazelle extends across the Asian deserts to China, though its population is greatly reduced in numbers. A sixth…

  • Gazella cuvierii (mammal)

    gazelle: African gazelles: The Atlas gazelle, also called Cuvier’s, or the edmi, gazelle (G. cuvieri), is found in the Atlas Mountains. The rhim, or slender-horned, gazelle (G. leptoceros) is the most desert-adapted African gazelle and lives in the Sahara’s great sand deserts (ergs) from Algeria to Egypt. The third…

  • Gazella dama (mammal)

    gazelle: The three largest species—the dama gazelle, Grant’s gazelle, and Soemmering’s gazelle—are placed in the genus Nanger (formerly considered a subgenus), and three of the smaller species—Thomson’s gazelle, the red-fronted gazelle, and the Mongalla gazelle—have become the genus Eudorcas

  • Gazella dorcas (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: bilkis; now extinct), and the dorcas gazelle (G. dorcas). The dorcas gazelle also ranges into North Africa. The range of the goitred gazelle extends across the Asian deserts to China, though its population is greatly reduced in numbers. A sixth Asian gazelle, the Indian gazelle or chinkara (G. bennetti), survives…

  • Gazella gazella (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: …Gazella, with six species: the mountain gazelle (G. gazella), the goitred, or sand, gazelle (G. subgutturosa), the Arabian gazelle (G. arabica; now extinct), the Saudi gazelle (G. saudiya; now extinct in the wild), the Queen of Sheba’s gazelle (G. bilkis; now extinct), and the dorcas gazelle (G. dorcas).

  • Gazella granti (mammal)

    gazelle: …three largest species—the dama gazelle, Grant’s gazelle, and Soemmering’s gazelle—are placed in the genus Nanger (formerly considered a subgenus), and three of the smaller species—Thomson’s gazelle, the red-fronted gazelle, and the Mongalla gazelle—have become the genus Eudorcas. The Gazella genus as

  • Gazella leptoceros (mammal)

    gazelle: African gazelles: The rhim, or slender-horned, gazelle (G. leptoceros) is the most desert-adapted African gazelle and lives in the Sahara’s great sand deserts (ergs) from Algeria to Egypt. The third indigenous species, Speke’s gazelle (G. spekei), inhabits the coastal plain of Somalia.

  • Gazella saudiya (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: arabica; now extinct), the Saudi gazelle (G. saudiya; now extinct in the wild), the Queen of Sheba’s gazelle (G. bilkis; now extinct), and the dorcas gazelle (G. dorcas). The dorcas gazelle also ranges into North Africa. The range of the goitred gazelle extends across the Asian deserts to China,…

  • Gazella spekei (mammal)

    gazelle: African gazelles: The third indigenous species, Speke’s gazelle (G. spekei), inhabits the coastal plain of Somalia.

  • Gazella subgutturosa (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: gazella), the goitred, or sand, gazelle (G. subgutturosa), the Arabian gazelle (G. arabica; now extinct), the Saudi gazelle (G. saudiya; now extinct in the wild), the Queen of Sheba’s gazelle (G. bilkis; now extinct), and the dorcas gazelle (G. dorcas). The dorcas gazelle also ranges into North…

  • gazelle (mammal)

    Gazelle, any of several fleet, medium-sized antelopes with slender, evenly developed limbs, level backs, and long necks. Most gazelles are tan-coloured, with white underparts and rump patch, a dark side stripe, and contrasting facial markings. They inhabit the arid lands of Asia from China to the

  • Gazelle Peninsula (peninsula, Papua New Guinea)

    Gazelle Peninsula, peninsula extending northeast from the island of New Britain, Papua New Guinea, southwestern Pacific Ocean. It is about 50 miles (80 km) wide but tapers to 20 miles (32 km) at the isthmus that joins it to the main part of the island. From coastal plains its surface rises as high

  • Gazelle River (river, South Sudan)

    Ba?r al-Ghazāl, river, South Sudan, chief western affluent of the Nile River. It is 445 miles (716 km) long and joins the Mountain Nile (Ba?r al-Jabal) through Lake No, from which it flows eastward as the White Nile (Ba?r al-Abya?). Vaguely known to early Greek geographers, the river was mapped in

  • Gazette (American newspaper)

    William Allen White: …own small-town newspaper, the Emporia Gazette, internationally known, and strongly affected at least one U.S. presidential election.

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