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  • Jingō (empress of Japan)

    Jingū, semilegendary empress-regent of Japan who is said to have established Japanese hegemony over Korea. According to the traditional records of ancient Japan, Jingū was the wife of Chūai, the 14th sovereign (reigned 192–200), and the regent for her son ōjin. Aided by a pair of divine jewels that

  • jingoism (nationalism)

    Jingoism, an attitude of belligerent nationalism, or a blind adherence to the rightness or virtue of one’s own nation, society, or group, simply because it is one’s own. The term is the approximate equivalent of chauvinism (in one of its meanings), originally a French word (chauvinisme) denoting

  • Jingoki (Japanese mathematics)

    East Asian mathematics: The elaboration of Chinese methods: …mathematical book written in Japan, Jingoki (“Inalterable Treatise”), published in 1627 by Yoshida Mitsuyoshi, seems to be the first book that played an important role in the emerging Japanese tradition. Inspired by the Chinese text “Systematic Treatise on Mathematics,” whose importance is stressed above, it described in Japanese the use…

  • Jingozaemon (Japanese military strategist)

    Yamaga Sokō, military strategist and Confucian philosopher who set forth the first systematic exposition of the missions and obligations of the samurai (warrior) class and who made major contributions to Japanese military science. Yamaga’s thought became the central core of what later came to be

  • Jingpho language

    Sino-Tibetan languages: Tibeto-Burman languages: Lahu, Lisu, Kachin (Jingpo), Kuki-Chin, the obsolete Xixia (Tangut), and other languages. The Tibetan writing system (which dates from the 7th century) and the Burmese (dating from the 11th century) are derived from the Indo-Aryan (Indic) tradition. The Xixia system (developed in the 11th–13th century in northwestern…

  • Jingpo language

    Sino-Tibetan languages: Tibeto-Burman languages: Lahu, Lisu, Kachin (Jingpo), Kuki-Chin, the obsolete Xixia (Tangut), and other languages. The Tibetan writing system (which dates from the 7th century) and the Burmese (dating from the 11th century) are derived from the Indo-Aryan (Indic) tradition. The Xixia system (developed in the 11th–13th century in northwestern…

  • Jingshan Park (park, Beijing, China)

    Beijing: Recreation: Jingshan (Prospect Hill) Park, also known as Meishan (Coal Hill) Park, is a man-made hill, more than a mile (1.6 km) in circumference, located north of the Forbidden City. The hill, offering a spectacular panorama of Beijing from its summit, has five ridges, with a…

  • Jingshi dadian (Chinese history)

    China: Literature: …the compilation (1329–33) of the Jingshi dadian, a repository of 800 juan (chapters) of official documents and laws; the text is now lost. Private historiography, especially works on the events of the Song, fared rather poorly under the Yuan because of the adverse political and intellectual climate. The most-distinguished contribution…

  • Jingtai (emperor of Ming dynasty)

    Jingtai, reign name (nianhao) of the seventh emperor (reigned 1449–57) of the Ming dynasty. He ascended to the throne after his brother, the Zhengtong emperor, was captured while leading the imperial forces against the Oryat (western Mongol) leader Esen Taiji in 1449. When Esen tried to take

  • jingtian (Chinese history)

    Well-field system, the communal land organization supposedly in effect throughout China early in the Zhou dynasty (c. 1046–256 bce). The well-field system was first mentioned in the literature of the late Zhou dynasty (c. 4th century bce), especially in the writings of the famous Confucian

  • Jingū (empress of Japan)

    Jingū, semilegendary empress-regent of Japan who is said to have established Japanese hegemony over Korea. According to the traditional records of ancient Japan, Jingū was the wife of Chūai, the 14th sovereign (reigned 192–200), and the regent for her son ōjin. Aided by a pair of divine jewels that

  • Jingū Kōgō (empress of Japan)

    Jingū, semilegendary empress-regent of Japan who is said to have established Japanese hegemony over Korea. According to the traditional records of ancient Japan, Jingū was the wife of Chūai, the 14th sovereign (reigned 192–200), and the regent for her son ōjin. Aided by a pair of divine jewels that

  • Jingu qiguan (Chinese anthology)

    China: Literature and scholarship: …influence dominate the best-known anthology, Jingu qiguan (“Wonders Old and New”), published in Suzhou in 1624.

  • jingxi (Chinese theatre)

    Jingxi, (Chinese: “opera of the capital”) popular Chinese theatrical form that developed in the mid-19th century. It incorporated elements of huidiao from Anhui, dandiao from Hubei, and kunqu, the traditional opera that had predominated since the 16th century. Sung in Mandarin, the dialect of

  • jingying weizhi (Chinese aesthetics)

    Chinese painting: Three Kingdoms (220–280) and Six Dynasties (220–589): …to kind in applying colours); jingying weizhi (planning and design in placing and positioning); and chuanyi moxie (transmission of ancient models by copying). The last principle seems to refer to the copying of ancient paintings both for technical training and as a means of preserving them and hence the tradition…

  • Jingzhong (Chinese inventor)

    Cai Lun, Chinese court official who is traditionally credited with the invention of paper. Cai Lun was a eunuch who entered the service of the imperial palace in 75 ce and was made chief eunuch under the emperor Hedi (reigned 88–105/106) of the Dong (Eastern) Han dynasty in the year 89. About the

  • Jingzhou (China)

    Jingzhou, city and river port, southern Hubei sheng (province), south-central China. It is located on the north bank of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) near Lake Chang. The city was established in 1994 by combining what was then the city of Shashi with Jiangling county and the former Jingzhou

  • Jingzong (emperor of Xi Xia)

    Li Yuanhao, leader of the Tangut (Chinese: Dangxiang) tribes, a people who inhabited the northwestern region of China in what are now parts of Gansu and Shaanxi provinces and the Ningxia Hui and Inner Mongolia autonomous regions. Li founded the Xia (or Daxia) dynasty (1038–1227), usually referred

  • jingzuo (meditation technique)

    Ching-tso, (Chinese: “quiet sitting”) meditation technique associated with Neo-Confucianism. Influenced by both Taoist and Ch’an (Zen) Buddhist forms of meditation, it involves sitting in a relaxed fashion with the intent of quieting the flow of discursive thought and the attainment of the original

  • Jinhae (district, Ch’angw?n, South Korea)

    Chinhae, former city, on Chinhae Bay, South Ky?ngsang (Gyeongsang) do (province), southern South Korea, now a district of Ch’angw?n city. Its picturesque natural harbour is protected by K?je (Geoje) Island and Kos?ng (Goseong) Peninsula. During the Russo-Japanese War (1904–05) the Japanese navy

  • Jinhua (China)

    Jinhua, city, central Zhejiang sheng (province), China. Jinhua is the natural centre of the eastern half of the Jin-Qu (Jinhua-Quzhou) Basin, being situated at the junction of two of the tributaries of the Wu (Jinhua) River—the Dongyang River and the Wuyi River. It is also a junction on the railway

  • Jining (Shandong, China)

    Jining, city, southwestern Shandong sheng (province), China. In early times the seat of the state of Ren, it later became a part of the state of Qi, which flourished in the Zhou period (1046–256 bce). It underwent many changes of name and administrative status. The present name, Jining, first

  • Jining (former city, Inner Mongolia, China)

    Jining, former city, south-central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. In 2003 it became part of the large and newly formed Ulanqab municipality. A town and a minor station named Pingdiquan before 1956, it was a collecting point on the east-west Beijing-Baotou railway. It experienced

  • Jining Ulaanbaatar International Railway (railway, Asia)

    Inner Mongolia: Transportation: The Jining and Ulaanbaatar International Railway (completed in 1955) connects China with Mongolia and with Russia. This route shortened the rail distance between Beijing and Moscow by some 700 miles (1,130 km). The most important line constructed since 1949, however, is that from Baotou to Lanzhou…

  • Jinja (Uganda)

    Jinja, town located in southeastern Uganda where the Nile flows out of Lake Victoria, situated at an elevation of 3,740 feet (1,140 metres) above sea level. Jinja was founded in 1901 as a British administrative centre and grew to become one of the larger towns in Uganda. When construction on the

  • jinja (Japanese religious architecture)

    Jinja, in the Shintō religion of Japan, the place where the spirit of a deity is enshrined or to which it is summoned. Historically, jinja were located in places of great natural beauty; in modern times, however, urban shrines have become common. Though they may vary from large complexes of

  • Jinja Honchō (religious organization, Japan)

    jinja: …in Japan belong to the Jinja Honchō (Association of Shintō Shrines); its membership includes the majority of Japan’s 107,000,000 Shintō worshipers. Each shrine is managed by its own shrine committee, made up of priests and parishioners or their representatives.

  • Jinja Shintō (Japanese religion)

    Shrine Shintō, form of the Shintō religion of Japan that focusses on worship in public shrines, in contrast to folk and sectarian practices (see Kyōha Shintō); the successor to State Shintō, the nationalistic cult disbanded by decree of the Allied occupation forces at the end of World War II and

  • Jinji (fortress, India)

    Jinji, site of an almost inaccessible fortress constructed by the Hindu rulers of the Vijayanagar empire (c. 1347–1642). It is located about 80 miles (130 km) southwest of Chennai (Madras) in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. In 1638 the fortress was captured from the Maratha chief Shahji by the

  • Jinju (South Korea)

    Chinju, city, South Ky?ngsang (Gyeongsang) do (province), southern South Korea. It is situated west of Ch’angw?n along the Nam River, a tributary of the Naktong River. It was the centre of local administration beginning in the Three Kingdoms period (c. 57 bce–668 ce), under various names, and from

  • jink (cards)

    twenty-five: …to the fourth trick (“jink”), thereby undertaking to win all five. If he then loses a trick, he loses his stake. Jinking is now often omitted from the standard game.

  • Jinken shinsetsu (work by Katō Hiroyuki)

    Danshaku Katō Hiroyuki: …taken by Katō in his Jinken shinsetsu (1882; “New Theory on Human Rights”).

  • Jinks, Dan (American film producer)
  • Jinling Bajia (Chinese artists)

    Eight Masters of Nanjing, group of Chinese artists who lived and worked during the late 17th century in Nanjing (known as Jinling during the early Tang dynasty, c. 7th century). Although their group identity derives largely from the locale in which they worked, certain aesthetic similarities are

  • Jinlujai (Daoist rite)

    Daoism: The Lingbao scriptures and liturgies: Jinlujai (“Retreat of the Golden Register”), on the other hand, was intended to promote auspicious influences on the living. The Tutanjai (“Mud and Soot Retreat, or Retreat of Misery”) was a ceremony of collective contrition, with the purpose of fending off disease, the punishment of…

  • Jinmen Dao (island, Taiwan)

    Quemoy Island, island under the jurisdiction of Taiwan in the Taiwan Strait at the mouth of mainland China’s Xiamen (Amoy) Bay and about 170 miles (275 km) northwest of Kao-hsiung, Taiwan. Quemoy is the principal island of a group of 12, the Quemoy (Chin-men) Islands, which constitute Chin-men

  • jinn (Arabian mythology)

    Jinni, in Arabic mythology, a supernatural spirit below the level of angels and devils. Ghūl (treacherous spirits of changing shape), ?ifrīt (diabolic, evil spirits), and si?lā (treacherous spirits of invariable form) constitute classes of jinn. Jinn are beings of flame or air who are capable of

  • Jinnah Barrage (hydrology project, Pakistan)

    Pakistan: The desert areas: …before the construction of the Jinnah Barrage on the Indus River near Kalabagh in 1946. The Thal canal system, which draws water from the barrage, has turned parts of the desert into fertile cultivated land.

  • Jinnah, Mohammed Ali (Pakistani governor-general)

    Mohammed Ali Jinnah, Indian Muslim politician, who was the founder and first governor-general (1947–48) of Pakistan. Jinnah was the eldest of seven children of Jinnahbhai Poonja, a prosperous merchant, and his wife, Mithibai. His family was a member of the Khoja caste, Hindus who had converted to

  • jinni (Arabian mythology)

    Jinni, in Arabic mythology, a supernatural spirit below the level of angels and devils. Ghūl (treacherous spirits of changing shape), ?ifrīt (diabolic, evil spirits), and si?lā (treacherous spirits of invariable form) constitute classes of jinn. Jinn are beings of flame or air who are capable of

  • jinnī (Arabian mythology)

    Jinni, in Arabic mythology, a supernatural spirit below the level of angels and devils. Ghūl (treacherous spirits of changing shape), ?ifrīt (diabolic, evil spirits), and si?lā (treacherous spirits of invariable form) constitute classes of jinn. Jinn are beings of flame or air who are capable of

  • Jinno shotoki (work by Kitabatake)

    Kitabatake Chikafusa: …of the influential politico-historical treatise Jinnō shōtōki (“Record of the Legitimate Succession of the Divine Emperors”), which set forth the mystic and nationalist doctrine that Japan had a unique superiority among nations because of its unbroken succession of divine rulers.

  • Jinotega (Nicaragua)

    Jinotega, city, north-central Nicaragua. It lies in the central highlands just south of Lake Apanás. The city was a site of rebel incursions during the Contra war, mainly in the Jinotega mountains. The surrounding area is rugged, but its fertile soils produce coffee, tobacco, corn (maize), beans,

  • Jinotepe (Nicaragua)

    Jinotepe, city, southwestern Nicaragua. It is situated in the Diriamba Highlands at an elevation of 1,867 feet (569 m) above sea level. Given city status in 1883, it was a scene of heavy fighting in 1979 between Sandinista guerrillas and government troops. Jinotepe is a major commercial and

  • Jinpingmei (Chinese literature)

    Jinpingmei, (Chinese: “Gold Plum Vase”) the first realistic social novel to appear in China. It is the work of an unknown author of the Ming dynasty, and its earliest extant version is dated 1617. Two English versions were published in 1939 under the titles The Golden Lotus and Chin P’ing Mei: The

  • jinrickshaw (vehicle)

    Rickshaw, (from Japanese: “human-powered vehicle”), two-wheeled vehicle with a doorless, chairlike body and a collapsible hood, which holds one or two passengers and is drawn by a man between two shafts. It was used widely in the Orient but was largely superseded by the pedicab, a rickshaw driven

  • jinrikisha (vehicle)

    Rickshaw, (from Japanese: “human-powered vehicle”), two-wheeled vehicle with a doorless, chairlike body and a collapsible hood, which holds one or two passengers and is drawn by a man between two shafts. It was used widely in the Orient but was largely superseded by the pedicab, a rickshaw driven

  • Jinsha Jiang (river, China)

    Jinsha River, westernmost of the major headwater streams of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), southwestern China. Its headwaters rise in the Wulan and Kekexili (Hoh Xil) ranges in western Qinghai province, to the south of the Kunlun Mountains, and on the northern slope of the Tanggula (Dangla)

  • Jinsha River (river, China)

    Jinsha River, westernmost of the major headwater streams of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), southwestern China. Its headwaters rise in the Wulan and Kekexili (Hoh Xil) ranges in western Qinghai province, to the south of the Kunlun Mountains, and on the northern slope of the Tanggula (Dangla)

  • Jinshi (China)

    Jinshi, market town, northern Hunan sheng (province), China. Administratively a county-level city under the city of Changde, it was established through separation from Lixian county, first in 1950, and again in 1979. It stands on the north bank of the Li River some distance above its discharge into

  • jinshi (Chinese title)

    Chinese civil service: …bureaucracy then competed in the jinshi exams, which tested a candidate’s knowledge of the Confucian Classics. This system gradually became the major method of recruitment into the bureaucracy; by the end of the Tang dynasty, the old aristocracy was destroyed, and its power was taken by the scholar-gentry, who staffed…

  • Jinshin-no-ran (Japanese history)

    Jinshin-no-ran, (Japanese: “War of the Year of the Monkey”) in Japanese history, war of imperial succession that brought an emperor with a secure military base to the Japanese throne for the first time in history. The war strengthened the power of the imperial family at the expense of powerful

  • Jinshu (Chinese literature)

    Earth sciences: Knowledge of landforms and of land-sea relations: In the Jinshu (“History of the Jin Dynasty”), it is said of Du Yu (222–284 ce) that when he ordered monumental stelae to be carved with the records of his successes, he had one buried at the foot of a mountain and the other erected on top.…

  • Jinsi lu (Chinese anthology)

    Jinsi lu, (Chinese: “Reflections on Things at Hand”) influential anthology of neo-Confucian philosophical works compiled by the great Song dynasty thinker Zhu Xi (1130–1200) and his friend the philosopher Lu Ziqian (1137–81). Zhu Xi developed a philosophical system that became the orthodox

  • Jintian (Chinese literary magazine)

    Bei Dao: …created, with some fellow poets, Jintian (“Today”), the first nonofficial literary magazine in mainland China since the 1950s; it was censored by the authorities in 1980, after the first nine issues.

  • jinwen (Chinese script)

    Guwen, (Chinese: “ancient script”) early form of Chinese writing, examples of which are found on bronze vessels and objects of the Shang (c. 18th–12th century bc) and Zhou (12th century–256/255 bc) dynasties. The term jinwen (“metal script”), a reference to those metal objects, has also been used

  • Jinxian (southern Liaoning, China)

    Jinzhou, former town, southern Liaoning sheng (province), China. Now administratively a district under the city of Dalian, it is situated on Jinzhou Bay, a part of the Bo Hai (Gulf of Chihli), and on the neck of the Liaodong Peninsula immediately northeast of Dalian. Jinzhou is an important

  • Jinzhong (China)

    Jinzhong, city, central Shanxi sheng (province), northeast-central China. It is situated on the Xiao River, about 15 miles (25 km) south of Taiyuan, the provincial capital. Jinzhong was created in 1999 by amalgamating the city of Yuci and Jinzhong prefecture, with the former Yuci becoming a

  • Jinzhou (southern Liaoning, China)

    Jinzhou, former town, southern Liaoning sheng (province), China. Now administratively a district under the city of Dalian, it is situated on Jinzhou Bay, a part of the Bo Hai (Gulf of Chihli), and on the neck of the Liaodong Peninsula immediately northeast of Dalian. Jinzhou is an important

  • Jinzhou (western Liaoning, China)

    Jinzhou, city, western Liaoning sheng (province), China. It is strategically situated at the northern end of the narrow coastal plain between the Song Mountains and the Bo Hai (Gulf of Chihli). A Chinese administration was first established there under the Han dynasty (206 bce–220 ce) in the 2nd

  • Jippensha Ikku (Japanese author)

    Japan: The maturity of Edo culture: … in the sharebon (genre novel), Jippensha Ikku in the kokkeibon (comic novel), and Takizawa Bakin in the yomihon (regular novel). They examined in detail such things as the townspeople’s way of life, customs, conceptions of beauty, and ways of thinking. Ikku is best known for his Tōkai dōchu hizakurige (1802–22;…

  • jiqiu (Daoist priest)

    Daoism: The Way of the Celestial Masters: Here the jiqiu (“libationer”), the priestly functionary of the nuclear community, officiated. Each household contributed a tax of five pecks of rice to the administration, whence came the other common name of the movement, the Way of the Five Pecks of Rice (Wudoumidao).

  • Jirajara (people)

    Jirajara, Indians of northwestern Venezuela who were extinct by the mid-17th century. The little known about them suggests that they were very similar culturally to the Caquetío (

  • Jirara (people)

    Jirajara, Indians of northwestern Venezuela who were extinct by the mid-17th century. The little known about them suggests that they were very similar culturally to the Caquetío (

  • Jirásek, Alois (Czech writer)

    Alois Jirásek, the most important Czech novelist in the period before World War I, as well as a great national figure. Jirásek was a secondary-school teacher until his retirement in 1909. He wrote a series of historical novels imbued with faith in his nation and in progress toward freedom and

  • Jirgalanta (Mongolia)

    Hovd, town, administrative headquarters of Hovd aymag (province), western Mongolia, in the northern foothills of the Mongol Altayn Nuruu (Mongolian Altai Mountains) at an elevation of 4,260 ft (1,300 m). Har Us Nuur (lake) lies to the east and is fed by the Hovd Gol (river). Founded in 1731 as a

  • Ji?í z Poděbrad (king of Bohemia)

    George, king of Bohemia from 1458. As head of the conservative Utraquist faction of Hussite Protestants, he established himself as a power when Bohemia was still under Habsburg rule, and he was thereafter unanimously elected king by the estates. A nationalist and Hussite king of a prosperous

  • Jirjā (Egypt)

    Jirjā, town, Sawhāj mu?āfa?ah (governorate), Upper Egypt. It is situated on the west bank of the Nile River, which encroached considerably on the town in the 18th and 19th centuries. In pharaonic times it was probably the town of This (Tny), ancestral home of the 1st dynasty (c. 2925–c. 2775 bce),

  • Jirobei (Japanese artist)

    Suzuki Harunobu, Japanese artist of the Ukiyo-e movement (paintings and wood-block prints of the “floating world”), who established the art of nishiki-e, or polychrome prints. He created a fashion for pictures of lyrical scenes with figures of exquisite grace. It is believed that Harunobu studied

  • Jishi Mountains (mountains, China)

    Min Mountains: …far west are called the Amne Machin (Jishi Mountains), and those in the north are called the Xiqing Mountains. The central section of the range lying west of the Min River, which has an axis running from north to south, is known as the Qionglai Mountains. The easternmost section, which…

  • Jishū (Buddhist sect)

    Buddhism: Pure Land: …his school was called the Ji (“Times”) school, or Jishū.

  • JIT (business)

    Just-in-time manufacturing (JIT), Production-control system, developed by Toyota Motor Corp. and imported to the West, that has revolutionized manufacturing methods in some industries. By relying on daily deliveries of most supplies, it eliminates waste due to overproduction and lowers warehousing

  • Jitney (play by Wilson)

    John Legend: …2017 Legend coproduced August Wilson’s Jitney on Broadway, and he received a Tony Award when the drama was named best play revival. The following year Legend played the title role in a well-received live telecast of the 1970 rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar. As a coproducer, he garnered a Creative…

  • jitō (Japanese history)

    Jitō, in feudal Japan, land steward appointed by the central military government, or shogunate, whose duties involved levying taxes and maintaining peace within the manor. First appointed at the beginning of the 12th century, the jitō enforced the edicts of the shogunate and ensured that taxes

  • jitterbug (dance)

    Jitterbug, exuberant ballroom dance popular in the 1930s and ’40s, originating in the United States and spread internationally by U.S. armed forces during World War II. Its original freewheeling acrobatic swings and lifts were modified for more conservative ballroom versions. Couples did most

  • Jitterbug Perfume (novel by Robbins)

    Tom Robbins: …Still Life with Woodpecker (1980); Jitterbug Perfume (1984), which centres on a medieval king who lives for 1,000 years before becoming a janitor in Albert Einstein’s laboratory; Skinny Legs and All (1990), a fantastical novel that follows five inanimate objects on a journey to Jerusalem while exploring the Arab-Israeli conflict…

  • Jiu Defile (pass, Romania)

    Surduc Pass, pass, southwestern Romania. The Jiu River flows through the pass between the Valcan (west) and the Parang (east) mountains, in the Transylvanian Alps (Southern Carpathians). The pass connects the Petro?ani Depression (upper Jiu Valley) with the Plain of Oltenia. A road and the

  • Jiu Pass (pass, Romania)

    Surduc Pass, pass, southwestern Romania. The Jiu River flows through the pass between the Valcan (west) and the Parang (east) mountains, in the Transylvanian Alps (Southern Carpathians). The pass connects the Petro?ani Depression (upper Jiu Valley) with the Plain of Oltenia. A road and the

  • Jiu River (river, Romania)

    Jiu River, river formed south of Petro?ani, southwestern Romania, with the joining of two headstreams rising in the Valcan and Parang mountains. It then flows south, cutting a wild, deep gorge, the Surduc Pass in the Transylvanian Alps (Southern Carpathians), before flowing onto the Danube Plain

  • Jiu Zhuji (Chinese monk)

    Ch’ang-ch’un, Taoist monk and alchemist who journeyed from China across the heartland of Asia to visit Genghis Khan, the famed Mongol conqueror, at his encampment north of the Hindu Kush mountains. The narrative of Ch’ang-ch’un’s expedition, written by his disciple-companion Li Chih-chang, presents

  • Jiuhua Mountains (mountain range, China)

    Huang Mountains: …in elevation, known as the Jiuhua Mountains, runs parallel to the main range to the north along the southern bank of the Yangtze River.

  • Jiujiang (China)

    Jiujiang, river port and city, northern Jiangxi sheng (province), southeastern China. It lies along the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) to the west of its junction with Lake Poyang and the tributary system of the Gan River. Jiujiang is an important river port, although it does not have a good natural

  • Jiuling Mountains (mountains, China)

    Jiuling Mountains, range in northern Jiangxi province, China. The range runs southwest-northeast from east of Changsha in Hunan province to the valley of the Xiu River west of Lake Poyang, a distance of some 155 miles (250 km). It lies south of, and parallel to, the Mufu Mountains, from which it is

  • Jiuling Shan (mountains, China)

    Jiuling Mountains, range in northern Jiangxi province, China. The range runs southwest-northeast from east of Changsha in Hunan province to the valley of the Xiu River west of Lake Poyang, a distance of some 155 miles (250 km). It lies south of, and parallel to, the Mufu Mountains, from which it is

  • Jiulong (peninsula, Hong Kong, China)

    Kowloon Peninsula, part of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, southeastern China. It constitutes the Chinese mainland portion of the Hong Kong region and is located north of Hong Kong Island and east of the mouth of the Pearl (Zhu) River Delta. Geographically, it consists of two portions:

  • Jiulong Jiang (river, China)

    Jiulong River, river in southeastern Fujian province, China. The river rises in the mountains northwest of Zhangzhou, draining a large interior basin above Zhangping. The Xinqiao River and the Yanshi River and their tributaries drain the northeast and the southwest of the basin, respectively. The

  • Jiulong River (river, China)

    Jiulong River, river in southeastern Fujian province, China. The river rises in the mountains northwest of Zhangzhou, draining a large interior basin above Zhangping. The Xinqiao River and the Yanshi River and their tributaries drain the northeast and the southwest of the basin, respectively. The

  • Jiulongshan Formation (rock deposit, China)

    Castorocauda: Castorocauda was found in the Jiulongshan Formation (which is also called the Haifanggou Formation) of China, which preserved a nearly complete skeleton and skull, along with carbonized impressions of the skin and hair. Like living mammals, it had integument with an undercoat and guard hairs. Although it was not directly…

  • Jiuquan (China)

    Jiuquan, city, western Gansu sheng (province), China. An important staging post on the ancient Silk Road to Central Asia, Jiuquan was founded in 111 bce as a military outpost. From 602 ce onward it was the seat of Suzhou prefecture, and under the Tang dynasty (618–907) it was given its present

  • Jiushi liuliu de ta (film by Hou Hsiao-hsien [1980])

    Hou Hsiao-hsien: …feature-length films in 1980 with Jiushi liuliu de ta (“Cute Girl”), a melodrama that bore little resemblance to the films he would make as his personal style developed. The segment Hou directed for the anthology film Er zi de da wan ou (1983; “The Sandwich Man”) displayed the first flowering…

  • jiuta (musical form)

    stringed instrument: Ensembles: In jiuta the koto plays the principal melody, and the other instruments simultaneously produce variants of it. A traditional Japanese saying picturesquely describes the music of this ensemble by likening the koto to the bone, the samisen (sangen) to the flesh, and the shakuhachi to the…

  • Jiuzhai River valley (valley, China)

    Sichuan: Cultural life: …Mount Emei area and the Jiuzhai River valley. Mount Emei, in the south-central Daxiang Mountains, is one of the four sacred mountains of Chinese Buddhism; it reaches an elevation of 10,167 feet (3,099 metres) at Wanfo Summit. The mountain and the Leshan Giant Buddha (carved into a hillside in the…

  • Jiuzhaigou valley (valley, China)

    Sichuan: Cultural life: …Mount Emei area and the Jiuzhai River valley. Mount Emei, in the south-central Daxiang Mountains, is one of the four sacred mountains of Chinese Buddhism; it reaches an elevation of 10,167 feet (3,099 metres) at Wanfo Summit. The mountain and the Leshan Giant Buddha (carved into a hillside in the…

  • Jiuzhang suan fa zuan lei (work by Yang Hui)

    Yang Hui: Yang’s Jiuzhang suan fa zuan lei (c. 1275; “Reclassification of the Mathematical Procedures in the Nine Chapters”)—a compilation and reclassification, with further explanations, of the problems from the Han dynasty classic and its commentaries, Jiuzhang suanshu (c. 100 bc–ad 50; Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Procedures)—contains…

  • Jiuzhang suanshu (Chinese mathematics)

    East Asian mathematics: The textual sources: …Chinese is Jiuzhang suanshu (The Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art), which contains arithmetic, algebraic, and geometric algorithms, presented in relation to problems, some of which evoke the duties of the civil administration: surveying fields (areas), levying taxes according to various types of grains (ratios), determining wages for civil…

  • jiva (Indian philosophy and religion)

    Jiva, (Sanskrit: “living substance”) in Indian philosophy and religion, and particularly in Jainism and Hinduism, a living sentient substance akin to an individual soul. In the Jain tradition, jivas are opposed to ajivas, or “nonliving substances.” Jivas are understood as being eternal and infinite

  • Jiva (Uzbekistan)

    Khiva, city, south-central Uzbekistan. It lies west of the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River) on the Palvan Canal, and it is bounded on the south by the Karakum Desert and on the northeast by the Kyzylkum desert. A notorious slave market was centred there from the 17th to the 19th century. The city is

  • jīva (Indian philosophy and religion)

    Jiva, (Sanskrit: “living substance”) in Indian philosophy and religion, and particularly in Jainism and Hinduism, a living sentient substance akin to an individual soul. In the Jain tradition, jivas are opposed to ajivas, or “nonliving substances.” Jivas are understood as being eternal and infinite

  • Jiva Gosvamin (Indian philosopher)

    Indian philosophy: Chaitanya: …particularly by Rupa Gosvamin and Jiva Gosvamin. Rupa is the author of two great works: Bhakti-rasamrita-sindhu (“The Ocean of the Nectar of the Essence of Bhakti”) and Ujjvalanilamani (“The Shining Blue Jewel”). Jiva’s main work is the great and voluminous Shatsamdarbha. These are the main sources of the philosophy of…

  • jivandan (Indian social movement)

    India: Economic planning and development: …to a cooperative system, and jivandan (“gift of life”), the giving of all one’s labour, the latter attracting volunteers as famous as the socialist J.P. (Jaya Prakash) Narayan, who was the inspiration for the foundation of the Janata (People’s) Party opposition coalition to the Congress Party in the mid-1970s. The…

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