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  • Jívaro (people)

    Jívaro, South American Indian people living in the Monta?a (the eastern slopes of the Andes), in Ecuador and Peru north of the Mara?ón River. They speak a language of the Jebero-Jivaroan group. No recent and accurate Jívaro census has been completed; population estimates ranged from 15,000 to

  • jive (dance step)

    jitterbug: …one in place), and the jive, in which dancers took a step to each side and then executed two “shuffles” (side step, almost close other foot, side step). Jitterbug music—also called jive, or jump—is in 44 time with syncopated rhythm.

  • Jiwaji University (university, Gwalior, India)

    Gwalior: The contemporary city: Gwalior is the seat of Jiwaji University (founded 1964) with several affiliated colleges in the city, including science, medical, and education schools. Nearby is the 16th-century tomb of the Indian singer Tansen. The city is still a music centre, with its own distinctive style and tradition.

  • Jiwā?, Al- (geographical region, Arabia)

    Arabia: The Rub? al-Khali: …oasis hamlets of Al-Jiwā? (Liwā? in the United Arab Emirates) lie among the dunes on the desert’s northeastern fringe. The largest dunes of the Rub? al-Khali are in the far east, where heights of more than 800 feet are reached and sand ridges extend for more than 30 miles,…

  • Jixi (China)

    Jixi, city in southeastern Heilongjiang sheng (province), China. Located on the upper Muleng River, a tributary of the Ussuri (Wusuli) River, it is in a mountainous area rich in timber and various minerals including coal, iron, graphite, fluorite, and limestone. Jixi is, however, predominantly a

  • Jiyangzi (China)

    Gyangzê, town, southern Tibet Autonomous Region, western China. It is situated on the Nianchu River some 53 miles (86 km) southeast of Xigazê and about halfway between Lhasa (capital of Tibet) and the town of Yadong (Xarsingma) on the frontiers with India and Bhutan. Gyangzê is an important route

  • Jiyū-Minshutō (political party, Japan)

    Liberal-Democratic Party of Japan (LDP), Japan’s largest political party, which has held power almost continuously since its formation in 1955. The party has generally worked closely with business interests and followed a pro-U.S. foreign policy. During nearly four decades of uninterrupted power

  • Jiyūtō (political party, Japan)

    Gotō Shōjirō: …political party, the Jiyūtō (Liberal Party), based on Rousseauist democratic doctrines. After the movement was discontinued briefly, Gotō reorganized it as a league calling for revision of Japan’s treaties with the West. Upon the promulgation of the constitution and co-optation of the party leaders, he joined the government in…

  • Jīzah, Ahrāmāt al- (pyramids, Egypt)

    Pyramids of Giza, three 4th-dynasty (c. 2575–c. 2465 bce) pyramids erected on a rocky plateau on the west bank of the Nile River near Al-Jīzah (Giza) in northern Egypt. In ancient times they were included among the Seven Wonders of the World. The ancient ruins of the Memphis area, including the

  • Jīzah, Al- (governorate, Egypt)

    Al-Jīzah, mu?āfa?ah (governorate) of Upper Egypt, on the west bank of the Nile River, extending toward the southwest into the Western (Libyan) Desert as far as Al-Wādī Al-Jadīd governorate. It is bordered on the north by Al-Minūfiyyah governorate and on the south by Banī Suwayf and Al-Fayyūm

  • Jīzah, Al- (Egypt)

    Al-Jīzah, city, capital of Al-Jīzah mu?āfa?ah (governorate) in Upper Egypt, located on the west bank of the Nile River just south-southwest of Cairo. It is a suburb of the national capital, with a distinctive character enriched by several archaeological and cultural sites. The district was settled

  • Jīzān (Saudi Arabia)

    Jīzān, town and port, southwestern Saudi Arabia, on the Red Sea opposite the Farasān Islands. Defined by the 1934 Treaty of Al-?ā?if as belonging to Saudi Arabia, the town has been claimed by Yemen since the 1960s. Jīzān is the principal town of the Tihāmah coastal plain and the exporting and

  • Jizang (Buddhist monk)

    Chi-tsang, Chinese Buddhist monk who systematized the teachings of the San-lun (“Three Treatises,” or Middle Doctrine) school of Māhāyana Buddhism in China and who is sometimes regarded as its founder. Chi-tsang was the son of a Parthian father and a Chinese mother, but his education and u

  • Jízdní hlídka (work by Langer)

    Franti?ek Langer: Of his later writing, only Jízdní hlídka (1935; “The Cavalry Watch”) compared with his earlier successes; it was based upon his experiences with the legion.

  • Jizera Mountains (mountains, Europe)

    Jizera Mountains, part of the Sudeten mountain ranges in northern Bohemia, Czech Republic, extending into Poland. It comprises a small group of peaks, though it has the highest point in the Czech Republic, at Jizera (3,681 feet [1,122 m]); Wysoka Kopa in Poland is slightly higher (3,698 feet [1,127

  • Jizera River (river, Czech Republic)

    Jizera River, tributary of the Elbe (Labe) River in northern Czech Republic. It rises at the southern base of Smrk Mountain on the Polish border, in the Giant (Krkono?e) Mountains, and flows generally south past Turnov and Mladá Boleslav. It reaches the Elbe northeast of Prague after a course of

  • Jizerské Hory (mountains, Europe)

    Jizera Mountains, part of the Sudeten mountain ranges in northern Bohemia, Czech Republic, extending into Poland. It comprises a small group of peaks, though it has the highest point in the Czech Republic, at Jizera (3,681 feet [1,122 m]); Wysoka Kopa in Poland is slightly higher (3,698 feet [1,127

  • Jizhi (Chinese archaeologist)

    Li Chi, archaeologist chiefly responsible for establishing the historical authenticity of the semilegendary Shang dynasty of China. The exact dates of the Shang dynasty are uncertain; traditionally, they have been given as from c. 1766 to c. 1122 bce, but more recent archaeological evidence has

  • Jizl-?am? (river, Saudi Arabia)

    Arabian Desert: Physiography: …have intercepted them, including Wadi Jizl-?am? in northern Hejaz and Wadi ?a?ramawt in the south.

  • Jizō (bodhisattva)

    Dizang, in Chinese Buddhism, bodhisattva (buddha-to-be) who is especially committed to delivering the dead from the torments of hell. His name is a translation of the Sanskrit Kshitigarbha (“Womb of the Earth”). Dizang seeks to deliver the souls of the dead from the punishments inflicted by the 10

  • jizya (Islamic tax)

    Jizyah, historically, a tax (the term is often incorrectly translated as a “head tax” or “poll tax”) paid by non-Muslim populations to their Muslim rulers. The jizyah is described in the Qur?ān as a tax that is imposed on a certain erring faction from among the People of the Book (Ahl al-Kitāb;

  • jizyah (Islamic tax)

    Jizyah, historically, a tax (the term is often incorrectly translated as a “head tax” or “poll tax”) paid by non-Muslim populations to their Muslim rulers. The jizyah is described in the Qur?ān as a tax that is imposed on a certain erring faction from among the People of the Book (Ahl al-Kitāb;

  • Jizzax (Uzbekistan)

    Jizzax, city, eastern Uzbekistan. The city is located in a small oasis irrigated by the Sanzar River, northeast of Samarkand. One of the most ancient settlements of Uzbekistan, it was situated on the trade routes to the Mediterranean near Tamerlane’s Gates, the only convenient passage through the

  • jj coupling (physics)

    spectroscopy: Total orbital angular momentum and total spin angular momentum: A coupling scheme known as jj coupling is sometimes applicable. In this scheme, each electron n is assigned an angular momentum j composed of its orbital angular momentum l and its spin s. The total angular momentum J is then the vector addition of j1 + j2 + j3 +…,…

  • Jk3 (antigen)

    Kidd blood group system: Jka, Jkb, and Jk3, all of which are encoded by a gene known as SLC14A1 (solute carrier family 14, member 1). The Jka antigen occurs in more than 90 percent of blacks, 75 percent of whites, and 70 percent of Asians. The Jkb antigen is found in about…

  • Jka (antigen)

    Kidd blood group system: …of three known antigens, designated Jka, Jkb, and Jk3, all of which are encoded by a gene known as SLC14A1 (solute carrier family 14, member 1). The Jka antigen occurs in more than 90 percent of blacks, 75 percent of whites, and 70 percent of Asians. The Jkb antigen is…

  • Jkb (antigen)

    Kidd blood group system: …three known antigens, designated Jka, Jkb, and Jk3, all of which are encoded by a gene known as SLC14A1 (solute carrier family 14, member 1). The Jka antigen occurs in more than 90 percent of blacks, 75 percent of whites, and 70 percent of Asians. The Jkb antigen is found…

  • JKNC (political party, India)

    Jammu and Kashmir National Conference (JKNC), regional political party in the state of Jammu and Kashmir, northwestern India. In October 1932 the All Jammu and Kashmir Muslim Conference, the precursor of the Jammu and Kashmir National Conference (JKNC), was founded at Srinagar by Sheikh Muhammad

  • JLP (political party, Jamaica)

    Jamaica: Political process: …main political parties are the Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) and the People’s National Party (PNP), and between them they have dominated legislative elections since the country’s independence, to the virtual exclusion of any third party. The adversarial nature of Jamaican politics conceals broad agreement on constitutionalism, public education, and social…

  • JMM (political party, India)

    Jharkhand Mukti Morcha (JMM), regional political party of Jharkhand state, northeastern India. It has had only a limited presence on the national political scene in New Delhi. The JMM was formed in 1973 as a movement to spearhead what would become a decades-long effort to establish a separate

  • JN-4 (airplane)

    Glenn Hammond Curtiss: The Curtiss JN-4 (“Jenny”) was the standard training and general-purpose aircraft in American military service during the years prior to the U.S. entry into World War I. The NC-4, a multiengine Curtiss flying boat, made the first flight across the Atlantic Ocean in 1919, opening the…

  • j?āna (Indian religion)

    Jnana, (Sanskrit: “knowledge”) in Hindu philosophy, a word with a range of meanings focusing on a cognitive event that proves not to be mistaken. In the religious realm it especially designates the sort of knowledge that is a total experience of its object, particularly the supreme being or

  • jnana (Indian religion)

    Jnana, (Sanskrit: “knowledge”) in Hindu philosophy, a word with a range of meanings focusing on a cognitive event that proves not to be mistaken. In the religious realm it especially designates the sort of knowledge that is a total experience of its object, particularly the supreme being or

  • jnana-marga (Hinduism)

    Hinduism: Dharma and the three paths: …ritual and social obligations; the jnana-marga (“path of knowledge”), the use of meditative concentration preceded by long and systematic ethical and contemplative training (Yoga) to gain a supraintellectual insight into one’s identity with brahman; and the bhakti-marga (“path of devotion”), love for a personal God. These ways are regarded as…

  • J?āna-Mīmām?ā (Hindu philosophy)

    Vedanta, one of the six systems (darshans) of Indian philosophy. The term Vedanta means in Sanskrit the “conclusion” (anta) of the Vedas, the earliest sacred literature of India. It applies to the Upanishads, which were elaborations of the Vedas, and to the school that arose out of the study

  • Jnanadeva (Indian poet)

    Jnanadeva, mystical poet-saint of Maharashtra and composer of the Bhavarthadipika (popularly known as the Jnaneshvari), a translation and commentary in Marathi oral verse on the Bhagavadgita. Born into a family that had renounced society (sannyasi), Jnanadeva was considered an outcaste when his

  • Jnaneshvara (Indian poet)

    Jnanadeva, mystical poet-saint of Maharashtra and composer of the Bhavarthadipika (popularly known as the Jnaneshvari), a translation and commentary in Marathi oral verse on the Bhagavadgita. Born into a family that had renounced society (sannyasi), Jnanadeva was considered an outcaste when his

  • Jnaneshvari (work by Jnanadeva)

    Indo-Aryan literature: Jnaneshvari, a Marathi verse commentary on the Bhagavadgita written by Jnaneshvara (Jnanadeva) in the late 13th century spread devotional movement through Maharashtra. As a result, it was reflected in the works of the poet-saints Namdev and Tukaram. In Rajasthan

  • Jnanpith Award (Indian literary award)

    Jnanpith Award, highest literary award in India, given annually for the best creative literary writing to writers in any of the 22 “scheduled languages” recognized in the Indian Constitution. The prize carries a cash award, a citation, and a bronze replica of Vagdevi (Saraswati), the goddess of

  • J?āt?ka (people)

    India: Political systems: …those of the Koliyas, Moriyas, Jnatrikas, Shakyas, and Licchavis. The Jnatrikas and Shakyas are especially remembered as the tribes to which Mahavira (the founder of Jainism) and Gautama Buddha, respectively, belonged. The Licchavis eventually became extremely powerful.

  • JNP (political party, Japan)

    Hosokawa Morihiro: …of the reform political party Japan New Party (Nihon Shintō) and prime minister of Japan in 1993–94.

  • JNR (Japanese organization)

    Japan Railways Group, principal rail network of Japan, consisting of 12 corporations created by the privatization of the government-owned Japanese National Railways (JNR) in 1987. The first railroad in Japan, built by British engineers, opened in 1872, between Tokyo and Yokohama. After some initial

  • Jo Shui (river, China)

    Hei River, river rising in central Gansu province, China, and flowing into the western Alxa Plateau (Ala Shan Desert) in western Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The river is formed by a series of small glacier-fed rivers flowing north from the Nan and Qilian mountain ranges in Gansu, between

  • Jo’s Boys (novel by Alcott)

    Little Women: …with Jo’s Boys (1871) and Jo’s Boys and How They Turned Out (1886). Little Women also inspired numerous movies, including the 1933 classic, which starred Katharine Hepburn as Jo, and a 1994 film directed by Gillian Armstrong. In addition, director-screenwriter Greta Gerwig’s adaptation earned wide acclaim in 2019.

  • Jo’s Boys and How They Turned Out (novel by Alcott)

    Little Women: …with Jo’s Boys (1871) and Jo’s Boys and How They Turned Out (1886). Little Women also inspired numerous movies, including the 1933 classic, which starred Katharine Hepburn as Jo, and a 1994 film directed by Gillian Armstrong. In addition, director-screenwriter Greta Gerwig’s adaptation earned wide acclaim in 2019.

  • Jo, Sumi (South Korean opera singer)

    Sumi Jo, South Korean soprano known for her light, expressive voice and her virtuosic performance of major coloratura roles of the operatic repertoire. Jo began studying music at an early age. She entered the music school of Seoul National University but left in her second year to attend the

  • Jo-block (engineering)

    Carl Edvard Johansson: Johansson’s blocks, known as “Jo-blocks,” were made of the highest quality steel and were fabricated to a precision that made them famous around the world. From 1925 to 1936 he worked in Dearborn, Mich., under exclusive contract to Henry Ford, who used his blocks and also sold them to…

  • Jo-erh-kai Chao-tse (marsh, China)

    Zoigê Marsh, large marsh lying mostly in northern Sichuan province, west-central China. It occupies about 1,000 square miles (2,600 square km) of the eastern part of the Plateau of Tibet at an elevation of 11,800 feet (3,600 metres) above sea level and extends westward across the border of Sichuan

  • jo-ha-kyū (music)

    Japanese music: Structural ideals: …the Japanese tripartite form is jo-ha-kyū—the introduction, the scatterings, and the rushing toward the end. A Western musician might wish to compare this with sonata form and its three parts (exposition, development, recapitulation). But the Western example relates to a complete event and involves the development of certain motives or…

  • Joab (biblical figure)

    Joab, in the Old Testament (2 Samuel), a Jewish military commander under King David, who was his mother’s brother. He led the commando party that captured Jerusalem for David and as a reward was appointed commander in chief of the army. He played a leading part in many of David’s victories (e.g.,

  • Joachim Frederick (elector of Brandenburg)

    Joachim Frederick, elector of Brandenburg (1598–1608), eldest son of Elector John George. Joachim established the rule of primogeniture for the Hohenzollern electorate by a family agreement known as the Gera Bond (1598), which confirmed the practice begun by Albert III Achilles whereby Brandenburg

  • Joachim Friedrich (elector of Brandenburg)

    Joachim Frederick, elector of Brandenburg (1598–1608), eldest son of Elector John George. Joachim established the rule of primogeniture for the Hohenzollern electorate by a family agreement known as the Gera Bond (1598), which confirmed the practice begun by Albert III Achilles whereby Brandenburg

  • Joachim I Nestor (elector of Brandenburg)

    Joachim I Nestor, elector of Brandenburg, an opponent of the Habsburg emperors, yet a devout Roman Catholic who prevented the spread of Protestantism in his lands during his lifetime. Joachim at first supported Francis I of France at the imperial election of 1519 and at one point even hoped to

  • Joachim II Hektor (elector of Brandenburg)

    Joachim II Hektor, elector of Brandenburg who, while supporting the Holy Roman emperor, tolerated the Reformation in his lands and resisted imperial efforts at re-Catholicization. The elder son of Joachim I, Joachim II was given the Old (Altmark) and Middle Marks of Brandenburg on his father’s

  • Joachim of Fiore (Italian theologian)

    Joachim Of Fiore, Italian mystic, theologian, biblical commentator, philosopher of history, and founder of the monastic order of San Giovanni in Fiore. He developed a philosophy of history according to which history develops in three ages of increasing spirituality: the ages of the Father, the

  • Joachim of Floris (Italian theologian)

    Joachim Of Fiore, Italian mystic, theologian, biblical commentator, philosopher of history, and founder of the monastic order of San Giovanni in Fiore. He developed a philosophy of history according to which history develops in three ages of increasing spirituality: the ages of the Father, the

  • Joachim, Al (American entertainer)

    Ritz Brothers: …the three were known as Al (Alfred; b. August 27, 1901, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.—d. December 22, 1965, New Orleans, Louisiana), Jimmy (b. October 23, 1904, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.—d. November 17, 1985, Los Angeles, California), and Harry (Herschel May; b. May 28, 1907, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.—d. March 29,…

  • Joachim, Alfred (American entertainer)

    Ritz Brothers: …the three were known as Al (Alfred; b. August 27, 1901, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.—d. December 22, 1965, New Orleans, Louisiana), Jimmy (b. October 23, 1904, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.—d. November 17, 1985, Los Angeles, California), and Harry (Herschel May; b. May 28, 1907, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.—d. March 29,…

  • Joachim, Harold Henry (British philosopher)

    truth: Coherence and pragmatist theories: Bradley and H.H. Joachim, who, like all idealists, rejected the existence of mind-independent facts against which the truth of beliefs could be determined (see also realism: realism and truth).

  • Joachim, Harry (American entertainer)

    Ritz Brothers: …1985, Los Angeles, California), and Harry (Herschel May; b. May 28, 1907, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.—d. March 29, 1986, San Diego, California).

  • Joachim, Herschel May (American entertainer)

    Ritz Brothers: …1985, Los Angeles, California), and Harry (Herschel May; b. May 28, 1907, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.—d. March 29, 1986, San Diego, California).

  • Joachim, Jimmy (American entertainer)

    Ritz Brothers: …22, 1965, New Orleans, Louisiana), Jimmy (b. October 23, 1904, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.—d. November 17, 1985, Los Angeles, California), and Harry (Herschel May; b. May 28, 1907, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.—d. March 29, 1986, San Diego, California).

  • Joachim, Joseph (Hungarian violinist)

    Joseph Joachim, Hungarian violinist known for his masterful technique and his interpretations of works of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven. Joachim first studied at Budapest, and at age seven he appeared with his teacher S. Serwaczyński. In 1844 he visited London, where he was sponsored by Mendelssohn

  • Joachim, Saint (father of Virgin Mary)

    Saints Anne and Joachim: Traditional account and legends: She married Joachim, and, although they shared a wealthy and devout life at Nazareth, they eventually lamented their childlessness. Joachim, reproached at the Temple for his sterility, retreated into the countryside to pray, while Anne, grieved by his disappearance and by her barrenness, solemnly promised God that,…

  • Joachimsthal (Czech Republic)

    Jáchymov, spa town, western Czech Republic. It lies at the foot of Mount Klínovec, the highest summit in the Ore Mountains (Kru?né hory), just north of Karlovy Vary and near the border with Germany. A silver-mining centre for the Holy Roman Empire, the town reached its peak in the 16th century,

  • Joachimsthaler (coin)

    Jáchymov: …German monetary unit taler, or thaler, from which the English word dollar is derived, refers to the Joachimsthaler, a coin first minted in Jáchymov in 1517.

  • Joachin (king of Judah)

    Jehoiachin, in the Old Testament (II Kings 24), son of King Jehoiakim and king of Judah. He came to the throne at the age of 18 in the midst of the Chaldean invasion of Judah and reigned three months. He was forced to surrender to Nebuchadrezzar II and was taken to Babylon (597 bc), along with 1

  • Joad family (fictional characters)

    Joad family, fictional family of dispossessed tenant farmers, the main characters in The Grapes of Wrath (1939), John Steinbeck’s novel of the Great

  • Joad, C. E. M. (British philosopher)

    C.E.M. Joad, British philosopher, author, teacher, and radio personality. He was one of Britain’s most colourful and controversial intellectual figures of the 1940s. He was a pacifist and an agnostic until the last years of his life, a champion of unpopular causes, and a writer of popular

  • Joad, Cyril Edwin Mitchinson (British philosopher)

    C.E.M. Joad, British philosopher, author, teacher, and radio personality. He was one of Britain’s most colourful and controversial intellectual figures of the 1940s. He was a pacifist and an agnostic until the last years of his life, a champion of unpopular causes, and a writer of popular

  • Joakim (king of Judah)

    Jehoiakim, in the Old Testament (II Kings 23:34–24:17; Jer. 22:13–19; II Chron. 36:4–8), son of King Josiah and king of Judah (c. 609–598 bc). When Josiah died at Megiddo, his younger son, Jehoahaz (or Shallum), was chosen king by the Judahites, but the Egyptian conqueror Necho took Jehoahaz to E

  • Joan (Spanish infanta)

    Spain: Castile and León, 1252–1479: …the legitimacy of the infanta Joan, who they declared was the child of the queen and of the king’s most recent favourite, Beltrán de la Cueva. Because of that account, the young girl was derided as “La Beltraneja.” Henry IV repudiated her and recognized his sister Isabella as heir to…

  • Joan (niece of Philip V)

    Philip V: …1316, leaving an infant daughter Joan by his adulterous first wife, and a pregnant widow, Philip won recognition as regent for the unborn child and then, upon its death in November 1316, five days after birth, declared himself king. Anointed at Reims in January 1317, Philip quickly moved to consolidate…

  • Joan (queen of Castile and Aragon)

    Joan, queen of Castile (from 1504) and of Aragon (from 1516), though power was exercised for her by her husband, Philip I, her father, Ferdinand II, and her son, the emperor Charles V (Charles I of Spain). Joan was the third child of Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile and became h

  • Joan and Peter (novel by Wells)

    novel: Apprenticeship: …The Dream (1924) and, in Joan and Peter (1918), concentrates on the search for the right modes of apprenticeship to the complexities of modern life.

  • Joan Armatrading (album by Armatrading)

    Joan Armatrading: …solo, winning critical acclaim with Joan Armatrading (1976), which cracked the British top 20 and featured the top 10 single “Love and Affection.” Armatrading’s romantic, bittersweet lyrics conveyed in her rounded, expressive voice dominated a series of best-selling albums, namely Show Some Emotion (1977), To the Limit (1978), Me Myself…

  • Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold (film by Dunne [2017])

    Joan Didion: …the focus of the documentary Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold (2017).

  • Joan I (queen of France)

    Joan I, queen of Navarre (as Joan I, from 1274), queen consort of Philip IV (the Fair) of France (from 1285), and mother of three French kings—Louis X, Philip V, and Charles IV. Joan was the sole daughter and heir of Henry I, king of Navarre, her brother Theobald (Thibaut) having died at an early

  • Joan I (queen of Naples)

    Joan I, countess of Provence and queen of Naples (1343–82) who defended her claim as well as that of the house of Anjou to the throne of Naples, only to lose it to Charles of Durazzo (Charles III of Naples). Beautiful and intelligent, she was also a patron of the poets and scholars of her time.

  • Joan II (queen of Naples)

    Joan II, queen of Naples whose long reign (1414–35) was marked by a succession of love affairs, by continual intrigues, and by power struggles over her domain between the French house of Anjou and that of Aragon, in Spain. After her first husband, William of Austria, died in 1406, Joan is r

  • Joan Makes History (novel by Grenville)

    Kate Grenville: Joan Makes History (1988) considers the subject of Australian history and identity through the story of Joan, born in 1901, the year of Australia’s federation. As Joan moves through her life, she imagines a multiplicity of other Joans present at different moments in Australia’s history,…

  • Joan of Arc (film by Fleming [1948])

    Victor Fleming: The 1940s: His next—and final—movie was Joan of Arc (1948), a rather plodding adaptation of Maxwell Anderson’s stage epic, though Bergman and costar José Ferrer both received Oscar nominations.

  • Joan of Arc, St. (French heroine)

    St. Joan of Arc, ; canonized May 16, 1920; feast day May 30; French national holiday, second Sunday in May), national heroine of France, a peasant girl who, believing that she was acting under divine guidance, led the French army in a momentous victory at Orléans that repulsed an English attempt to

  • Joan of Arcadia (American television series)

    Mary Steenburgen: …in the 2003–05 TV series Joan of Arcadia. In addition, Steenburgen performed in David Lynch’s dramatic film Inland Empire (2006) and the romantic comedy The Proposal (2009).

  • Joan of England (queen of Sicily)

    Richard I: Sicily: …imprisoned the late king’s wife, Joan of England (Richard’s sister), and denied her possession of her dower. By the Treaty of Messina Richard obtained for Joan her release and her dower, acknowledged Tancred as king of Sicily, declared Arthur of Brittany (Richard’s nephew) to be his own heir, and provided…

  • Joan of Navarre (queen of France)

    Joan I, queen of Navarre (as Joan I, from 1274), queen consort of Philip IV (the Fair) of France (from 1285), and mother of three French kings—Louis X, Philip V, and Charles IV. Joan was the sole daughter and heir of Henry I, king of Navarre, her brother Theobald (Thibaut) having died at an early

  • Joan of Navarre (queen of England)

    Joan of Navarre, the wife of Henry IV of England and the daughter of Charles the Bad, king of Navarre. In 1386 Joan was married to John IV (or V), duke of Brittany; they had eight children. John died in 1399, and Joan was regent for her son John V (or VI) until 1401. During his banishment

  • Joan of Paris (film by Stevenson [1942])

    Robert Stevenson: Early films: Joan of Paris (1942) was one of the best early World War II action movies and starred Michèle Morgan, Paul Henreid, and Laird Cregar. Stevenson then contributed a segment to the episodic drama Forever and a Day (1943). The intergenerational family saga featured an all-star…

  • Joan the Mad (queen of Castile and Aragon)

    Joan, queen of Castile (from 1504) and of Aragon (from 1516), though power was exercised for her by her husband, Philip I, her father, Ferdinand II, and her son, the emperor Charles V (Charles I of Spain). Joan was the third child of Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile and became h

  • Joan, Pope (legendary pope)

    Pope Joan, legendary female pontiff who supposedly reigned, under the title of John VIII, for slightly more than 25 months, from 855 to 858, between the pontificates of St. Leo IV (847–855) and Benedict III (855–858). It has subsequently been proved that a gap of only a few weeks fell between Leo

  • Joanie Loves Chachi (American television series)

    Happy Days: …Out of the Blue (1979), Joanie Loves Chachi (1982–83), Laverne and Shirley (1976–83), and Mork and Mindy (1978–82), the last two of which, like Happy Days, were produced by Gary Marshall, who went on to direct motion pictures such as Pretty Woman (1990). Howard, who had received his start in…

  • Joanna Godden (novel by Kaye-Smith)

    Sheila Kaye-Smith: Tamarisk Town (1919) and Joanna Godden (1921) similarly deal with struggle and survival in rural Sussex.

  • Joanna I (queen of Naples)

    Joan I, countess of Provence and queen of Naples (1343–82) who defended her claim as well as that of the house of Anjou to the throne of Naples, only to lose it to Charles of Durazzo (Charles III of Naples). Beautiful and intelligent, she was also a patron of the poets and scholars of her time.

  • Joanna II (queen of Naples)

    Joan II, queen of Naples whose long reign (1414–35) was marked by a succession of love affairs, by continual intrigues, and by power struggles over her domain between the French house of Anjou and that of Aragon, in Spain. After her first husband, William of Austria, died in 1406, Joan is r

  • Joannes Andreae (canonist)

    decretal: …IX at Gregory’s direction; and Joannes Andreae (d. 1348), a married lay professor of the decretals at the University of Bologna, who is regarded as the father of the history of canon law.

  • Joannides (Eastern Orthodox patriarch)

    Anthimus VI, Eastern Orthodox patriarch of Constantinople who attempted to maintain his ecclesiastical authority over the rebellious Bulgarian Orthodox Church, and, with others, wrote an Orthodox encyclical letter repudiating Roman Catholic overtures toward reunion. In about 1840 Anthimus, a monk o

  • Jo?o Belo (Mozambique)

    Xai-Xai, port town, southern Mozambique. Located on the eastern bank of the Limpopo River near its mouth, the town is a market centre for cashew nuts, rice, corn (maize), cassava, and sorghum raised in the surrounding area, which is irrigated by the lower Limpopo irrigation project; dairy cattle

  • Jo?o de Aviz (king of Portugal)

    John I, king of Portugal from 1385 to 1433, who preserved his country’s independence from Castile and initiated Portugal’s overseas expansion. He was the founder of the Aviz, or Joanina (Johannine), dynasty. John was the illegitimate son of King Pedro I and Teresa Louren?o. At age six he was made

  • J?ao de Deus (Portuguese monk)

    Saint John of God, ; canonized 1690; feast day March 8), founder of the Hospitaller Order of St. John of God (Brothers Hospitallers), a Roman Catholic religious order of nursing brothers. In 1886 Pope Leo XIII declared him patron of hospitals and the sick. Formerly a shepherd and soldier, he was so

  • Jo?o I (king of Kongo Kingdom)

    Kongo: …baptized and assumed Christian names—Jo?o I Nzinga a Nkuwu and Afonso I Mvemba a Nzinga, respectively. Afonso, who became manikongo c.1509, extended Kongo’s borders, centralized administration, and forged strong ties between Kongo and Portugal. He eventually faced problems with the Portuguese community that settled in Kongo regarding their handling…

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