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  • Jewish Revolt, Second (132-135 CE)

    Second Jewish Revolt, (ad 132–135), Jewish rebellion against Roman rule in Judaea. The revolt was preceded by years of clashes between Jews and Romans in the area. Finally, in ad 132, the misrule of Tinnius Rufus, the Roman governor of Judaea, combined with the emperor Hadrian’s intention to found

  • Jewish State Theatre (theatre, Warsaw, Poland)

    Ida Kaminska: …her homeland to found the Jewish State Theatre of Poland (1945), which received official recognition and financial aid from the state until she abandoned Poland for the United States in 1968. Her best-known stage performance was the title role in Mirele Efros by Jacob Gordin in a version she adapted…

  • Jewish State, The (pamphlet by Herzl)

    Israel: Zionism: Theodor Herzl began advocating a Jewish state as the political solution for both anti-Semitism (he had covered the sensational Dreyfus affair in France) and a Jewish secular identity. Herzl’s brief and dramatic bid for international support from the major powers at the First Zionist Congress (August 1897) failed, but, after…

  • Jewish Theological Seminary of America (seminary, New York City, New York, United States)

    Jewish Theological Seminary of America (JTSA), the academic and spiritual centre of Conservative Judaism in the United States. Founded in New York City in 1886 as the Jewish Theological Seminary Association, the institution was first headed by Rabbi Sabato Morais, whose declared goal was to educate

  • Jewish Theological Seminary, Alumni Association of the

    The Rabbinical Assembly, organization of Conservative rabbis in the United States, Canada, Latin America, Europe, and Israel. It was founded in 1900 as the Alumni Association of the Jewish Theological Seminary and was reorganized in 1940 as the Rabbinical Assembly of America; in 1962 it acquired

  • Jewish Theology Systematically and Historically Considered (work by Kohler)

    Kaufmann Kohler: …wrote his most profound work, Jewish Theology Systematically and Historically Considered (1918). Prior to Kohler’s work, the philosophical literature of the Middle Ages and the rabbinical writings were the only available materials to serve the needs of the student. Kohler’s book methodically and succinctly sets forth the teachings of Jewish…

  • Jewison, Norman (Canadian director and producer)

    Norman Jewison, Canadian television and film director and producer known for his adroit depictions of American social ills. Jewison was raised in Toronto, the youngest of two children born to the owners of a dry-goods store. Following a brief stint in the Canadian Royal Navy, he attended Victoria

  • Jewison, Norman Frederick (Canadian director and producer)

    Norman Jewison, Canadian television and film director and producer known for his adroit depictions of American social ills. Jewison was raised in Toronto, the youngest of two children born to the owners of a dry-goods store. Following a brief stint in the Canadian Royal Navy, he attended Victoria

  • Jewitt, David (American astronomer)

    comet: The modern era: …finally rewarded when British astronomer David Jewitt and Vietnamese American astronomer Jane Luu found an object well beyond Neptune in an orbit with a semimajor axis of 43.9 AU, an eccentricity of only 0.0678, and an inclination of only 2.19°. The object, officially designated (15760) 1992 QB1, has a diameter…

  • Jewitt, John R. (American sailor)

    Canadian literature: From settlement to 1900: …a captivity narrative that describes Jewitt’s experience as a prisoner of the Nootka (Nuu-chah-nulth) chief Maquinna after Jewitt was shipwrecked off Canada’s west coast; on the whole, it presents a sympathetic ethnography of the Nuu-chah-nulth people. The Diary of Mrs. John Graves Simcoe (1911) records the everyday life in 1792–96…

  • Jews of Spain and Portugal and the Inquisition, The (work by Mocatta)

    Frederic David Mocatta: …work is the survey The Jews of Spain and Portugal and the Inquisition (1877), which was later translated into several languages. Mocatta is perhaps best remembered as a patron of learning and as a bibliophile. He subsidized the publication of such major works as Zur Geschichte und Literatur (1845; “On…

  • Jews Without Money (work by Gold)

    American literature: Lyric fictionists: …War I: Michael Gold’s harsh Jews Without Money (1930) and Henry Roth’s Proustian Call It Sleep (1934), one of the greatest novels of the decade. They followed in the footsteps of Anzia Yezierska, a prolific writer of the 1920s whose passionate books about immigrant Jews, especially Bread Givers (1925),

  • Jews’ College (college, London, United Kingdom)

    Nathan Marcus Adler: …the British Empire, who founded Jews’ College and the United Synagogue.

  • Jex-Blake, Sophia Louisa (British physician)

    Sophia Louisa Jex-Blake, British physician who successfully sought legislation (1876) permitting women in Britain to receive the M.D. degree and a license to practice medicine and surgery. Through her efforts a medical school for women was opened in London in 1874, and in 1886 she established one

  • Jeyaretnam, J. B. (Singaporean lawyer and politician)

    J.B. Jeyaretnam, Singaporean lawyer and politician (born Jan. 5, 1926, Ceylon [now Sri Lanka]—died Sept. 30, 2008, Singapore), was a longtime critic of Singapore’s authoritarian ruling People’s Action Party (PAP) and the country’s first opposition party MP (1981–86; 1997–2001). Jeyaretnam (commonly

  • Jeyaretnam, Joshua Benjamin (Singaporean lawyer and politician)

    J.B. Jeyaretnam, Singaporean lawyer and politician (born Jan. 5, 1926, Ceylon [now Sri Lanka]—died Sept. 30, 2008, Singapore), was a longtime critic of Singapore’s authoritarian ruling People’s Action Party (PAP) and the country’s first opposition party MP (1981–86; 1997–2001). Jeyaretnam (commonly

  • Je?, Teodor Tomasz (Polish writer)

    Polish literature: Romanticism: Zygmunt Mi?kowski (pseudonym Teodor Tomasz Je?) wrote on a wide range of subjects, including folklore and the history of the Balkan countries. The literary criticism of Maurycy Mochnacki, a passionate advocate of Romanticism and the first Polish critic to link literature with Poland’s political progress,…

  • Jezabel (queen of Israel)

    Jezebel, in the Bible (books of Kings), the wife of King Ahab, who ruled the kingdom of Israel. By interfering with the exclusive worship of the Hebrew God, Yahweh, by disregarding the rights of the common people, and by defying the great prophets Elijah and Elisha, she provoked the internecine

  • Jezebel (queen of Israel)

    Jezebel, in the Bible (books of Kings), the wife of King Ahab, who ruled the kingdom of Israel. By interfering with the exclusive worship of the Hebrew God, Yahweh, by disregarding the rights of the common people, and by defying the great prophets Elijah and Elisha, she provoked the internecine

  • Jezebel (film by Wyler [1938])

    Jezebel, American drama film, released in 1938, that features Bette Davis opposite Henry Fonda in an opulent antebellum romance. Davis, in an Academy Award-winning performance, portrayed Julie Marsden, the strong-willed belle whose impertinent spoiled nature wreaks havoc on her relationship with

  • Jezreel (biblical figure)

    biblical literature: Hosea: …first, a son, is named Jezreel, to symbolize that the house of Jehu will suffer for the bloody atrocities committed in the Valley of Jezreel by the founder of the dynasty when he annihilated the house of Omri. The second, a daughter, is named Lo Ru?ama (Not pitied), to indicate…

  • Jezreel (ancient city, Israel)

    Jezreel, (May God Give Seed), ancient city of Palestine, capital of the northern kingdom of Israel under King Ahab, located on a spur of Mt. Gilboa in Israel. King Saul was slain there in a battle with the Philistines. It was called Esdraelon in the book of Judith; to the crusaders it was Parvum G

  • Jezreel, Valley of (region, Israel)

    Plain of Esdraelon, lowland in northern Israel, dividing the hilly areas of Galilee in the north and Samaria (in the Israeli-occupied West Bank) in the south. Esdraelon is the Greek derivation of the Hebrew Yizre?el, meaning “God will sow” or “May God make fruitful,” an allusion to the fertility of

  • Jezyk Polski

    Polish language, West Slavic language belonging to the Lekhitic subgroup and closely related to Czech, Slovak, and the Sorbian languages of eastern Germany; it is spoken by the majority of the present population of Poland. The modern literary language, written in the Roman (Latin) alphabet, dates

  • JFET (electronics)

    electronics: Using MOSFETs: Another type, the junction field-effect transistor, works in a similar fashion but is much less frequently used. The MOSFET consists of two regions: (1) the source (here shown connected to the silicon substrate) and (2) the drain of one conductivity type embedded in a body of the opposite…

  • JFK (president of United States)

    John F. Kennedy, 35th president of the United States (1961–63), who faced a number of foreign crises, especially in Cuba and Berlin, but managed to secure such achievements as the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty and the Alliance for Progress. He was assassinated while riding in a motorcade in Dallas. The

  • JFK (film by Stone [1991])

    conspiracy theory: Effects of belief in conspiracy theories: …viewing the Oliver Stone movie JFK (1991) increased belief in a conspiracy to assassinate Kennedy and decreased belief in the official account that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone. A further outcome was that, compared with people who were about to view the movie, those who had seen it expressed less…

  • JFK Jr. (American publisher)

    John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr., American publisher and public figure (born Nov. 25, 1960, Washington, D.C.—died July 16, 1999, off Martha’s Vineyard, Mass.), was a member of the American family that to many people most resembled royalty and as such spent his entire life in the public eye. From the t

  • JGA (anatomy)

    renal system disease: Vascular disease: …in healthy individuals involves the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA) and the secretion of renin. Occasionally, following trauma or arising spontaneously as a result of vascular disease, one or the other of the main renal arteries becomes constricted (renal artery stenosis). The fall in blood pressure beyond the constriction leads to increased…

  • Jhabua (India)

    Jhabua, town, western Madhya Pradesh state, central India. It is situated on an upland plateau about 45 miles (72 km) northwest of Dhar. Jhabua was founded in the 16th century by a Banjari freebooter and served as the capital of Jhabua princely state. Today it is a local agricultural and timber

  • Jhabvala, Ruth Prawer (German-born American author)

    Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, novelist and screenwriter, well known for her witty and insightful portrayals of contemporary Indian lives and, especially, for her 46 years as a pivotal member of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory’s filmmaking team. Jhabvala’s family was Jewish, and in 1939 they emigrated from

  • Jhalawar (India)

    Jhalawar, town, far southeastern Rajasthan state, northwestern India. It is situated on an upland plateau just west of the Kali Sindh River, a tributary of the Chambal River, about 40 miles (64 km) southeast of Kota. The old town of Jhalrapatan (Patan) was founded as a cantonment (military

  • Jhalore (India)

    Jalor, town, southwestern Rajasthan state, northwestern India. It lies just south of the Sukri River, which is a tributary of the Luni River. Jalor was a medieval stronghold that served as the 12th-century capital of the Cauhan Rajputs (the warrior rulers of the historic region of Rajputana). It

  • Jhalrapatan (India)

    Jhalawar, town, far southeastern Rajasthan state, northwestern India. It is situated on an upland plateau just west of the Kali Sindh River, a tributary of the Chambal River, about 40 miles (64 km) southeast of Kota. The old town of Jhalrapatan (Patan) was founded as a cantonment (military

  • jhāna (Buddhism)

    Dhyāna, in Indian philosophy, a stage in the process of meditation leading to Nirvā?a. See Buddhist

  • Jhang Maghiāna (Pakistan)

    Jhang Sadar, city consisting of historical twin towns, headquarters of Jhang district, Faisalabad division, Punjab province, Pakistan, situated just east of the Chenab River. The city was first incorporated as an administrative unit under the British raj, combining the towns of Maghiana and Jhang.

  • Jhang Sadar (Pakistan)

    Jhang Sadar, city consisting of historical twin towns, headquarters of Jhang district, Faisalabad division, Punjab province, Pakistan, situated just east of the Chenab River. The city was first incorporated as an administrative unit under the British raj, combining the towns of Maghiana and Jhang.

  • Jhansi (India)

    Jhansi, city, southwestern Uttar Pradesh state, northern India. It lies in the western part of the upland Bundelkhand region, along the border with Madhya Pradesh state and just west of the Betwa River. The city, which is enclosed by a wall, expanded around a fort built in 1613 by the ruler of

  • Jharia (India)

    Jharia, coalfield and former town, northern Jharkhand state, eastern India. The coalfield lies in the Damodar River valley and covers about 110 square miles (280 square km). The bituminous coal produced there is suitable for coke (most of India’s coal comes from the Jharia and Raniganj fields in

  • Jharkhand (state, India)

    Jharkhand, state of India, located in the northeastern part of the country. Jharkhand is bordered by the states of Bihar to the north, West Bengal to the east, Odisha to the south, Chhattisgarh to the west, and Uttar Pradesh to the northwest. Its capital is Ranchi. Jharkhand, one of India’s newest

  • Jharkhand Liberation Front (political party, India)

    Jharkhand Mukti Morcha (JMM), regional political party of Jharkhand state, northeastern India. It has had only a limited presence on the national political scene in New Delhi. The JMM was formed in 1973 as a movement to spearhead what would become a decades-long effort to establish a separate

  • Jharkhand Mukti Morcha (political party, India)

    Jharkhand Mukti Morcha (JMM), regional political party of Jharkhand state, northeastern India. It has had only a limited presence on the national political scene in New Delhi. The JMM was formed in 1973 as a movement to spearhead what would become a decades-long effort to establish a separate

  • Jhelum (Pakistan)

    Jhelum, town, Punjab province, northeastern Pakistan. The town lies just west of the Jhelum River (there bridged by both road and rail) and is connected by rail and the Grand Trunk Road with Peshāwar and Lahore. The old town, across the river, may have been Bucephala, founded by Alexander the Great

  • Jhelum River (river, Asia)

    Jhelum River, river of northwestern India and northern and eastern Pakistan. It constitutes the westernmost of the five rivers of the Punjab region that merge with the Indus River in eastern Pakistan. The Jhelum rises from a deep spring at Vernag, in western Jammu and Kashmir state, in the

  • Jhering, Rudolf von (German scholar)

    Rudolf von Jhering, German legal scholar, sometimes called the father of sociological jurisprudence. He developed a philosophy of social utilitarianism that, in emphasizing the needs of society, differed from the individualist approach of the English utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham. Jhering

  • Jherria (India)

    Jharia, coalfield and former town, northern Jharkhand state, eastern India. The coalfield lies in the Damodar River valley and covers about 110 square miles (280 square km). The bituminous coal produced there is suitable for coke (most of India’s coal comes from the Jharia and Raniganj fields in

  • Jhind (India)

    Jind, city, central Haryana state, northwestern India. It is located about 70 miles (110 km) northwest of Delhi. Jind is said to have been founded by the Pandavas of the Mahabharata epic, who built a temple around which the town of Jaintapuri (Jind) grew. It was formerly one of the princely

  • JHM (museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Jewish Historical Museum (JHM), museum in Amsterdam that displays artifacts, artwork, and other items associated with Jewish history, religion, and culture. The objects on view at the Jewish Historical Museum demonstrate the Jewish spiritual, cultural, and historical experience in The Netherlands

  • Jhukar culture (Indian history)

    India: The Post-Urban Period in northwestern India: …phase is recognizable in the Jhukar culture at Chanhu-daro and other sites. There certain copper or bronze weapons and tools appear to be of “foreign” type and may be compared to examples from farther west (Iran and Central Asia); a different but parallel change is seen at Pirak, not far…

  • Jhuldabhaj (India)

    Baruni, town, central Bihar state, northeastern India. It lies north of the Ganges (Ganga) River and is part of the Begusarai urban agglomeration. Baruni, formerly called Jhuldabhaj, merged with Phulwaria township in 1961. It has major highway, rail, and ferry connections and is an agricultural

  • jhum (agriculture)

    Arunachal Pradesh: Agriculture and forestry: …to practice shifting agriculture (jhum), whereby land is cleared by burning the vegetation, is cultivated for several years, and then is abandoned in favour of another site when the productivity of the soil declines. Rice, corn (maize), millet, and buckwheat are among the chief crops grown by that method.…

  • Jhumia Marma (people)

    Marma: One group, the Jhumia Marma, have long settled in this southeastern region of Bengal; the other group, the Rakhaing Marma, are recent immigrants, having come from Arakan toward the end of the 18th century, when their kingdom was conquered by the Burmese.

  • Jhunjhunun (India)

    Jhunjhunun, city, northeastern Rajasthan state, northwestern India. It is situated in the Rajasthan Steppe, a semiarid sandy plain, about 30 miles (48 km) southeast of Churu. Jhunjhunun is a local trade centre for wool, cattle, hides, and gram (chickpeas). The city’s major industries include a dye

  • Ji (emperor of Han dynasty)

    Gaozu, temple name (miaohao) of the founder and first emperor of the Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 220), under which the Chinese imperial system assumed most of the characteristics that it was to retain until it was overthrown in 1911/12. He reigned from 206 to 195 bc. His wife, the empress Gaohou

  • Ji (Buddhist sect)

    Buddhism: Pure Land: …his school was called the Ji (“Times”) school, or Jishū.

  • JI (international agreement mechanism)

    carbon offset: Carbon-offsetting process: …offsets through a mechanism called joint implementation (JI), where one party develops an emission-reduction or emission-removal project in another country where emissions are limited. Parties can also obtain offsets through the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) for projects in developing countries, where emissions are not otherwise limited.

  • Ji Fa (ruler of Zhou)

    Wuwang, reign name (nianhao) of the founder and first ruler (1046–43 bc) of the Zhou dynasty (1046–256 bc). He was regarded by later Confucians as a wise king. Ji Fa succeeded his father, the famous Wenwang, as head of the semibarbaric state of Zhou, located on the western border of China. Wenwang

  • Ji Kang (Chinese philosopher)

    Ji Kang, Chinese Daoist philosopher, alchemist, and poet who was one of the most important members of the free-spirited, heavy-drinking Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove, a coterie of poets and philosophers who scandalized Chinese society by their iconoclastic thoughts and actions. Of influential

  • Ji Pengfei (Chinese diplomat)

    Ji Pengfei, Chinese diplomat (born 1910, Linyi, Shanxi province, China—died Feb. 10, 2000, Beijing, China), served from 1982 to 1990 as director of Hong Kong and Macau affairs in the State Council, playing a lead role in the negotiations with Britain over the return of Hong Kong to Chinese so

  • Ji’an (China)

    Ji’an, city, west-central Jiangxi sheng (province), southeastern China. Ji’an is situated on the west bank of the Gan River, at the head of navigation for small steamboats from Nanchang. The city is a highway centre located on the north-south route up the Gan valley at the point where it is joined

  • Ji’an ware (Chinese whiteware)

    Chinese pottery: Late Song, Liao, and Jin dynasties: These Ji’an, or Kian, wares appear to be imitations of Ding, and there may be truth in the tradition that the kilns were set up by refugees from the north. The Yonghe kilns were unable to compete with Jingdezhen, however, and had ceased production by the…

  • jia (Chinese government unit)

    China: Social organization: …in Chinese society remained the jia (“family”), consisting of kin related by blood, marriage, or adoption that shared a common budget and common property. The Chinese family system was patrilineal; daughters married out, while sons brought in wives and shared the residence of their fathers. The head of the family,…

  • Jia (novel by Ba Jin)

    Ba Jin: …was the novel Jia (1933; Family). It was the first volume of the autobiographical trilogy Jiliu (“Torrent”), which was completed in 1940 with the publication of the second and third volumes, Chun (“Spring”) and Qiu (“Autumn”). In the 1940s his writing became more pessimistic and less radical, and there was…

  • jia (bronze work)

    Jia, type of ancient Chinese vessel used for holding or heating wine and for pouring wine into the ground during a memorial ceremony. The jia can either be a form of pottery or it can be bronze. It is a deep, cup-shaped vessel supported on three or four pointed, splayed legs. There is a vertical

  • Jia Lanpo (Chinese archaeologist)

    Jia Lanpo, Chinese archaeologist (born Nov. 25, 1908, Hebei province, China—died July 8, 2001, Beijing, China), was internationally known for his work as director of the Peking man excavation at the Zhoukoudian cave complex near Beijing. In 1929, while still a graduate student, Jia was named in

  • Jia Sidao (Chinese statesman)

    Jia Sidao, Chinese statesman of the Nan (Southern) Song dynasty (1127–1279) who achieved great power over the throne after his sister became a concubine of the emperor Lizong (reigned 1224/25–1264). In charge of Mongol affairs, he followed a policy of placating these Central Asian tribes and has

  • Jia Xian (Chinese mathematician and astronomer)

    Jia Xian, mathematician and astronomer active at the beginning of the greatest period of traditional Chinese mathematics. Little is known about Jia’s life except that he held a relatively low military office during the reign (1022/23–1063/64) of Emperor Renzong of the Song dynasty. He was a pupil

  • jiaguwen (pictographic script)

    Jiaguwen, (Chinese: “bone-and-shell script”) pictographic script found on oracle bones, it was widely used in divination in the Shang dynasty (c. 18th–12th century bc). Turtle carapaces and ox scapulae with inscriptions scratched into them were discovered about 1900 in the area of Xiaotun, a

  • Jiahuangdi (emperor of Xin dynasty)

    Wang Mang, founder of the short-lived Xin dynasty (ad 9–25). He is known in Chinese history as Shehuangdi (the “Usurper Emperor”), because his reign (ad 9–23) and that of his successor interrupted the Liu family’s succession of China’s Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 220); as a result, the Han is typically

  • Jiajing (emperor of Ming dynasty)

    Jiajing, reign name (nianhao) of the 11th emperor of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644), whose long reign (1521–66/67) added a degree of stability to the government but whose neglect of official duties ushered in an era of misrule. Notoriously cruel, Jiajing caused hundreds of officials who had the

  • Jialing Jiang (river, China)

    Jialing River, river in central China. A tributary of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), with the largest drainage area of the Yangtze basin, it rises in the rugged western outliers of the Qin (Tsinling) Mountains in southern Gansu province. It flows south and east into far western Shaanxi province,

  • Jialing River (river, China)

    Jialing River, river in central China. A tributary of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), with the largest drainage area of the Yangtze basin, it rises in the rugged western outliers of the Qin (Tsinling) Mountains in southern Gansu province. It flows south and east into far western Shaanxi province,

  • Jiamusi (China)

    Jiamusi, city, northeastern Heilongjiang sheng (province), northeastern China. Jiamusi is situated on the lower reaches of the Sungari (Songhua) River and has good natural communications by river upstream to such cities as Harbin and Yilan, as well as with the Amur and Ussuri rivers during the

  • jian (Chinese bronze vessel)

    Jian, type of ancient Chinese bronze vessel having a large, deep bowl with a heavy rim that is meant to contain water or ice. The jian, which has a simple silhouette, is supported upon a narrow ring base. It has two or four ring handles that freely hang from slightly modeled monster masks (taotie).

  • Jian dang wei ye (motion picture [2011])

    Chow Yun-Fat: …Jian dang wei ye (2011; Beginning of the Great Revival), which dramatized the events leading to the founding of the Chinese Communist Party, Chow took on the role of political leader Yuan Shikai. His later films included Tong que tai (2012; The Assassins), in which he portrayed Cao Cao, a…

  • Jian Jiang (Chinese painter)

    Hongren, foremost painter of the Anhui (Xinan) school, a centre of painting in southeast China during the Qing period that was noted for its unusual land features, especially of Huang Shan (“Yellow Mountain”), which frequently appears in paintings of the school. Jiang Tao adopted his Buddhist name

  • Jian River (river, China)

    Fujian: Drainage: …largest of which is the Jian, which flows from its source near the Fujian-Zhejiang border. The Jian has its own subsystem of tributary streams that drain the famous Wuyi tea district. The second source stream of the Min, the Futun, is also called the Shaowu, for the chief city of…

  • Jian ware (Chinese stoneware)

    Jian ware, dark brown or blackish Chinese stoneware made for domestic use chiefly during the Song dynasty (960–1279) and into the early 14th century. Jian ware was made in Fujian province, first in kilns at Jian’an and later at Jianyang. The clay used for Jian ware was of a very hard, coarse grain.

  • Jian’an (China)

    pottery: Song dynasty (960–1279 ce): …the original place of manufacture, Jian’an, in Fujian province. Manufacture was later moved to nearby Jianyang, probably during the Yuan period. The glaze is very dark brown, approaching black, over a dark stoneware body, and it usually stops short of the base in a thick treacly roll.

  • jianai (Chinese philosophy)

    ren: Non-Confucian critiques: …instead for “universal love” (jianai). Despite the meaning of its name, jianai was not an overflowing of goodness or benevolence directed toward all but rather a starkly practical approach to other human beings, all of whom were to be treated as equals. Each person, even one’s own father or…

  • Jiancheng (Chinese prince)

    China: Early Tang (618–626): …army under the crown prince Jiancheng at the beginning of 623. The prolonged resistance in Hebei and the comparatively harsh Tang conquest of the region were the beginning of resistance and hostility in the northeast that continued to some degree throughout the Tang dynasty.

  • Jiang Bingzhi (Chinese author)

    Ding Ling, one of China’s most popular 20th-century authors. In her early career Ding Ling initially wrote highly successful short stories centring on young, unconventional Chinese women. About 1930, with a distinct change in her artistic tendency, she became a major literary figure of the

  • Jiang Haicheng (Chinese poet)

    Ai Qing, Chinese poet whose free verse was influential in the development of xinshi (“new poetry”). The son of a well-to-do landowner, Ai Qing was encouraged to learn Western languages. He studied painting in Paris from 1928 to 1932, and he developed an appreciation for Western literature.

  • Jiang Hua (Chinese jurist)

    Jiang Hua, Chinese judge who, as president of a special tribunal of the Supreme People’s Court—China’s highest judicial body—presided over the sensational 1980 trial of the “Gang of Four,” a radical communist group led by Mao Zedong’s widow, Jiang Qing (b. 1907, Jianghua, Hunan province, China—d.

  • Jiang Jie-shi (Chinese statesman)

    Chiang Kai-shek, soldier and statesman, head of the Nationalist government in China from 1928 to 1949 and subsequently head of the Chinese Nationalist government in exile on Taiwan. Chiang was born into a moderately prosperous merchant and farmer family in the coastal province of Zhejiang. He

  • Jiang Jieshi (Chinese statesman)

    Chiang Kai-shek, soldier and statesman, head of the Nationalist government in China from 1928 to 1949 and subsequently head of the Chinese Nationalist government in exile on Taiwan. Chiang was born into a moderately prosperous merchant and farmer family in the coastal province of Zhejiang. He

  • Jiang Jingguo (president of Taiwan)

    Chiang Ching-kuo, son of Chiang Kai-shek (Jiang Jieshi), and his successor as leader of the Republic of China (Taiwan). His father’s death in 1975 was followed by a caretaker presidency until March 21, 1978, when Chiang Ching-kuo (Jiang Jingguo) was formally elected by the National Assembly to a

  • Jiang Kanghu (Chinese scholar)

    Jiang Kanghu, Chinese scholar, teacher, and reformer who was a leading proponent of socialism in China in the early 20th century. Born into a scholar-official family, Jiang studied at home and briefly in Japan before returning to China in 1901 to take a position as head of the Zhili Northern

  • Jiang Qing (Chinese politician)

    Jiang Qing, third wife of Chinese communist leader Mao Zedong and the most influential woman in the People’s Republic of China for a while until her downfall in 1976, after Mao’s death. As a member of the Gang of Four she was convicted in 1981 of “counter-revolutionary crimes” and imprisoned.

  • Jiang Tao (Chinese painter)

    Hongren, foremost painter of the Anhui (Xinan) school, a centre of painting in southeast China during the Qing period that was noted for its unusual land features, especially of Huang Shan (“Yellow Mountain”), which frequently appears in paintings of the school. Jiang Tao adopted his Buddhist name

  • Jiang Wei (Chinese author)

    Ding Ling, one of China’s most popular 20th-century authors. In her early career Ding Ling initially wrote highly successful short stories centring on young, unconventional Chinese women. About 1930, with a distinct change in her artistic tendency, she became a major literary figure of the

  • Jiang Zemin (Chinese politician)

    Jiang Zemin, Chinese official who was general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP; 1989–2002) and president of China (1993–2003). Jiang joined the CCP in 1946 and graduated from Shanghai Jiao Tong University the following year with a degree in electrical engineering. He worked in several

  • Jiang Zhitong (Chinese politician)

    Qiao Shi, Chinese politician who rose to top leadership positions in the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and for a time in the 1990s was one of the most powerful men in China. Raised in Shanghai, Jiang Zhitong changed his name after joining the CCP in 1940. A graduate of East China Associated

  • Jiang Ziya (Chinese mythological figure)

    Caishen: …Shang dynasty (12th century bce), Jiang Ziya, a supporter of the subsequent Zhou-dynasty clan, made a straw effigy of Zhao and, after 20 days of incantations, shot an arrow made of peach-tree wood through the heart of the image. At that moment Zhao became ill and died. Later, during a…

  • Jiang-Huai plain (region, China)

    Jiangsu: Drainage: …what Chinese geographers call the Yangtze (Jiang)-Huai plain, built by the alluvium of the two rivers. The centre of this plain is only 6.5 to 13 feet (2 to 4 metres) above sea level, while its periphery stands at about 16 to 33 feet (5 to 10 metres). It is…

  • Jiangbei (district, Chongqing, China)

    Chongqing: Suburban and outlying districts: …the municipality’s core districts, including Jiangbei, Nan’an, Shapingba, Jiulongpo, and Dadukou. These districts have developed into major shopping and commercial centres. Shapingba also has emerged as a regional cultural centre, home to several of the municipality’s major institutions of higher learning. Jiangbei district is a centre of automobile and machinery…

  • Jiangmen (China)

    Jiangmen, city in central Guangdong sheng (province), China. The city is situated on the west bank of the main channel of the Xi River, at the southwest corner of the Pearl (Zhu) River Delta, some 45 miles (70 km) from Guangzhou (Canton). It has excellent waterway communications and is the chief

  • Jiangnan (region, China)

    Jiangsu: Land: … (Chang Jiang) into two sections, Jiangnan (literally, “South of the River”) and Subei (“North [Jiang]su”). Jiangnan is fertile and well-watered, famed for its silk and handicrafts, and very densely populated and industrialized. The cities of Suzhou (Soochow), Nanjing, and Wuxi, as well as Shanghai, are all located in this region.…

  • Jiangnan Arsenal (Chinese history)

    Jiangnan Arsenal, in Shanghai, major Chinese centre during the 1860s and 1870s for the manufacture of modern arms and the study of Western technical literature and Western languages. It was opened in 1865 as part of China’s Self-Strengthening movement. Begun as an ironworks base with machinery

  • Jiangnan Binggongchang (Chinese history)

    Jiangnan Arsenal, in Shanghai, major Chinese centre during the 1860s and 1870s for the manufacture of modern arms and the study of Western technical literature and Western languages. It was opened in 1865 as part of China’s Self-Strengthening movement. Begun as an ironworks base with machinery

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