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  • Jubilee Field (oil and gas field, Ghana)

    Ghana: Resources and power: Oil production at the offshore Jubilee field began in 2010, and Ghana saw a significant increase in output. This was further supplemented by the start of production at the Tweneboa-Enyenra-Ntomme (TEN) field in 2016 and the Offshore Cape Three Points field in 2017. Natural gas is produced at the aforementioned…

  • Jubilee, Year of (religious celebration)

    Year of Jubilee, in the Roman Catholic Church, a celebration that is observed on certain special occasions and for 1 year every 25 years, under certain conditions, when a special indulgence is granted to members of the faith by the pope and confessors are given special faculties, including the

  • Jubilees, Book of (pseudepigraphal work)

    Book of Jubilees, pseudepigraphal work (not included in any canon of scripture), most notable for its chronological schema, by which events described in Genesis on through Exodus 12 are dated by jubilees of 49 years, each of which is composed of seven cycles of seven years. The institution of a

  • jubilus (music)

    sequence: …text, or both) to the jubilus, the florid ending of the last syllable of the Alleluia. The melodic tropes were normally broken into phrases that were repeated in performance (as aa, bb, cc,…) by alternating choirs. Texts set to these and to Alleluia melodies were originally prose and thus were…

  • Jubogha, Jubo (Ibo ruler)

    Ikot Abasi: In 1870 Jubo Jubogha, a former Igbo (Ibo) slave and ruler of the Anna Pepple house of Bonny (28 miles [45 km] west-southwest), came to Ikot Abasi and founded the kingdom of Opobo, which he named for Opobo the Great, a Pepple king (reigned 1792–1830). Also called…

  • Jubrān, Jubrān Khalīl (Lebanese-American author)

    Khalil Gibran, Lebanese American philosophical essayist, novelist, poet, and artist. Having received his primary education in Beirut, Gibran immigrated with his parents to Boston in 1895. He returned to Lebanon in 1898 and studied in Beirut, where he excelled in the Arabic language. On his return

  • Juca, Romero (Brazilian politician and economist)

    Petrobras scandal: …weeks after taking office when Romero Juca, the new planning minister and a close confidant of the acting president, was forced to step down amid accusations that he had sought to obstruct the Operation Car Wash investigation. A newspaper released a taped conversation between Juca and an ex-senator under investigation…

  • Júcar River (river, Spain)

    Júcar River, river in eastern Spain, rising in the Universales Mountains north of Cuenca city. It flows in a southerly and then easterly direction for 309 miles (498 km) through Cuenca, Albacete, and Valencia provinces and into the Gulf of Valencia, at Cullera. Beyond Cuenca its valley widens and

  • juche (Korean history)

    Kim Jong Il: …national policy of self-reliance (juche), and, later, Kim Jong Il himself and his “military first” (s?ngun ch?ngch’i) policy. As part of his desire to create better films, in the late 1970s the younger Kim had a South Korean film director, Shin Sang-Ok, and his wife, actress Choi Eun-Hee, abducted…

  • Juchen (people)

    Huizong: …formed an alliance with the Juchen (Chinese: Nüzhen, or Ruzhen) tribes of Manchuria (now the Northeast region of China). The resulting victory over the Liao was wholly illusory, since it was the Juchen who turned out to be the real menace. In mounting crisis, Huizong abdicated in 1125/26 in favour…

  • Juchen dynasty (China-Mongolia [1115-1234])

    Jin dynasty, (1115–1234), dynasty that ruled an empire formed by the Tungus Juchen (or Jurchen) tribes of Manchuria. The empire covered much of Inner Asia and all of present-day North China. Originally subjects of the Liao, an Inner Asian dynasty created in the 10th century by the Khitan tribes,

  • Juchen language (language)

    Manchu-Tungus languages: Linguistic history: …of the Manchu-Tungus family is Juchen (Jurchen), which was spoken by the founders of the Chin dynasty (1115–1234) in northern China. Almost nothing is known about this now-extinct language because few examples of written Juchen remain, these being inscriptions on stelae found in Manchuria and Korea. Juchen script was borrowed…

  • Juchereau de Saint-Denis, Louis (French-Canadian explorer)

    Louis Juchereau de Saint-Denis, French-Canadian explorer and soldier, leader of a 1714 expedition from French-held Natchitoches, in the Louisiana Territory, to the Spanish town of San Juan Bautista (modern Villahermosa) on the Rio Grande. From 1703 to 1707 Saint-Denis explored the lower Mississippi

  • Juchi (Mongol prince)

    J?chi, Mongol prince, the eldest of Genghis Khan’s four sons and, until the final years of his life, a participant in his father’s military campaigns. J?chi, like his brothers, received his own ulus (vassal kingdom to command), a yurt (a domain for his ulus), and an inju (personal domains to s

  • Juchitán (Mexico)

    Juchitán, city, southeastern Oaxaca estado (state), southern Mexico. It is on the Juchitán River (or De los Perros River), near the southern coast of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, at 125 feet (38 metres) above sea level. Juchitán has long been one of the principal centres of the Zapotec Indians.

  • Juchitán de Zaragoza (Mexico)

    Juchitán, city, southeastern Oaxaca estado (state), southern Mexico. It is on the Juchitán River (or De los Perros River), near the southern coast of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, at 125 feet (38 metres) above sea level. Juchitán has long been one of the principal centres of the Zapotec Indians.

  • Jud Süss (work by Feuchtwanger)

    Lion Feuchtwanger: …Süss (1925; also published as Jew Süss and Power), set in 18th-century Germany, revealed a depth of psychological analysis that remained characteristic of his subsequent work—the Josephus-Trilogie (Der jüdische Krieg, 1932; Die S?hne, 1935; Der Tag wird kommen, 1945); Die Geschwister Oppenheim (1933; The Oppermanns), a novel of modern life;…

  • Jud, Jakob (Swiss linguist)

    Jakob Jud, Swiss linguist who used comparative linguistics to reconstruct cultural history. He taught French at the lyceum of Zürich from 1906 to 1922 and afterward was professor of Romance languages at the University of Zürich. Jud mediated imaginatively between the linguistic traditions of

  • Jud, Leo (Swiss religious reformer)

    Leo Jud, Swiss religious Reformer, biblical scholar, and translator and an associate of Huldrych Zwingli and Heinrich Bullinger in the Zürich Reformation. He collaborated in drafting the first Helvetic Confession (an important Reformation creed; 1536). After studying medicine at the University of

  • Judaea (region, Middle East)

    Judaea, the southernmost of the three traditional divisions of ancient Palestine; the other two were Galilee in the north and Samaria in the centre. No clearly marked boundary divided Judaea from Samaria, but the town of Beersheba was traditionally the southernmost limit. The region presents a

  • Judaea and Samaria (region, Palestine)

    West Bank, area of the former British-mandated (1920–47) territory of Palestine west of the Jordan River, claimed from 1949 to 1988 as part of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan but occupied from 1967 by Israel. The territory, excluding East Jerusalem, is also known within Israel by its biblical

  • Judaea, Hills of (mountains, Middle East)

    Palestine: Land: …south, the high plateau of Judaea is a rocky wilderness of limestone, with rare patches of cultivation, as found around Al-Bīrah and Hebron. It is separated from the coastal plain by a longitudinal fosse and a belt of low hills of soft chalky limestone, about 5 to 8 miles (8…

  • Judaean Hills (mountains, Middle East)

    Palestine: Land: …south, the high plateau of Judaea is a rocky wilderness of limestone, with rare patches of cultivation, as found around Al-Bīrah and Hebron. It is separated from the coastal plain by a longitudinal fosse and a belt of low hills of soft chalky limestone, about 5 to 8 miles (8…

  • Judah (Hebrew tribe)

    Judah, one of the 12 tribes of Israel, descended from Judah, who was the fourth son born to Jacob and his first wife, Leah. It is disputed whether the name Judah was originally that of the tribe or the territory it occupied and which was transposed from which. After the Israelites took possession

  • Judah (region, Middle East)

    Judaea, the southernmost of the three traditional divisions of ancient Palestine; the other two were Galilee in the north and Samaria in the centre. No clearly marked boundary divided Judaea from Samaria, but the town of Beersheba was traditionally the southernmost limit. The region presents a

  • Judah bar Ezekiel (Babylonian-Jewish scholar)

    yeshiva: …set up at Pumbedita by Judah bar Ezekiel. From c. 200 to 1040 these two yeshivas had immense authority as centres of learning and issued “official” interpretations of the law.

  • Judah ben David ?ayyuj (Hebrew scholar)

    Menahem ben Saruq: …Menahem’s pupils, one of whom, Judah ben David ?ayyuj, was a major Hebrew grammarian.

  • Judah ben Samuel (German Jewish mystic)

    Judah ben Samuel, Jewish mystic and semilegendary pietist, a founder of the fervent, ultrapious movement of German ?asidism. He was also the principal author of the ethical treatise Sefer ?asidim (published in Bologna, 1538; “Book of the Pious”), possibly the most important extant document of

  • Judah ha-Levi (Hebrew poet)

    Judah ha-Levi, Jewish poet and religious philosopher. His works were the culmination of the development of Hebrew poetry within the Arabic cultural sphere. Among his major works are the poems collected in Dīwān, the “Zionide” poems celebrating Zion, and the Sefer ha-Kuzari (“Book of the Khazar”),

  • Judah ha-Nasi (Jewish scholar)

    Judah ha-Nasi, one of the last of the tannaim, the small group of Palestinian masters of the Jewish Oral Law, parts of which he collected as the Mishna (Teaching). The Mishna became the subject of interpretation in the Talmud, the fundamental rabbinic compendium of law, lore, and commentary.

  • Judah ibn Kuraish (Spanish-Jewish scholar)

    Hebrew literature: The golden age in Spain, 900–1200: …creation of comparative linguistics by Judah ibn Kuraish (about 900) and Isaac ibn Barun (about 1100). Judah Hayyuj, a disciple of Menahem ben Saruk, recast Hebrew grammar, and, in the form given to it by David Kimhi of Narbonne (died c. 1235), the new system was taken over by the…

  • Judah Maccabee (Jewish leader)

    Judas Maccabeus, Jewish guerrilla leader who defended his country from invasion by the Seleucid king Antiochus IV Epiphanes, preventing the imposition of Hellenism upon Judaea, and preserving the Jewish religion. The son of Mattathias, an aged priest who took to the mountains in rebellion when

  • Judah the ?asid of Regensburg (German Jewish mystic)

    Judah ben Samuel, Jewish mystic and semilegendary pietist, a founder of the fervent, ultrapious movement of German ?asidism. He was also the principal author of the ethical treatise Sefer ?asidim (published in Bologna, 1538; “Book of the Pious”), possibly the most important extant document of

  • Judah the Prince (Jewish scholar)

    Judah ha-Nasi, one of the last of the tannaim, the small group of Palestinian masters of the Jewish Oral Law, parts of which he collected as the Mishna (Teaching). The Mishna became the subject of interpretation in the Talmud, the fundamental rabbinic compendium of law, lore, and commentary.

  • Jūdah, Battle of (Arabian history)

    Saudi Arabia: Death of Fay?al: … for six years until the Battle of Jūdah (1871), in which Sa?ūd triumphed. ?Abd Allāh fled, and Sa?ūd took power. But during the next five years the throne changed hands no fewer than seven times in favour of different members of the Sa?ūd family. Drought in 1870–74 exacerbated the civil…

  • Judaism (religion)

    Judaism, monotheistic religion developed among the ancient Hebrews. Judaism is characterized by a belief in one transcendent God who revealed himself to Abraham, Moses, and the Hebrew prophets and by a religious life in accordance with Scriptures and rabbinic traditions. Judaism is the complex

  • Judaism as a Civilization (work by Kaplan)

    Mordecai Menahem Kaplan: …well defined in Kaplan’s book Judaism as a Civilization: Toward the Reconstruction of American-Jewish Life (1934). Its goals were further refined in subsequent works such as The Meaning of God in Modern Jewish Religion (1937), Judaism Without Supernaturalism (1958), and The Religion of Ethical Nationhood (1970). In 1935 the Reconstructionist,…

  • Judaism, Christianity, and Germany (sermons by Faulhaber)

    Michael von Faulhaber: …delivered his famous sermons entitled Judaism, Christianity, and Germany (translated in 1934), which emphasized the Jewish background of Christianity and pointed out that the teachings of the New Testament logically followed those of the Old. He further emphasized that the German tribes had become civilized only after Christianization and asserted…

  • Judaizers (Christianity)

    St. Ignatius of Antioch: The letters: warnings against false teachings: …two groups of heretics: (1) Judaizers, who did not accept the authority of the New Testament and clung to such Jewish practices as observing the Sabbath, and (2) docetists (from the Greek dokein, “to seem”), who held that Christ had suffered and died only in appearance. Ignatius untiringly affirmed that…

  • Judas (ballad)

    ballad: Chronology: “Judas,” the oldest example found in Francis James Child’s exhaustive collection, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads (1882–98), dates from 1300, but until the 17th century ballad records are sparse indeed. As an oral art, the ballad does not need to be written down to…

  • Judas (Apostle)

    St. Jude, ; Western feast day October 28, Eastern feast days June 19 and August 21), one of the original Twelve Apostles of Jesus. He is the reputed author of the canonical Letter of Jude that warns against the licentious and blasphemous heretics. The devotion to him as patron saint of desperate

  • Judas Aristobulus (king of Judaea)

    Aristobulus I, Hasmonean (Maccabean) Hellenized king of Judaea (104–103 bc). The son of Hyrcanus I, he broke his late father’s will and seized the throne from his mother and jailed or killed his brothers. According to the historian Josephus, Aristobulus conquered the Ituraeans of Lebanon and

  • Judas Barsabbas (biblical figure)

    prophecy: New Testament and early Christianity: …them are Agabus of Jerusalem; Judas Barsabbas and Silas, who also were elders of the Jerusalem church; the four prophesying daughters of Philip the Evangelist; and John, the author of Revelation. The term prophet is used with reference to an office in the early church along with evangelists and teachers,…

  • Judas Iscariot (Apostle)

    Judas Iscariot, one of the Twelve Apostles, notorious for betraying Jesus. Judas’ surname is more probably a corruption of the Latin sicarius (“murderer” or “assassin”) than an indication of family origin, suggesting that he would have belonged to the Sicarii, the most radical Jewish group, some of

  • Judas Maccabaeus (Jewish leader)

    Judas Maccabeus, Jewish guerrilla leader who defended his country from invasion by the Seleucid king Antiochus IV Epiphanes, preventing the imposition of Hellenism upon Judaea, and preserving the Jewish religion. The son of Mattathias, an aged priest who took to the mountains in rebellion when

  • Judas Repentant (painting by Rembrandt)

    Rembrandt van Rijn: The Leiden period (1625–31): …or 1629 Rembrandt finished the Judas Repentant and, among other works, painted The Artist in His Studio. After amazingly rapid changes in style from 1625 onward, Rembrandt reached a first major peak in his artistic development in the late 1620s.

  • Judas Thomas (Christian Apostle)

    St. Thomas, ; Western feast day December 21, feast day in Roman and Syrian Catholic churches July 3, in the Greek church October 6), one of the Twelve Apostles. His name in Aramaic (Te?oma) and Greek (Didymos) means “twin”; John 11:16 identifies him as “Thomas, called the Twin.” He is called Judas

  • Judas tree (plant)

    redbud: …Mediterranean region, is often called Judas tree, for the betrayer of Christ, who is said to have hanged himself from such a tree, after which the white flowers turned red with blood or shame.

  • Judas von Tirol, Der (work by Sch?nherr)

    Karl Sch?nherr: …1897 he wrote a play, Der Judas von Tirol (rewritten 1927; “The Judas of the Tirol”), in which the Judas of a rural passion play becomes a real-life betrayer. Glaube und Heimat (1910; “Faith and Homeland”), often considered his best play, concerns peasant resistance to the Counter-Reformation of the church.

  • Judas Was a Woman (film by Renoir)

    Jean Renoir: Early years: …war; La Bête humaine (1938; The Human Beast, or Judas Was a Woman), an admirable free interpretation of Zola; and especially La Règle du jeu (1939; The Rules of the Game), his masterpiece. Cut and fragmented by the distributors, this classic film was also regarded as a failure until it…

  • Judas, Gospel of

    Gospel of Judas, apocryphal Christian scripture from the 2nd century ad attributed to the apostle Judas Iscariot. The gospel advances a Gnostic cosmology and portrays Judas in a positive light as the only apostle who fully understands Jesus’ teachings. Although lost for centuries, the Gospel of

  • Judd, Ashley (American actress)

    the Judds: …emerged as the screen actress Ashley Judd.

  • Judd, Charles Hubbard (American psychologist)

    Charles Hubbard Judd, U.S. psychologist and exponent of the use of scientific methods in the study of educational problems. His research dealt with psychological issues of school curriculum, pedagogical methods, and the nature of reading, language, and number. Judd was brought to the United States

  • Judd, Diana Ellen (American country music singer)

    the Judds: …country music duo, consisting of Naomi Judd (originally Diana Ellen Judd; b. January 11, 1946, Ashland, Kentucky, U.S.) and her daughter Wynonna Judd (originally Christina Claire Ciminella; b. May 30, 1964, Ashland, Kentucky), whose effective vocal harmonies, melding of traditional country sounds with popular music styles, and mother-daughter chemistry produced…

  • Judd, Donald (American artist and critic)

    Donald Judd, American artist and critic associated with Minimalism. Credited as Minimalism’s principal spokesman, Judd wrote what is considered to be one of the most significant texts of the movement, “Specific Objects” (1965; published first in Arts Yearbook 8 and later in the exhibition catalog

  • Judd, Donald Clarence (American artist and critic)

    Donald Judd, American artist and critic associated with Minimalism. Credited as Minimalism’s principal spokesman, Judd wrote what is considered to be one of the most significant texts of the movement, “Specific Objects” (1965; published first in Arts Yearbook 8 and later in the exhibition catalog

  • Judd, Edward (British actor)

    The Day the Earth Caught Fire: …reporter Peter Stenning (played by Edward Judd) is investigating recent events of unusual weather. He finds that the nearly simultaneous testing of nuclear weapons by the Soviet Union and the United States have apparently knocked Earth from its orbit and hurtled it toward the Sun. The planet begins to heat;…

  • Judd, Gerrit P. (American missionary)

    Gerrit P. Judd, U.S. missionary to Hawaii who played a crucial role in governing the islands. The son of a physician, Judd studied medicine in his father’s office and at a medical school in Fairfield, N.Y. He was graduated in 1825 but the following year underwent a religious experience and decided

  • Judd, Gerrit Parmele (American missionary)

    Gerrit P. Judd, U.S. missionary to Hawaii who played a crucial role in governing the islands. The son of a physician, Judd studied medicine in his father’s office and at a medical school in Fairfield, N.Y. He was graduated in 1825 but the following year underwent a religious experience and decided

  • Judd, Nadine (South African dancer)

    Nadia Nerina, South African prima ballerina renowned for her remarkable versatility of roles. After touring South Africa in 1942, she went to England in 1945, where she studied under Dame Marie Rambert. Nerina became prima ballerina of the Royal Ballet in 1951, excelling in both classical,

  • Judd, Naomi (American country music singer)

    the Judds: …country music duo, consisting of Naomi Judd (originally Diana Ellen Judd; b. January 11, 1946, Ashland, Kentucky, U.S.) and her daughter Wynonna Judd (originally Christina Claire Ciminella; b. May 30, 1964, Ashland, Kentucky), whose effective vocal harmonies, melding of traditional country sounds with popular music styles, and mother-daughter chemistry produced…

  • Judd, Wynonna (American country music singer)

    the Judds: ) and her daughter Wynonna Judd (originally Christina Claire Ciminella; b. May 30, 1964, Ashland, Kentucky), whose effective vocal harmonies, melding of traditional country sounds with popular music styles, and mother-daughter chemistry produced a string of hits in the 1980s and early 1990s.

  • Juddah (Saudi Arabia)

    Jeddah, city and major port in central Hejaz region, western Saudi Arabia. It lies along the Red Sea west of Mecca. The principal importance of Jeddah in history is that it constituted the port of Mecca and was thus the site where the majority of Muslim pilgrims landed while journeying to the holy

  • Judds, the (American country music duo)

    The Judds, American country music duo, consisting of Naomi Judd (originally Diana Ellen Judd; b. January 11, 1946, Ashland, Kentucky, U.S.) and her daughter Wynonna Judd (originally Christina Claire Ciminella; b. May 30, 1964, Ashland, Kentucky), whose effective vocal harmonies, melding of

  • Jude the Obscure (novel by Hardy)

    Jude the Obscure, novel by Thomas Hardy, published in 1894–95 in an abridged form in Harper’s New Monthly as Hearts Insurgent; published in book form in 1895. Jude the Obscure is Hardy’s last work of fiction and is also one of his most gloomily fatalistic, depicting the lives of individuals who are

  • Jude, Der (German periodical)

    Martin Buber: From Vienna to Jerusalem: …Buber founded the influential monthly Der Jude (“The Jew”), which he edited until 1924 and which became the central forum for practically all German-reading Jewish intellectuals. In its pages he advocated the unpopular cause of Jewish-Arab cooperation in the formation of a binational state in Palestine.

  • Jude, Letter of

    Letter of Jude, brief New Testament letter written to a general Christian audience by one who called himself “Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and brother of James”; the author’s identity is uncertain. The letter appeals to Christians to “contend for the faith which was once for all delivered to the

  • Jude, St. (Apostle)

    St. Jude, ; Western feast day October 28, Eastern feast days June 19 and August 21), one of the original Twelve Apostles of Jesus. He is the reputed author of the canonical Letter of Jude that warns against the licentious and blasphemous heretics. The devotion to him as patron saint of desperate

  • Judea (region, Middle East)

    Judaea, the southernmost of the three traditional divisions of ancient Palestine; the other two were Galilee in the north and Samaria in the centre. No clearly marked boundary divided Judaea from Samaria, but the town of Beersheba was traditionally the southernmost limit. The region presents a

  • Juden, Die (play by Lessing)

    Gotthold Ephraim Lessing: Education and first dramatic works.: …Maid”], Der Misogyn [“The Misogynist”], Die Juden [“The Jews”], Der Freigeist [“The Free Thinker”]) are witty commentaries on human weaknesses—bigotry, prejudice, nagging, fortune hunting, matchmaking, intrigue, hypocrisy, corruption, and frivolity. Set against this background are virtuous men and women who are considerate and selfless, sensitive and helpful, forthright, and faithful…

  • Judenbuche, Die (work by Droste-Hülshoff)

    Annette, Freiin von Droste-Hülshoff: …a novella, Die Judenbuche (1842; The Jew’s Beech), is a psychological study of a Westphalian villager who murders a Jew. For the first time in German literature, the fate of the hero is portrayed as arising from his social environment; the crime becomes understandable within the context of the life…

  • Judenkn?chlein (eschatology)

    death: Judaism: …that of the “bone called Luz” (or Judenkn?chlein, as it was to be called by early German anatomists). In his Glossa magna in Pentateuchum (ad 210), Rabbi Oshaia had affirmed that there was a bone in the human body, just below the 18th vertebra, that never died. It could not…

  • Judenr?te (German history)

    Judenr?te, (German: Jewish Councils) Jewish councils established in German-occupied Poland and eastern Europe during World War II to implement German policies and maintain order in the ghettos to which the Nazis confined the country’s Jewish population. Reinhard Heydrich, chief of Nazi Germany’s

  • Judenstaat, Der (pamphlet by Herzl)

    Israel: Zionism: Theodor Herzl began advocating a Jewish state as the political solution for both anti-Semitism (he had covered the sensational Dreyfus affair in France) and a Jewish secular identity. Herzl’s brief and dramatic bid for international support from the major powers at the First Zionist Congress (August 1897) failed, but, after…

  • Judeo-Aramaic language

    Aramaic language: …northeast of Damascus), Palestinian-Christian, and Judeo-Aramaic. West Aramaic is still spoken in a small number of villages in Syria.

  • Judeo-Spanish language

    Ladino language, Romance language spoken by Sephardic Jews living mostly in Israel, the Balkans, North Africa, Greece, and Turkey. Ladino is very nearly extinct in many of these areas. A very archaic form of Castilian Spanish mixed somewhat with Hebrew elements (as well as Aramaic, Arabic, Turkish,

  • Judesmo language

    Ladino language, Romance language spoken by Sephardic Jews living mostly in Israel, the Balkans, North Africa, Greece, and Turkey. Ladino is very nearly extinct in many of these areas. A very archaic form of Castilian Spanish mixed somewhat with Hebrew elements (as well as Aramaic, Arabic, Turkish,

  • Judeu, O (Portuguese writer)

    Ant?nio José da Silva, Portuguese writer whose comedies, farces, and operettas briefly revitalized the Portuguese theatre in a period of dramatic decadence. Silva was born in Brazil, the son of Jews. Though his parents professed Christianity, his mother was accused by the Inquisition of relapsing

  • Judex (film by Feuillade)

    Louis Feuillade: Judex (1916) and La Nouvelle Mission de Judex (1917–18; “The New Mission of Judex”) feature Judex, the daring detective with the sweeping black cape, a righter of wrongs who was the prototype of many future film heroes. The tremendous success of these pictures saved the…

  • judex (law)

    Judge, public official vested with the authority to hear, determine, and preside over legal matters brought in a court of law. In jury cases, the judge presides over the selection of the panel and instructs it concerning pertinent law. The judge also may rule on motions made before or during a

  • Judge (periodical)

    Bernhard Gillam: …of the pro-Republican comic weekly Judge, which he developed into a powerful political voice. During the presidential campaigns of 1888 and 1892, Gillam’s cartoons depicted the dangers of the free-trade policy of the Democrats and the benefits of Republican protectionism. Gillam’s career was cut short when he died of typhoid…

  • judge (law)

    Judge, public official vested with the authority to hear, determine, and preside over legal matters brought in a court of law. In jury cases, the judge presides over the selection of the panel and instructs it concerning pertinent law. The judge also may rule on motions made before or during a

  • judge (sports)

    boxing: Ring, rules, and equipment: … the contest along with two judges outside the ring. In most jurisdictions, however, the referee does not participate in the judging, and three ringside officials score the bout. The officials award points to each boxer for each round, and a boxer must win on two of the three scorecards to…

  • Judge Jerry (American television program)

    Jerry Springer: In 2019 the show Judge Jerry debuted, with Springer presiding over legal disputes.

  • Judge Judy (American television program)

    Judy Sheindlin: …best known for the show Judge Judy (1996– ).

  • Judge Not— (work by Asch)

    Sholem Asch: Judge Not—). These novels describe the cultural and economic conflicts experienced by eastern European Jewish immigrants in America.

  • judge of the frontier (Spanish history)

    Spain: Granada: …“judge of the frontier” (juez de la frontera y de los fieles del rastro); the judge was a Muslim official who heard Christian complaints against the Granadans. This procedure did much to reduce frontier incidents between Muslims and Christians.

  • Judge on Trial (novel by Klíma)

    Ivan Klíma: …Loves); Soudce z milosti (1986; Judge on Trial), a Prague novel about a judge who is jeopardized by his friendships with liberals; and Láska a smetí (1988; Love and Garbage), the narrator of which is a banned Czech writer who sweeps streets for a living while meditating on Franz Kafka…

  • Judge, Michael Craig (American animator, writer, director, and producer)

    Mike Judge, American animator, writer, director, and producer who was one of the foremost satirists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Judge was born in Ecuador to an archaeologist father and teacher mother and was raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He graduated with a physics degree from

  • Judge, Mike (American animator, writer, director, and producer)

    Mike Judge, American animator, writer, director, and producer who was one of the foremost satirists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Judge was born in Ecuador to an archaeologist father and teacher mother and was raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He graduated with a physics degree from

  • Judge, The (American musician)

    Milt Hinton, African American jazz musician, a highly versatile bassist who came of age in the swing era and became one of the favourite bassists of post-World War II jazz. Hinton grew up in Chicago, where he began playing bass in high school and then worked with jazz bands in the early to

  • Judge, The (film by Dobkin [2014])

    Robert Downey, Jr.: …accused of vehicular homicide, in The Judge (2014). He reprised the role of Tony Stark in the Iron Man sequels (2010 and 2013), The Avengers (2012) and its sequels (2015, 2018, and 2019), Captain America: Civil War (2016), and Spider-Man: Homecoming

  • Judge, William Q. (American mystic)

    theosophy: History: Henry Steel Olcott (1832–1907), and William Quan Judge (1851–96). A Russian aristocrat, Blavatsky immigrated to the United States in 1873 after many years of travel and study in Europe and the Middle East. Olcott, an American lawyer, newspaperman, and student of spiritualism—a 19th-century movement based on the belief that the…

  • judgement (law)

    Judgment, in all legal systems, a decision of a court adjudicating the rights of the parties to a legal action before it. A final judgment is usually a prerequisite of review of a court’s decision by an appellate court, thus preventing piecemeal and fragmentary appeals on interlocutory

  • Judgement at Nuremberg (motion picture)

    Marlene Dietrich: …Touch of Evil (1958), and Judgment at Nuremberg (1961). She was also a popular nightclub performer and gave her last stage performance in 1974. After a period of retirement from the screen, she appeared in the film Just a Gigolo (1978). The documentary film Marlene, a review of her life…

  • Judgement of Solomon, The (painting by Poussin)

    Nicolas Poussin: The Raphael of our century: …Family on the Steps, and The Judgment of Solomon. In all of those the artist integrated the figures with their setting in a strict and uncompromising manner that resulted in scenes that are not only conceived in depth but also highly unified across the two-dimensional surface of the picture. The…

  • judgement sampling (statistics)

    sampling: …alternative to probability sampling is judgment sampling, in which selection is based on the judgment of the researcher and there is an unknown probability of inclusion in the sample for any given case. Probability methods are usually preferred because they avoid selection bias and make it possible to estimate sampling…

  • Judges’ Bill (United States [1925])

    United States: The judicial branch: The Judiciary Act of 1925 provided the justices with the sole discretion to determine their caseload. In order to issue a writ of certiorari, which grants a court hearing to a case, at least four justices must agree (the “Rule of Four”). Three types of cases…

  • Judges’ Rules (English law)

    crime: Interrogation and confession: …the police, known as the Judges’ Rules. Principally, the Judges’ Rules obliged the investigating police officer to caution suspects that they were not required to answer any question and that anything they did say might be given in evidence at trial. That caution was required to be stated at the…

  • Judges, Book of (Bible)

    Book of Judges, an Old Testament book that, along with Deuteronomy, Joshua, I and II Samuel, and I and II Kings, belongs to a specific historical tradition (Deuteronomic history) that was first committed to writing about 550 bc, during the Babylonian Exile. The judges to whom the title refers were

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