<var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"><listing id="79jxb"></listing></video></cite><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem></span></cite><cite id="79jxb"><noframes id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><cite id="79jxb"></cite></span></cite><var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<menuitem id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></menuitem><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • germinoma (tumour)

    pineal tumour: …are germ cell tumours (germinomas and teratomas), which arise from embryonic remnants of germ cells (precursors of egg and sperm cells). Germ cell tumours are malignant and invasive and may be life-threatening. Tumours of the pinealocytes (the primary cell type of the pineal gland) also occur and vary in…

  • Germiston (South Africa)

    Germiston, city, Gauteng province, South Africa. Germiston lies 5,550 feet (1,690 metres) above sea level and is situated in the Witwatersrand directly southeast of Johannesburg. It is the largest railway junction of South Africa and has substantial rail repair shops. Germiston lies in the heart of

  • germline gene therapy

    gene therapy: Approaches to gene therapy: Germline gene therapy aims to place corrected cells inside the germ line (e.g., cells of the ovary or testis). If that is achieved, those cells will undergo meiosis and provide a normal gametic contribution to the next generation. Germline gene therapy has been achieved experimentally…

  • germline mosaicism (genetic disorder)

    human genetic disease: Calculating risks of known carriers: This scenario is called germline mosaicism. Finally, with regard to X-linked disorders, if the pedigree or carrier testing suggests that the mother carries a gene for a sex-linked disease, there is a 50 percent chance that each son will be affected and that each daughter will be a carrier.

  • Germo alalunga (fish)

    Albacore, (species Thunnus alalunga), large oceanic fish noted for its fine flesh. The bluefin tuna (T. thynnus) is also sometimes called albacore. See

  • germon (fish)

    Albacore, (species Thunnus alalunga), large oceanic fish noted for its fine flesh. The bluefin tuna (T. thynnus) is also sometimes called albacore. See

  • Germond, Jack (American journalist)

    Jack Germond, (John Worthen Germond), American journalist (born Jan. 30, 1928, Newton, Mass.—died Aug. 14, 2013, Charles Town, W.Va.), covered national politics in print and on television for more than 40 years, developing a reputation as a member of the “old school” of journalism for his irascible

  • Germond, John Worthen (American journalist)

    Jack Germond, (John Worthen Germond), American journalist (born Jan. 30, 1928, Newton, Mass.—died Aug. 14, 2013, Charles Town, W.Va.), covered national politics in print and on television for more than 40 years, developing a reputation as a member of the “old school” of journalism for his irascible

  • germplasm (biology)

    biological development: The scope of development: …19th century, as the “germ plasm” and the “soma.” The germ plasm consists of the essential elements, or genes, passed on from one generation to the next, and the soma consists of the body that may be produced as the organism develops. In more modern terms, Weismann’s germ plasm…

  • Gernika-Lumo (Spain)

    Guernica, city, just northeast of Bilbao, Vizcaya provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Basque Country, northern Spain. The city, on the Río de Plencia (Butrón) near the inlet of the Bay of Biscay, is the statutory capital of the former lordship of Vizcaya,

  • Gernons, Ranulf de, 4th Earl of Chester (English noble)

    Ranulf de Gernons, 4th earl of Chester, a key participant in the English civil war (from 1139) between King Stephen and the Holy Roman empress Matilda (also a claimant to the throne of England). Initially taking Matilda’s part, he fought for her in the Battle of Lincoln (1141), capturing and

  • Gernreich, Rudi (American fashion designer)

    Rudi Gernreich, Austrian-born American avant-garde fashion designer of the 1960s. Gernreich immigrated to the United States in 1938 and, from 1942 to 1948, was a dancer and costume designer for the Lester Horton Modern Dance Troupe. From 1951 to 1959 he worked as a designer for a Los Angeles

  • Gernrode (Germany)

    Western architecture: Ottonian period: Cyriacus built at Gernrode. The two churches have wooden-roofed, three-aisle naves; but, in contrast to the Carolingian pillar basilicas, alternating pillars and columns have been used, and at Gernrode the side aisles are crowned by galleries. The two churches have both an east and a west choir and…

  • Gernsback, Hugo (American inventor and publisher)

    Hugo Gernsback, American inventor and publisher who was largely responsible for the establishment of science fiction as an independent literary form. After receiving a technical education in Luxembourg and Germany, Gernsback traveled to the United States in 1904 to market an improved dry battery

  • Gernsheim, Helmut Erich Robert (British photographer)

    Helmut Erich Robert Gernsheim, German-born British photographer, collector, and photographic historian (born March 1, 1913, Munich, Germany—died July 20, 1995, Switzerland), was central to the evolution of the history of photography as an academic discipline in his roles as one of the art’s first s

  • Gero Crucifix (sculpture)

    Western sculpture: Carolingian and Ottonian periods: The wooden “Gero Crucifix” (about 73.6 inches [187 centimetres] high; cathedral of Cologne), which was carved before 986, already reveals a certain realism in the representation of the shape of the body, in contrast to the contemporary crucifix of Gerresheim (before 1000). The so-called Bernward Crucifix at…

  • Ger?, Ern? (Hungarian leader)

    Ern? Ger?, Hungarian communist and first secretary of the Hungarian Workers’ (communist) Party (1956). In that capacity Ger? served as the country’s last Stalinist leader before the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. Ger?, the son of a shopkeeper and tenant farmer, entered the Budapest Medical Faculty

  • Geroldseck Fortress (fort, Kufstein, Austria)

    Kufstein: The Geroldseck Fortress in the town, built in the early 13th century, was converted into a strong bastion by Maximilian. It now houses a local museum and the great “Heroes’ Organ” (Heldenorgel; 1931), named for the daily recitals played to honour the war dead. Kufstein is…

  • Gér?me, Jean-Léon (French artist)

    Jean-Léon Gér?me, painter, sculptor, and teacher, one of the most prominent late 19th-century academic artists in France. Gér?me, whose father was a goldsmith, studied with Paul Delaroche. His historical and mythological compositions, such as Pygmalion and Galatea, were anecdotal, painstaking,

  • Gerona (Spain)

    Girona, city, capital of Girona provincia (province), in the Catalonia comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), northeastern Spain. It lies on the O?ar River in the foothills of the Los ángeles Mountains, a short distance inland from a Mediterranean coastal resort area known as the Costa Brava.

  • Gerona (province, Spain)

    Girona, provincia (province) in the Catalonia comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), northeastern Spain. Girona is the northeasternmost province of the autonomous community and of Spain. It is bounded by France and the Pyrenees to the north, by the Mediterranean Sea to the east and southeast,

  • Gerona, School of (Judaism)

    Judaism: School of Gerona (Catalonia): The gnosticizing theosophy of the Sefer ha-bahir and the contemplative mysticism of the masters of Languedoc became one in the hands of the Kabbalists in Catalonia, where the Jewish community of Gerona was a veritable seat of esoterism during the first…

  • Geronimo (Apache leader)

    Geronimo, Bedonkohe Apache leader of the Chiricahua Apache, who led his people’s defense of their homeland against the military might of the United States. For generations the Apaches had resisted white colonization of their homeland in the Southwest by both Spaniards and North Americans. G

  • Geronimo Rex (novel by Hannah)

    Barry Hannah: His first novel, Geronimo Rex (1972), which received a National Book Award nomination, is a raucous coming-of-age story addressing the theme of racism. In the less successful Nightwatchmen (1973), both a secret killer and a hurricane are unleashed upon a small college town.

  • Geronticus eremita (bird)

    ibis: The hermit ibis (Geronticus eremita), an endangered species, inhabits northern Africa and the Middle East. Its bill and the bare skin on its head are reddish. Breeding colonies once existed in central and southern Europe, Syria, and Algeria but are now known only in Turkey and…

  • Gerontion (poem by Eliot)

    James Blish: Eliot’s poem “Gerontion” (1920), “After such knowledge, what forgiveness?”—that examined the competition between religion and science. The other novels in the series included Doctor Mirabilis (1964), a historical novel about the 13th-century English philosopher and scientist Roger Bacon, and two novels that Blish considered as one work:…

  • gerontology (medicine)

    Gerontology and geriatrics, scientific and medical disciplines, respectively, that are concerned with all aspects of health and disease in the elderly, and with the normal aging process. Gerontology is the scientific study of the phenomena of aging, by which is meant the progressive changes that

  • Gerould, G. H. (American philologist)

    ballad: Theories: …Barry (1880–1937) and the scholar G.H. Gerould (1877–1953), the ballad is conceded to be an individual composition originally. This fact is considered of little importance because the singer is not expressing himself individually, but serving as the deputy of the public voice, and because a ballad does not become a…

  • Gerould, Katharine Elizabeth Fullerton (American writer)

    Katharine Elizabeth Fullerton Gerould, American writer, noted for short stories that reveal her elevated sensibilities and fine craftsmanship. Katharine Fullerton was of staunchly New England lineage for many generations on either side. She was schooled privately in Boston and France, graduated

  • gerousia (council)

    Gerousia, in ancient Sparta, council of elders, one of the two chief organs of the Spartan state, the other being the apella (assembly). The functions of both were likely delineated at the time of the reforms of Lycurgus, probably in the 7th century bc. The gerousia prepared business to be

  • Gerow, Frank (American plastic surgeon)

    silicone breast implant: The first silicone breast implants: …developed by American plastic surgeons Frank Gerow and Thomas Cronin, who used as source material a supply of silicone donated by the U.S.-based company Dow Corning (a conglomerate of Dow Chemical Company and Corning, Inc.). The original design of the silicone breast implant underwent a series of refinements in the…

  • Geroy nashego vremeni (novel by Lermontov)

    A Hero of Our Time, novel by Mikhail Lermontov, published in Russian in 1840 as Geroy nashego vremeni. Its psychologically probing portrait of a disillusioned 19th-century aristocrat and its use of a nonchronological and fragmented narrative structure influenced Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Leo Tolstoy, and

  • Gerpla (work by Laxness)

    Icelandic literature: Prose: íslandsklukkan (1943; Iceland’s Bell), and Gerpla (1952; Eng. trans. The Happy Warriors). He helped restore Icelandic as a medium for storytelling.

  • Gerrard, Steven (English football player)

    Steven Gerrard, English professional football (soccer) player who was considered one of the most-complete footballers in the world in the early 2000s. Gerrard was discovered by his local upper-division football club, Liverpool FC, at age nine. He played for Liverpool’s youth squad and signed a

  • Gerreidae (fish)

    Mojarra, any of approximately 40 species of fishes in the family Gerreidae (order Perciformes), found in marine environments in most warm regions of the world. Brackish habitats or fresh water are entered on occasion by some species. Mojarras are silvery fishes with compressed bodies; they are

  • Gerrhonotus liocephalus (reptile)

    alligator lizard: …largest alligator lizard is the smooth-headed alligator lizard (G. liocephalus), and its body alone can reach 20 cm (8 inches). Although many alligator lizards are dull brown or gray, some are brightly coloured. Cope’s arboreal alligator lizard (A. aurita), for example, is mottled green with scales on the head and…

  • Gerrhosauridae (reptile)

    lizard: Annotated classification: Family Gerrhosauridae (African plated lizards) Lizards with 2 parietal scales on the head and each nostril enclosed in 3–4 scales. Diurnal lizards that live in a variety of habitats. Some are semiaquatic, some swim through sand, and many live on the ground. They occur in Africa south…

  • Gerridae (insect)

    Water strider, any insect of the family Gerridae (order Heteroptera), which numbers about 350 species. Water striders, often seen running or skating in groups over the surface of a pond or stream, are slender, dark coloured, and generally more than 5 mm (0.2 inch) long. With their short front legs

  • Gerris gracilicornis (insect)

    water strider: Male and female Gerris gracilicornis demonstrate a phenomenon known as antagonistic coevolution. Females have a shield that covers their genitalia, which protects them against forced copulation and is believed to allow for mate selectivity. To increase mating opportunities, males counterevolved a strategy of vibrational signaling that attracts both…

  • Gerry and the Pacemakers (British musical group)

    Sir George Martin: …albums by such performers as Gerry and the Pacemakers, Cilla Black, Elton John, and Céline Dion. Martin published his memoir, All You Need Is Ears, in 1979. He was made CBE in 1988 and was knighted in 1996.

  • Gerry, Elbridge (vice president of United States)

    Elbridge Gerry, signer of the American Declaration of Independence and fifth vice president of the United States (1813–14) in the second term of Pres. James Madison. From his name the term gerrymander later was derived. Gerry was the son of Thomas Gerry, a merchant, and Elizabeth Greenleaf. He

  • gerrymandering (politics)

    Gerrymandering, in U.S. politics, the practice of drawing the boundaries of electoral districts in a way that gives one political party an unfair advantage over its rivals (political or partisan gerrymandering) or that dilutes the voting power of members of ethnic or linguistic minority groups

  • Gers (department, France)

    Midi-Pyrénées: Tarn, Tarn-et-Garonne, Gers, Hautes-Pyrénées, Haute-Garonne, and Ariège. In 2016 Midi-Pyrénées was joined with the région of Languedoc-Roussillon to form the new administrative entity of Occitanie.

  • Gers, the (Scottish football club)

    Rangers, Scottish professional football (soccer) club based in Glasgow. The club is the most successful team in the world in terms of domestic league championships won, with more than 50. It is known for its fierce rivalry with its Glaswegian neighbour, Celtic. The club was founded in 1872 and

  • Gershenfeld, Neil (American computer engineer)

    quantum computer: …the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Neil Gershenfeld of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Mark Kubinec of the University of California at Berkeley created the first quantum computer (2-qubit) that could be loaded with data and output a solution. Although their system was coherent for only a few nanoseconds…

  • Gershom ben Judah (Jewish scholar)

    Gershom ben Judah, eminent rabbinical scholar who proposed a far-reaching series of legal enactments (taqqanot) that profoundly molded the social institutions of medieval European Jewry. He was called the light of the exile and also Rabbenu (“Our Teacher,” a title of reverence). As head of the

  • Gershon Loans, Joseph ben (German Jewish advocate)

    Josel Of Rosheim, famous shtadlan (advocate who protected the interests and pled the cause of the Jewish people); through persistent legal exertions, he aborted many incipient acts of persecution. Josel’s career as a shtadlan began in the reign of the Holy Roman emperor Maximilian I and lasted

  • Gershovitz, Israel (American lyricist)

    Ira Gershwin, American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, George Gershwin, on more than 20 Broadway musicals and motion pictures until George’s death (1937) and who later collaborated on films and plays with others—Moss Hart, Kurt Weill, Jerome Kern, Harry Warren, and Harold

  • Gershovitz, Jacob (American composer)

    George Gershwin, one of the most significant and popular American composers of all time. He wrote primarily for the Broadway musical theatre, but important as well are his orchestral and piano compositions in which he blended, in varying degrees, the techniques and forms of classical music with the

  • Gershvin, Israel (American lyricist)

    Ira Gershwin, American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, George Gershwin, on more than 20 Broadway musicals and motion pictures until George’s death (1937) and who later collaborated on films and plays with others—Moss Hart, Kurt Weill, Jerome Kern, Harry Warren, and Harold

  • Gershvin, Jacob (American composer)

    George Gershwin, one of the most significant and popular American composers of all time. He wrote primarily for the Broadway musical theatre, but important as well are his orchestral and piano compositions in which he blended, in varying degrees, the techniques and forms of classical music with the

  • Gershwin, George (American composer)

    George Gershwin, one of the most significant and popular American composers of all time. He wrote primarily for the Broadway musical theatre, but important as well are his orchestral and piano compositions in which he blended, in varying degrees, the techniques and forms of classical music with the

  • Gershwin, Ira (American lyricist)

    Ira Gershwin, American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, George Gershwin, on more than 20 Broadway musicals and motion pictures until George’s death (1937) and who later collaborated on films and plays with others—Moss Hart, Kurt Weill, Jerome Kern, Harry Warren, and Harold

  • Gerson, Jean de (French theologian)

    Jean de Gerson, theologian and Christian mystic, leader of the conciliar movement for church reform that ended the Great Schism (between the popes of Rome and Avignon). Gerson studied at the University of Paris under the noted theologian Pierre d’Ailly, later his colleague at the Council of

  • Gerson, Juan (Spanish artist)

    Latin American art: Renaissance: Juan Gersón, the artist who created these works, was once believed to be European because he has a Flemish name and skillfully executes a convincing northern Renaissance style. However, closer study of the archives revealed that Gersón was in fact indigenous. As early as one…

  • Gerson, Michael (American journalist)

    axis of evil: …David Frum and presidential aide Michael Gerson for use by U.S. President George W. Bush in his 2002 State of the Union address, when he asserted that

  • Gersonides (French scholar)

    Levi ben Gershom, French Jewish mathematician, philosopher, astronomer, and Talmudic scholar. In 1321 Levi wrote his first work, Sefer ha-mispar (“Book of the Number”), dealing with arithmetical operations, including extraction of roots. In De sinibus, chordis et arcubus (1342; “On Sines, Chords,

  • Gersonii, Johannes Arnaudi de (French theologian)

    Jean de Gerson, theologian and Christian mystic, leader of the conciliar movement for church reform that ended the Great Schism (between the popes of Rome and Avignon). Gerson studied at the University of Paris under the noted theologian Pierre d’Ailly, later his colleague at the Council of

  • Gersoppa Falls (cataract, India)

    Jog Falls, cataract of the Sharavati River, western Karnataka state, southwestern India. The Jog Falls are located 18 miles (29 km) upstream from Honavar at the river’s mouth on the Arabian Sea. As it plunges 830 feet (253 metres) into a chasm, the river splits into four cascades known as the Raja,

  • Gerstenberg, Heinrich Wilhelm von (German writer)

    Heinrich Wilhelm von Gerstenberg, German poet, critic, and theorist of the Sturm und Drang (“Storm and Stress”) literary movement, whose Briefe über die Merkwürdigkeiten der Literatur (1766–67; “Letters About the Peculiarities of Literature”) contained the first definite formulation of the critical

  • Gerstmann-Str?ussler-Scheinker disease (pathology)

    prion: include: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Str?ussler-Scheinker disease, fatal familial insomnia, and kuru. Prion diseases affecting animals include scrapie, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (commonly called mad cow disease), and chronic wasting disease of mule deer

  • Gerstner, Lou (American businessman)

    Lou Gerstner, American businessman best known for the pivotal role he played in revitalizing the ailing IBM in the mid-1990s; he served as CEO of the company from 1993 to 2002. Gerstner studied engineering at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (B.A., 1963), where he graduated magna cum

  • Gerstner, Louis Vincent, Jr. (American businessman)

    Lou Gerstner, American businessman best known for the pivotal role he played in revitalizing the ailing IBM in the mid-1990s; he served as CEO of the company from 1993 to 2002. Gerstner studied engineering at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (B.A., 1963), where he graduated magna cum

  • Gertie the Dinosaur (work by McCay)

    Winsor McCay: …his most famous animated film, Gertie the Dinosaur (1914). Most cartoon characters of the early 20th century had their origins in newspaper comic strips; Gertie was the first featured character created specifically for the new medium. The film was composed of more than 10,000 drawings; for each, McCay drew backgrounds…

  • Gertrud (novel by Hesse)

    Hermann Hesse: …inward and outward search in Gertrud (1910) and Rosshalde (1914). A visit to India in these years was later reflected in Siddhartha (1922), a poetic novel, set in India at the time of the Buddha, about the search for enlightenment.

  • Gertrude (daughter of Lothair III)

    Henry II Jasomirgott: …Conrad negotiated Henry’s marriage with Gertrude, widow of Henry the Proud, the Welf duke of Bavaria and Saxony, and in 1143 Henry was granted the duchy of Bavaria.

  • Gertrude (fictional character)

    Gertrude, queen of Denmark and mother of Hamlet, who is married to her first husband’s murderer in Shakespeare’s tragedy

  • Gertrude (niece of Frederick II the Warlike)

    Austria: Contest for the Babenberg heritage: …of the Babenbergs, Frederick’s niece Gertrude and his sister Margaret, were considered to embody the claims to the heritage. Gertrude married first the Bohemian prince Vladislav and afterward the margrave Hermann of Baden, who died in 1250. After Hermann’s death, Otakar II, prince of Bohemia (from 1253 king) and a…

  • Gertrude and Claudius (novel by Updike)

    John Updike: …popular obsession with cinema, while Gertrude and Claudius (2000) offers conjectures on the early relationship between Hamlet’s mother and her brother-in-law. In response to the cultural shifts that occurred in the United States after the September 11 attacks, Updike released Terrorist in 2006.

  • Gerts have (work by Heiberg)

    Norwegian literature: Poetry and the novel: …spirit in Kong Midas (1890), Gerts have (1894; “Gert’s Garden”), Balkonen (1894; The Balcony), and Kj?rlighetens tragedie (1904; The Tragedy of Love). Sharing Hamsun’s preoccupation with the irrational side of human conduct was Hans E. Kinck, a writer of considerable power and penetration. In his verse drama Driftekaren

  • Gertsen, Aleksandr Ivanovich (Russian writer)

    Aleksandr Ivanovich Herzen, political thinker, activist, and writer who originated the theory of a unique Russian path to socialism known as peasant populism. Herzen chronicled his career in My Past and Thoughts (1861–67), which is considered to be one of the greatest works of Russian prose. Herzen

  • Gertz, Elmer (American lawyer)

    Elmer Gertz, American lawyer, teacher, and writer (born Sept. 14, 1906, Chicago, Ill.—died April 27, 2000, Chicago), was a champion of civil rights—working for fairness in access to housing, battling against police brutality, and shepherding a strong bill of rights into the Illinois c

  • Gerulaitis, Vitas (American tennis player)

    Vitas Gerulaitis, U.S. tennis player (born July 26, 1954, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Sept. 18, 1994, Southampton, N.Y.), by means of his court-sweeping speed, precision shots, and dependable forehand, ranked among the top 10 professional tennis players from 1977 to 1982; he won only one Grand Slam e

  • Gerulf (Viking ruler in The Netherlands)

    history of the Low Countries: The secular principalities: …northern coastal regions, the Viking Gerulf was granted in about 885 the rights over a number of counties between the Meuse and the Vlie (Masalant, Kinnem, Texla, Westflinge, and a district known as Circa oras Rheni, which was, as the name implies, on both sides of the Rhine); his descendants…

  • Gerusalemme conquistata (work by Tasso)

    Torquato Tasso: Composition of the Gerusalemme liberata.: …version of his epic (Gerusalemme conquistata, published 1593), a poetic failure that reveals the extent of Tasso’s final submission to the moral and literary prejudices of the times. He wrote two more religious poems (Lagrime di Maria Vergine and Lagrime di Gesù Cristo), and in June 1594 he went…

  • Gerusalemme liberata (work by Tasso)

    Gerusalemme liberata, (Italian: “Jerusalem Liberated”) heroic epic poem in ottava rima, the masterpiece of Torquato Tasso. He completed it in 1575 and then spent several years revising it. While he was incarcerated in the asylum of Santa Anna, part of the poem was published without his knowledge as

  • Gervais du Bus (French author)

    Roman de Fauvel: …of Fauvel”), French poem by Gervais du Bus that, in addition to its literary value, is a crucial document for the history of music. The poem condemns abuses in contemporary political and religious life. Its hero is the fawn-coloured (French: fauve) stallion Fauvel, the letters of whose name are the…

  • Gervais, Fran?ois-Louis-Paul (French paleontologist and zoologist)

    Paul Gervais, paleontologist and zoologist who succeeded Georges Cuvier and Henri de Blainville as principal French contributor to vertebrate paleontology. Gervais was a student of Blainville, who was Cuvier’s successor as professor of comparative anatomy at the Muséum National d’Histoire

  • Gervais, Paul (French paleontologist and zoologist)

    Paul Gervais, paleontologist and zoologist who succeeded Georges Cuvier and Henri de Blainville as principal French contributor to vertebrate paleontology. Gervais was a student of Blainville, who was Cuvier’s successor as professor of comparative anatomy at the Muséum National d’Histoire

  • Gervais, Ricky (British comedian)

    Ricky Gervais, English comedian perhaps best known for his work on the television series The Office (2001–03). After completing his studies in philosophy at the University of London, Gervais fronted the little-known band Seona Dancing, which scored a minor hit in the Philippines in 1985 with the

  • Gervase of Canterbury (English historian)

    Gervase Of Canterbury, monk at Christ Church, Canterbury, from 1163, compiler of chronicles having considerable value for the reign of Richard I (1189–99) and the first decade of King John’s reign (from 1199). Ordained by Thomas Becket, Gervase was sacristan of the Christ Church monastery for s

  • Gervasius Dorobornensis (English historian)

    Gervase Of Canterbury, monk at Christ Church, Canterbury, from 1163, compiler of chronicles having considerable value for the reign of Richard I (1189–99) and the first decade of King John’s reign (from 1199). Ordained by Thomas Becket, Gervase was sacristan of the Christ Church monastery for s

  • Gervin, George (American basketball player)

    George Gervin, American professional basketball player who rose to stardom as a member of the San Antonio Spurs of the National Basketball Association (NBA) in the 1970s and established himself as one of the greatest guards in the history of the sport. His nickname “The Iceman”—which became

  • Geryon (Greek mythology)

    Heracles: …cattle of the three-bodied giant Geryon, who ruled the island Erytheia (meaning red) in the far west; (11) the bringing back of the golden apples kept at the world’s end by the Hesperides; and (12) the fetching up from the underworld of the triple-headed dog Cerberus, guardian of its gates.

  • Geryusy (Armenia)

    Armenia: Settlement patterns: Alexandropol (Gyumri), Kamo, and Goris—accounted for about one-tenth of the total population. Two-thirds of the population are now urbanized.

  • Gerza, El- (region, Sudan)

    Al-Jazīrah, region, central-southeast Sudan. Al-Jazīrah lies just southeast of the confluence of the Blue and White Nile rivers; the Blue Nile runs northwestward through the central part of the region, and the White Nile lies to the west. The Blue Nile is joined by the Dinder River at the southern

  • Gerzean culture (Egyptian history)

    Gerzean culture, predynastic Egyptian cultural phase given the sequence dates 40–65 by Sir Flinders Petrie and later dated c. 3400–c. 3100 bce. Evidence indicates that the Gerzean culture was a further development of the culture of the Amratian period, which immediately preceded the Gerzean.

  • gesaku (Japanese literature)

    Kanagaki Robun: …Bunkyō, a writer in the gesaku tradition (writing intended for the entertainment of the merchant and working classes of Edo). Eventually Robun was recognized as a leading gesaku writer, noted for such works as Kokkei Fuji mōde (1860–61; “A Comic Mount Fuji Pilgrimage”), a satire of popular works on pilgrimages…

  • Gesammelte Gedichte (work by Lenau)

    Nikolaus Lenau: His later poems, Gesammelte Gedichte (1844; “Collected Poems”) and the religious epics Savonarola (1837) and Die Albigenser (1842; “The Albigensians”), deal with his relentless and unsuccessful search for order and constancy in love, nature, and faith. Following Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s death in 1832, the appearance in 1833…

  • Gesamthandeigentum (German law)

    property law: Concurrent individual owners: …a form of cotenancy (Gesamthandeigentum) in which the cotenants cannot partition the tenancy property, although they may alienate their shares. This form of cotenancy is used for many kinds of partnerships, including the partnership of coheirs that exists until the deceased’s estate is settled and divided.

  • Gesamtkultur (social philosophy)

    Ludwig Mies van der Rohe: Early training and influence: …then give birth to a Gesamtkultur, that is, a new universal culture in a totally reformed man-made environment. These ideas motivated the “modern” movement in architecture that would soon culminate in the so-called International Style of modern architecture.

  • Gesamtkunstwerk (art)

    Claude Debussy: Middle period: Wagner’s conception of Gesamtkunstwerk (“total art work”) encouraged artists to refine upon their emotional responses and to exteriorize their hidden dream states, often in a shadowy, incomplete form; hence the more tenuous nature of the work of Wagner’s French disciples. It was in this spirit that Debussy wrote…

  • Gesamtschulen (German education)

    Germany: Preschool, elementary, and secondary: Many so-called Gesamtschulen (equivalent to British comprehensive schools), which were established beginning in the 1960s, are now operated in each state, though conservative areas were generally resistant to them. These Gesamtschulen are intended as an alternative to the previously rigid division into three levels, often criticized for…

  • Gesang der Geister über den Wassern (work by Schubert)

    Franz Schubert: Maturity: …Geister über den Wassern (Song of the Spirits over the Water) for male-voice octet with accompaniment for bass strings, D. 714, completed in February 1821.

  • Gesang vom lusitanischen Popanz (play by Weiss)

    Peter Weiss: …Gesang vom lusitanischen Popanz (1967; The Song of the Lusitanian Bogey); and American policy in the Vietnam War, Viet Nam Diskurs (1968; Discourse on Viet Nam).

  • Gesch?fte des Herrn Julius Caesar, Die (novel by Brecht)

    Bertolt Brecht: …des Herrn Julius Caesar (1957; The Business Affairs of Mr. Julius Caesar). It concerns a scholar researching a biography of Caesar several decades after his assassination.

  • Geschichte der b?hmischen Sprache und Litteratur (work by Dobrovsky)

    Josef Dobrovsky: …three most important works was Geschichte der b?hmischen Sprache und Literatur (1792; “History of the Bohemian Language and Literature”), which included considerations of many earlier works long suppressed because of their Protestant religious content. His grammar of Czech, Lehrgeb?ude der b?hmischen Sprache (1809; “Learning System of the Bohemian Language”), codified…

  • Geschichte der Botanik vom 16. Jahrhundert bis 1860 (work by Sachs)

    Julius von Sachs: His Geschichte der Botanik vom 16. Jahrhundert bis 1860 (1875; History of Botany 1530–1860) remains an indispensable guide to the history of botany and to the first stages in the emergence of plant physiology as a separate discipline. Sachs was also influential in establishing the importance…

  • Geschichte der Chemie (work by Kopp)

    Hermann Franz Moritz Kopp: …most notable achievements, the great Geschichte der Chemie, 4 vol. (1843–47; “History of Chemistry”). Although he spent his life gathering material for a second edition, it was never finished.

  • Geschichte der deutschen Schauspielkunst (work by Devrient)

    Eduard Devrient: …development of the German theatre, Geschichte der deutschen Schauspielkunst (1848; “History of German Dramatic Art”).

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
91国产福利在线观看