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  • golden rice (cereal grain)

    agricultural sciences: Emerging agricultural sciences: …their nutritional quality, such as “golden” rice, which was genetically modified to produce almost 20 times the beta-carotene of previous varieties.

  • golden rose (metalwork)

    Golden rose, ornament of wrought gold set with gems, generally sapphires, that is blessed by the pope on the fourth Sunday in Lent (Laetare Sunday) and sent, as one of the highest honours he can confer, to some distinguished individual, ecclesiastical body, or religious community or, failing a

  • Golden Rule (ethical precept)

    Golden Rule, precept in the Gospel of Matthew (7:12): “In everything, do to others what you would have them do to you. . . .” This rule of conduct is a summary of the Christian’s duty to his neighbour and states a fundamental ethical principle. In its negative form, “Do not do to others what you

  • Golden Section (art group)

    Section d’Or, (French: “Golden Section”) Paris-based association of Cubist painters; the group was active from 1912 to about 1914. The group’s name was suggested by the painter Jacques Villon, who had developed an interest in the significance of mathematical proportions such as the ancient concept

  • golden section (mathematics)

    Golden ratio, in mathematics, the irrational number (1 + 5)/2, often denoted by the Greek letter ? or τ, which is approximately equal to 1.618. It is the ratio of a line segment cut into two pieces of different lengths such that the ratio of the whole segment to that of the longer segment is equal

  • Golden Serpent, The (novel by Alegría)

    Ciro Alegría: …La serpiente de oro (1935; The Golden Serpent), which portrays the diverse human life to be found along the Mara?ón River in Peru. Los perros hambrientos (1938; “The Hungry Dogs”) describes the difficulties faced by the sheepherding Indians of the Peruvian highlands. The novel that is generally considered Alegría’s masterpiece…

  • golden shiner (fish)

    minnow: The golden shiner, or American roach (Notemigonus cryseleucas), a larger, greenish and golden minnow attaining a length of 30 cm and a weight of 0.7 kg (1.5 pounds), is both edible and valuable as bait.

  • golden silk spider (arachnid)

    Silk spider, (genus Nephila), any of a genus of the class Arachnida (phylum Arthropoda), so named because of the great strength of their silk and the golden colour of their huge orb webs. These webs often measure 1 metre (about 3.3 feet) or more in diameter and are suspended between trees by guy

  • golden snub-nosed monkey (primate)

    primate: Distribution and abundance: …snub-nosed monkey, the golden (Rhinopithecus roxellana) and black (R. bieti), are confined to high altitudes (up to 3,000 metres in the case of the former and to 4,500 metres in the latter), where the temperature drops below 0 °C (32 °F) every night and often barely rises above it…

  • Golden Speech (English history)

    Elizabeth I: The woman ruler in a patriarchal world: …strategy was her famous “Golden Speech” of 1601, when, in the face of bitter parliamentary opposition to royal monopolies, she promised reforms:

  • golden spike (geology)

    Guzhangian Stage: …Commission on Stratigraphy established the Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) defining the base of this unit in the carbonate rock beds of the Huaqiao Formation in the Wuling Mountains of Hunan, China. The GSSP marks the first appearance of the trilobite Lejopyge laevigata in the fossil record. The Guzhangian…

  • Golden Spike National Historic Site (Utah, United States)

    Golden Spike National Historic Site, national historic site at Promontory in Box Elder County, northern Utah, U.S., near the Great Salt Lake, commemorating the completion in 6 12 years of the first transcontinental railroad (1,800 mi [2,900 km] of hand-built track) in the country. A pyramidal

  • golden spiny mouse (mammal)

    African spiny mouse: The golden spiny mouse (Acomys russatus), found from Egypt to Saudi Arabia, is one of the largest, with a body up to 25 cm (9.8 inches) long and a shorter tail of up to 7 cm. The Cape spiny mouse (A. subspinosus) of South Africa is…

  • Golden Spurs, Battle of the (European history)

    Battle of the Golden Spurs, (July 11, 1302), military engagement on the outskirts of Kortrijk in Flanders (now in Belgium) in which an untrained Flemish infantry militia, consisting mainly of members of the craft guilds (notably that of the weavers) defeated a professional force of French and

  • Golden Staircase (sculpture by Siloé)

    Diego de Siloé: His early masterpiece, the Escalera Dorada (Golden Staircase; 1519–23) in the Burgos Cathedral, combines both his sculptural and architectural gifts in a work of painted and gilded exuberance.

  • Golden State (state, United States)

    California, constituent state of the United States of America. It was admitted as the 31st state of the union on September 9, 1850, and by the early 1960s it was the most populous U.S. state. No version of the origin of California’s name has been fully accepted, but there is wide support for the

  • Golden State Warriors (American basketball team)

    Golden State Warriors, American professional basketball team based in San Francisco that plays in the Western Conference of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Warriors have won five NBA championships (1956, 1975, 2015, 2017, and 2018) and one Basketball Association of America (BAA)

  • Golden Stool (Asante tradition)

    Osei Tutu: …credit for introducing the legendary Golden Stool, which, according to Asante tradition, was brought down from heaven by the priest and, as the repository of the spirit of the nation, became the symbol of the mystical bond between all Asante. With a spiritual as well as practical basis for unity,…

  • golden takin (mammal)

    takin: The golden takin (B. t. bedfordi) inhabits the Qin Mountains in south Shaanxi province, China; its coat is golden in colour, and it may have been the “golden fleece” of Greek mythology. The Mishmi takin (B. t. taxicolor) lives in the border area between Tibet, Myanmar,…

  • Golden Temple (temple, Amritsar, India)

    Harmandir Sahib, the chief gurdwara, or house of worship, of Sikhism and the Sikhs’ most important pilgrimage site. It is located in the city of Amritsar, Punjab state, northwestern India. The first Harmandir Sahib was built in 1604 by Arjan, the fifth Sikh Guru, who symbolically had it placed on a

  • Golden Thirteen (first African-American naval officers)

    Golden Thirteen, group of African Americans who in 1944 became the first group of black servicemen to complete officer training for the United States Navy. In 1977 members of the group organized the first of several reunions, some of which were highly publicized and even promoted by navy

  • golden torch (cactus)

    torch cactus: The golden torch (E. spachiana) has erect columnar stems, branching at the base and rising to about 2 metres (6 feet) in height; it is about 7.5 cm (3 inches) thick. It bears fragrant white funnel-shaped flowers, up to 20 cm (8 inches) long, which open…

  • Golden Torpedo, the (Danish swimmer)

    Ragnhild Hveger, (Ragnhild Tove Hveger-Andersen; “The Golden Torpedo”), Danish swimmer (born Dec. 10, 1920, Nyborg, Den.—died Dec. 1, 2011), was a swimming phenomenon in pre-World War II Europe, setting 44 world records in six events (200-, 400-, 800-, and 1,500-m freestyle, 4 × 100-m freestyle

  • Golden Treasury of English Songs and Lyrics, The (work by Palgrave)

    Francis Turner Palgrave: …however, was his compilation of The Golden Treasury of English Songs and Lyrics (1861), a comprehensive, well-chosen anthology, carefully arranged in its sequence. Palgrave’s choice of poems was made in consultation with Tennyson. The Anthology had great influence on the poetic taste of several generations and was of particular value…

  • golden treesnake (reptile)

    flying snake: …and Sri Lanka, sometimes called golden treesnake, is up to 100 cm (40 inches) long and usually black or greenish, with yellow or reddish markings.

  • Golden Triangle (region, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Allegheny: …an area known as the Golden Triangle; this was a strategic point of contention between the French and the English, who fortified the area with Fort Duquesne (1754) and Fort Pitt (1761), respectively. With the defeat of Pontiac’s warriors (1763), the area opened up to settlers who founded Pittsburgh (1764),…

  • Golden Triangle (region, Southeast Asia)

    opium: History of opium: … eventually became known as the Golden Triangle, a region that by the mid-1990s was the world’s leader in opium cultivation.

  • golden trout (fish, Oncorhynchus aguabonita)

    trout: ), and the golden trout. The golden trout (O. aguabonita) is a mountain trout of clear waters in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The brown trout (q.v.), Salmo trutta, is a common European trout that has been widely introduced into suitable waters around the world. Salmon trout…

  • golden tuft alyssum (plant)

    Basket-of-gold, (Aurinia saxatilis), ornamental perennial plant of the mustard family (Brassicaceae) with golden yellow clusters of tiny flowers and gray-green foliage. Basket-of-gold is native to sunny areas of central and southern Europe, usually growing in thin rocky soils. It forms a dense

  • Golden Vale (region, Ireland)

    Golden Vale, extensive lowland area in Counties Limerick and Tipperary, Ireland, comprising parts of the valleys of the Rivers Mulkear, Suir, Ara, and Aherlow. This fertile lowland has been settled since prehistoric times and was the centre of power of the early kings of Munster. It is now noted as

  • Golden Warrior (work by Muntz)

    biography: Fiction presented as biography: …Count Belisarius and Hope Muntz’s Golden Warrior (on Harold II, vanquished at the Battle of Hastings, 1066). Some novels-as-biography, using fictional names, are designed to evoke rather than re-create an actual life, such as W. Somerset Maugham’s Moon and Sixpence (Gauguin) and Cakes and Ale (Thomas Hardy) and Robert Penn…

  • golden wattle (plant)

    acacia: Major species: …of tannin, among them the golden wattle (A. pycnantha), the green wattle (A. decurrens), and the silver wattle (A. dealbata). A few species produce valuable timber, among them the Australian blackwood (A. melanoxylon); the yarran (A. omalophylla), also of Australia; and A. koa of Hawaii. Many of the

  • Golden Week (Japanese holidays)

    Golden Week, series of four holidays closely spaced together and observed at the end of April and beginning of May in Japan. The four holidays are Shōwa Day (April 29), Constitution Day (May 3), Greenery Day (May 4), and Children’s Day (May 5). Showa Day (Showa no Hi), first celebrated in 2007, is

  • Golden Whip (harness race)

    harness racing: Early history.: The Golden Whip, Holland’s most famous trotting event, was first run in 1777 at Soestdijk. About the same time Aleksey, Count Orlov, began to develop a powerful trotting strain at his stud farm in Russia. From his stallion Barss came the Orlov trotter that became the…

  • golden whistler (bird)

    Golden whistler, songbird, a species of thickhead

  • Golden, William Theodore (American government official and philanthropist)

    William Theodore Golden, American government official and philanthropist (born Oct. 25, 1909 , New York, N.Y.—died Oct. 7, 2007, New York City), was a principal force behind the development of U.S. science policy. After serving on the Atomic Energy Commission in the late 1940s, Golden became (1950)

  • golden-bellied mangabey (primate)

    mangabey: …River westward into Gabon; the golden-bellied mangabey (C. chrysogaster), which lacks a whorl and has a bright golden orange underside and is restricted to the region south of the Congo River; the Sanje mangabey (C. sanjei), discovered quite unexpectedly in 1980 living in the Udzungwa Mountains and Mwanihana forest of…

  • golden-bellied water rat (rodent)

    water rat: Natural history: The golden-bellied water rat (Hydromys chrysogaster) of Australia and New Guinea is the largest, with a body 20 to 39 cm long and a slightly shorter tail (20 to 33 cm). Living by freshwater lakes, estuaries, and rivers and in coastal mangrove swamps, it is tolerant…

  • golden-breasted starling (bird)

    starling: The 36-cm golden-breasted, or regal, starling (Lamprotornis regius) of eastern Africa, is green, blue, and yellow, with a long tail. The wattled starling (Creatophora cinerea) is brown, gray, and white; uniquely, the breeding male becomes bald, showing bright yellow skin, and grows large black wattles on the…

  • golden-brown algae (class of algae)

    Golden algae, (class Chrysophyceae), class of about 33 genera and some 1,200 species of algae (division Chromophyta) found in both marine and fresh waters. The group is fairly diverse in form, and its taxonomy is contentious. Most golden algae are single-celled biflagellates with two specialized

  • golden-crowned kinglet (bird)

    kinglet: The golden-crowned kinglet (Regulus satrapa) of North America is often considered the same species as the goldcrest (R. regulus) of Eurasia; both have the crown patch—red in males, yellow in females—strikingly bordered with black. The firecrest (R. ignicapillus) of Europe resembles the goldcrest but has a…

  • golden-crowned sifaka (primate)

    sifaka: …highlands of Ankarana, and the golden-crowned, or Tattersall’s, sifaka (P. tattersalli), first described scientifically in 1988, lives only in the Daraina region of the northeast. Both species are critically endangered. Sifakas are related to avahis and the indri; all are primates of the leaping lemur family, Indridae.

  • golden-eyed lacewing (insect)

    lacewing: …common lacewings are in the green lacewing family, Chrysopidae, and the brown lacewing family, Hemerobiidae. The green lacewing, sometimes known as the golden-eyed lacewing, has long delicate antennae, a slender greenish body, golden- or copper-coloured eyes, and two pairs of similar veined wings. It is worldwide in distribution and flies…

  • golden-fronted leafbird (bird)

    leafbird: The golden-fronted leafbird (C. aurifrons) is a popular cage bird.

  • golden-handed tamarin (primate)

    marmoset: The golden-handed tamarin, S. midas, is named for the mythological Greek king.

  • golden-headed quetzal (bird)

    quetzal: antisianus), the golden-headed quetzal (P. auriceps), the resplendent quetzal (P. mocinno), and the pavonine quetzal (P. pavoninus)—reside in the neotropics (Central America and South America).

  • golden-mantled ground squirrel (mammal)

    Colorado tick fever: …of the virus is the golden-mantled ground squirrel, Citellus lateralis. The carrier tick is found chiefly in the western parts of the United States, notably in Colorado, and is most active in the late spring and summer.

  • golden-mantled squirrel (mammal)

    Colorado tick fever: …of the virus is the golden-mantled ground squirrel, Citellus lateralis. The carrier tick is found chiefly in the western parts of the United States, notably in Colorado, and is most active in the late spring and summer.

  • golden-silky bird-of-paradise (bird)

    bird-of-paradise: …mocha-breasted, bird-of-paradise (Cnemophilus macgregorii); the wattle-billed, or golden-silky, bird-of-paradise (Loboparadisea sericea); and Loria’s, or Lady Macgregor’s, bird-of-paradise (Loria loriae)—three species formerly classified as bowerbirds.

  • Goldenberg, Emmanuel (American actor)

    Edward G. Robinson, American stage and film actor who skillfully played a wide range of character types but was best known for his portrayals of gangsters and criminals. Robinson was born in Romania but emigrated with his parents at age 10 and grew up on New York’s Lower East Side. He gave up early

  • goldencup oak (plant)

    live oak: …the white oak group, the canyon live oak (Q. chrysolepsis), a timber tree occasionally more than 27 m tall, is often called goldencup oak for its egg-shaped acorns, each enclosed at the base in a yellow, woolly cup. The thick, leathery leaves remain on the tree three to four years.

  • goldencup Saint-John’s-wort (plant)

    Saint-John's-wort: …of Sharon or Aaron’s-beard, and goldencup Saint-John’s-wort (H. patulum) are both shrubby East Asian species. Creeping Saint-John’s-wort bears pale yellow flowers with orange stamens on 30-cm- (1-foot-) tall plants, while goldencup Saint-John’s-wort has slightly smaller deep yellow flowers with darker stamens. St.-Andrew’s-cross (H. hypericoides) is cultivated as an ornamental shrub…

  • goldene keyt, Die (work by Peretz)

    I.L. Peretz: In his drama Die goldene keyt (1909; “The Golden Chain”), Peretz stressed the timeless chain of Jewish culture.

  • goldene keyt, Die (literary magazine)

    Avrom Sutzkever: …1949 to 1995 he edited Di goldene keyt (“The Golden Chain”), a Yiddish literary journal.

  • goldene Vlies, Das (work by Grillparzer)

    Franz Grillparzer: …trilogy Das Goldene Vlies (1821; The Golden Fleece) was interrupted by the suicide of Grillparzer’s mother and by illness. This drama, with Medea’s assertion that life is not worth living, is the most pessimistic of his works and offers humanity little hope. Once more the conflict between a life of…

  • Goldenen Vlies, Der Orden vom (European knighthood order)

    The Order of the Golden Fleece, order of knighthood founded in Burgundy in 1430 and associated later especially with Habsburg Austria and with Spain. The order was founded by Philip III the Good, duke of Burgundy, at Bruges in Flanders in 1430, to commemorate his wedding there to Isabella of

  • Goldener B?r (film award)

    Berlin International Film Festival: Martay was awarded a Golden Bear (Goldener B?r), the festival’s top prize, for his work in bringing the Berlinale to reality. Other prizes awarded at the first Berlinale included a Golden Bear for best music film to Cinderella (1951), which also won the festival’s audience-choice prize, the Big Bronze…

  • goldeneye (bird)

    Goldeneye, either of two species of small, yellow-eyed diving ducks (family Anatidae), which produce a characteristic whistling sound with their rapidly beating wings. The common goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) breeds throughout the Northern Hemisphere; the major breeding areas of Barrow’s

  • GoldenEye (film by Campbell [1995])

    Pierce Brosnan: …first film in the series, GoldenEye (1995), made more than $350 million worldwide, the most ever for a Bond film at that time. The second, Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), scored record grosses for a Bond film in the United States. Brosnan brought out the human side of the Bond character,…

  • Goldenfoden, Avrom (Jewish author)

    Avrom Goldfaden, Hebrew and Yiddish poet and playwright and originator of Yiddish theatre and opera. Goldfaden published volumes of Hebrew and Yiddish poems before his graduation from a rabbinical seminary at Zhitomir in 1866. He then taught in Russia until migrating in 1875 to Poland, where he

  • Goldenhar syndrome (pathology)

    deaf-blindness: Causes of deaf-blindness: …such as CHARGE syndrome and Goldenhar syndrome, can also cause the condition. Other causes include illnesses or diseases of the pregnant mother or her child (e.g., rubella, meningitis, cytomegalovirus, and tumours) or accidents (e.g., head injury). A combination of any of the causes mentioned above is also possible. For example,…

  • goldenrain tree (plant)

    Goldenrain tree, (Koelreuteria paniculata), flowering tree of the soapberry family (Sapindaceae), native to East Asia and widely cultivated in temperate regions for its handsome foliage and curious bladderlike seedpods. The dome-shaped tree grows to about 9 metres (30 feet) tall. The yellow

  • goldenrod (plant)

    Goldenrod, any of about 150 species of weedy, usually perennial herbs that constitute the genus Solidago of the family Asteraceae. Most of them are native to North America, though a few species grow in Europe and Asia. They have toothed leaves that usually alternate along the stem and yellow flower

  • goldenseal (plant)

    Goldenseal, (species Hydrastis canadensis), perennial herb native to woods of the eastern United States. Its rootstocks have medicinal properties. The plant has a single greenish white flower, the sepals of which fall as they open, followed by a cluster of small red berries. Goldenseal is

  • Goldenson, Leonard Harry (American executive)

    Leonard Harry Goldenson, American motion picture, radio, and television executive (born Dec. 7, 1905, Scottsdale, Pa.—died Dec. 27, 1999, Sarasota, Fla.), was a low-key, self-contained entrepreneur who was the least known of the three businessmen whose broadcast networks became dominant in the t

  • Goldenthal, Elliot (American composer)

    Julie Taymor: Early life and career: In 1980 she met composer Elliot Goldenthal, who became her life partner and artistic collaborator. One of their first projects was the original musical Liberty’s Taken (1985), an irreverent retelling of the story of the American Revolution. Other early collaborations included a stage adaptation (1986) of The Transposed Heads: A…

  • goldentop (plant)

    Goldentop, (Lamarckia aurea), annual grass of the family Poaceae, native to the Mediterranean region. Goldentop is cultivated in gardens for its golden, tufted flower clusters and is considered weedy in cultivated and disturbed areas of Europe, Australia, and the Americas. Goldentop is a fairly

  • Goldenweiser, Alexander (American anthropologist)

    Alexander Goldenweiser, American anthropologist whose analyses of cultural questions ranged widely, encompassing intellectual movements in psychology and psychoanalysis. In particular, he suggested that cultural diffusion is not a mechanical process but, rather, depends in part on the receptiveness

  • Goldenweiser, Alexander Alexandrovich (American anthropologist)

    Alexander Goldenweiser, American anthropologist whose analyses of cultural questions ranged widely, encompassing intellectual movements in psychology and psychoanalysis. In particular, he suggested that cultural diffusion is not a mechanical process but, rather, depends in part on the receptiveness

  • goldeye (fish)

    Goldeye, North American freshwater fish, a species of mooneye

  • Goldfaden, Abraham (Jewish author)

    Avrom Goldfaden, Hebrew and Yiddish poet and playwright and originator of Yiddish theatre and opera. Goldfaden published volumes of Hebrew and Yiddish poems before his graduation from a rabbinical seminary at Zhitomir in 1866. He then taught in Russia until migrating in 1875 to Poland, where he

  • Goldfaden, Avrom (Jewish author)

    Avrom Goldfaden, Hebrew and Yiddish poet and playwright and originator of Yiddish theatre and opera. Goldfaden published volumes of Hebrew and Yiddish poems before his graduation from a rabbinical seminary at Zhitomir in 1866. He then taught in Russia until migrating in 1875 to Poland, where he

  • Goldfadn, Avrom (Jewish author)

    Avrom Goldfaden, Hebrew and Yiddish poet and playwright and originator of Yiddish theatre and opera. Goldfaden published volumes of Hebrew and Yiddish poems before his graduation from a rabbinical seminary at Zhitomir in 1866. He then taught in Russia until migrating in 1875 to Poland, where he

  • Goldfarb, Abraham Jevons (American communist)

    Tillie Olsen: Early life and influences: …practiced by several men, including Abraham Jevons Goldfarb, who took her to Stockton, California, where his parents lived, the day after her 18th birthday. She spent the rest of 1930 crusading for the Communist Party of the United States in the Midwest. In 1931, on Valentine’s Day, in Reno, Nevada,…

  • Goldfield (Nevada, United States)

    Goldfield, mining ghost town, seat (1907) of Esmeralda county, southwestern Nevada, U.S., in desert country south of Tonopah. It was the site of a gold rush that began in 1902 and lasted until 1918. In 1910 the production of ore reached an all-time high, valued at more than $11 million. Federal

  • Goldfield, Randy (American novelist)

    Olivia Goldsmith, (Randy Goldfield), American novelist (born 1949, New York, N.Y.—died Jan. 15, 2004, New York City), used her own bitter divorce experience as the basis of her best-known work, The First Wives Club (1992), in which three women whose wealthy husbands divorce them in order to a

  • goldfinch (bird)

    Goldfinch, any of several species of the genus Carduelis (some formerly in Spinus) of the songbird family Fringillidae; they have short, notched tails and much yellow in the plumage. All have rather delicate sharp-pointed bills for finches. Flocks of goldfinches feed on weeds in fields and gardens.

  • Goldfinch, The (painting by Fabritius)

    Carel Fabritius: The Goldfinch (1654) is one of his best-known works and a unique composition in the tradition of 17th-century Dutch painting. An early portrait and a late portrait (1654) usually are regarded as self-portraits.

  • Goldfinch, The (film by Crowley [2019])

    Nicole Kidman: Resurgence and subsequent films: Barbour in The Goldfinch, a film based on Donna Tartt’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name. Also that year Kidman starred in Bombshell, portraying Gretchen Carlson, a former host on Fox News who accused the channel’s president, Roger Ailes, of sexual harassment.

  • Goldfinch, The (novel by Tartt)

    Donna Tartt: …publication of The Little Friend, The Goldfinch appeared. The title refers to an exquisite 1654 painting—not much bigger than a standard sheet of paper—by the Dutch artist Carel Fabritius (1622–54) that serves as the plot device that drives the story. Many readers found the work to be a significant addition…

  • Goldfinger (film by Hamilton [1964])

    Goldfinger, British spy film, released in 1964, that made James Bond an international icon of action cinema. Like the rest of the Bond film franchise, it is based on the works of author Ian Fleming. Bond (played by Sean Connery) is assigned to track the activities of millionaire Auric Goldfinger

  • goldfish (fish)

    Goldfish, (Carassius auratus), ornamental aquarium and pond fish of the carp family (Cyprinidae) native to East Asia but introduced into many other areas. The goldfish resembles the carp (Cyprinus carpio) but differs from its relative in having no mouth barbels. It was domesticated by the Chinese

  • Goldfish, Samuel (American filmmaker and producer)

    Samuel Goldwyn, pioneer American filmmaker and one of Hollywood’s most prominent producers for more than 30 years. Orphaned as a child, Goldwyn emigrated first to London and eventually to a small town in New York state, where he worked in a glove factory. By the age of 18 he was one of the top

  • Goldfus, Emil R. (Soviet spy)

    Rudolf Abel, Soviet intelligence officer, convicted in the United States in 1957 for conspiring to transmit military secrets to the Soviet Union. He was exchanged in 1962 for the American aviator Francis Gary Powers, who had been imprisoned as a spy in the Soviet Union since 1960. Genrich Fischer

  • Goldhaber, Gerson (German-born physicist)

    Gerson Goldhaber, German-born physicist (born Feb. 20, 1924, Chemnitz, Ger. —died July 19, 2010, Berkeley, Calif. ), contributed to several seminal discoveries, notably the antiproton, the J/psi particle, and dark energy. After Goldhaber and his Jewish family left Germany in 1933, he studied

  • Goldhaber, Maurice (American physicist)

    Maurice Goldhaber, American physicist whose contributions to nuclear physics included the discovery that the nucleus of the deuterium atom consists of a proton and a neutron. While studying at the University of Cambridge, Goldhaber, in collaboration with James Chadwick, discovered (1934) the

  • Goldie, Sir George (British colonial administrator)

    Sir George Goldie, British colonial administrator, organizer of a chartered company (1886) that established British rule on the Niger River, who was chiefly responsible for the development of northern Nigeria into an orderly and prosperous British protectorate and later a major region of

  • Goldie, Sir George Dashwood Taubman (British colonial administrator)

    Sir George Goldie, British colonial administrator, organizer of a chartered company (1886) that established British rule on the Niger River, who was chiefly responsible for the development of northern Nigeria into an orderly and prosperous British protectorate and later a major region of

  • Goldie-Taubman, George Dashwood (British colonial administrator)

    Sir George Goldie, British colonial administrator, organizer of a chartered company (1886) that established British rule on the Niger River, who was chiefly responsible for the development of northern Nigeria into an orderly and prosperous British protectorate and later a major region of

  • Goldin, Daniel (American engineer)

    Daniel Goldin, American engineer who was the longest-serving National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) administrator (1992–2001) and who brought a new vision to the U.S. space agency and a concentration on “faster, better, cheaper” programs to achieve that vision. Goldin received a B.S.

  • Goldin, Daniel Saul (American engineer)

    Daniel Goldin, American engineer who was the longest-serving National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) administrator (1992–2001) and who brought a new vision to the U.S. space agency and a concentration on “faster, better, cheaper” programs to achieve that vision. Goldin received a B.S.

  • Goldin, Nan (American photographer)

    Nan Goldin, American photographer noted for visual narratives detailing her own world of addictive and sexual activities. After leaving home at age 13, Goldin lived in foster homes and attended an alternative school in Lincoln, Massachusetts. Suspicious of middle-class myths of romantic love

  • Golding, Bruce (Jamaican politician)

    Portia Simpson Miller: …Simpson Miller was replaced by Bruce Golding as prime minister, though she retained her seat in Parliament.

  • Golding, Louis (British author)

    Louis Golding, English novelist and essayist, an interpreter of British Jewish life. The son of poor Jewish parents who had emigrated to Britain from Russia, Golding attended Manchester Grammar School and Queen’s College, Oxford. He began to write while at the university, publishing his first

  • Golding, Sir William Gerald (British novelist)

    William Golding, English novelist who in 1983 won the Nobel Prize for Literature for his parables of the human condition. He attracted a cult of followers, especially among the youth of the post-World War II generation. Educated at Marlborough Grammar School, where his father taught, and at

  • Golding, William (British novelist)

    William Golding, English novelist who in 1983 won the Nobel Prize for Literature for his parables of the human condition. He attracted a cult of followers, especially among the youth of the post-World War II generation. Educated at Marlborough Grammar School, where his father taught, and at

  • goldleaf (art)

    Gold leaf, extremely thin sheet of gold (about 0.1 micrometre, or 4 millionths of an inch, thick) used for gilding. Medieval illuminated manuscripts gleam with gold leaf, and it is still widely used for gilding ornamental designs, lettering and edgings on paper, wood, ceramics, glass, textiles,

  • Goldman and Salatsch Building (building, Vienna, Austria)

    Adolf Loos: …best-known large structure is the Goldman and Salatsch Building, Vienna (1910), in which a little classical exterior detail is offset by large areas of blank, polished marble. A resident of France from 1922, he built a house in Paris for the Dada writer Tristan Tzara in 1926.

  • Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. (American corporation)

    Henry Paulson: In 1974 he joined Goldman Sachs’s Chicago office, becoming a partner in 1982 and a managing partner in 1988. He coheaded the firm’s investment banking division from 1990 to 1994, when he was named president and chief operating officer. He became chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs in 1999,…

  • Goldman Sachs International Corp. (American corporation)

    Henry Paulson: In 1974 he joined Goldman Sachs’s Chicago office, becoming a partner in 1982 and a managing partner in 1988. He coheaded the firm’s investment banking division from 1990 to 1994, when he was named president and chief operating officer. He became chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs in 1999,…

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