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  • Johnson, Judy (American baseball player and manager)

    Judy Johnson, American professional baseball player and manager in the Negro leagues between 1918 and 1936. A sure-handed and graceful fielder, Johnson is considered one of the best defensive third baseman ever to play baseball. He had a .309 career batting average but hit with little power.

  • Johnson, Junior (American stock-car driver)

    Junior Johnson, American stock-car driver who ranks among the most influential figures in National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) history. One of NASCAR’s most colourful characters, Johnson was a direct link back to the sport’s early connection to liquor bootlegging. Though he never

  • Johnson, Katherine (American mathematician)

    Katherine Johnson, American mathematician who calculated and analyzed the flight paths of many spacecraft during her more than three decades with the U.S. space program. Her work helped send astronauts to the Moon. Coleman’s intelligence and skill with numbers became apparent when she was a child,

  • Johnson, Kelly (American aeronautical engineer)

    Kelly Johnson, highly innovative American aeronautical engineer and designer. Johnson received his B.S. (1932) and M.S. (1933) degrees from the University of Michigan before beginning his career with the Lockheed Corporation in 1933. As head of the “Skunk Works,” Lockheed’s secret development unit,

  • Johnson, Kevin (American basketball player)

    Phoenix Suns: …Suns traded for point guard Kevin Johnson in the middle of the 1987–88 season and signed free agent forward Tom Chambers in the off-season. The two would form the core of a reinvigorated team that advanced to the conference finals in both 1989 and 1990, the first 2 of 13…

  • Johnson, La Raine (American actress)

    Laraine Day, (La Raine Johnson), American actress (born Oct. 13, 1920, Roosevelt, Utah—died Nov. 10, 2007, Ivins, Utah), portrayed decent and steadfast women in Hollywood films of the 1940s, but her most memorable role was that of Mary Lamont, the beloved nurse in seven Dr. Kildare movies. Though

  • Johnson, Lady Bird (first lady of the United States)

    Lady Bird Johnson, American first lady (1963–69), the wife of Lyndon B. Johnson, 36th president of the United States, and an environmentalist noted for her emphasis on beautification. The daughter of Thomas Jefferson Taylor, a prosperous businessman, and Minnie Patillo Taylor, Claudia Alta Taylor

  • Johnson, Larry (American basketball player)

    New Orleans Pelicans: The team drafted forward Larry Johnson in 1991 and centre Alonzo Mourning in 1992, and the pair helped Charlotte to its first playoff appearance (and postseason series win) in the 1992–93 season. The Hornets went on to make the playoffs three additional times in the 1990s but never advanced…

  • Johnson, Leon William (United States military officer)

    Leon William Johnson, general (ret.), U.S. Air Force (born Sept. 13, 1904, Columbia, Mo.—died Nov. 10, 1997, Fairfax, Va.), was awarded (1943) the Medal of Honor, the U.S. military’s highest decoration, for his World War II heroic role in the attack on the oil fields at Ploesti, Rom., an action t

  • Johnson, Lester (American painter)

    Lester Johnson, American painter (born Jan. 27, 1919, Minneapolis, Minn.—died May 30, 2010, Westhampton, N.Y.), was known for bold, energetic canvases depicting human figures. Johnson studied at the Minneapolis School of Art, the St. Paul School of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago before

  • Johnson, Lionel (English poet and critic)

    Lionel Johnson, English poet and critic who was notable for his fastidious and wistful lyrical poems but is mainly remembered as a typical representative of the “tragic generation” of the 1890s, which suffered from fin-de-siècle decadence and melancholy. Johnson studied at Winchester College and at

  • Johnson, Lionel Pigot (English poet and critic)

    Lionel Johnson, English poet and critic who was notable for his fastidious and wistful lyrical poems but is mainly remembered as a typical representative of the “tragic generation” of the 1890s, which suffered from fin-de-siècle decadence and melancholy. Johnson studied at Winchester College and at

  • Johnson, Lonnie (American musician)

    Lonnie Johnson, prolific American musician, singer, and songwriter who was one of the first major blues and jazz guitarists. One of a large family of musicians, Johnson played violin in his father’s string band, and he also played guitar in New Orleans in the early 20th century. He traveled with a

  • Johnson, Louis (New Zealand poet)

    Louis Johnson, New Zealand poet who rejected the rural themes and parochial nationalism of traditional New Zealand poetry in favour of the themes of everyday suburban life and ordinary human relationships. Johnson worked as a journalist before attending Wellington Teachers’ Training College. He

  • Johnson, Louis Albert (New Zealand poet)

    Louis Johnson, New Zealand poet who rejected the rural themes and parochial nationalism of traditional New Zealand poetry in favour of the themes of everyday suburban life and ordinary human relationships. Johnson worked as a journalist before attending Wellington Teachers’ Training College. He

  • Johnson, Louisa Catherine (American first lady)

    Louisa Adams, American first lady (1825–29), the wife of John Quincy Adams, sixth president of the United States. Louisa Johnson was born to Joshua Johnson, an American businessman from Maryland, and an Englishwoman, Katherine Nuth Johnson. Louisa was the first first lady born abroad. When she was

  • Johnson, Lyndon B. (president of United States)

    Lyndon B. Johnson, 36th president of the United States (1963–69). A moderate Democrat and vigorous leader in the United States Senate, Johnson was elected vice president in 1960 and acceded to the presidency in 1963 upon the assassination of Pres. John F. Kennedy. During his administration he

  • Johnson, Lyndon Baines (president of United States)

    Lyndon B. Johnson, 36th president of the United States (1963–69). A moderate Democrat and vigorous leader in the United States Senate, Johnson was elected vice president in 1960 and acceded to the presidency in 1963 upon the assassination of Pres. John F. Kennedy. During his administration he

  • Johnson, Magic (American basketball player)

    Magic Johnson, American basketball player who led the National Basketball Association (NBA) Los Angeles Lakers to five championships. The son of an autoworker, Johnson earned his nickname “Magic” in high school for his creative and entertaining ballhandling. He was an intense competitor who led his

  • Johnson, Margie Stewart (American actress and pinup girl)

    Margie Stewart , (Margery Stewart; Margie Stewart Johnson), American actress and pinup girl (born Dec. 14, 1919, Wabash, Ind.—died April 26, 2012, Burbank, Calif.), was selected by the U.S. Army as its official and only World War II poster girl. Her wholesome image was emblazoned on 12 posters (94

  • Johnson, Marguerite Annie (American poet, memoirist, and actress)

    Maya Angelou, American poet, memoirist, and actress whose several volumes of autobiography explore the themes of economic, racial, and sexual oppression. Although born in St. Louis, Angelou spent much of her childhood in the care of her paternal grandmother in rural Stamps, Arkansas. When she was

  • Johnson, Mark (American producer and director)
  • Johnson, Marmaduke (American printer)

    history of publishing: America: …was broken in 1674, when Marmaduke Johnson, who had come over to print an Indian Bible (1663), moved his press to Boston. Gradually others followed—Philadelphia had a press in 1685, New York City in 1693. It was difficult for the colonial printer, as for any small printer, to produce large…

  • Johnson, Marques (American basketball player)

    Milwaukee Bucks: …coach (1976–87) and featuring forward Marques Johnson, guard Sidney Moncrief, and guard-forward Junior Bridgeman began in 1979–80 a streak of 12 straight playoff appearances for the franchise. The team advanced to two consecutive conference finals in 1982–83 and 1983–84 but was beaten by the Philadelphia 76ers and the Celtics, respectively.…

  • Johnson, Martin E. (American adventurer and photographer)

    Osa Johnson: …Leighty married adventurer and photographer Martin E. Johnson. For two years they played the vaudeville circuit with an exhibit of photographs Martin Johnson had taken in the South Seas while accompanying Jack London on his voyage of the Snark. By 1912 the couple had accumulated the funds to return to…

  • Johnson, Marvin (American boxer)

    Víctor Galíndez: …by the American Olympic medalist Marvin Johnson, the other by the American Jesse Burnett. His career record was 55 wins (34 by knockout), 9 losses, and 1 draw.

  • Johnson, Merle, Jr. (American actor)

    Troy Donahue, (Merle Johnson, Jr.), American actor (born Jan. 27, 1936, New York, N.Y.—died Sept. 2, 2001, Santa Monica, Calif.), was a teen heartthrob in the late 1950s and early ’60s, with starring roles in movies, including A Summer Place (1959), Parrish (1961), Rome Adventure (1962), and Palm S

  • Johnson, Michael (American athlete)

    Michael Johnson, American sprinter, perhaps the most eminent figure in athletics (track and field) in the 1990s. For much of the decade he was virtually unbeaten in the long sprints—the 200-metre and 400-metre races—and he held world records in the indoor 400 metres and the outdoor 200 metres. At

  • Johnson, Michael Duane (American athlete)

    Michael Johnson, American sprinter, perhaps the most eminent figure in athletics (track and field) in the 1990s. For much of the decade he was virtually unbeaten in the long sprints—the 200-metre and 400-metre races—and he held world records in the indoor 400 metres and the outdoor 200 metres. At

  • Johnson, Nkosi (South African activist)

    Nkosi Johnson, (Xolani Nkosi), South African activist (born Feb. 4, 1989, Daveytown, S.Af.—died June 1, 2001, Johannesburg, S.Af.), became the human face of AIDS in South Africa and an iconic figure in the campaign to raise money and public awareness about the disease. Johnson, who was born H

  • Johnson, Nucky (American politician)

    Nucky Johnson, American politician who controlled both government and organized crime in Atlantic City, New Jersey, from 1913 to 1941. For Johnson, politics was the family business. In 1887 his father, Smith Johnson, became sheriff of Atlantic county and, with Congressman John Gardner and County

  • Johnson, Nunnally (American producer, screenwriter, and director)

    Nunnally Johnson, motion-picture producer, screenwriter, and director who has been classified as a perfect example of the Hollywood scriptwriter—one who works under contract and is able to write about virtually any subject. He was one of the industry’s most prolific and respected writers. The

  • Johnson, Osa (American explorer, filmmaker and author)

    Osa Johnson, American explorer, filmmaker, and writer who, with her husband, made a highly popular series of films featuring mostly African and South Sea tribal groups and wildlife. In 1910 Osa Leighty married adventurer and photographer Martin E. Johnson. For two years they played the vaudeville

  • Johnson, Pamela Hansford (British novelist)

    Pamela Hansford Johnson, English novelist who treated moral concerns with a light but sure touch. In her novels, starting with The Unspeakable Skipton (1959), she mined a rich vein of satire. Born into a middle-class family, Johnson grew up in the inner London suburb of Clapham. She corresponded

  • Johnson, Pauline (Canadian Indian poet)

    Pauline Johnson, Canadian Indian poet who celebrated the heritage of her people in poems that had immense appeal in her lifetime. The daughter of a Mohawk chief and an English mother, Johnson began publishing poetry in her teens. Using her Indian name, “Tekahionwake,” she toured Canada, England,

  • Johnson, Pete (American musician)

    boogie-woogie: …the term itself, Albert Ammons, Pete Johnson, and Meade “Lux” Lewis.

  • Johnson, Philip (American architect)

    Philip Johnson, American architect and critic known both for his promotion of the International Style and, later, for his role in defining postmodernist architecture. Johnson majored in philosophy at Harvard University, graduating in 1930. In 1932 he was named director of the Department of

  • Johnson, Philip Cortelyou (American architect)

    Philip Johnson, American architect and critic known both for his promotion of the International Style and, later, for his role in defining postmodernist architecture. Johnson majored in philosophy at Harvard University, graduating in 1930. In 1932 he was named director of the Department of

  • Johnson, Prince (Liberian politician)

    Liberia: Decades of strife: …groups, Charles Ghankay Taylor and Prince Johnson, contended for power after Doe’s downfall and execution. The war dragged on for seven years as new factions arose and neighbouring countries became enmeshed in the strife. The toll on the civilian population and the economy was devastating. After a series of abortive…

  • Johnson, Rafer (American athlete and executive)

    Rafer Johnson, American athlete, who won a gold medal in the decathlon at the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome. Johnson competed in his first decathlon in 1954 as a sophomore at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and in 1955 he won the gold medal at the Pan American Games. Injuries forced

  • Johnson, Rafer Lewis (American athlete and executive)

    Rafer Johnson, American athlete, who won a gold medal in the decathlon at the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome. Johnson competed in his first decathlon in 1954 as a sophomore at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and in 1955 he won the gold medal at the Pan American Games. Injuries forced

  • Johnson, Randall David (American baseball player)

    Randy Johnson, American professional baseball player who—with five career Cy Young Awards (1995, 1999–2002) as the best pitcher in either the American or National League—is considered one of the greatest pitchers in the sport’s history. Johnson excelled in both basketball and baseball through high

  • Johnson, Randy (American baseball player)

    Randy Johnson, American professional baseball player who—with five career Cy Young Awards (1995, 1999–2002) as the best pitcher in either the American or National League—is considered one of the greatest pitchers in the sport’s history. Johnson excelled in both basketball and baseball through high

  • Johnson, Reverdy (American lawyer and politician)

    Reverdy Johnson, constitutional lawyer, U.S. senator from Maryland (1845–49, 1863–68), attorney general under President Zachary Taylor (1849–50), and minister to Great Britain (1868–69). Able to grasp either side of an issue, he was called “the Trimmer” for his ability to bring about compromises.

  • Johnson, Richard (British actor, producer, and writer)

    Richard Keith Johnson, British actor, producer, and writer (born July 30, 1927, Upminster, Essex, Eng.—died June 6, 2015, London, Eng.), was a distinguished character actor throughout his six-decade stage and screen career and was an associate artist with the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) from

  • Johnson, Richard (English author)

    Richard Johnson, English author of popular romances, notably The Most Famous History of the Seaven Champions of Christendome (vol 1., 1596; vol. 2, 1597), which was so successful that one or two further parts were added later. The work includes a number of unacknowledged quotations from William

  • Johnson, Richard Keith (British actor, producer, and writer)

    Richard Keith Johnson, British actor, producer, and writer (born July 30, 1927, Upminster, Essex, Eng.—died June 6, 2015, London, Eng.), was a distinguished character actor throughout his six-decade stage and screen career and was an associate artist with the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) from

  • Johnson, Richard M. (vice president of United States)

    Richard M. Johnson, ninth vice president of the United States (1837–41) in the Democratic administration of President Martin Van Buren. Johnson was the son of Robert Johnson, who later served in the Kentucky legislature, and Jemima Suggett. Admitted to the bar in 1802, Richard Johnson was elected

  • Johnson, Richard Mentor (vice president of United States)

    Richard M. Johnson, ninth vice president of the United States (1837–41) in the Democratic administration of President Martin Van Buren. Johnson was the son of Robert Johnson, who later served in the Kentucky legislature, and Jemima Suggett. Admitted to the bar in 1802, Richard Johnson was elected

  • Johnson, Robert (American musician)

    Robert Johnson, American blues composer, guitarist, and singer whose eerie falsetto singing voice and masterful rhythmic slide guitar influenced both his contemporaries and many later blues and rock musicians. Johnson was the product of a confusing childhood, with three men serving as his father

  • Johnson, Robert (English musician)

    Robert Johnson, British composer and lutenist, who wrote music for a number of plays, including several by William Shakespeare, and was considered one of England’s leading lutenists. Johnson was believed to be the son of John Johnson, a composer who was also a lutenist to Elizabeth I. From 1596 to

  • Johnson, Robert Glenn, Jr. (American stock-car driver)

    Junior Johnson, American stock-car driver who ranks among the most influential figures in National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) history. One of NASCAR’s most colourful characters, Johnson was a direct link back to the sport’s early connection to liquor bootlegging. Though he never

  • Johnson, Robert L. (American businessman)

    Robert L. Johnson, American businessman, founder of Black Entertainment Television (BET), and the first African American majority owner of a major professional sports team in the United States. Johnson grew up in Freeport, Illinois, the 9th of 10 children. He majored in history at the University of

  • Johnson, Robert Louis (American businessman)

    Robert L. Johnson, American businessman, founder of Black Entertainment Television (BET), and the first African American majority owner of a major professional sports team in the United States. Johnson grew up in Freeport, Illinois, the 9th of 10 children. He majored in history at the University of

  • Johnson, Robert Wood (American manufacturer)

    Robert Wood Johnson, American manufacturer who helped further the cause of modern surgery by developing antiseptic bandages and dressings. Johnson began his career as an apprentice in a pharmacy and went on to become a retail pharmacist and then a drug broker in New York City. In 1874, he formed

  • Johnson, Ron (United States senator)

    Ron Johnson, American politician who was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 2010 and began representing Wisconsin the following year. Johnson was born and raised in Mankato, Minnesota. He gained early admission to the University of Minnesota, from which he received a bachelor’s degree in

  • Johnson, Ronald Harold (United States senator)

    Ron Johnson, American politician who was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 2010 and began representing Wisconsin the following year. Johnson was born and raised in Mankato, Minnesota. He gained early admission to the University of Minnesota, from which he received a bachelor’s degree in

  • Johnson, Samuel (English author)

    Samuel Johnson, English critic, biographer, essayist, poet, and lexicographer, regarded as one of the greatest figures of 18th-century life and letters. Johnson once characterized literary biographies as “mournful narratives,” and he believed that he lived “a life radically wretched.” Yet his

  • Johnson, Samuel Curtis (American business executive)

    Samuel Curtis Johnson, American business executive (born March 2, 1928, Racine, Wis.—died May 22, 2004, Racine), served for more than 30 years, until 2000, as head of S.C. Johnson & Son, a company founded by his great-grandfather in 1886. Under his guidance the company, known for its Johnson Wax, e

  • Johnson, Sargent (American artist)

    Sargent Johnson, versatile American artist known especially for his paintings and sculptures of African American subjects. By his own account, he was concerned with Johnson’s father, who died in 1897, was of Swedish ancestry, and his mother, who died in 1902, was of African American and Cherokee

  • Johnson, Sargent Claude (American artist)

    Sargent Johnson, versatile American artist known especially for his paintings and sculptures of African American subjects. By his own account, he was concerned with Johnson’s father, who died in 1897, was of Swedish ancestry, and his mother, who died in 1902, was of African American and Cherokee

  • Johnson, Sir William, 1st Baronet (American colonist)

    Sir William Johnson, 1st Baronet, pioneer in the Mohawk Valley, New York, whose service as colonial superintendent of Indian affairs was largely responsible for keeping the Iroquois neutral and even friendly to the British in the latter stages of the struggle with the French for control of North

  • Johnson, Steve (American musician)

    Alabama Shakes: February 16, 1988), drummer Steve Johnson (b. April 19, 1985), and guitarist Heath Fogg (b. August 10, 1984).

  • Johnson, Thomas (United States governor and jurist)

    Thomas Johnson, American Revolutionary War leader, first governor of Maryland (1777–79), and associate justice of the United States Supreme Court (1792–93). Johnson studied law in Annapolis, Md., and entered the provincial assembly in 1762. Opposed to British colonial policy, he was a member of

  • Johnson, Thomas Christian (Canadian ice hockey player and coach)

    Tom Johnson, (Thomas Christian Johnson), Canadian ice hockey player and coach (born Feb. 18, 1928, Baldur, Man.—died Nov. 21, 2007, Falmouth, Mass.), played 15 seasons (1947–48, 1949–63) for the Montreal Canadiens, during which time he helped lead the team to six Stanley Cup titles (1953, 1956–60)

  • Johnson, Tom (Canadian ice hockey player and coach)

    Tom Johnson, (Thomas Christian Johnson), Canadian ice hockey player and coach (born Feb. 18, 1928, Baldur, Man.—died Nov. 21, 2007, Falmouth, Mass.), played 15 seasons (1947–48, 1949–63) for the Montreal Canadiens, during which time he helped lead the team to six Stanley Cup titles (1953, 1956–60)

  • Johnson, Tommy (American musician)

    Tommy Johnson, American singer-guitarist who was one of the most evocative and influential of blues artists. Born on a plantation, Johnson grew up in Crystal Springs, Mississippi, and learned to play guitar from one of his brothers. He ran away from home to play in the Mississippi Delta region,

  • Johnson, Ural Alexis (American diplomat)

    U. Alexis Johnson, American diplomat who sat at numerous negotiating tables during his 42-year career in the Foreign Service, culminating in his role as chief U.S. negotiator at the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (b. Oct. 17, 1908--d. March 24,

  • Johnson, Uwe (German author)

    Uwe Johnson, German author noted for his experimental style. Many of his novels explore the contradictions of life in a Germany divided after World War II. Johnson grew up during the difficult war years. In East Germany he studied German at the Universities of Rostock and Leipzig, graduating from

  • Johnson, Van (American actor)

    Van Johnson, American actor (born Aug. 25, 1916, Newport, R.I.—died Dec. 12, 2008, Nyack, N.Y.), was one of Hollywood’s biggest stars during the early part of his six-decade career, particularly during his 12-year tenure (1942–54) at MGM studios, where he made nearly 50 films. Johnson’s clean-cut

  • Johnson, Virginia E. (American sex therapist)

    Virginia E. Johnson, American sex researcher and therapist who, with American gynecologist William H. Masters, conducted pioneering research on human sexuality. Together the researchers established the Masters & Johnson Institute (originally the Reproductive Biology Research Foundation), a

  • Johnson, Virginia Eshelman (American sex therapist)

    Virginia E. Johnson, American sex researcher and therapist who, with American gynecologist William H. Masters, conducted pioneering research on human sexuality. Together the researchers established the Masters & Johnson Institute (originally the Reproductive Biology Research Foundation), a

  • Johnson, Walter (American baseball player)

    Walter Johnson, American professional baseball player who had perhaps the greatest fastball in the history of the game. A right-handed thrower with a sidearm delivery who batted right as well, Johnson pitched for the Washington Senators of the American League (AL) from 1907 through 1927. Johnson

  • Johnson, Walter Perry (American baseball player)

    Walter Johnson, American professional baseball player who had perhaps the greatest fastball in the history of the game. A right-handed thrower with a sidearm delivery who batted right as well, Johnson pitched for the Washington Senators of the American League (AL) from 1907 through 1927. Johnson

  • Johnson, William (United States jurist)

    William Johnson, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1804 who established the practice of rendering individual opinions—concurring or dissenting—in addition to the majority opinion of the court. A deeply sensitive man and a learned, courageous jurist, he set himself against

  • Johnson, William Dean (American skier)

    Bill Johnson, (William Dean Johnson), American downhill skier (born March 30, 1960, Los Angeles, Calif.—died Jan. 21, 2016, Gresham, Ore.), was in 1984 the first American man to capture a gold medal in Alpine skiing, winning the downhill race at the Olympic Winter Games in Sarajevo, Yugos. (now in

  • Johnson, William Geary (American musician)

    Bunk Johnson, black American jazz trumpeter, one of the first musicians to play jazz and a principal figure of the 1940s traditional jazz revival. Johnson claimed to have been born in 1879, to have played with the legendary Buddy Bolden, and to have taught cornet to the boy Louis Armstrong. It is

  • Johnson, William Julius (American baseball player and manager)

    Judy Johnson, American professional baseball player and manager in the Negro leagues between 1918 and 1936. A sure-handed and graceful fielder, Johnson is considered one of the best defensive third baseman ever to play baseball. He had a .309 career batting average but hit with little power.

  • Johnson, Willie (American musician)

    Bunk Johnson, black American jazz trumpeter, one of the first musicians to play jazz and a principal figure of the 1940s traditional jazz revival. Johnson claimed to have been born in 1879, to have played with the legendary Buddy Bolden, and to have taught cornet to the boy Louis Armstrong. It is

  • Johnson-Bovey Building (building, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States)

    construction: The invention of reinforced concrete: In the Johnson-Bovey Building (1905) in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the American engineer C.A.P. Turner employed concrete floor slabs without beams (called flat slabs or flat plates) that used diagonal and orthogonal patterns of reinforcing bars. The system still used today—which divides the bays between columns into column strips…

  • Johnsson, Minna (Finnish author)

    Minna Canth, novelist and dramatist, a late 19th-century leader of the revival of the Finnish vernacular and Realist movement. In 1863 she entered the seminary at Jyv?skyl?, where she married her teacher, J.F. Canth, in 1865. Widowed in 1879, with seven children, she went into business at Kuopio

  • Johnsson, Minna (Finnish author)

    Minna Canth, novelist and dramatist, a late 19th-century leader of the revival of the Finnish vernacular and Realist movement. In 1863 she entered the seminary at Jyv?skyl?, where she married her teacher, J.F. Canth, in 1865. Widowed in 1879, with seven children, she went into business at Kuopio

  • Johnsson, Ulrika Vilhelmina (Finnish author)

    Minna Canth, novelist and dramatist, a late 19th-century leader of the revival of the Finnish vernacular and Realist movement. In 1863 she entered the seminary at Jyv?skyl?, where she married her teacher, J.F. Canth, in 1865. Widowed in 1879, with seven children, she went into business at Kuopio

  • Johnston Atoll (United States territory, Pacific Ocean)

    Johnston Atoll, unincorporated territory of the United States in the central Pacific Ocean, about 825 miles (1,330 km) southwest of Honolulu. It consists of four small islands on a raised coral atoll formation that are partially enclosed on the north and west by a 7.5-mile (12-km) semicircular

  • Johnston Island (United States territory, Pacific Ocean)

    Johnston Atoll, unincorporated territory of the United States in the central Pacific Ocean, about 825 miles (1,330 km) southwest of Honolulu. It consists of four small islands on a raised coral atoll formation that are partially enclosed on the north and west by a 7.5-mile (12-km) semicircular

  • Johnston, Albert Sidney (Confederate general)

    Albert Sidney Johnston, commander of the Confederate forces in the Western theatre during the early stages of the American Civil War (1861–65). His battlefield death was considered an irreparable loss by the South. He was the highest-ranking soldier on either side to die in battle during the war.

  • Johnston, Archibald, Lord Warriston (Scottish clergyman)

    Archibald Johnston, Lord Warriston, Scottish Presbyterian who was a leading anti-Royalist during the English Civil Wars between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians. Later he became an official in Oliver Cromwell’s Commonwealth regime. He was known to his contemporaries as petulant and

  • Johnston, Benjamin (American composer)

    12-tone music: The American composer Benjamin Johnston combined principles of 12-tone music with microtonality (use of intervals smaller than whole tones or semitones). There are no sufficient analytic techniques used by musicians in understanding 12-tone music, which is partly why it remains not very well understood as a total musical…

  • Johnston, Bruce (American musician)

    the Beach Boys: …22, 1948, Newcastle, Pennsylvania) and Bruce Johnston (original name William Baldwin; b. June 24, 1944, Chicago, Illinois). Initially perceived as a potent pop act—celebrants of the surfing and hot rod culture of the Los Angeles Basin during the 1960s—the Beach Boys and lead singer-bassist-producer Brian Wilson later gained greater respect…

  • Johnston, David (Canadian government official)

    Micha?lle Jean: …governor-general and was succeeded by David Johnston.

  • Johnston, David Claypoole (American cartoonist)

    David Claypoole Johnston, American cartoonist who, strongly influenced by the English caricaturist George Cruikshank, produced imaginative and original drawings. As a schoolboy, Johnston showed an interest in drawing, and in 1815 he was apprenticed to a successful Philadelphia engraver. Shortly

  • Johnston, Edward (British calligrapher)

    Edward Johnston, British teacher of calligraphy who had a widespread influence on 20th-century typography and calligraphy, particularly in England and Germany. He has been credited with starting the modern calligraphic revival. Johnston, whose father was a Scottish military officer, was brought to

  • Johnston, George (Australian military leader)

    Rum Rebellion: George Johnston of the corps to depose Bligh. The corps invaded Government House on January 26, 1808, placed Bligh under arrest, and took over the administration of the colony until Lachlan Macquarie became governor in January 1810. Later that year the corps was recalled to…

  • Johnston, Hannah Clark (American social reformer)

    Hannah Clark Johnston Bailey, U.S. reformer who was a leading advocate of the peace movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1868 she was married to Moses Bailey, a Maine manufacturer, who died in 1882. In 1883 Bailey joined the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. From 1887 to 1916

  • Johnston, Harriet Lane (American first lady)

    Harriet Lane, acting American first lady (1857–61), niece of bachelor James Buchanan, 15th president of the United States. For both her popularity and her advocacy work, she has been described as the first of the modern first ladies. Harriet Lane was the youngest child of Elliott Tole Lane, a

  • Johnston, Henrietta (American artist)

    Henrietta Johnston, early American portrait artist who was quite possibly the earliest woman artist in America. Henrietta Deering was married to the Reverend Gideon Johnston in Dublin in April 1705. Nothing is known of her early life. In 1707 she and her husband immigrated to America and settled in

  • Johnston, James A. (American warden)

    San Quentin State Prison: Reforms and renovations: Other notable wardens include James A. Johnston, whose tenure (1913–25) brought improved medical treatment and the creation of educational and vocational training. He also replaced corporal punishment with solitary confinement. During this time, the inmates also began publishing Wall City News, called “the only newspaper in the world published…

  • Johnston, Jennifer (Irish author)

    Jennifer Johnston, Irish novelist whose works deal with political and cultural tensions in Ireland, with an emphasis on the problems of the Anglo-Irish. Rich in dialogue, Johnston’s novels often concern interpersonal relationships and the difficult transition from childhood to adulthood. Johnston,

  • Johnston, Jennifer Prudence (Irish author)

    Jennifer Johnston, Irish novelist whose works deal with political and cultural tensions in Ireland, with an emphasis on the problems of the Anglo-Irish. Rich in dialogue, Johnston’s novels often concern interpersonal relationships and the difficult transition from childhood to adulthood. Johnston,

  • Johnston, Jill (American writer and cultural critic)

    Jill Johnston, American writer and cultural critic (born May 17, 1929, London, Eng.—died Sept. 18, 2010, Hartford, Conn.), found a fervent voice amid the feminist movement of the 1960s and ’70s. After studying dance at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Johnston was hired in 1959 to

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