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  • London, Tower of (tower, London, United Kingdom)

    Tower of London, royal fortress and London landmark. Its buildings and grounds served historically as a royal palace, a political prison, a place of execution, an arsenal, a royal mint, a menagerie, and a public records office. It is located on the north bank of the River Thames, in the extreme

  • London, Treaties of (history of international relations)

    Edward III: Hundred Years’ War: …but forced him by the Treaty of London (1359) to surrender so much territory that the agreement was repudiated in France. In an effort to compel acceptance, Edward landed at Calais (October 28) and besieged Reims, where he planned to be crowned king of France. The strenuous resistance of the…

  • London, Treaty of (European history [1915])

    Treaty of London, (April 26, 1915) secret treaty between neutral Italy and the Allied forces of France, Britain, and Russia to bring Italy into World War I. The Allies wanted Italy’s participation because of its border with Austria. Italy was promised Trieste, southern Tyrol, northern Dalmatia, and

  • London, University of (university, London, United Kingdom)

    University of London, federation of British institutions of higher learning, located primarily in London, that includes 19 virtually autonomous colleges, 10 separate institutes known collectively as the School of Advanced Study, an institute in Paris, and a marine biological station. The university

  • Londonderry (Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Londonderry, city and former district (1973–2015), now in Derry City and Strabane district, northwestern Northern Ireland. It is Northern Ireland’s second most populous city. Long part of the former County Londonderry, the old city and adjacent urban and rural areas were administratively merged in

  • Londonderry (former county, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Londonderry, former (until 1973) county, Northern Ireland. It was bounded by the Atlantic Ocean (north), the River Bann (east), former County Tyrone (south), and the River Foyle (west). It had an area of 801 square miles (2,075 square km), roughly triangular in shape. The former county’s principal

  • Londonderry City (Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Londonderry, city and former district (1973–2015), now in Derry City and Strabane district, northwestern Northern Ireland. It is Northern Ireland’s second most populous city. Long part of the former County Londonderry, the old city and adjacent urban and rural areas were administratively merged in

  • Londonderry, Robert Stewart, 2nd marquess of (Irish statesman)

    Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh, British foreign secretary (1812–22), who helped guide the Grand Alliance against Napoleon and was a major participant in the Congress of Vienna, which redrew the map of Europe in 1815. Castlereagh was one of the most distinguished foreign secretaries in British

  • Londonese, Il (Italian composer)

    Giuseppe Sammartini, oboist and composer prominent in England in the first half of the 18th century and brother of Giovanni Battista Sammartini. Giuseppe wrote an aria and sinfonia (both lost) for La Calumnia Delusa, which was performed in Milan in 1724. In about 1728 he went to London, where he

  • londoni férfi, A (film by Tarr and Hranitzky [2007])

    László Nemes: …and A londoni férfi (2007; The Man from London). Nemes went on to direct a short film of his own: Türelem (2007; With a Little Patience), which was shown at the Venice International Film Festival. In 2006 he briefly sojourned in New York City, attending the Tisch School of the…

  • Londoninesis Bible (work by Walton)

    polyglot Bible: …considered the finest is the London Polyglot, also called the Londoninesis or Waltonian (1657), compiled by Brian Walton, with the aid of many contemporary scholars; the Waltonian was one of the first English books assembled under public subscription. Its six volumes contain a total of nine languages: Hebrew, Samaritan, Aramaic,…

  • londres (cigar)

    cigar: … is a smaller torpedo-shaped cigar; Londres is a straight cigar about 4.75 inches long. These descriptive terms appear after the brand name. A panatela is a thin cigar open at both ends, usually about 5 inches long with a straight shape but sometimes having a shoulder, or drawn-in portion, at…

  • Londrina (Brazil)

    Londrina, city, northern Paraná estado (state), southeastern Brazil. It is located west of the Tibagi River at more than 1,800 feet (550 metres) above sea level. Londrina’s origins date to the late 1920s and early 1930s with the arrival of a handful of German and Japanese settlers and the

  • lone pair (chemistry)

    chemical bonding: Lewis formulation of a covalent bond: …the chlorine atom are called lone pairs and play no direct role in holding the two atoms together.

  • Lone Pine, Battle of (World War I [1915])

    Battle of Lone Pine, (6–10 August 1915), World War I conflict that exemplified the courage and skills of Australian troops engaged in the Gallipoli Campaign. Conceived as a diversionary attack on a quiet sector of the Turkish trenches, Lone Pine developed into a ferocious close-quarters engagement

  • Lone Ranger (fictional character)

    Lone Ranger, renegade lawman in the American West, a fictional character of American radio and television programs, books, films, and comics. In all media the Lone Ranger fictions are similar. John Reid was born in 1850 and was the sole survivor of a group of Texas Rangers who were ambushed by

  • Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, The (book by Alexie)

    Sherman Alexie: …Old Shirts &amp; New Skins—and The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, a collection of interwoven stories that won the PEN/Hemingway Award for best first book of fiction.

  • Lone Ranger, The (American radio program)

    Mutual Broadcasting System: Origins: the popular western adventure program The Lone Ranger) withdrew to join the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) network in 1935, Canadian station CKLW in Windsor, Ontario (serving the Detroit market), replaced it. (The Lone Ranger remained on Mutual until 1942 under contractual obligation.)

  • Lone Ranger, The (American television program)

    Television in the United States: Developing genres: … (NBC, 1949–51; syndicated, 1952–54) and The Lone Ranger (ABC, 1949–57), crime shows such as Martin Kane, Private Eye (NBC, 1949–54) and Man Against Crime (CBS/DuMont/NBC, 1949–56), and game shows such as Stop the Music (ABC, 1949–56) and Groucho Marx’s You Bet Your Life (NBC, 1950–61) were all represented in the…

  • Lone Ranger, The (film by Verbinski [2013])

    Helena Bonham Carter: …Old West brothel owner in The Lone Ranger (2013). Also in the early 21st century, she received critical acclaim for her portrayal of mad witch Bellatrix Lestrange in the Harry Potter movie franchise. Bonham Carter evinced more-beneficent qualities as the fairy godmother of the title character in Cinderella (2015). She…

  • Lone Star (film by Sayles [1996])

    John Sayles: …intricately crafted cross-cultural murder mystery Lone Star (1996); The Secret of Roan Inish (1994); Men with Guns (1997); Limbo (1999); Sunshine State (2002); Casa de Los Babys (2003); Silver City (2004); and Honeydripper (2007).

  • Lone Star (Liberian football team)

    George Weah: Athletic career: …was able to sustain the Lone Star—the national team—only with the assistance of Weah, who played for, coached, and to a large extent financed the team. In 2002, after the Lone Star nearly qualified for the World Cup and then performed poorly at the African Cup of Nations, Weah retired…

  • Lone Star Flag (United States state flag)

    U.S. state flag consisting of a vertical blue stripe at the hoist bearing a large white star; the fly end is horizontally divided white over red.Prior to the 1836 declaration of Texan independence from Mexico, the “Lone Star State” had a number of flags. English-speaking settlers and filibusters

  • Lone Star State (state, United States)

    Texas, constituent state of the United States of America. It became the 28th state of the union in 1845. Texas occupies the south-central segment of the country and is the largest state in area except for Alaska. The state extends nearly 1,000 miles (1,600 km) from north to south and about the same

  • lone star tick (arachnid)

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever: …are also traced to the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum. In Brazil the common carrier is Amblyomma cajennense.

  • Lone Wolf and Cub (comic by Kojima)

    comic strip: Asia and the manga: …English readers under the title Lone Wolf and Cub in 1987 and was made into a television series in 2002.

  • Lone Wolf v. Hitchcock (law case)

    Native American: Allotment: …the Supreme Court determined, in Lone Wolf v. Hitchcock (1903), that allotment was legal because Congress was entitled to abrogate treaties. In Canada the decision in St. Catherine’s Milling &amp; Lumber Company v. The Queen (1888) found that aboriginal land remained in the purview of the crown despite treaties that…

  • Lone, John (Chinese actor)

    The Last Emperor: …of Pu Yi (played by John Lone) at a prison in China, where he attempts suicide but is revived by the prison governor (Ruocheng Ying). The story then unfolds as a series of flashbacks intercut with scenes of Pu Yi’s reeducation. In 1908, at the age of three, Pu Yi…

  • loneliness (psychology)

    Loneliness, distressing experience that occurs when a person’s social relationships are perceived by that person to be less in quantity, and especially in quality, than desired. The experience of loneliness is highly subjective; an individual can be alone without feeling lonely and can feel lonely

  • Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, The (film by Richardson [1962])

    The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, British film drama, released in 1962, that was directed by Tony Richardson and featured the impressive screen debut of Tom Courtenay. Courtenay played Colin Smith, a troubled young man sent to a reform school after he robs a bakery. A gifted runner, he is

  • Lonely Are the Brave (film by Miller [1962])

    Lonely Are the Brave, American western film, released in 1962, that was a downbeat but moving tale of a cowboy out of place in the modern American West. Kirk Douglas earned acclaim in the lead role. Jack Burns (played by Douglas) is a middle-aged cowboy who is comfortable on the plains of New

  • Lonely Crowd : A Study of the Changing American Character, The (work by Riesman, Denney, and Glazer)

    David Riesman: …and author most noted for The Lonely Crowd: A Study of the Changing American Character (with Reuel Denney and Nathan Glazer, 1950), a work dealing primarily with the social character of the urban middle class. “The lonely crowd” became a catchphrase denoting modern urban society in which the individual feels…

  • Lonely Girl, The (work by O’Brien)

    Edna O'Brien: …subsequent lives are traced in The Lonely Girl (1962) and Girls in Their Married Bliss (1964), by which time both have settled in London and have become disillusioned with marriage and men in general. Among O’Brien’s many subsequent novels are August Is a Wicked Month (1965), Casualties of Peace (1966),…

  • Lonely Guy, The (film by Hiller [1984])

    Arthur Hiller: Later films: … as an overwhelmed playwright, and The Lonely Guy (1984), with Steve Martin and a scene-stealing Charles Grodin. Hiller had a modest hit with Outrageous Fortune (1987), which cast Bette Midler and Shelley Long as rivals, but See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989) was disappointing, despite the presence of Wilder…

  • Lonely Hearts (film by Robinson [2006])

    Jared Leto: …Lord of War (2005), and Lonely Hearts (2006), and then he put on 60 pounds (27 kg) for his portrayal of John Lennon’s killer, Mark David Chapman, in the widely panned film Chapter 27 (2007).

  • Lonely Lives (work by Hauptmann)

    Gerhart Hauptmann: …family, while Einsame Menschen (1891; Lonely Lives) describes the tragic end of an unhappy intellectual torn between his wife and a young woman (patterned after the writer Lou Andreas-Salomé) with whom he can share his thoughts.

  • Lonely Londoners, The (work by Selvon)

    Samuel Selvon: The Lonely Londoners (1956) describes apparently naive immigrants living by their wits in a hostile city. His later works include a collection of short stories, Ways of Sunlight (1958), and the novels I Hear Thunder (1962), The Housing Lark (1965), Moses Ascending (1975), and Moses…

  • Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne, The (novel by Moore)

    The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne, novel by Brian Moore, published in 1955 as Judith Hearne, about an aging Irish spinster’s disillusionment and her subsequent descent into alcoholism. The American version was published in 1956 as The Lonely Passion of Judith

  • Lonely Villa (film by Griffith [1909])

    history of the motion picture: D.W. Griffith: …of three simultaneous actions in The Lonely Villa, cutting rapidly back and forth between a band of robbers breaking into a suburban villa, a woman and her children barricaded within, and the husband rushing from town to the rescue. This type of crosscutting, or intercutting, came to be known as…

  • Lonely White Sail (work by Katayev)

    Valentin Katayev: Beleyet parus odinoky (1936; Lonely White Sail, or A White Sail Gleams), another novel, treats the 1905 revolution from the viewpoint of two Odessa schoolboys; it was the basis of a classic Soviet film. Katayev’s Vremya, vperyod! (1932; Time, Forward!), concerning workers’ attempts to build a huge steel plant…

  • Lonely Wife, The (work by Ray)

    Satyajit Ray: Among such works, Charulata (1964; The Lonely Wife), a tragic love triangle set within a wealthy, Western-influenced Bengali family in 1879, is perhaps Ray’s most accomplished film. Teen Kanya (1961; “Three Daughters,” English-language title Two Daughters) is a varied trilogy of short films about women, while Ghare Baire (1984; The…

  • Lonergan, Bernard (Canadian philosopher)

    Christianity: 20th-century discussions: …it included the work of Bernard Lonergan in Insight (1957), which has stimulated considerable discussion. Lonergan argued that the act of understanding, or insight, is pivotal for the apprehension of reality, and that it implies in the long run that the universe is itself due to the fiat of an…

  • Lonesome Dove (American television miniseries)

    Chris Cooper: …Johnson in the television miniseries Lonesome Dove (1989) and Return to Lonesome Dove (1993). He appeared in the film Guilty by Suspicion (1991), about the Hollywood blacklists, and performed in Sayles’s City of Hope (also 1991).

  • Lonesome Dove (work by McMurtry)

    Larry McMurtry: McMurtry’s frontier epic, Lonesome Dove (1985; television miniseries 1989), won a Pulitzer Prize in 1986. A sequel, Streets of Laredo, appeared in 1993; Dead Man’s Walk (1995) and Comanche Moon (1997) are prequels. Urban Houstonians are featured in Moving On (1970), All My Friends Are Going to Be…

  • Lonesome Jubilee, The (album by Mellencamp)

    John Mellencamp: Scarecrow (1985) and The Lonesome Jubilee (1987) were his commercial and artistic high points, exploring the impact of Ronald Reagan’s presidency on Middle America and producing the hits “Small Town,” “R.O.C.K. in the USA,” and “Cherry Bomb.” He also was a chief sponsor of the first Farm Aid…

  • long (Chinese mythology)

    Long, (Chinese: “dragon”) in Chinese mythology, a type of majestic beast that dwells in rivers, lakes, and oceans and roams the skies. Originally a rain divinity, the Chinese dragon, unlike its malevolent European counterpart (see dragon), is associated with heavenly beneficence and fecundity. Rain

  • Long Acre Square (square, New York City, New York, United States)

    Times Square, square in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, formed by the intersection of Seventh Avenue, 42nd Street, and Broadway. Times Square is also the centre of the Theatre District, which is bounded roughly by Sixth and Eighth avenues to the east and west, respectively, and by 40th and 53rd

  • Long and Happy Life, A (novel by Price)

    Reynolds Price: Price’s first novel, A Long and Happy Life (1962), introduced his memorable young heroine, the naive, spirited Rosacoke Mustian, who loves, becomes pregnant by, and weds an indifferent young man. A younger Rosacoke appeared in Price’s short-story collection The Names and Faces of Heroes (1963), and in the…

  • Long Beach (island and township, New Jersey, United States)

    Long Beach, island and township in Ocean county, eastern New Jersey, U.S. It lies in the Atlantic Ocean 4–6 miles (6–10 km) offshore and shelters Little Egg Harbor and the southern portion of Barnegat Bay (both part of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway) from the ocean. Extending 12 miles (19 km)

  • Long Beach (United States cruiser)

    Long Beach, first nuclear-powered cruiser, launched by the U.S. Navy in 1959. With a length of 721 feet (219 metres) and a displacement of 14,000 tons, the Long Beach was the first large surface warship to be built with a main armament consisting of guided missiles. The compactness of its power

  • Long Beach (California, United States)

    Long Beach, city, port, Los Angeles county, California, U.S. Long Beach lies on San Pedro Bay, 22 miles (35 km) south of Los Angeles, and surrounds the independent city of Signal Hill. The area was originally an Indian trading camp. In 1542 Spanish explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo anchored off the

  • Long Ben (British pirate)

    John Avery, one of Britain’s most renowned pirates of the late 17th century, and the model for Daniel Defoe’s hero in Life, Adventures, and Pyracies, of the Famous Captain Singleton (1720). Avery reputedly served in the Royal Navy and on merchantmen, as well as on buccaneer and slave ships, before

  • Long Branch (New Jersey, United States)

    Long Branch, city, Monmouth county, eastern New Jersey, U.S. It lies along the Atlantic Ocean, 50 miles (80 km) south of New York City. Settled in 1668 on land purchased from the Delaware Indians, it was named for its location on the Long Branch of the South Shrewsbury River. Its development as a

  • Long Branch, New Jersey (painting by Homer)

    Winslow Homer: Early life and work: Such early pictures as Long Branch, New Jersey (1869) and Snap the Whip (1872) depict happy scenes, the former of fashionable ladies promenading along the seashore and the latter of children frolicking in a meadow after school. In a few early pictures a disquieting note of human isolation is…

  • long call (animal behavior)

    orangutan: Reproduction: …resonating chamber for the “long call,” a sequence of roars that can sometimes be heard for 2 km (1.2 miles). Males typically vocalize for a minute or more; calls up to five minutes in length have been recorded, giving the call its name. Females virtually never give the full…

  • Long Campaign (Hungarian history [1443–44])

    János Hunyadi: The Long Campaign: The famous “Long Campaign” took place in the autumn and winter of 1443–44. The preparations needed time. Internal troubles in Hungary and the hostility of the Habsburgs were mollified with papal help. Venice and the papacy supported Hunyadi’s army financially and diplomatically. Poland…

  • Long Count (Mayan chronology)

    chronology: Maya and Mexican: …are called Initial Series, or Long Counts, the former because they usually stand at the start of an inscription (see calendar: The Mayan calendar). For example, the combination day 8 Muluc, falling on second of Zip (third month), recurs every 52 years, but the Initial Series (here 9.10.6.5.9 8 Muluc…

  • Long Count, Battle of the (American boxing history)

    Jack Dempsey: …again in the famous “Battle of the Long Count,” in which Dempsey forfeited his chance for a seventh-round knockout by standing over the fallen Tunney rather than going to a neutral corner of the ring. Tunney recovered to win another 10-round decision.

  • Long Day’s Journey into Night (film by Lumet [1962])

    Sidney Lumet: The 1960s: Fail Safe, The Pawnbroker, and The Hill: It was Long Day’s Journey into Night (1962), though, that brought Lumet his best notices to date and launched a series of films that are widely considered classics. A lengthy, deliberately theatrical adaptation of Eugene O’Neill’s acclaimed play about a dysfunctional family, it offered standout performances by…

  • Long Day’s Journey into Night (play by O’Neill)

    Long Day’s Journey into Night, drama in four acts by Eugene O’Neill, written 1939–41 and produced and published posthumously in 1956. The play, which is considered an American masterpiece, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1957. O’Neill’s autobiographical play is a shattering depiction of a day in

  • Long Dimanche de fian?ailles, Un (film by Jeunet [2004])

    Marion Cotillard: …Long Dimanche de fian?ailles (2004; A Very Long Engagement). While that film and the Taxi series cemented Cotillard’s star status in her own country, she became known to American audiences with her turn in American director Tim Burton’s Big Fish (2003), in which she had a small but memorable role.…

  • Long Earth, The (book by Pratchett and Baxter)

    Terry Pratchett: The Long Earth (2012; with Stephen Baxter) and The Long War (2013; also with Baxter) concern the ramifications of the discovery that humans can access numerous parallel Earths. Dragons at Crumbling Castle (2014) was a collection of comic children’s stories about a young boy’s attempts…

  • long form canter (horsemanship)

    canter: The long form, or extended canter, permits the neck of the horse to stretch forward with the horse’s weight placed on its forequarter. The moment of suspension in this gait, which varies from a slow lope to a fast gallop, is restricted. In the short form, or collected canter,…

  • Long Goodbye, The (film by Altman [1973])

    Robert Altman: M*A*S*H and the 1970s: With the The Long Goodbye (1973) Altman reworked another classic genre. This time he deconstructed the iconic hard-boiled private eye at the centre of so much film noir. Gould provided an aggressively antiheroic, ignoble portrayal of Philip Marlowe, the protagonist in the 1953 novel by Raymond Chandler…

  • long gravity wave (hydrology)

    wave: Physical characteristics of surface waves: …the waves are known as long gravity waves, and their wavelength is directly proportional to their period. The deeper the water, the faster they travel. For capillary waves, shorter wavelengths travel faster than longer ones.

  • long hall (architecture)

    Western architecture: Prelude to Romanesque in the north: …well represented by the “long hall” or palace at Lojsta (built c. 1000) on the island of Gotland. Judging from the remains of the building, the superstructure must have consisted of tall, triangular frames stiffened by timbers that mark out a supporting square in the lower half of the…

  • long hedging (trading)

    futures: The theory and practice of hedging: …they are called short and long hedgers. Short hedgers are merchants and processors who acquire inventories of the commodity in the spot market and who simultaneously sell an equivalent amount or less in the futures market. The hedgers in this case are said to be long on their spot transaction…

  • long hop (cricket)

    cricket: Bowling: A long hop is a ball short of good length.

  • long house (dwelling)

    Longhouse, traditional dwelling of many Northeast Indians of North America. A traditional longhouse was built by using a rectangular frame of saplings, each 2 to 3 inches (5 to 7.5 cm) in diameter. The larger end of each sapling was placed in a posthole in the ground, and a domed roof was created

  • Long Island (island, Cumberland Islands, Queensland, Australia)

    Long Island, small land mass in the Cumberland Islands, 0.5 mile (1 km) off the northeastern coast of Queensland, Australia, in Whitsunday Passage of the Coral Sea. One of the inshore, coral-fringed, hilly continental islands of the Great Barrier Reef, it measures 6 miles by 1 mile (10 km by 1.6

  • Long Island (island, New York, United States)

    Long Island, island in the Atlantic Ocean that comprises the southeasternmost part of New York state, U.S. The island lies roughly parallel to the southern shore of Connecticut, from which it is separated to the north by Long Island Sound. Long Island’s western end forms part of the harbour of New

  • Long Island (island, Georgia, United States)

    Cockspur Island, island, Chatham county, southeastern Georgia, U.S., in the mouth of the Savannah River. Known during colonial times as Peeper Island, it was given the name Cockspur for the shape of its reef. Its strategic advantages were early recognized; in the 18th century the island held Fort

  • Long Island of Holston, Treaty of (American Revolution [1777])

    Cherokee: … (May 20, 1777) and the Treaty of Long Island of Holston (July 20, 1777).

  • Long Island of Holston, Treaty of (American Revolution [1781])

    Cherokee: The second Treaty of Long Island of Holston (July 26, 1781) confirmed previous land cessions and caused the Cherokee to yield additional territory.

  • Long Island Rail Road Company (American railway)

    Long Island Rail Road Company, American railroad on Long Island, N.Y., and one of the few in the world still operating under its original name. Incorporated in 1834, it opened its main line to Greenport, at the eastern end of Long Island, in 1844. Over the years it acquired other Long Island

  • Long Island Sound (sound, Connecticut-New York, United States)

    Long Island Sound, semienclosed arm of the North Atlantic Ocean, lying between the New York–Connecticut (U.S.) shore to the north and Long Island to the south. Covering 1,180 square miles (3,056 square km), it is 90 miles (145 km) long and 3–20 miles (5–32 km) wide and is limited on the east by

  • Long Island, Battle of (American history [1776])

    Battle of Long Island, also known as the Battle of Brooklyn or the Battle of Brooklyn Heights, (August 27–29, 1776), in the American Revolution, successful British action in Brooklyn, New York, against the American Continental Army and the first major battle of the war since the American

  • Long Journey, The (work by Jensen)

    Johannes V. Jensen: (1908–22; The Long Journey, 3 vol., 1922–24). This story of the rise of man from the most primitive times to the discovery of America by Columbus exhibits both his imagination and his skill as an amateur anthropologist.

  • long jump (athletics)

    Long jump, sport in athletics (track-and-field) consisting of a horizontal jump for distance. It was formerly performed from both standing and running starts, as separate events, but the standing long jump is no longer included in major competitions. It was discontinued from the Olympic Games after

  • Long Kesh (prison, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Maze prison, prison located 10 miles (16 km) west of Belfast, N.Ire., that was a symbolic centre of the struggle between unionists and nationalists during the “Troubles” in Northern Ireland in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Located on the site of a former Royal Air Force airfield, the

  • Long Kiss Goodnight, The (film by Harlin [1996])

    Samuel L. Jackson: …A Time to Kill (1996), The Long Kiss Goodnight (1996), Tarantino’s Jackie Brown (1997), The Negotiator (1998), and Star Wars: Episode I—The Phantom Menace (1999), as Mace Windu. He reprised that role in Star Wars: Episode II—Attack of the Clones (2002) and Star Wars: Episode III—Revenge of the Sith

  • Long Lake (lake, Canada)

    Last Mountain Lake, lake in south central Saskatchewan, Canada, which drains southward to the Qu’Appelle River. Named after a hill 12 mi (19 km) to the east, the lake averages only 2 mi in width but extends northward for nearly 60 mi. It has an area of 89 sq mi (231 sq km). Since the establishment

  • Long Land (firearm)

    small arm: Standardized patterns and parts: …army musket, called the “Long Land,” which had a 46-inch (1,168-mm) barrel and a calibre, or bore diameter, of .75 inch (19 mm). The Long Land became popularly known in America as the first model Brown Bess musket. Fighting experience in the wilderness of North America during the Seven…

  • Long Lankin (work by Banville)

    John Banville: His first piece of fiction, Long Lankin (1970), is a series of nine episodic short stories. This work was followed by two novels: Nightspawn (1971), an intentionally ambiguous narrative, and Birchwood (1973), the story of a decaying Irish family. Doctor Copernicus (1976), Kepler (1981), and The Newton Letter: An

  • Long March (Chinese launch vehicles)

    Chang Zheng, (Chinese: “Long March”) family of Chinese launch vehicles. Like those of the United States and the Soviet Union, China’s first launch vehicles were also based on ballistic missiles. The Chang Zheng 1 (CZ-1, or Long March 1) vehicle, which put China’s first satellite into orbit in 1970,

  • Long March (Chinese history)

    Long March, (1934–35), the 6,000-mile (10,000-km) historic trek of the Chinese communists, which resulted in the relocation of the communist revolutionary base from southeastern to northwestern China and in the emergence of Mao Zedong as the undisputed party leader. Fighting Nationalist forces

  • Long March, The (book by Styron)

    William Styron: His next work, The Long March (1956), chronicles a brutal forced march undertaken by recruits in a Marine training camp. The novel Set This House on Fire, complexly structured and set largely in Italy, appeared in 1960.

  • long measure (poetry)

    Long metre, in poetry, a quatrain in iambic tetrameter with the second and fourth lines rhyming and often the first and third lines rhyming. An example is the following stanza from the poem “When I Survey the Wondrous Cross” by Isaac

  • long metre (poetry)

    Long metre, in poetry, a quatrain in iambic tetrameter with the second and fourth lines rhyming and often the first and third lines rhyming. An example is the following stanza from the poem “When I Survey the Wondrous Cross” by Isaac

  • long moss (plant)

    Spanish moss, (Tillandsia usneoides), epiphyte (a nonparasitic plant that is supported by another plant and has aerial roots exposed to the humid atmosphere) of the pineapple family (Bromeliaceae). It is found in southern North America, the West Indies, and Central and South America. The

  • Long Mountains (mountains, Norway)

    Lang Mountains, mountainous area lying south and west of the Dovre Mountains in west-central Norway. The Lang Mountains include the Jotunheim Mountains, the Jostedals Glacier, the Hardanger Ice Cap, the Hardanger Plateau, the Bykle Hills, and many lesser features. The highest mountains in

  • Long Mountains (mountains, China)

    Liupan Mountains: …southern section is called the Long Mountains (also called Guan Mountains, Longtou, or Longban).

  • Long Night, The (film by Litvak [1947])

    Anatole Litvak: The Hollywood years: …returned to Hollywood and directed The Long Night (1947), a film noir that opens with a man (Henry Fonda) barricading himself in his apartment after killing someone; through flashbacks it is revealed how he ended up in the situation. The picture was a box-office failure for RKO, but Litvak’s production…

  • Long Now Foundation (American organization)

    Danny Hillis: Walt Disney, the Long Now, and Applied Minds: …Hillis and others established the Long Now Foundation, created to develop a multigenerational perspective on many issues facing civilization. The foundation’s most famous project was a mechanical clock designed to last for at least 10,000 years—an appropriate challenge for an unconventional and provocative thinker. In 2000 Hillis left Disney to…

  • Long Pants (film by Capra)

    Harry Langdon: Long Pants (1927), again directed by Capra, was Langdon’s third hit comedy. Audiences loved the innocent new screen character that Langdon had created, and, on the strength of these three films, he became one of the most adored comedians in the country, along with Chaplin…

  • Long Parliament (British history)

    Long Parliament, the English Parliament summoned in November 1640 by King Charles I; it has been so named to distinguish it from the Short Parliament of April–May 1640. The duration of the Long Parliament has been held to have extended either until April 1653, when its remaining members were

  • Long Pennant (novel by La Farge)

    Oliver La Farge: Long Pennant (1933) and The Copper Pot (1942) have New Englanders as their main characters. La Farge’s short stories were collected in All the Young Men (1935) and A Pause in the Desert (1957). La Farge’s autobiography, Raw Material, was published in 1945.

  • long pike (weapon)

    Philip II: Early life and accession: …the decisive innovations in arms—the sarissa, a pike nearly one and a half times as long as the spear of the Greeks—tactics, and training belong probably to this first year.

  • Long Point (peninsula, Ontario, Canada)

    Long Point, peninsula in Lake Erie, Norfolk county, southern Ontario, Canada. It lies about 45 miles (70 km) southwest of Port Colborne, which is the Lake Erie terminus of the Welland Canal. Formerly an island separated from the mainland by a small channel, it is now a narrow peninsula jutting

  • Long Point (Missouri, United States)

    Kirksville, city, seat of Adair county, northeastern Missouri, U.S., about 90 miles (145 km) north of Columbia, near the Chariton River. Founded about 1841 as the county seat, it was known as Long Point and Hopkinsville before being renamed for Jesse Kirk, an early resident. A minor American Civil

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