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  • Jervis, Sir John (British admiral)

    Gulf Saint Vincent: …was named after Admiral John Jervis, Earl of St. Vincent. Port Adelaide, South Australia’s leading port, is on the eastern side of the gulf.

  • Jerwan, Aqueduct of (aqueduct, Middle East)

    Sennacherib: Building and technological achievements: …canal and a massive stone aqueduct to feed the Khosr.

  • Jeseník Mountains (mountain range, Czech Republic)

    Jeseník Mountains, mountain range that forms the eastern section of the Sudeten mountain system in the northern Czech Republic. The range lies in northern Moravia, bordering the Polish frontier. The Hruby (High) Jeseník, also known as Vysoky Jeseník, reaches the highest point at Praděd (4,892 feet

  • Jeshurun (Jewish publication)

    Samson Raphael Hirsch: …(1855) and edited the monthly Jeshurun (the poetic name for Israel). Six volumes of his essays were published posthumously (1902–12).

  • Jesi (Italy)

    Jesi, town and episcopal see, Marche regione, east-central Italy. Jesi lies along the Esino River, just southwest of Ancona. The Roman colony of Aesis from 247 bc, it was destroyed by the Goths and Lombards and formed part of the Frankish king Pippin III’s gift to the church in 756. In the early

  • Jespersen, Jens Otto Harry (Danish linguist)

    Otto Jespersen, Danish linguist and a foremost authority on English grammar. He helped to revolutionize language teaching in Europe, contributed greatly to the advancement of phonetics, linguistic theory, and the history of English, and originated an international language, Novial (q.v.). As a boy

  • Jespersen, Otto (Danish linguist)

    Otto Jespersen, Danish linguist and a foremost authority on English grammar. He helped to revolutionize language teaching in Europe, contributed greatly to the advancement of phonetics, linguistic theory, and the history of English, and originated an international language, Novial (q.v.). As a boy

  • jess (falconry)

    falconry: Terms and equipment: ) Jesses are leather straps of equal length, fastened around the legs of a hawk to enable the falconer to retain it on the gloved fist. These straps allow for control of the hawk before it is fully trained or away from the hunting ground by…

  • jessamine (plant)

    Jasmine, (genus Jasminum), genus of about 200 species of fragrant-flowered shrubs and vines of the olive family (Oleaceae). The plants are native to tropical and to some temperate areas of the Old World. Several are cultivated as ornamentals. Most true jasmines have climbing branches without

  • Jesse (biblical figure)

    Jesse, in the Old Testament, the father of King David. Jesse was the son of Ohed, and the grandson of Boaz and Ruth. He was a farmer and sheep breeder in Bethlehem. David was the youngest of Jesse’s eight sons. The appellation “son of Jesse” served as a synonym for David both at Saul’s court and, s

  • Jesse James (song)

    refrain: …the following excerpt from “Jesse James”:

  • Jesse James (film by King [1939])

    Henry King: Films of the 1930s: …hitting his stride, King made Jesse James (1939), one of Power’s best vehicles; the biopic about the famed outlaw had a noteworthy supporting cast that included Fonda, Randolph Scott, and Jane Darwell. King turned away from the United States with the period adventure Stanley and Livingstone (1939), a colourful account…

  • Jesse tree (Christian art theme)

    Western painting: Late 12th century: …many figures in the great Tree of Jesse on the ceiling of the Church of St. Michael at Hildesheim, figures conceived in elaborate three-dimensional attitudes, with angular broken drapery. Finally, the Zackenstil—the new, elegant, early Gothic, jagged style of early 13th-century Germany, most magnificently exemplified in the Saxon Gospels in…

  • Jessel, George (American comedian)

    George Jessel, American comedian, actor, writer, composer, and producer, whose skill as a dinner speaker earned him the honorary title of Toastmaster General of the United States. Jessel began his career at the age of nine, after his father’s death. He toured vaudeville and variety theatres in the

  • Jessel, George Albert (American comedian)

    George Jessel, American comedian, actor, writer, composer, and producer, whose skill as a dinner speaker earned him the honorary title of Toastmaster General of the United States. Jessel began his career at the age of nine, after his father’s death. He toured vaudeville and variety theatres in the

  • Jessel, Sir George (British jurist)

    Sir George Jessel, jurist considered one of the greatest English trial judges in equity. It is said that Jessel, as solicitor general (1871–73), was the first professing Jew to hold important governmental office in England. (Benjamin Disraeli, who had become prime minister in 1868, was born into

  • Jesselton (Malaysia)

    Kota Kinabalu, city of Sabah state, East Malaysia, on the northwest coast of Borneo. Although razed by bombing during World War II (1939–45), the site was chosen in 1946 for the new capital of British North Borneo (now Sabah) because of the deepwater anchorage at Gaya Bay on the South China Sea;

  • Jessenia (tree genus)

    palm: Economic importance: …pulp from the fruits of Jessenia and the closely related Oenocarpus is reported to have a protein content similar to that of meat. Large-scale production of such genera has been advocated.

  • Jessenia bataua (tree species)

    palm: Economic importance: …the seeds of one species, Jessenia bataua, is physically and chemically much like olive oil, and the mesocarp pulp from the fruits of Jessenia and the closely related Oenocarpus is reported to have a protein content similar to that of meat. Large-scale production of such genera has been advocated.

  • Jessentuki (Russia)

    Yessentuki, city, Stavropol kray (territory), southwestern Russia, in the valley of the Podkumok River. It was founded in 1798, developed as a fortress in the 1830s, and became a city in 1917. It is located at mineral springs at the base of the Caucasus Mountains. The city is composed of an old

  • Jessica (film by Negulesco [1962])

    Jean Negulesco: Later films: Jessica (1962) was a poorly conceived drama with Angie Dickinson as a widowed Italian midwife and Maurice Chevalier as the village priest. The Pleasure Seekers (1964), Negulesco’s musical remake of Three Coins in the Fountain, was set in Spain and featured Ann-Margret, Pamela Tiffin, and…

  • Jessner, Leopold (German director and producer)

    Leopold Jessner, theatrical producer and director associated with the German Expressionist theatre. His bold innovations in the 1920s gained him an international reputation. Jessner worked as a touring actor in his youth. He began directing in 1904, and from 1905 to 1915 he was a director at the

  • Jessore (Bangladesh)

    Jessore, city, southwestern Bangladesh. It is situated on the Bhairab River, a distributary stream of the vast Padma (Ganges [Ganga])–Jamuna (Brahmaputra) delta. According to tradition, its name is a corruption of yashohara (“glory depriving”), as the town is said to have robbed Vikramaditya’s

  • Jest of God, A (novel by Laurence)

    Margaret Laurence: A Jest of God (1966; made into the motion picture Rachel, Rachel in 1968) and The Fire Dwellers (1969) are about two sisters, a Manitoba schoolteacher and a Vancouver housewife, each trying to achieve personal fulfillment. After The Diviners (1974), a novel, and Heart of…

  • jester (comic entertainer)

    Fool, a comic entertainer whose madness or imbecility, real or pretended, made him a source of amusement and gave him license to abuse and poke fun at even the most exalted of his patrons. Professional fools flourished from the days of the Egyptian pharaohs until well into the 18th century, f

  • Jesu meine Freude (composition by Bach)

    choral music: Motets: Bach’s motets, of which Jesu meine Freude (Jesus My Joy; c. 1723) is a typical and splendid example, return to the a cappella manner of performance. Contrary to one popular conception, this often included instrumental doubling of the voice parts and the use of an organ continuo, an improvised…

  • Jesuit drama (theatre)

    Jesuit drama, program of theatre developed for educational and propagandist purposes in the colleges of the Society of Jesus during the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. Cultivated as a medium for disseminating Roman Catholic doctrine, drama flourished in the Jesuit schools for more than 200 years,

  • Jesuit Estates controversy (Canadian history)

    Jesuit Estates controversy, in Canadian history, dispute that arose between Protestants and Roman Catholics after the re-establishment of the Jesuit order. When the Society of Jesus (the Jesuit order) was suppressed by the papacy in 1773, its extensive landholdings in Canada were transferred to

  • Jesuit ware (Chinese pottery)

    Jesuit ware, Chinese porcelain decorated with European subject matter and made for export to the West during the Qing dynasty in the reign of Qianlong (1736–96). The sources for the decoration were mainly European engravings brought to China by Jesuit missionaries. The most commonly used

  • Jesuits (religious order)

    Jesuit, member of the Society of Jesus (S.J.), a Roman Catholic order of religious men founded by St. Ignatius of Loyola, noted for its educational, missionary, and charitable works. The order has been regarded by many as the principal agent of the Counter-Reformation and was later a leading force

  • Jesuits in North America in the Seventeenth Century, The (work by Parkman)

    Francis Parkman: Literary career.: The Jesuits in North America in the Seventeenth Century (1867) is a powerful narrative of the tragedy of the Jesuit missionaries whose missions among the Hurons were destroyed by persistent Iroquois attacks, and his La Salle and the Discovery of the Great West, first published…

  • Jesup North Pacific Expedition (anthropology)

    Franz Boas: …the reports submitted by the Jesup North Pacific Expedition, an investigation of the relationships between the aboriginal peoples of Siberia and of North America.

  • Jesup, Thomas (United States general)

    Second Seminole War: …of the year, however, General Thomas Jesup took charge of the U.S. forces, and he instituted a change in strategy, sending small contingents of men to pursue Seminole bands. The tide subsequently began to turn. In October 1837 Jesup set up a false truce and captured Osceola and dozens of…

  • Jesus

    Jesus, religious leader revered in Christianity, one of the world’s major religions. He is regarded by most Christians as the Incarnation of God. The history of Christian reflection on the teachings and nature of Jesus is examined in the article Christology. Ancient Jews usually had only one name,

  • Jesus (work by Bultmann)

    Rudolf Bultmann: Early career: …it with a book on Jesus (Jesus, 1926; Jesus and the Word, 1934), in which the beginning of his own theological position can be traced. Between 1922 and 1928 he had as a colleague at Marburg the German existentialist philosopher Martin Heidegger, whose Sein und Zeit (Being and Time) was…

  • Jesus and Mary Chain, the (British rock group)

    The Jesus and Mary Chain, Scottish alternative rock band whose landmark debut album, Psychocandy (1985), mixed cheery power-pop melodies with feedback-distorted guitar playing and the drone of sombre lyrics. Influenced by the Sex Pistols and the Velvet Underground as well as by the Beach Boys and

  • Jesus and Mary, Congregation of (religious order)

    Saint John Eudes: …August 19), founder of the Congregation of Jesus and Mary (Eudist Fathers), an order dedicated to the training of candidates for the priesthood and to the preaching of missions.

  • Jesus and the Word (work by Bultmann)

    Rudolf Bultmann: Early career: …it with a book on Jesus (Jesus, 1926; Jesus and the Word, 1934), in which the beginning of his own theological position can be traced. Between 1922 and 1928 he had as a colleague at Marburg the German existentialist philosopher Martin Heidegger, whose Sein und Zeit (Being and Time) was…

  • Jesus ben Sirach (Hebrew writer)

    Judaism: Hellenism and Judaism: The apocryphal writer Jesus ben Sirach so bitterly denounced the Hellenizers in Jerusalem (c. 180 bce) that he was forced by the authorities to temper his words.

  • Jesus Christ

    Jesus, religious leader revered in Christianity, one of the world’s major religions. He is regarded by most Christians as the Incarnation of God. The history of Christian reflection on the teachings and nature of Jesus is examined in the article Christology. Ancient Jews usually had only one name,

  • Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Reorganized Church of (American church)

    Community of Christ, church that claims to be the legal continuation of the church founded by Joseph Smith at Fayette in Seneca county, New York, in 1830. World headquarters are in Independence, Missouri. In the early 21st century the church’s members numbered about 250,000, with congregations in

  • Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Church of (religion)

    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), church that traces its origins to a religion founded by Joseph Smith in the United States in 1830. The term Mormon, often used to refer to members of this church, comes from the Book of Mormon, which was published by Smith in 1830; use of the term

  • Jesus Christ Superstar (film by Jewison [1973])

    Norman Jewison: …on the Roof (1971) and Jesus Christ Superstar (1973), both adapted from Broadway productions and the first of which earned Jewison another Oscar nomination for best director.

  • Jesus Christ Superstar (rock opera by Lloyd Webber and Rice)

    theatre music: Stage musicals: In Jesus Christ Superstar (1971) the covering of the orchestra pit, the permanent amplification of instruments, and the use of voices entirely dependent on microphones amounts to a replacement of the illusion of theatre in any traditional sense with the actuality of a modern recording studio…

  • Jésus de Montréal (film by Arcand [1989])

    Christology: Film: Denys Arcand’s Jesus of Montreal (1990), for example, portrays a group of actors in Montreal who are hired to stage a Passion play. As they do, they come into conflict with the religious and political establishment; their leader is killed when a crucifix used in the play…

  • Jesus Disputing with the Doctors (work by Valdés Leal)

    Juan de Nisa Valdés Leal: …Death (1660 and 1672), and Jesus Disputing with the Doctors (1686), all characterized by their macabre subject matter, dynamic energy, and theatrical violence. The violence of his subjects has often distracted attention from the inventiveness of his execution.

  • Jesus Is King (album by West)

    Kanye West: His next release, Jesus Is King, was a gospel album that reflected his recommitment to Christianity. During this time West remained involved in fashion, and YEEZY Season 6 and Season 7 were released in 2018 and 2019, respectively, though neither was shown at New York Fashion Week.

  • Jesús María (Peru)

    Jesús María, distrito (district), south of central Lima city in the Lima–Callao metropolitan area in Peru. Given district status in 1963, Jesús María is mainly a middle- and upper-income residential area. Most striking is its architecturally innovative San Felipe housing development, a mixture of

  • Jesus of Galilee

    Jesus, religious leader revered in Christianity, one of the world’s major religions. He is regarded by most Christians as the Incarnation of God. The history of Christian reflection on the teachings and nature of Jesus is examined in the article Christology. Ancient Jews usually had only one name,

  • Jesus of Montreal (film by Arcand [1989])

    Christology: Film: Denys Arcand’s Jesus of Montreal (1990), for example, portrays a group of actors in Montreal who are hired to stage a Passion play. As they do, they come into conflict with the religious and political establishment; their leader is killed when a crucifix used in the play…

  • Jesus of Nazareth

    Jesus, religious leader revered in Christianity, one of the world’s major religions. He is regarded by most Christians as the Incarnation of God. The history of Christian reflection on the teachings and nature of Jesus is examined in the article Christology. Ancient Jews usually had only one name,

  • Jesus of the People (painting by McKenzie)

    Christology: Early 20th century to the present: …the winning painting, Janet McKenzie’s Jesus of the People, Jesus is dark-skinned, thick-lipped, and feminine.

  • Jesus Only (religious movement, United States)

    Jesus Only, movement of believers within Pentecostalism who hold that true baptism can only be “in the name of Jesus” rather than in the name of the Trinity. It began at a Pentecostal camp meeting in California in 1913 when one of the participants, John G. Scheppe, experienced the power of the name

  • Jesus Prayer (Eastern Orthodoxy)

    Jesus Prayer, in Eastern Christianity, a mental invocation of the name of Jesus Christ, considered most efficacious when repeated continuously. The most widely accepted form of the prayer is “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me.” It reflects the biblical idea that the name of God is

  • Jesus son of Joseph

    Jesus, religious leader revered in Christianity, one of the world’s major religions. He is regarded by most Christians as the Incarnation of God. The history of Christian reflection on the teachings and nature of Jesus is examined in the article Christology. Ancient Jews usually had only one name,

  • Jesus the Nazarene

    Jesus, religious leader revered in Christianity, one of the world’s major religions. He is regarded by most Christians as the Incarnation of God. The history of Christian reflection on the teachings and nature of Jesus is examined in the article Christology. Ancient Jews usually had only one name,

  • Jesus the Son of Sirach, Wisdom of (biblical literature)

    Ecclesiasticus, deuterocanonical biblical work (accepted in the Roman Catholic canon but noncanonical for Jews and Protestants), an outstanding example of the wisdom genre of religious literature that was popular in the early Hellenistic period of Judaism (3rd century bc to 3rd century ad). This

  • Jesus Walks (song by West)

    Kanye West: …Wire” and the gospel-choir-backed “Jesus Walks.” The latter cut won a Grammy Award for best rap song in 2005, and West also picked up awards that year for best rap album and best rhythm-and-blues song (as one of the songwriters of Alicia Keys’s “You Don’t Know My Name”).

  • Jesus, Fort (fort and museum, Mombasa, Kenya)

    Mombasa: It is the site of Fort Jesus, built by the Portuguese (1593–95) and now a museum. There are Anglican and Roman Catholic cathedrals. A Hindu temple built in 1952 has a gilded dome. Mombasa’s many historical and cultural attractions have made it a popular tourist destination.

  • Jesus, Society of (religious order)

    Jesuit, member of the Society of Jesus (S.J.), a Roman Catholic order of religious men founded by St. Ignatius of Loyola, noted for its educational, missionary, and charitable works. The order has been regarded by many as the principal agent of the Counter-Reformation and was later a leading force

  • Jesus, the Virgin, and the Baptist (painting by Gossart)

    Jan Gossart: Other early works, such as Jesus, the Virgin, and the Baptist, reflect his interest in the works of Jan van Eyck and Albrecht Dürer. Another early work, famous for its sense of mood, is the Agony in the Garden.

  • Jesus, Tomé de (Portuguese writer)

    Portuguese literature: The novel and other prose: …religious and other topics; and Tomé de Jesus with his mystic and devotional treatise Trabalhos de Jesus (1602–09; “Deeds of Jesus”). The work of scientists included that of a cosmographer and mathematician, Pedro Nunes, and of a botanist, Garcia da Orta, whose Colóquios dos simples e drogas (1563; Colloquies on…

  • Jet (American magazine)

    Ebony: The circulation of Jet, another Johnson magazine with an emphasis on news as well as entertainment, was about 900,000.

  • JET (nuclear physics facility)

    plasma: Applications of plasmas: …machine called the JET (Joint European Torus) was able to generate 1.7 million watts of fusion power for almost 2 seconds after researchers injected titrium into the JET’s magnetically confined plasma. It was the first successful controlled production of fusion power in such a confined medium.

  • jet (gemstone)

    Jet, a dense, fine-grained, compact variety of subbituminous coal, or lignite. It is coal-black in colour and has a hardness of 2+ and a specific gravity of 1.1 to 1.4. Unlike lignite, it is not laminated and so has little tendency to split but breaks with a conchoidal fracture. It can be worked

  • jet (drug)

    Ketamine, general anesthetic agent related structurally to the hallucinogen phencyclidine (PCP). Ketamine was first synthesized in 1962 at Parke Davis Laboratories by American scientist Calvin Stevens, who was searching for a new anesthetic to replace PCP, which was not suitable for use in humans

  • jet aircraft

    military aircraft: The jet age: Beginning in the 1920s, steady advances in aircraft performance had been produced by improved structures and drag-reduction technologies and by more powerful, supercharged engines, but by the early 1930s it had become apparent to a handful of farsighted engineers that speeds would soon…

  • jet airplane

    military aircraft: The jet age: Beginning in the 1920s, steady advances in aircraft performance had been produced by improved structures and drag-reduction technologies and by more powerful, supercharged engines, but by the early 1930s it had become apparent to a handful of farsighted engineers that speeds would soon…

  • jet ejector pump

    pump: Electromagnetic pumps.: In the jet ejector pump, fluid passes through a venturi nozzle (see venturi tube) and develops a suction that causes a second stream of fluid to be entrained. In the aspirator pump, water flows through a venturi nozzle and develops a suction for drawing in air. Steam…

  • jet engine (engineering)

    Jet engine, any of a class of internal-combustion engines that propel aircraft by means of the rearward discharge of a jet of fluid, usually hot exhaust gases generated by burning fuel with air drawn in from the atmosphere. The prime mover of virtually all jet engines is a gas turbine. Variously

  • jet fuel

    petroleum refining: Kerosene: …the primary fuel for modern jet engines. When burned as a domestic fuel, kerosene must produce a flame free of smoke and odour. Standard laboratory procedures test these properties by burning the oil in special lamps. All kerosene fuels must satisfy minimum flash-point specifications (49 °C, or 120 °F) to…

  • jet lag (biological condition)

    Jet lag, physiological desynchronization caused by transmeridian (east-west) travel between different time zones. The severity and extent of jet lag vary according to the number of time zones crossed as well as the direction of travel—most people find it difficult to travel eastward (i.e., to adapt

  • jet propulsion

    cephalopod: Locomotion: …move by crawling, swimming, or jet propulsion, mainly the latter. The mantle, which has a passive role in the majority of mollusks, has become involved in locomotion in cephalopods, having almost entirely lost its rigid shell and become highly muscular. Its expansion and contraction produce a locomotory water current by…

  • Jet Propulsion Laboratory (laboratory, Pasadena, California, United States)

    Mario Molina: Molina worked in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena from 1982 to 1989, when he became a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. In 2004 he moved to the University of California, San Diego. Molina was awarded the U.S. Presidential…

  • Jet Ranger (helicopter)

    Charles Wilfred Butler: …army helicopter (1961) into the Bell Jet Ranger (1965). He and his designers restyled the machine inside and out in the manner of automotive design, creating in the process one of the world’s most successful and beautiful helicopters.

  • Jet Set, the (American music group)

    The Byrds, American band of the 1960s who popularized folk rock, particularly the songs of Bob Dylan, and whose changes in personnel created an extensive family tree of major country rock bands and pop supergroups. The principal members were Roger McGuinn (original name James Joseph McGuinn III; b.

  • jet skiing (recreation)

    surfing: Recent trends: The introduction of jet-skis, too, has radically redefined big-wave riding. First, it allowed surfers to handle waves that were more than 30 feet (9 metres) tall. (At that height the water flowing up the face of the wave pushes the surfer back, making it impossible to catch a…

  • jet stream (meteorology)

    Jet stream, a region of long, narrow, high-speed winds that typically flow northeastward, eastward, and southeastward in the middle and upper troposphere or lower stratosphere. Jet streams are characterized by wind motions that generate strong vertical shearing action, which is thought to be

  • jet syndrome (biological condition)

    Jet lag, physiological desynchronization caused by transmeridian (east-west) travel between different time zones. The severity and extent of jet lag vary according to the number of time zones crossed as well as the direction of travel—most people find it difficult to travel eastward (i.e., to adapt

  • jet, radio (astronomy)

    Radio jet, material spewing from the centres of some galaxies at close to the speed of light and emitting strong radio waves. The most powerful extragalactic sources of radio waves are double-lobed sources (or “dumbbells”) in which two large regions of radio emission are situated in a line on

  • Jet, The (American football player)

    Joe Perry, (Fletcher Joseph Perry; “The Jet”), American football player (born Jan. 22, 1927, Stephens, Ark.—died April 25, 2011, Tempe, Ariz.), possessed tremendous speed and an uncanny ability to find holes in the defensive line as the powerful fullback (1948–60 and 1963) for the San Francisco

  • Jetavana (monastic settlement, Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka)

    South Asian arts: Sri Lankan architecture: …other sites; of these the Jetavana at Anurādhapura is the largest, though now largely ruined.

  • Jetavanavihāravāsī (Buddhism)

    Buddhism: Theravada: …whom the third group, the Jetavanaviharavasi, was loosely associated—established the first monastery in Sri Lanka and preserved intact the original Theravadin teachings.

  • jeté (ballet movement)

    Jeté, (French jeté: “thrown”), ballet leap in which the weight of the dancer is transferred from one foot to the other. The dancer “throws” one leg to the front, side, or back and holds the other leg in any desired position upon landing. Among the commonly seen forms of this step are the jeté

  • jeté battu (ballet)

    jeté: …of this step are the jeté battu, in which the legs are crossed in the air before the descent; the grand jeté, a broad, high leap with one leg stretched forward and the other back like a “split” in the air; and the jeté en tournant, or tour jeté (“flung…

  • jeté en tournant (ballet)

    jeté: …in the air; and the jeté en tournant, or tour jeté (“flung turn”), in which the dancer executes a half-turn in the air away from the forward leg before landing on it.

  • Jeter, Derek (American baseball player)

    Derek Jeter, American professional baseball player who, as a shortstop for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB), was selected to multiple American League (AL) All-Star teams and was one of the most popular players of his time. Jeter grew up in Michigan and started playing Little

  • Jeter, Derek Sanderson (American baseball player)

    Derek Jeter, American professional baseball player who, as a shortstop for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB), was selected to multiple American League (AL) All-Star teams and was one of the most popular players of his time. Jeter grew up in Michigan and started playing Little

  • Jeter, Mildred Delores (American civil rights activist)

    Mildred Loving, (Mildred Delores Jeter), American civil rights activist (born July 22, 1939, Virginia—died May 2, 2008, Central Point, Va.), was one of the plaintiffs in the landmark 1967 U.S. Supreme Court case Loving v. Virginia, in which the court overturned long-standing miscegenation laws that

  • Jethro (biblical figure)

    Jethro, in the Old Testament, priest of Midian of the Kenite clan, with whom Moses took refuge after he killed an Egyptian and whose daughter Moses married (Exodus 3:1). After the Exodus, Jethro visited the Hebrews encamped at the “mountain of God” and brought with him Moses’ wife and sons. There

  • Jethro Tull (British musical group)

    art rock: …created by such groups as Jethro Tull and the Strawbs. In common, all these bands regularly employ complicated and conceptual approaches to their music. Moreover, there has been a relatively fluid movement of musicians between bands that fall under the most general definition of art rock. Among the musicians who…

  • Jetstar (Australian airline)

    Qantas: …Qantas launched the low-cost carrier Jetstar to compete in the budget market.

  • jetty (marine structure)

    Jetty, any of a variety of engineering structures connected with river, harbour, and coastal works designed to influence the current or tide or to protect a harbour or beach from waves (breakwater). The two principal kinds of jetties are those constructed at river mouths and other coastal

  • Jeu d’Adam (French literature)

    French literature: Religious drama: …is the Jeu d’Adam (Adam: A Play). It is known from a copy in an Anglo-Norman manuscript, and it may have originated in England in the mid-12th century. With lively dialogue and the varied metres characteristic of the later mystères (all of which were based on biblical stories), it…

  • jeu de boules (French game)

    Boules, French ball game, similar to bowls and boccie. It is thought to have originated about 1910, but it is based on the very old French game of jeu Proven?al. Boules is played between two players or teams. Players take turns throwing or rolling a ball (boule) as close as possible to the target

  • Jeu de l’amour et du hasard, Le (work by Marivaux)

    Pierre Marivaux: …l’amour et du hasard (1730; The Game of Love and Chance) display typical characteristics of his love comedies: romantic settings, an acute sense of nuance and the finer shades of feeling, and deft and witty wordplay. This verbal preciousness is still known as marivaudage and reflects the sensitivity and sophistication…

  • Jeu de la feuillée (work by Adam de la Halle)

    Adam De La Halle: Adam’s Jeu de la feuillée (“Play of the Greensward”) is a satirical fantasy based on his own life, written to amuse his friends in Arras upon his departure for Paris to pursue his studies. Le Congé (“The Leave Taking”) expresses his sorrow at leaving his wife…

  • Jeu de Paume (museum, Paris, France)

    Jeu de Paume, (French: “Palm Game”) museum in Paris built as a tennis court and later converted into an Impressionist art museum and subsequently into a photography museum. The Jeu de Paume was constructed in the 17th century in the Tuileries Gardens in Paris. It was used by the nobility as an

  • jeu de paume (sport)

    Real tennis, racket sport that is descended from and almost identical to the medieval tennis game jeu de paume (“game of the palm”). Real tennis has been played since the Middle Ages, but the game has become almost completely obscured by its own descendant, lawn tennis. Although real tennis

  • Jeu de Robin et de Marion, Le (work by Adam de la Halle)

    Adam De La Halle: Jeu de Robin et de Marion is a dramatization of the pastoral theme of a knight’s wooing of a pretty shepherdess, with dances and peasants’ dialogue. Jeu du pélérin (“Play of the Pilgrim”) mocks his friends for forgetting him.

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