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  • Girardelli, Marc (Luxembourgian skier)

    Marc Girardelli, Austrian-born Luxembourgian skier who won five overall World Cup titles in the 1980s and ’90s. Coached by his father, Helmut, Girardelli made his debut on the World Cup circuit at age 15. Early on, Girardelli appeared not to approach the biennial Fédération Internationale de Ski

  • Girardi, Joe (American baseball player and manager)

    New York Yankees: …time in six years, under Joe Girardi, who had become the Yankees’ manager in 2008. In six games the Yankees dethroned the Philadelphia Phillies, en route to winning their 27th World Series title. The team continued to post winning records and qualified for the playoffs four times over the following…

  • Girardin, émile de (French journalist)

    émile de Girardin, popular French journalist, called the Napoleon of the press for his success in publishing inexpensive newspapers with massive circulations. The illegitimate son of Count Alexandre de Girardin by the wife of a Parisian lawyer, he took his father’s name upon the publication of his

  • Girardin, Marquis de (French noble)

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau: The last decade: …de Conti and then the Marquis de Girardin, in whose park at Ermenonville he died.

  • Girardon, Fran?ois (French sculptor)

    Fran?ois Girardon, the most representative sculptor employed on the great sculptural project of decorating Versailles during the period of Louis XIV. Girardon attracted the attention of Chancellor Pierre Séguier, who brought him to Paris to study under Fran?ois Anguier and afterward sent him to

  • Girardot (Colombia)

    Girardot, river port, central Colombia, at the confluence of the upper Magdalena (there bridged) and Bogotá rivers, opposite Flandes. The site, once a canoe outpost named Pastor Montero, was donated for the creation of San Miguel parish in 1844. Under a provincial ordinance (1852) this became a

  • Girardot, Annie (French actress)

    Annie Suzanne Girardot , French actress (born Oct. 25, 1931, Paris, France—died Feb. 28, 2011, Paris), achieved film stardom in France with more than 100 movies over a six-decade career (1955–2007), but she earned international acclaim—and a nomination for best foreign actress in the 1961 British

  • Girart de Roussillon (poem by Guilhem de Tudela)

    Proven?al literature: Decline and fall: …notable of which is the Girart de Roussillon, a poem of 10,000 lines which related the struggles of Charles Martel with his vassal Gerard of Roussillon. Several Proven?al romances of adventure have also survived: Jaufré, Blandin de Cornoalha, and Guillem de la Barra. Connected with the romance of adventure was…

  • girasole (plant)

    Jerusalem artichoke, (Helianthus tuberosus), sunflower species (Asteraceae family) native to North America and noted for its edible tubers. Jerusalem artichoke is popular as a cooked vegetable in Europe and has long been cultivated in France as a stock feed. In the United States it is rarely

  • Giraud, Anna (Italian singer)

    Antonio Vivaldi: Life: In 1726 the contralto Anna Girò sang for the first time in a Vivaldi opera. Born in Mantua about 1711, she had gone to Venice to further her career as a singer. Her voice was not strong, but she was attractive and acted well. She became part of Vivaldi’s…

  • Giraud, Henri-Honoré (French military officer)

    Henri Giraud, army officer and one of the leaders, in World War II, of the French Committee of National Liberation. After graduating from Saint-Cyr in 1900, Giraud first served in Morocco and was captured by the Germans during World War I. Returning to North Africa in 1922, he participated in the

  • Giraud, Jean (French artist)

    Jean Giraud, (Jean Henri Gaston Giraud; Gir; Moebius), French graphic artist (born May 8, 1938, Nogent-sur-Marne, France—died March 10, 2012, Paris, France), gained near-legendary status among aficionados for his densely drawn, detailed graphic evocations of the American West (which he drew over

  • Giraudeau, Bernard René (French actor)

    Bernard René Giraudeau, French actor (born June 18, 1947, La Rochelle, France—died July 17, 2010, Paris, France), was a versatile performer, director, and writer. Giraudeau served (1963–70) as an engineer in the French navy before entering (1970) the Paris Conservatory to study acting. His early

  • Giraudoux, Hyppolyte-Jean (French author)

    Jean Giraudoux, French novelist, essayist, and playwright who created an impressionistic form of drama by emphasizing dialogue and style rather than realism. Giraudoux was educated at the école Normale Superiéure and made the diplomatic service his career. He became known as an avant-garde writer

  • Giraudoux, Hyppolyte-Jean (French author)

    Jean Giraudoux, French novelist, essayist, and playwright who created an impressionistic form of drama by emphasizing dialogue and style rather than realism. Giraudoux was educated at the école Normale Superiéure and made the diplomatic service his career. He became known as an avant-garde writer

  • Giraudoux, Jean (French author)

    Jean Giraudoux, French novelist, essayist, and playwright who created an impressionistic form of drama by emphasizing dialogue and style rather than realism. Giraudoux was educated at the école Normale Superiéure and made the diplomatic service his career. He became known as an avant-garde writer

  • GIRD (Soviet organization)

    space exploration: Soviet Union: …into an organization known as GIRD (the abbreviation in Russian for “Group for the Study of Reactive Motion”), with branches in Moscow and Leningrad. Emerging as leaders of the Moscow branch were the aeronautical engineer Sergey Korolyov, who had become interested in spaceflight at a young age, and the early…

  • girder (architecture)

    Girder, in building construction, a horizontal main supporting beam that carries a vertical concentrated load. See

  • girder bridge

    bridge: Beam: The beam bridge is the most common bridge form. A beam carries vertical loads by bending. As the beam bridge bends, it undergoes horizontal compression on the top. At the same time, the bottom of the beam is subjected to horizontal tension. The supports carry the…

  • girdle (pupa)

    lepidopteran: Pupa, or chrysalis: …position by a threadlike silk girdle about the body.

  • girdle (garment)

    Girdle, a band that encircles or girds the waist either to confine the loose and flowing outer garments so as to allow freedom of movement or to fasten and support the garments of the wearer. Girdle in this sense is now a literary word and may connote a more elaborate item of dress than the term

  • girdle scone (bread)

    Scone, quick bread of British origin and worldwide fame, made with leavened barley flour or oatmeal that is rolled into a round shape and cut into quarters before baking on a griddle. The first scones were baked in cast iron pans hung in the kitchen fires of rural England and Wales. With the a

  • girdle tie (Egyptian ornament)

    Girdle tie, in Egyptian religion, protective amulet formed like a knot and made of gold, carnelian, or red glazed ware. Most samples of the girdle tie have been found tied around the necks of mummies; the amulets were intended to protect the dead from all that was harmful in the

  • girdle-tailed lizard (lizard)

    Girdle-tailed lizard, any of various south and east African and Madagascan lizards belonging to the family Cordylidae. They are live-bearers, having as few as one to four young per litter. Their name is derived from the rings of spiny scales that encircle the tail, and sometimes the body, in a

  • girdling (horticulture)

    angiosperm: Evolution of the transport process: Experiments now called girdling experiments were performed, in which a ring of bark is removed from a woody plant. Girdling, or ringing, does not immediately interfere with upward movement of water in the xylem, but it does interrupt phloem movement. In some plants surgical removal of phloem is…

  • girdling (gem cutting)

    brilliant cut: …of which are above the girdle (the widest part of the stone) and 25 of which are below. When the stone is cut so that the facets of the crown (above the girdle) make an angle of 35° to the plane of the girdle and those of the pavilion (below…

  • Girella nigricans (fish)

    coloration: Short-term changes: Greenfish, or opaleye (Girella nigricans), kept in white-walled aquariums became very pale during a four-month period, storing about four times the quantity of integumentary guanine as was recoverable from the skins of individuals living in black-walled aquariums but receiving the same kind and amounts of…

  • Giresun (Turkey)

    Giresun, city and seaport, northeastern Turkey. It lies along the Black Sea about 110 miles (175 km) west of Trabzon. The older parts of the city lie on a peninsula crowned by a ruined Byzantine fortress, sheltering the small natural harbour. Nearby is Giresun Island, in ancient times called Ares.

  • Girga (Egypt)

    Jirjā, town, Sawhāj mu?āfa?ah (governorate), Upper Egypt. It is situated on the west bank of the Nile River, which encroached considerably on the town in the 18th and 19th centuries. In pharaonic times it was probably the town of This (Tny), ancestral home of the 1st dynasty (c. 2925–c. 2775 bce),

  • Girgenti (Italy)

    Agrigento, city, near the southern coast of Sicily, Italy. It lies on a plateau encircled by low cliffs overlooking the junction of the Drago (ancient Hypsas) and San Biagio (Acragas) rivers and is dominated from the north by a ridge with twin peaks. Agrigento was a wealthy ancient city founded

  • Girgrah, Isra (Yemeni athlete)

    Yemen: Sports and recreation: …and early 21st century; and Isra Girgrah, a female boxer born in Yemen and fighting out of the United States, held several lightweight belts during that same period.

  • giri (Japanese philosophy)

    Japan: Commerce, cities, and culture: …works is the idea of giri (“duty”), which is to be understood not so much as feudal morality enforced from above but rather as the traditional consciousness of honour and dignity in one’s motives and of social consciousness in human relations. The compositions of Chikamatsu’s later years seek the motif…

  • Giri, Varahagiri Venkata (president of India)

    Varahagiri Venkata Giri, statesman, president of India from 1969 to 1974. Giri began his education at Khallikote College, Berhampore, and then went to Dublin to study law. There he became engaged in the Sinn Féin (Irish political party) movement and was expelled from Ireland in 1916. Upon his

  • Giridharadaja (Indian poet)

    Harishchandra: His father, Gopalachandra (pen name Giridharadaja), was a poet who composed a considerable amount of traditional Braj Bhasa (a dialect of Hindi) verse of technical virtuosity but with little poetic feeling.

  • Giridih (India)

    Giridih, city, east-central Jharkhand state, northeastern India. It lies 72 miles (115 km) northeast of Hazaribagh, on both banks of the Usri River. In 1871 a branch line of the Eastern Railway was built to Girdih, primarily to allow mineral resources found in the area to be exploited. That

  • Girkansk (sea, Eurasia)

    Caspian Sea, world’s largest inland body of water. It lies to the east of the Caucasus Mountains and to the west of the vast steppe of Central Asia. The sea’s name derives from the ancient Kaspi peoples, who once lived in Transcaucasia to the west. Among its other historical names, Khazarsk and

  • Girl (novel by O’Brien)

    Edna O'Brien: In 2019 O’Brien published Girl, which was inspired by the Nigerian schoolgirls who were kidnapped by members of Boko Haram.

  • Girl Before a Mirror (work by Picasso)

    Pablo Picasso: The 1930s: …colour with flowing forms (Girl Before a Mirror [1932]).

  • Girl Can’t Help It, The (film by Tashlin [1956])

    Frank Tashlin: Films of the late 1950s: The Girl Can’t Help It (1956) was an inspired, wildly over-the-top comedy with the statuesque platinum-blonde bombshell Jayne Mansfield cast as the girlfriend of a retired gangster (Edmond O’Brien) who hires a press agent (Ewell) to make her a star. Using Mansfield as a kind…

  • Girl Crazy (musical by Gershwin)

    George Gershwin: Popular songs: …Ethel Merman in the musical Girl Crazy (1930). The following year, Gershwin scored a lengthy, elaborate piano arrangement of the song, and in late 1933 he arranged the piece into a set of variations for piano and orchestra; “I Got Rhythm” Variations has since become one of Gershwin’s most-performed orchestral…

  • Girl Crazy (film by Taurog [1943])

    Norman Taurog: Musical comedies and Boys Town: Taurog then inherited Girl Crazy (1943) from Busby Berkeley, who was released from the production early on but had already staged the acclaimed “I Got Rhythm” finale. It was the last film to feature Rooney and Garland as the leads, and it is in many ways their best,…

  • Girl Downstairs, The (film by Taurog [1938])

    Norman Taurog: Musical comedies and Boys Town: The Girl Downstairs (1938) had Hungarian import Franciska Gaal as a maid who wins the heart of a playboy (Franchot Tone), and Lucky Night (1939) was a comedy with Myrna Loy and Robert Taylor. After working (uncredited) on The Wizard of Oz (1939), Taurog made…

  • Girl from Ipanema, The (song by Moraes and Jobim)

    Stan Getz: …Jobim; for one track, “The Girl from Ipanema,” Gilberto’s wife, Astrud, who had never sung professionally, was a last-minute addition on vocals. Her somewhat naive, blasé delivery suited the tune and complimented Getz’s sax playing perfectly, and the recording became the biggest hit of Getz’s career when it was…

  • Girl from Missouri, The (film by Conway [1934])

    Jack Conway: Heyday of the 1930s: …the actress on the popular The Girl from Missouri (1934). His success continued with Viva Villa! (1934), starring Wallace Beery as the legendary revolutionary Pancho Villa. Conway inherited the biopic after Howard Hawks was fired, and both the film and Ben Hecht’s screenplay were nominated for Academy Awards. The

  • girl group (music)

    Girl groups, primarily American female vocal groups popular from the early to the mid-1960s, the period between the heyday of early rock and roll and the British Invasion. The girl group era produced a clearly identifiable hybrid of gospel, rhythm and blues, doo-wop, and quirky pop. The

  • Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (youth organization)

    Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, worldwide organizations for girls, dedicated to training them in good citizenship, good conduct, and outdoor activities. Robert (later Lord) Baden-Powell and his sister Agnes Baden-Powell founded the Girl Guides in Great Britain in 1910 in response to the requests of

  • Girl Hunters, The (work by Spillane)

    Mickey Spillane: …the Mike Hammer series with The Girl Hunters (1962). He also wrote the script for and played the role of Hammer in the novel’s film adaptation (1963). Later books in the series include The Killing Man (1989) and Black Alley (1996). In addition to movies, the Mike Hammer character was…

  • Girl in a Swing, The (novel by Adams)

    Richard Adams: The novels The Girl in a Swing (1980; film 1988) and Maia (1984) drew attention for their graphic depictions of sexuality. Adams took a different approach to anthropomorphism with Traveller (1988), told from the perspective of Robert E. Lee’s horse. He returned to his intrepid lagomorphs with…

  • Girl in Every Port, A (film by Hawks [1928])

    Louise Brooks: …Hollywood films as Howard Hawks’s A Girl in Every Port (1928) and William Wellman’s Beggars of Life (1928). Her performances attracted the attention of the German director G.W. Pabst, who cast her as the amoral self-destructive temptress Lulu in Die Büchse der Pandora (1929; Pandora’s Box). Brooks’s haunting performance in…

  • Girl in the Red Velvet Swing, The (film by Fleischer [1955])

    Richard Fleischer: Middle years: The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing (1955) was a well-done account of the Evelyn Nesbit scandal; Joan Collins starred as the seductive showgirl whose affair with famed architect Stanford White (Ray Milland) leads her husband, Harry Kendall Thaw (Farley Granger), to fatally shoot him.…

  • Girl in the Spider’s Web, The (novel by Lagercrantz)

    Stieg Larsson: The Girl in the Spider’s Web) was based in part on outlined scenarios left by Larsson, who had mapped out some 10 volumes of the series. The novel sets Salander and Blomkvist against an array of adversaries, from malevolent hackers to the U.S. National Security…

  • Girl in White, The (film by Sturges [1952])

    John Sturges: Bad, Magnificent, and Great: The Girl in White (1952) was a modest but well-done biography of New York City’s first woman doctor, Emily Dunning, with Allyson as the hard-nosed pioneer who worked in a slum hospital. Sturges was on more-familiar ground with Jeopardy (1953), a thriller that featured Barbara…

  • Girl of the Golden West, The (opera by Puccini)

    Giacomo Puccini: Mature work and fame: …La fanciulla del west (1910; The Girl of the Golden West). These four mature works also tell a moving love story, one that centres entirely on the feminine protagonist and ends in a tragic resolution. All four speak the same refined and limpid musical language of the orchestra that creates…

  • Girl on the Train, The (film by Taylor [2016])

    Emily Blunt: …may have committed murder in The Girl on the Train, an adaptation of Pamela Hawkins’s best seller. She also did voice work for the animated comedies My Little Pony: The Movie, which was based on the popular TV series, and Animal Crackers (both 2017). Blunt continued to show her range…

  • Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window (painting by Vermeer)

    Johannes Vermeer: Artistic training and early influences: …of Vermeer’s earliest genre paintings, Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window (c. 1659), in which he created a quiet space for the young woman to read her letter. Unlike the characteristically dark interiors of Terborch, however, Vermeer bathed this remarkably private scene in a radiant light that streams…

  • Girl Scouts (youth organization)

    Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, worldwide organizations for girls, dedicated to training them in good citizenship, good conduct, and outdoor activities. Robert (later Lord) Baden-Powell and his sister Agnes Baden-Powell founded the Girl Guides in Great Britain in 1910 in response to the requests of

  • Girl Scouts National Center West (encampment, Wyoming, United States)

    Ten Sleep: …entrance to the canyon is Nature Conservancy Ten Sleep Preserve (formerly the Girl Scouts National Center West), which harbours populations of mammals and more than 100 bird species. A conservation buffalo herd was begun at a nearby ranch in 1974. The village is a supply point for a livestock and…

  • Girl Scouts of the United States of America (American organization)

    Juliette Gordon Low: …had been changed to the Girl Scouts of the United States of America, the movement was formally organized on a national basis, and Low was elected president, a post she retained until 1920. Low traveled throughout the United States, donating and soliciting funds and organizing troops. In 1919 she represented…

  • Girl Shy (film by Newmeyer and Taylor [1924])

    Harold Lloyd: …above a city street; in Girl Shy (1924) he took a thrilling ride atop a runaway streetcar; in The Freshman (1925), one of the most successful of all silent pictures, he stood in for the football tackling dummy.

  • Girl Sleuth: A Feminist Guide, The (work by Mason)

    Bobbie Ann Mason: During that time she published The Girl Sleuth: A Feminist Guide (1975), in which she explored various childhood mystery series that feature female protagonists. In 1979 she began writing full-time, eventually publishing stories in The New Yorker, the Atlantic Monthly, and elsewhere.

  • Girl Who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest, The (work by Larsson)

    Stieg Larsson: The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest), an adrenaline-fueled exploration of institutional corruption—earned similar acclaim. Though some critics charged that the novels’ determined focus on systematic violence against women was complicated by overly graphic depictions of such violence, the trilogy became wildly popular both within…

  • Girl Who Lived Twice, The (novel by Lagercrantz)

    Stieg Larsson: The Girl Who Lived Twice).

  • Girl Who Played with Fire, The (work by Larsson)

    Stieg Larsson: …som lekte med elden (2006; The Girl Who Played with Fire), which delved into the seedy world of sex trafficking, and Luftslottet som spr?ngdes (2007; “The Air Castle That Blew Up”; Eng. trans. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest), an adrenaline-fueled exploration of institutional corruption—earned similar acclaim. Though some…

  • Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye, The (novel by Lagercrantz)

    Stieg Larsson: The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye) and Hon som m?ste d? (2019; “She Who Must Die”; Eng. trans. The Girl Who Lived Twice).

  • Girl Who Was Plugged In, The (novella by Tiptree)

    James Tiptree, Jr.: In “The Girl Who Was Plugged In” (1973; winner of a Hugo Award for best novella), an ugly homeless girl in a media-saturated future is recruited to remotely control the empty body of a new celebrity. This prophetic story of celebrity worship, product placement, and global…

  • Girl with a Mandolin (work by Picasso)

    Cubism: …appear sculptural, as in Picasso’s Girl with a Mandolin (1910). They simplified their colour schemes to a nearly monochromatic scale (hues of tan, brown, gray, cream, green, or blue were preferred) in order not to distract the viewer from the artist’s primary interest—the structure of form itself. The monochromatic colour…

  • Girl with a Pearl Earring (painting by Vermeer)

    Girl with a Pearl Earring, oil painting on canvas (c. 1665) by Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer, one of his most well-known works. It depicts an imaginary young woman in exotic dress and a very large pearl earring. The work permanently resides in the Mauritshuis museum in the The Hague. An observant

  • Girl with a Pearl Earring (film by Webber [2003])

    Girl with a Pearl Earring: …was adapted into an Oscar-nominated film in 2003 starring Scarlett Johansson as the fictional Griet and Colin Firth as Vermeer.

  • Girl with Balloon (work by Banksy)

    Banksy: In late 2018 Girl with Balloon (2006), a canvas version of one of Banksy’s most popular murals, startled onlookers at an auction when the work seemingly self-destructed by partly shredding just after selling for $1.4 million. As speculation about the meaning of the stunt and about the involvement…

  • Girl with the Cut-off Hands (work by Quillard)

    theatre: Reactions to Naturalism: …Frenchman Pierre Quillard’s play The Girl with the Cut-off Hands (1891), the actors intoned their lines behind a gauze curtain, backed by a gold cloth framed with red hangings. In front of the gauze, a girl in a long blue tunic repeated the actors’ lines and commented on their feelings.…

  • Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The (work by Larsson)

    Stieg Larsson: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo), which tracked the mismatched protagonists’ investigation into a decades-old disappearance, was swiftly met with praise in Sweden—in particular for Larsson’s indelible characterization of Salander as a surly pixie with a troubled past. Its two sequels—Flickan som lekte med elden…

  • Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The (film by Fincher [2011])

    Nine Inch Nails: …score, and their work on The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011) was honoured with a Grammy. Their score for Gone Girl (2015) was nominated for a Grammy. The pair also provided the music for the climate-change documentary Before the Flood and the thriller Patriots Day (both 2016) as well…

  • Girl’s Tyme (American singing group)

    Beyoncé: …formed the singing-rapping girl group Destiny’s Child (originally called Girl’s Tyme) in 1990 with childhood friends. In 1992 the group lost on the Star Search television talent show, and three years later it was dropped from a recording contract before an album had been released. In 1997 Destiny’s Child’s fortunes…

  • Girl, Interrupted (film by Mangold [1999])

    Jared Leto: …and had major roles in Girl, Interrupted (1999) and American Psycho (2000).

  • Girl, The (work by Le Sueur)

    Meridel Le Sueur: …subject of her first novel, The Girl. Although she wrote it in 1939, the novel was not published until 1978. Le Sueur’s short stories, including those collected in Salute to Spring (1940), were widely admired. North Star Country (1945) is a saga about the people of the Midwest told in…

  • Girl, Woman, Other (novel by Evaristo)

    Margaret Atwood: …a cowinner (with Bernardine Evaristo’s Girl, Woman, Other) of the Booker Prize.

  • Girlfriend Experience, The (film by Soderbergh [2009])

    Steven Soderbergh: Ocean’s series and Magic Mike: The Girlfriend Experience (2009) featured Sasha Grey, a pornographic actress, as a prostitute. Despite its provocative premise, the drama mainly concerns the character’s quotidian activities. The film was adapted as a television series (2016– ), which Soderbergh executive produced. In 2009 Soderbergh also directed The…

  • Girls (American television program)

    Judd Apatow: …and the HBO TV series Girls (2012–17), both of which he produced, focused primarily on female characters. He both produced and directed Trainwreck (2015), a comedy written by and starring stand-up comedian Amy Schumer. The film concerns an unabashedly promiscuous young woman who, despite her aversion to romance, falls in…

  • Girls at Play (novel by Theroux)

    Paul Theroux: Several of his early novels—including Girls at Play (1969), Jungle Lovers (1971), and Saint Jack (1973; film 1979)—centre on the social and cultural dislocation of Westerners in postcolonial Africa and Southeast Asia. His later works of fiction include The Family Arsenal (1976), about a group of terrorists in the London…

  • Girls in the Night (film by Arnold [1953])

    Jack Arnold: …juvenile-delinquent genre of that decade, Girls in the Night (1953). Telling, as its tagline put it, the “Tense, Terrifying Truth About the Big City’s Delinquent Daughters,” it never rose above its B-film budget and cast, but it did help pave the way for now-canonical films in the genre, The Wild…

  • Girls in Their Married Bliss (work by O’Brien)

    Edna O'Brien: …The Lonely Girl (1962) and Girls in Their Married Bliss (1964), by which time both have settled in London and have become disillusioned with marriage and men in general. Among O’Brien’s many subsequent novels are August Is a Wicked Month (1965), Casualties of Peace (1966), Night (1972), Johnny I Hardly…

  • Girls Industrial College (university, Denton, Texas, United States)

    Texas Woman’s University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Denton, Texas, U.S. It focuses on liberal arts and professional studies. Texas Woman’s University is divided into the University General Divisions, the Institute of Health Sciences, and the Graduate School. The

  • Girls Just Want to Have Fun (recording by Lauper)

    Cyndi Lauper: …included the effervescent single “Girls Just Want to Have Fun,” the popularity of which was enhanced by its supporting video, which became an MTV favourite. The chart-topping album spawned other hit singles, among them the ballad “Time After Time.” At the 1984 Grammy Awards, She’s So Unusual was a…

  • Girls of Slender Means, The (novel by Spark)

    The Girls of Slender Means, novel by Muriel Spark, published in a shortened version in 1963 in The Saturday Evening Post and published in book form later that year. The novel, set primarily in London during World War II, focuses on the inhabitants of a residential club for unmarried women and on

  • Girls on Top (British television series)

    Dawn French: …Comic Strip productions and the Girls on Top series, which French cowrote. In 1987 the duo began cowriting and costarring in French and Saunders, a comedy sketch show.

  • Girls Trip (film by Lee [2017])

    Tiffany Haddish: …gave her breakout performance in Girls Trip, in which she costarred with (and stole the show from) Regina Hall, Queen Latifah, and Jada Pinkett Smith. In the wake of that success, Haddish starred in a TV comedy special, Tiffany Haddish: She Ready! From the Hood to Hollywood, became the first…

  • Girls! Girls! Girls! (film by Taurog [1962])

    Norman Taurog: Elvis movies: …“Can’t Help Falling in Love”; Girls! Girls! Girls! (1962), which featured “Return to Sender”; and It Happened at the World’s Fair (1963), with Presley performing at the Seattle World’s Fair. Although they were box-office successes, critics derided the films as formulaic and musically uninspired.

  • Girls: A Tetralogy of Novels, The (work by Montherlant)

    Henry de Montherlant: …of the tetralogy was entitled The Girls: A Tetralogy of Novels.) This sardonic and misogynistic work describes the relationship between a libertine novelist and his adoring women victims. It exalts the pleasures of the body and of artistic creation while scornfully rejecting feminine possessiveness and sentiment. A similar arrogantly virile…

  • Girnar (temple, India)

    Gir Range: …because of the ancient Jaina temple of Girnar (historically called Raivata or Ujjayanta) situated on one of the hills; the temple is a major place of pilgrimage.

  • Girnar Hills (physical region, India)

    Girnar Hills, physiographic region on the Kathiawar Peninsula, Gujarat state, west-central India. At the foot of one of the hills is a rock bearing one of the rock edicts of Ashoka (3rd century bce). The same rock bears an inscription referring to the construction of a lake, called Sudarshana, in

  • Girne (Cyprus)

    Kyrenia, city, situated along the northern coast of Cyprus, in the Turkish Cypriot-administered area. Founded by the Achaeans, ancient Greek colonists, and fortified by the Byzantines, Franks, and Venetians, the city was the administrative headquarters of the Kyrenia district of the Republic of

  • Giro d’Italia (cycling)

    cycling: Modern sport racing: …three-week tours of Italy (the Giro d’Italia) and Spain (the Vuelta a Espa?a). Usually, the Giro is held in May and June, the Tour de France in July, the Vuelta in September, and the World Championships in October. Prizes in these races are substantial, amounting to $2.5 million in the…

  • Girò, Anna (Italian singer)

    Antonio Vivaldi: Life: In 1726 the contralto Anna Girò sang for the first time in a Vivaldi opera. Born in Mantua about 1711, she had gone to Venice to further her career as a singer. Her voice was not strong, but she was attractive and acted well. She became part of Vivaldi’s…

  • Girodet, Anne-Louis (French painter)

    Anne-Louis Girodet, painter whose works exemplify the first phase of Romanticism in French art. Girodet began to study drawing in 1773. He later became a student of the Neoclassical architect étienne-Louis Boullée, with whose encouragement he joined the studio of Jacques-Louis David in late 1783 or

  • Girodet-Trioson, Anne-Louis (French painter)

    Anne-Louis Girodet, painter whose works exemplify the first phase of Romanticism in French art. Girodet began to study drawing in 1773. He later became a student of the Neoclassical architect étienne-Louis Boullée, with whose encouragement he joined the studio of Jacques-Louis David in late 1783 or

  • Girodias, Maurice (French publisher)

    Maurice Girodias, French publisher of banned books, including many classics of modern literature. As a young man Girodias worked closely with his father, Jack Kahane, whose Obelisk Press published such classics of erotica as Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer (1934) and Frank Harris’s My Life and

  • Girón, Don Pedro (Spanish noble)

    Juan de Padilla: …field by replacing Padilla with Don Pedro Girón, an important nobleman. After Charles’s troops had recovered Tordesillas (December 5) and Girón had defected, the Junta Santa recalled Padilla. Padilla’s reappointment was received with a great outpouring of popular enthusiasm. He occupied Torrelobatón on February 28, 1521. Seven weeks later, however,…

  • Girona (Spain)

    Girona, city, capital of Girona provincia (province), in the Catalonia comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), northeastern Spain. It lies on the O?ar River in the foothills of the Los ángeles Mountains, a short distance inland from a Mediterranean coastal resort area known as the Costa Brava.

  • Girona (province, Spain)

    Girona, provincia (province) in the Catalonia comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), northeastern Spain. Girona is the northeasternmost province of the autonomous community and of Spain. It is bounded by France and the Pyrenees to the north, by the Mediterranean Sea to the east and southeast,

  • Gironde (estuary, France)

    Gironde, estuary on the Bay of Biscay, in Gironde département, Aquitaine région, southwestern France, formed by the confluence of the Garonne and Dordogne rivers (qq.v.). It trends from southeast to northwest for about 45 miles (72 km) and is navigable for oceangoing vessels, although it has

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