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  • Godmanis, Ivars (prime minister of Latvia)

    Latvia: Independence restored: …the government of Prime Minister Ivars Godmanis collapsed in February 2009. A shaky coalition was forged by former opposition leader Valdis Dombrovskis, and a series of economic reforms were pushed through the Saeima. With the Latvian economy showing signs of modest recovery, the Dombrovskis government survived a parliamentary general election…

  • godmother (Christianity)

    Godparent, in Christianity, one who stands surety for another in the rite of baptism. In the modern baptism of an infant or child, the godparent or godparents make a profession of faith for the person being baptized (the godchild) and assume an obligation to serve as proxies for the parents if the

  • Godmother of Cocaine (Colombian cocaine trafficker)

    Griselda Blanco, Colombian cocaine trafficker who amassed a vast empire and was a central figure in the violent drug wars in Miami in the 1970s and ’80s. Although there is some confusion about her birth location, a number of sources give it as Santa Marta, Colombia, where Blanco was baptized. She

  • Gododdin (people)

    Edinburgh: Strategic importance: The Votadini, the dominant Celtic tribe of the Lothians, with whom Rome had a relatively stable relationship, were the group most likely to have occupied the Castle Rock site. The Votadini capital was on Traprain Law, a cone-shaped hill (law) some 20 miles (30 km) east…

  • G?d?ll? (Hungary)
  • Godolphin Barb (horse)

    horse racing: Bloodlines and studbooks: …stallions (the Darley Arabian, the Godolphin Barb, and the Byerly Turk, all brought to Great Britain, 1690–1730) and from 43 “royal” mares (those imported by Charles II). The preeminence of English racing and hence of the General Stud Book from 1791 provided a standard for judging a horse’s breeding (and…

  • Godolphin, Margaret Blagge (English aristocrat)

    John Evelyn: …a paternal affection for Margaret Blagge, a maid of honour at court, who later secretly married Sidney Godolphin, future lord high treasurer. She died after giving birth to a child in 1678; Evelyn’s Life of Mrs. Godolphin (1847; ed. H. Sampson, 1939), is one of the most moving of 17th-century…

  • Godolphin, Sidney (English poet)

    Sidney Godolphin, English poet and Royalist during the reign of Charles I. Educated at Exeter College, Oxford (1624–27), and at one of the Inns of Court, Godolphin traveled abroad and also became friends with Ben Jonson, Thomas Hobbes, and other men of letters. He was elected a member of the House

  • Godolphin, Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of (English politician)

    Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin, British politician and administrator who did much to stabilize British financial administration during the 20 years after the Glorious Revolution of 1688. A member of a cadet branch of an ancient Cornish family, Godolphin became page of honour to King

  • Godolphin, Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of, Viscount Rialton, Baron Godolphin of Rialton (English politician)

    Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin, British politician and administrator who did much to stabilize British financial administration during the 20 years after the Glorious Revolution of 1688. A member of a cadet branch of an ancient Cornish family, Godolphin became page of honour to King

  • Godomer (king of Burgundy)

    France: The conquest of Burgundy: Godomer, the new Burgundian king, defeated the Franks at Vézeronce and forced them to retreat; Clodomir was killed in the battle. Childebert I, Chlotar I, and Theodebert I, the son of Theodoric I, regained the offensive in 532–534. The Burgundian kingdom was annexed and divided…

  • Godongwana (Mthethwa leader)

    Dingiswayo, African chief or king of the Mthethwa of Southern Africa. Few hard facts are known about Dingiswayo—not even the approximate dates of his birth, his assumption of chieftaincy, or his death—but it is clear that he was dominant during the first two decades of the 19th century (though he

  • Godowsky, Leopold (American pianist and composer)

    Leopold Godowsky, renowned Russian-born American virtuoso pianist and composer, known for his exceptional piano technique. Godowsky entered the Berlin High School for Music at age 14; soon thereafter he went to the United States, where he spent most of the remainder of his life. His first American

  • Godowsky, Leopold, Jr. (American musician and photography technician)

    Leopold Godowsky, Jr., American musician and photographic technician primarily known as a codeveloper of Kodachrome film (1935). Son of the pianist Leopold Godowsky, the young Godowsky attended New York City’s Riverdale School, where he met his future photographic partner, Leopold Mannes, who

  • Godoy Cruz (Argentina)

    Godoy Cruz, suburb immediately south of the city of Mendoza in northern Mendoza provincia (province), western Argentina. Originally an agricultural oasis supplying wine grapes, fruit, potatoes, and alfalfa, Godoy Cruz has become an important manufacturing and industrial centre within Greater

  • Godoy, Manuel de (prime minister of Spain)

    Manuel de Godoy, Spanish royal favourite and twice prime minister, whose disastrous foreign policy contributed to a series of misfortunes and defeats that culminated in the abdication of King Charles IV and the occupation of Spain by the armies of Napoleon Bonaparte. Born into an old but poor noble

  • godparent (Christianity)

    Godparent, in Christianity, one who stands surety for another in the rite of baptism. In the modern baptism of an infant or child, the godparent or godparents make a profession of faith for the person being baptized (the godchild) and assume an obligation to serve as proxies for the parents if the

  • Godrh (India)

    Godhra, city, northeastern Gujarat state, west-central India. It lies on a plain east of the Mahi River and about 40 miles (65 km) northeast of Vadodara. Godhra is a road and rail junction and a commercial centre for timber and agricultural produce. Industries include oilseed pressing, flour

  • Godrum (king of Denmark)

    Guthrum, leader of a major Danish invasion of Anglo-Saxon England who waged war against the West Saxon king Alfred the Great (reigned 871–899) and later made himself king of East Anglia (reigned 880–890). Guthrum went to England in the great Danish invasion of 865, and in mid-January 878 he

  • Gods and Earths, Nation of (American revisionist movement)

    Five Percent Nation, American revisionist movement, led by Clarence 13X, which split from the Nation of Islam in 1963. The movement rejected being called a religion, preferring instead to be known as a culture and way of life. Its teachings are referred to as “Supreme Mathematics.” In the early

  • Gods and Generals (film by Maxwell [2003])

    Robert Duvall: … in the Civil War saga Gods and Generals (2003) and as a wealthy eccentric old man who takes custody of his young nephew in Secondhand Lions (2003). Duvall won an Emmy for his role as a rancher who rescues five young Chinese girls sold into prostitution in the Old West…

  • Gods and Monsters (film by Condon [1998])

    Ian McKellen: …portrayed director James Whale in Gods and Monsters, for which he received his first Academy Award nomination, for best actor. He later played Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings (2001, 2002, 2003), a film trilogy based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s epic fantasy (1954–55). He

  • Gods Are Athirst, The (work by France)

    French literature: The novel later in the century: …Les Dieux ont soif (1912; The Gods Are Athirst). For Anglophone readers right up to the end of World War II, he spoke for that Voltairean liberal humanism, reason, and justice of which France became the symbol in a Europe twice overrun by German imperial ambitions.

  • Gods Must Be Crazy, The (film by Uys)

    South Africa: Film: …include Afrikaner director Jamie Uys’s The Gods Must Be Crazy (1980), Oliver Schmitz and Thomas Mogotlane’s Mapantsula (1988), Manie van Rensburg’s Taxi to Soweto (1991), Anant Singh and Darrell Roodt’s Sarafina! (1992), and Gavin Hood’s Tsotsi (2005), based on a novel by Fugard.

  • Gods of Egypt (film by Proyas [2016])

    Gerard Butler: …again for the action thriller Gods of Egypt (2016), in which he featured as the god of disorder and warfare. He later starred as a scientist in the disaster movie Geostorm (2017). Butler’s roles from 2018 included a cavalier cop in Den of Thieves, a submarine commander in Hunter Killer,…

  • Gods of Pegana, The (work by Dunsany)

    Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th baron of Dunsany: …book of short stories was The Gods of Pegana (1905); his first play, The Glittering Gate, was produced by the Abbey Theatre in Dublin in 1909; and his first London production, The Gods of the Mountain, at the Haymarket Theatre in 1911. As in his more than 50 subsequent verse…

  • Gods of the Mountain, The (play by Dunsany)

    Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th baron of Dunsany: …and his first London production, The Gods of the Mountain, at the Haymarket Theatre in 1911. As in his more than 50 subsequent verse plays, novels, short stories and memoirs, in these works Dunsany explored in a richly coloured prose mysterious kingdoms of fairies and gods; he also introduced a…

  • Godspell (musical by Schwartz and Tebelak)

    Christology: Film: …Schwartz and John Michael Tebelak’s Godspell (1971). Although those films do not escape the narrative and interpretive problems noted above, the format of the musical has a way of translating Jesus’ story into a lilting account of happy make-believe. A final genre of films about Jesus consists of satires of…

  • godspell

    biblical literature: Meaning of the term gospel: …is derived from the Anglo-Saxon godspell (“good story”). The classical Greek word euangelion means “a reward for bringing of good news” or the “good news” itself. In the emperor cult particularly, in which the Roman emperor was venerated as the spirit and protector of the empire, the term took on…

  • Godth?b (Greenland)

    Nuuk, capital and main port of Greenland, on the southwestern coast, near the mouth of the Godth?b Fjord, an inlet of the Davis Strait, and the mountain landmarks Sermitsiaq (“Saddle Island”) and Hjortetakken (“Deer Antlers”). The modern town dates from 1721, when Hans Egede, a Norwegian

  • Godunov, Aleksandr Borisovich (Russian dancer)

    Alexander Godunov, (ALEKSANDR BORISOVICH GODUNOV), Russian ballet dancer and actor (born November 25/28, 1949, Sakhalin Island, U.S.S.R.—died May 18?, 1995, Los Angeles, California), had a successful career with Moscow’s Bolshoi Ballet before defecting to the U.S. during the company’s 1979

  • Godunov, Alexander (Russian dancer)

    Alexander Godunov, (ALEKSANDR BORISOVICH GODUNOV), Russian ballet dancer and actor (born November 25/28, 1949, Sakhalin Island, U.S.S.R.—died May 18?, 1995, Los Angeles, California), had a successful career with Moscow’s Bolshoi Ballet before defecting to the U.S. during the company’s 1979

  • Godunov, Boris (literary character)

    Boris Godunov, the protagonist of Aleksandr Pushkin’s historical tragedy Boris Godunov

  • Godunov, Boris (tsar of Russia)

    Boris Godunov, Russian statesman who was chief adviser to Tsar Fyodor I (reigned 1584–98) and was himself elected tsar of Muscovy (reigning 1598–1605) after the extinction of the Rurik dynasty. His reign inaugurated the devastating Time of Troubles (1598–1613) in the Russian lands. A member of the

  • Godunov, Boris Fyodorovich (tsar of Russia)

    Boris Godunov, Russian statesman who was chief adviser to Tsar Fyodor I (reigned 1584–98) and was himself elected tsar of Muscovy (reigning 1598–1605) after the extinction of the Rurik dynasty. His reign inaugurated the devastating Time of Troubles (1598–1613) in the Russian lands. A member of the

  • Godunov, Fyodor Borisovich (tsar of Russia)

    Fyodor II, tsar who ruled Russia briefly (April–June 1605) during the Time of Troubles (1598–1613). The son of Boris Godunov (reigned 1598–1605), Fyodor received an excellent education and was well acquainted with state affairs when his father unexpectedly died and he ascended the Russian throne (

  • Godwi (work by Brentano)

    Clemens Brentano: …of Prague”) and the novel Godwi (1801), which forms an important link between the older and the newer forms of Romanticism.

  • Godwin (earl of Wessex)

    Godwine, earl of Wessex, the most powerful man in England during the opening years of the reign of Edward the Confessor. Although an Anglo-Saxon, Godwine became a favourite of the Danish king of England, Canute the Great, who made him earl of Wessex about 1018. In the disputes over the succession

  • Godwin Austen Glacier (glacier)

    K2: …feet (4,570 metres) on the Godwin Austen Glacier, a tributary of the Baltoro Glacier. The mountain was discovered in 1856 by Col. T.G. Montgomerie of the Survey of India, and it was given the symbol K2 because it was the second peak measured in the Karakoram Range. The name Mount…

  • Godwin Austen, Mount (mountain, Asia)

    K2, the world’s second highest peak (28,251 feet [8,611 metres]), second only to Mount Everest. K2 is located in the Karakoram Range and lies partly in a Chinese-administered enclave of the Kashmir region within the Uygur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, China, and partly in the Gilgit-Baltistan

  • Godwin, Edward (British architect and writer)

    Edward Godwin, British architect, designer, and writer notable for his contributions to the English Aesthetic movement in design, which drew its inspiration mainly from East Asia, particularly from Japan. In 1854 Godwin set up his own practice, specializing in ecclesiastical architecture. In 1861

  • Godwin, Francis (English bishop and historian)

    Francis Godwin, bishop and historian who wrote the first story of space travel in English literature, The Man in the Moone: or A Discourse of a Voyage Thither by Domingo Gonsales, the Speedy Messenger. The tale was begun in about 1603–06 and finished around 1621–30; it was published in 1638. By

  • Godwin, Gail (American author)

    Gail Godwin, American author of fiction about personal freedom in man-woman relationships and the choices women make. In childhood Godwin lived with her divorced mother, a writer and college literature teacher who was the model for some of Godwin’s strong female characters. Godwin studied at Peace

  • Godwin, Gail Kathleen (American author)

    Gail Godwin, American author of fiction about personal freedom in man-woman relationships and the choices women make. In childhood Godwin lived with her divorced mother, a writer and college literature teacher who was the model for some of Godwin’s strong female characters. Godwin studied at Peace

  • Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft (English author)

    Mary Wollstonecraft, English writer and passionate advocate of educational and social equality for women. The daughter of a farmer, Wollstonecraft taught school and worked as a governess, experiences that inspired her views in Thoughts on the Education of Daughters (1787). In 1788 she began working

  • Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft (British author)

    Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, English Romantic novelist best known as the author of Frankenstein. The only daughter of William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft, she met the young poet Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1812 and eloped with him to France in July 1814. The couple were married in 1816, after

  • Godwin, William (British philosopher)

    William Godwin, social philosopher, political journalist, and religious dissenter who anticipated the English Romantic literary movement with his writings advancing atheism, anarchism, and personal freedom. Godwin’s idealistic liberalism was based on the principle of the absolute sovereignty and

  • Godwine (earl of Wessex)

    Godwine, earl of Wessex, the most powerful man in England during the opening years of the reign of Edward the Confessor. Although an Anglo-Saxon, Godwine became a favourite of the Danish king of England, Canute the Great, who made him earl of Wessex about 1018. In the disputes over the succession

  • Godwine (archbishop of Canterbury)

    Saint Aelfheah, ; feast day, April 19), archbishop of Canterbury who was venerated as a martyr after his murder by the Danes. Of noble birth, Aelfheah entered the Benedictine abbey of Deerhurst, Gloucestershire, and later became a hermit at Bath, Somerset, where followers elected him abbot.

  • Godwinville (New Jersey, United States)

    Ridgewood, village, Bergen county, northeastern New Jersey, U.S. It lies along the Saddle River, 5 miles (8 km) northeast of Paterson, New Jersey. Dutch farmers settled in the area in the late 1600s. The village’s Old Paramus Reformed Church, built about 1800 and remodeled in 1875, is on the site

  • godwit (bird)

    Godwit, any of four species of large, long-billed shorebirds of the genus Limosa, family Scolopacidae, named for its whistling call. Godwits are generally reddish brown in summer and grayish in winter; all nest in the Northern Hemisphere. The black-tailed godwit (L. limosa), about 40 centimetres

  • Gody ?ycia (work by Dygasiński)

    Adolf Dygasiński: His masterpiece is Gody ?ycia (1902; “Feast of Life”), an allegorical prose poem about the struggle between a small bird and a powerful eagle owl. Dygasiński consistently introduced folk themes into national literature in his many short stories dealing with village life and he often used local dialects.…

  • Godzilla (film by Honda [1954])

    Godzilla, Japanese horror film, released in 1954, that was directed and cowritten by Honda Ishirō and features innovative special effects by Tsuburaya Eiji. The landmark film was a sensation at the box office and sparked a spate of “giant monster” movies. Godzilla, a giant monster spawned from the

  • Godzilla (film by Edwards [2014])

    Bryan Cranston: (2011), Argo (2012), and Godzilla (2014). He played blacklisted Hollywood screenwriter Dalton Trumbo in the biopic Trumbo (2015), and the performance earned Cranston his first Academy Award nomination. In The Infiltrator (2016), Cranston played real-life undercover federal agent Robert Mazur, who, in the 1980s, impersonated a money-laundering businessman in

  • Godzilla: King of the Monsters (film by Dougherty [2019])

    Zhang Ziyi: …appeared in the action adventure Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019).

  • Godzina strze?ona (work by Jastrun)

    Mieczys?aw Jastrun: His wartime poetry collections, Godzina strze?ona (1944; “A Curfew Hour”) and Rzecz ludzka (1946; “The Human Story”), reflect upon the national experience during the German occupation. Jastrun’s poems published after the mid-1950s, Gorácy popió? (1956; “Hot Ashes”) and Genezy (1959; “Genesis”), move from politics toward metaphysical and philosophical themes.…

  • Goebbels, Joseph (German propagandist)

    Joseph Goebbels, minister of propaganda for the German Third Reich under Adolf Hitler. A master orator and propagandist, he is generally accounted responsible for presenting a favourable image of the Nazi regime to the German people. Following Hitler’s suicide, Goebbels served as chancellor of

  • Goebbels, Paul Joseph (German propagandist)

    Joseph Goebbels, minister of propaganda for the German Third Reich under Adolf Hitler. A master orator and propagandist, he is generally accounted responsible for presenting a favourable image of the Nazi regime to the German people. Following Hitler’s suicide, Goebbels served as chancellor of

  • Goebel, Karl Immanuel Eberhard von (German botanist)

    Karl von Goebel, German botanist whose Organographie der Pflanzen (1898–1901; Organography of Plants, 1900–05) clarified the principles of the science of plant morphology in relation to form and structure. After receiving his Ph.D. in 1877, Goebel held a number of teaching positions and

  • Goebel, Timothy (American athlete)

    figure skating: Recent trends and changes: Timothy Goebel, an American, completed the first quad salchow in 1998 at the Junior Grand Prix finals. He also was the first to land three quads in one program, two quad salchows and one quad toe loop at the 2001 U.S. Figure Skating Championships in…

  • Goeben (ship)

    World War I: The Turkish entry: …of two German warships, the Goeben and the Breslau, in the Dardanelles on August 10 turned the scales in favour of Enver’s policy. The ships were ostensibly sold to Turkey, but they retained their German crews. The Turks began detaining British ships, and more anti-British provocations followed, both in the…

  • Goeben, August Karl von (Prussian general)

    August Karl von Goeben, a victorious and exceptionally able Prussian general in the wars of 1864, 1866, and 1870–71. About 1848, while a staff officer, Goeben formed a lasting friendship with Helmuth von Moltke, future chief of the Prussian and imperial German general staffs. In 1860 he served with

  • Goedel, Kurt (American mathematician)

    Kurt G?del, Austrian-born mathematician, logician, and philosopher who obtained what may be the most important mathematical result of the 20th century: his famous incompleteness theorem, which states that within any axiomatic mathematical system there are propositions that cannot be proved or

  • Goeie Hoop, Kaap die (historical province, South Africa)

    Cape Province, former province of South Africa, occupying the southern extremity of the African continent. Prior to the establishment of the Union of South Africa in 1910, the area was known as the Cape Colony. Cape Province comprised all of southern and western South Africa. It was the largest of

  • Goeje, Michael Jan de (Dutch scholar)

    Michael Jan de Goeje, Dutch scholar who edited many Arabic works, most important of which was the medieval history Annals of Tabari, 13 vol. (1879–1901). Attracted to Oriental languages during childhood, Goeje became proficient in Arabic. During his postdoctoral studies at the University of Oxford,

  • Goeken, Jack (American business executive)

    John Delbert Goeken, (Jack), American business executive (born Aug. 22, 1930, Joliet, Ill.—died Sept. 16, 2010, Joliet), was instrumental in toppling AT&T’s monopoly of the U.S. telephone industry as the head of telecommunications company MCI. Goeken became familiar with microwave technology while

  • Goeken, John Delbert (American business executive)

    John Delbert Goeken, (Jack), American business executive (born Aug. 22, 1930, Joliet, Ill.—died Sept. 16, 2010, Joliet), was instrumental in toppling AT&T’s monopoly of the U.S. telephone industry as the head of telecommunications company MCI. Goeken became familiar with microwave technology while

  • Goeldi’s marmoset (primate)

    marmoset: …“true” marmosets, the tamarins, and Goeldi’s monkey (Callimico goeldi). Also called Goeldi’s marmoset, this species is found only in the western Amazon River basin. Black in colour and maned, it differs from other marmosets in that it possesses a third set of molars and does not bear twins. Though Goeldi’s…

  • Goeldi’s monkey (primate)

    marmoset: …“true” marmosets, the tamarins, and Goeldi’s monkey (Callimico goeldi). Also called Goeldi’s marmoset, this species is found only in the western Amazon River basin. Black in colour and maned, it differs from other marmosets in that it possesses a third set of molars and does not bear twins. Though Goeldi’s…

  • Go?magot (Cornish legendary figure)

    Corineus: Corineus killed Gogmagog (Go?magot), the greatest of the giants inhabiting Cornwall, by hurling him from a cliff. A cliff near Totnes, Devon, is still called Giant’s Leap.

  • Goenka, Ramnath (Indian publisher)

    Ramnath Goenka, Indian newspaper publisher and crusader against government corruption. Goenka was born in northeastern India, schooled in Benares (Varanasi), and sent by his family to Madras (now Chennai) in 1922 to become a dealer in yarn and jute. In 1934 he bought shares in a local company that

  • Goeppert, Maria (American physicist)

    Maria Goeppert Mayer, German-born American physicist who shared one-half of the 1963 Nobel Prize for Physics with J. Hans D. Jensen of West Germany for their proposal of the shell nuclear model. (The other half of the prize was awarded to Eugene P. Wigner of the United States for unrelated work.)

  • Goerdeler, Carl (German politician)

    Carl Goerdeler, conservative German municipal administrator and prominent figure in the resistance movement and in an unsuccessful coup against Adolf Hitler. A long-time mayor of Leipzig, he was to have been chancellor of the new government if the coup had succeeded. After studying law and

  • Goerdeler, Carl Friedrich (German politician)

    Carl Goerdeler, conservative German municipal administrator and prominent figure in the resistance movement and in an unsuccessful coup against Adolf Hitler. A long-time mayor of Leipzig, he was to have been chancellor of the new government if the coup had succeeded. After studying law and

  • Goerdeler, Karl Friedrich (German politician)

    Carl Goerdeler, conservative German municipal administrator and prominent figure in the resistance movement and in an unsuccessful coup against Adolf Hitler. A long-time mayor of Leipzig, he was to have been chancellor of the new government if the coup had succeeded. After studying law and

  • Goering, Hermann (German minister)

    Hermann G?ring, a leader of the Nazi Party and one of the primary architects of the Nazi police state in Germany. He was condemned to hang as a war criminal by the International Military Tribunal at Nürnberg in 1946 but took poison instead and died the night his execution was ordered. G?ring was

  • Goes, Benedict de (Portuguese missionary)

    Pamirs: Study and exploration: …when the Portuguese Jesuit missionary Benedict de Goes reported on his travels through the area. As Konstantin Petrovich Kaufmann conquered successive Central Asian khanates for Russia during the mid-19th century, British representatives—such as John Wood in the 1830s—sought a suitable physiographic boundary between Russian Central Asia and British India. The…

  • Goes, Hugo van der (Flemish artist)

    Hugo van der Goes, one of the greatest Flemish painters of the second half of the 15th century, whose strange, melancholy genius found expression in religious works of profound but often disturbing spirituality. Early sources disagree about van der Goes’s birthplace, with Ghent, Antwerp, Bruges,

  • Goetel, Ferdynand (Polish author)

    Ferdynand Goetel, Polish novelist and essayist noted primarily for his memoirs and his novels about exotic countries. Goetel started writing after World War I, when he returned to Poland from Russian Turkestan. As a citizen of the Austrian-ruled part of Poland, he had been interned there as an

  • Goeth, Amon (Austrian Nazi officer)

    Amon G?th, Austrian Nazi officer who was commandant of Plaszow concentration camp in Poland. Decades after his execution for war crimes, G?th became widely known as the principal adversary of Oskar Schindler, the industrialist who shielded a group of Jews during the Holocaust. G?th was the son of a

  • Goethals, George Washington (American engineer)

    George Washington Goethals, U.S. Army officer and engineer who directed the building of the Panama Canal. Following his graduation from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., in 1880, Goethals was commissioned in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, where he gained valuable experience in the

  • Goethe and Tolstoi (essay by Mann)

    Thomas Mann: World War I and political crisis: …revised his outlook; the essays “Goethe und Tolstoi” and “Von deutscher Republik” (“The German Republic”) show his somewhat hesitant espousal of democratic principles. His new position was clarified in the novel The Magic Mountain. Its theme grows out of an earlier motif: a young engineer, Hans Castorp, visiting a cousin…

  • Goethe in the Campagna (painting by Tischbein)

    Johann Heinrich Wilhelm Tischbein: Tischbein’s most famous painting, “Goethe in the Campagna,” was painted in 1787 at the time the two men traveled from Rome to Naples. Though Goethe induced the artist to turn his interest toward the Neoclassical movement, Tischbein was later influenced by the ideas of German Romanticism.

  • Goethe in the Roman Campagna (painting by Tischbein)

    Johann Heinrich Wilhelm Tischbein: Tischbein’s most famous painting, “Goethe in the Campagna,” was painted in 1787 at the time the two men traveled from Rome to Naples. Though Goethe induced the artist to turn his interest toward the Neoclassical movement, Tischbein was later influenced by the ideas of German Romanticism.

  • Goethe’s Color Theory (work by Goethe)

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: Napoleonic period (1805–16): Goethe’s Color Theory), and in 1806 Goethe sent to him the completed manuscript of part one of Faust. War, however, delayed publication of Faust until 1808. On October 14, 1806, Napoleon routed the Prussian armies at the Battle of Jena. Weimar, 12 miles from the…

  • Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von (German author)

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, German poet, playwright, novelist, scientist, statesman, theatre director, critic, and amateur artist, considered the greatest German literary figure of the modern era. Goethe is the only German literary figure whose range and international standing equal those of

  • Goethe-Institut Inter Nationes (institution, Munich, Germany)

    Germany: Cultural institutions: …among cultural groups is the Goethe-Institut Inter Nationes (formerly the Goethe Institut of Munich). Founded in 1951, it has some 140 branches in more than 70 countries. It operates schools in Germany and abroad that offer instruction in the German language. It also maintains lending libraries and audiovisual centres, sponsors…

  • Goetheanum, Das (Swiss periodical)

    Albert Steffen: …was editor of its review, Das Goetheanum.) From that time his numerous writings became visions of a world permeated by metaphysical powers of good and evil, as revealed in old and esoteric European and Asiatic traditions. His novels include Die Erneuerung des Bundes (1913) and Aus Georg Archibalds Lebenslauf (1950);…

  • Goethes Briefwechsel mit einem Kinde (work by Arnim)

    Bettina von Arnim: …Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (Goethes Briefwechsel mit einem Kinde, 1835; “Goethe’s Correspondence with a Child”), with Karoline von Günderode (Die Günderode, 1840), and with her brother Clemens Brentano (Clemens Brentanos Frühlingskranz, 1844; “Clemens Brentano’s Spring Garland”). The result of her editing is a peculiar blend of documentation and fiction,…

  • goethite (mineral)

    Goethite, a widespread iron oxide mineral [α-FeO(OH)] and the most common ingredient of iron rust. It was named in 1806 for J.W. von Goethe, a German poet and philosopher with a keen interest in minerals. The name was originally applied to lepidocrocite [γ-FeO(OH)], a less common mineral with the s

  • Goetz, Bernhard (American vigilante)

    Bernhard Goetz, American vigilante who rose to national fame when he shot four African-American males on a New York City subway train on December 22, 1984. The event was notable for triggering widespread debate about race and crime in America. Goetz earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical and

  • Goetz, Bernhard Hugo, Jr. (American vigilante)

    Bernhard Goetz, American vigilante who rose to national fame when he shot four African-American males on a New York City subway train on December 22, 1984. The event was notable for triggering widespread debate about race and crime in America. Goetz earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical and

  • Goetz, Philip W. (American editor)

    Encyclop?dia Britannica: Fifteenth edition: …and the executive editor was Philip W. Goetz.

  • Goetz, Ruth Goodman (American playwright)

    Ruth Goodman Goetz, American playwright (born Jan. 12, 1908, Philadelphia, Pa.—died Oct. 12, 2001, Englewood, N.J.), collaborated with her husband, Augustus Goetz, most notably on The Heiress (1947)—an adaptation of the Henry James novel Washington Square—and on the screenplay for the film v

  • Goetz, Tom (American editor)

    Encyclop?dia Britannica: Fifteenth edition: …and the executive editor was Philip W. Goetz.

  • Goetz, Walter (British artist)

    Walter Goetz, German-born British illustrator and cartoonist whose amusing perspectives on the English and on Anglo-French relations delighted the public in the Daily Express cartoon strips "Colonel Up and Mr. Down" and "Dab and Flounder," 1934-54, and in Pierre Danino’s "Major Thompson" books,

  • Goetzeaceae (plant family)

    Solanaceae, the nightshade, or potato, family of flowering plants (order Solanales), with 102 genera and nearly 2,500 species, many of considerable economic importance as food and drug plants. Among the most important of those are potato (Solanum tuberosum); eggplant (S. melongena); tomato (S.

  • Goeze, J. M. (German clergyman)

    Gotthold Ephraim Lessing: Final years at Wolfenbüttel.: …the chief pastor of Hamburg, J.M. Goeze. Against this rigid dogmatist, who was a man of almost pharisaical narrow-mindedness, Lessing launched some of his most cutting polemics, notably “Anti-Goeze” (1778), in which he expounded his belief that the search for truth is more valuable than the certainty gained by clinging…

  • Gofannon (Celtic mythology)

    Goibhniu, (Celtic: “Divine Smith”, ) ancient Celtic smith god. Goibhniu figured in Irish tradition as one of a trio of divine craftsmen; the other two were Luchta the wright and Creidhne the metalworker. Goibhniu was also the provider of the sacred otherworld feast, the Fled Goibhnenn; he allegedly

  • Goff, Helen Lyndon (British author)

    P.L. Travers, Australian English writer known for her Mary Poppins books, about a magical nanny. The books insightfully explored the fraught relationship between children and adults through a combination of mythological allusion and biting social critique. Goff was known to have embroidered upon

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