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  • Los Alamos (New Mexico, United States)

    Los Alamos, city, seat (1949) of Los Alamos county, north-central New Mexico, U.S. It lies on the Pajarito Plateau (elevation 7,300 feet [2,225 metres]) of the Jemez Mountains, 35 miles (56 km) northwest of Santa Fe. The site was named Los Alamos (Spanish: “the cottonwoods”) by Ashley Pond, founder

  • Los Alamos Laboratory (laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the laboratory that produced the first atomic bombs used during World War II and home of the primary nuclear weapons research facility in the United States. It is located in Los Alamos, New Mexico, 35 miles (56 km) northwest of Santa Fe. In 1942 General Leslie

  • Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (New Mexico, United States)

    linear accelerator: …proton linac is at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility in Los Alamos, N.M., U.S.; it is 875 m (2,870 feet) long and accelerates protons to 800 million electron volts (800 megaelectron volts). For much of its length, this machine utilizes a structural variation, known as the side-coupled cavity…

  • Los Alamos National Laboratory (laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the laboratory that produced the first atomic bombs used during World War II and home of the primary nuclear weapons research facility in the United States. It is located in Los Alamos, New Mexico, 35 miles (56 km) northwest of Santa Fe. In 1942 General Leslie

  • Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the laboratory that produced the first atomic bombs used during World War II and home of the primary nuclear weapons research facility in the United States. It is located in Los Alamos, New Mexico, 35 miles (56 km) northwest of Santa Fe. In 1942 General Leslie

  • Los Alerces National Park (national park, Argentina)

    Chubut: The Los Alerces National Park (463,400 acres [187,500 hectares]) includes glaciated mountains, alpine lakes, rivers, and forests. To the east are isolated mountain ranges, salt flats, and salt lakes. The Chubut River crosses the province west to east. The Valdés Peninsula, designated as a UNESCO World…

  • Los Angeles (California, United States)

    Los Angeles , city, seat of Los Angeles county, southern California, U.S. It is the second most populous city and metropolitan area (after New York City) in the United States. The city sprawls across a broad coastal plain situated between mountains and the Pacific Ocean; the much larger Los Angeles

  • Los Angeles (work by P?rt)

    Arvo P?rt: …which his fourth symphony (Los Angeles) premiered, the Arvo P?rt Archive was established in Harjumaa, Estonia. In 2014 P?rt received the Japan Art Association’s Praemium Imperiale prize for music.

  • Los Angeles (United States submarine class)

    submarine: Attack submarines: The Sturgeon and Los Angeles submarines, designed at the height of the Cold War, originally carried not only conventional torpedoes for antisubmarine warfare but also rocket-launched nuclear depth bombs, known as SUBROCs. The Seawolf submarines, also Cold War designs (though commissioned after the collapse of the Soviet Union),…

  • Los Angeles (album by X)

    X: Formed in 1977, X released Los Angeles in 1980. That effort and the follow-up albums Wild Gift (1981) and Under the Big Black Sun (1982) drew critical raves, as X broadened punk’s do-it-yourself ethos with excellent musicianship (Zoom, who had once played with rock-and-roll pioneer Gene Vincent, blazed through country,…

  • Los Angeles (county, California, United States)

    Hispanics in the United States: The U.S. Census of 2000: …largest concentration of Hispanics was Los Angeles county, with more than four million Hispanics; counties with more than one million Hispanics included Miami-Dade (encompassing Miami) in Florida, Harris (Houston) in Texas, and Cook (Chicago) in Illinois.

  • Los Angeles (Chile)

    Los Angeles, city, Biobío región, south-central Chile. It is located on a tributary of the Biobío River in the southern part of the Central Valley. Founded in 1739 as Nuestra Se?ora de Los ángeles (“Our Lady of the Angels”) and elevated to city status in 1852, Los Angeles was swept by fire in 1820,

  • Los Angeles (aircraft)

    Hugo Eckener: The ZR-3 (later named Los Angeles) had been built for the United States as a war reparations payment. Eckener also commanded the Graf Zeppelin on its epic around-the-world flight in 1929 and on its polar-exploration flight in 1931.

  • Los Angeles 1932 Olympic Games

    Los Angeles 1932 Olympic Games, athletic festival held in Los Angeles that took place July 30–Aug. 14, 1932. The Los Angeles Games were the ninth occurrence of the modern Olympic Games. Only about 1,300 athletes, representing 37 countries, competed in the 1932 Games. The poor participation was the

  • Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games

    Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games, athletic festival held in Los Angeles that took place July 28–Aug. 12, 1984. The Los Angeles Games were the 20th occurrence of the modern Olympic Games. Many communist countries—including the Soviet Union, East Germany, and Cuba—retaliated for the U.S.-led boycott of

  • Los Angeles 2028 Olympic Games

    Olympic Games: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2016: …held in Paris, and the 2028 Games were scheduled to be held in Los Angeles.

  • Los Angeles Angels (American baseball team)

    Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, American professional baseball team based in Anaheim, California, that plays in the American League (AL). The Angels won a World Series title in 2002, their first appearance in the “Fall Classic.” The Angels began play in 1961 as one of two expansion teams (with the

  • Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (American baseball team)

    Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, American professional baseball team based in Anaheim, California, that plays in the American League (AL). The Angels won a World Series title in 2002, their first appearance in the “Fall Classic.” The Angels began play in 1961 as one of two expansion teams (with the

  • Los Angeles Chargers (American football team)

    Los Angeles Chargers, American professional gridiron football team that plays in the American Football Conference (AFC) of the National Football League (NFL). The Chargers are based in the Greater Los Angeles area and have appeared in one Super Bowl (1995). The Chargers began play in 1960 as one of

  • Los Angeles Clippers (American basketball team)

    Los Angeles Clippers, American professional basketball team based in Los Angeles that plays in the Western Conference of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The franchise was originally based in Buffalo, New York, and was known as the Buffalo Braves upon joining the NBA in 1970 alongside

  • Los Angeles County Museum of Art (museum, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), museum campus in Los Angeles with distinguished collections of Asian (Indian, Tibetan, Nepalese), Islamic, medieval, Latin American, European, and modern art. In the early 21st century LACMA held more than 100,000 works of art. Established in 1910, the

  • Los Angeles County Museum of Art on Fire, The (painting by Ruscha)

    Ed Ruscha: …works of dark humour include The Los Angeles County Museum of Art on Fire (1965–68), a painting depicting the institution in flames; Actual Size (1962), an image of a flying can of Spam (a precooked luncheon meat) beneath the Spam logo; and Large Trademark with Eight Spotlights (1962), a dramatic…

  • Los Angeles Dodgers (American baseball team)

    Los Angeles Dodgers, American professional baseball team based in Los Angeles that plays in the National League (NL). The team has won six World Series titles and 23 NL pennants. Founded in 1883, the Dodgers were originally based in Brooklyn, New York, and were known as the Atlantics. The team

  • Los Angeles Express (American football team)

    Steve Young: …at the time) with the Los Angeles Express of the short-lived United States Football League (USFL). In two seasons with a bad team, he completed only 56.4 percent of his passes with 16 touchdowns and 22 interceptions. He bought out his contract with the Express after the spring season of…

  • Los Angeles FC (American soccer club)

    Mia Hamm: …Garciaparra, and numerous others—of the Los Angeles Football Club of Major League Soccer; the team began play in 2018.

  • Los Angeles Football Club (American soccer club)

    Mia Hamm: …Garciaparra, and numerous others—of the Los Angeles Football Club of Major League Soccer; the team began play in 2018.

  • Los Angeles Galaxy (American soccer team)

    David Beckham: …a record-setting deal with the Los Angeles Galaxy of Major League Soccer (MLS) in the United States. In October 2008 Beckham signed to play with Italian football powerhouse AC Milan during the MLS off-season. In 2011 he helped the Galaxy win an MLS Cup title. The Galaxy won a second…

  • Los Angeles International Airport (airport, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: Transportation: Los Angeles International Airport (popularly called by its international code, LAX) is one of the world’s largest airports, handling tens of millions of passengers and millions of tons of freight annually. Traffic at LAX keeps rising, but proposals to expand the facility evoke strong opposition…

  • Los Angeles Kings (American hockey team)

    Los Angeles Kings, American professional ice hockey team based in Los Angeles that plays in the Western Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Kings have won two Stanley Cup titles (2012 and 2014) and three conference championships (1993, 2012, and 2014). The Kings were one of the

  • Los Angeles Lakers (American basketball team)

    Los Angeles Lakers, American professional basketball team based in Los Angeles. The Lakers are one of the most successful and popular professional franchises in all American sports. The franchise has won a combined 16 Basketball Association of America (BAA) and National Basketball Association (NBA)

  • Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art (museum, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Isozaki Arata: …international commission was for the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art in 1986. Others followed, and he soon worked throughout Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. His notable works included the Team Disney Building (1991) in Lake Buena Vista, Florida, U.S.; Domus (1995; formerly La Casa del Hombre) in A…

  • Los Angeles Music Center (building complex, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: Cultural life: …a county subsidy for the Los Angeles Music Center (which included the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion). The city bolstered its own arts program by requiring builders to set aside “one percent [of construction costs] for the arts” at major building construction sites and by supporting an arts council, which, among other…

  • Los Angeles Philharmonic (American orchestra)

    Los Angeles Philharmonic, American symphony orchestra based in Los Angeles, California. It was founded in 1919 by William Andrews Clark, Jr. Its music directors have been Walter Henry Rothwell (1919–27), Georg Schneevoigt (1927–29), Artur Rodzinski (1929–33), Otto Klemperer (1933–39), Alfred

  • Los Angeles Police Department (law enforcement agency, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: Municipal services: The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) was, until about 1965, considered one of the most highly professional and best-run law agencies in the country. In the 1950s and early ’60s the department prided itself on its ability “to protect and to serve” the sprawling metropolis and…

  • Los Angeles Rams (American football team)

    Los Angeles Rams, American professional gridiron football franchise that plays in the National Football Conference (NFC) of the National Football League (NFL). Based in the Greater Los Angeles area, the Rams have won two NFL championships (1945 and 1951) and one Super Bowl (2000). The Rams began

  • Los Angeles Riots of 1992 (United States history)

    Los Angeles Riots of 1992, major outbreak of violence, looting, and arson in Los Angeles that began on April 29, 1992, in response to the acquittal of four white Los Angeles policemen on all but one charge (on which the jury was deadlocked) connected with the severe beating of an African American

  • Los Angeles River (river, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: City site: …River in the north; the Los Angeles River in the south, extending from the San Fernando Valley east and south to the Pacific Ocean; and the San Gabriel River, which rises from the San Gabriel Mountains in the north and flows south to the ocean. Huge floods have periodically inundated…

  • Los Angeles smog (atmospheric science)

    smog: Photochemical smog, which is also known as “Los Angeles smog,” occurs most prominently in urban areas that have large numbers of automobiles. It requires neither smoke nor fog. This type of smog has its origin in the nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbon vapours emitted by automobiles…

  • Los Angeles Times (American newspaper)

    Los Angeles Times, morning daily newspaper founded (1881) in Los Angeles that in the 1960s began to develop from a regional daily into one of the world’s great newspapers. The paper moved its headquarters to El Segundo, California, in 2018. Harrison Gray Otis became a partial owner of the Los

  • Los Angeles Times Festival of Books (literary event, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: Literature: The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, held annually since 1996, draws tens of thousands of participants to the USC campus and constitutes the country’s largest such literary event.

  • Los Angeles Unified School District (school district, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: Education: The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), the second largest public school district in the country, is run by an independent elected board working under state—rather than city—jurisdiction. Turmoil erupted in the 1970s over court-ordered busing to eliminate racial segregation. This litigation never gained full public…

  • Los Angeles Zoo, The (zoo, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    The Los Angeles Zoo, zoological park founded in 1912 in Los Angeles as the Griffith Park Menagerie. It is a completely outdoor zoo that has holdings of the emperor tamarin, mountain tapir, and California condor. The Los Angeles Zoo was also the first to breed the tarictic hornbill. Comprising a

  • Los Anjeles (Chile)

    Los Angeles, city, Biobío región, south-central Chile. It is located on a tributary of the Biobío River in the southern part of the Central Valley. Founded in 1739 as Nuestra Se?ora de Los ángeles (“Our Lady of the Angels”) and elevated to city status in 1852, Los Angeles was swept by fire in 1820,

  • Los Ba?os (Philippines)

    Los Ba?os, resort town, southwestern Luzon, Philippines. Near the southern shore of Laguna de Bay, it was named Los Ba?os (“The Baths”) for the thermal springs that flow from the base of Mount Makiling. The waters are piped into the town’s numerous hotels. Los Ba?os was the site of a U.S. air base

  • Los Caballos (Spain)

    Western painting: Mesolithic: …a leaping ibex, while at Los Caballos a line of archers fires arrows into a small herd of panic-stricken deer, presumably driven into the ambush by beaters. Scenes of battle or groups of dancers also occur, while social status is implied in a carefully executed archer found at Santolea: he…

  • Los Dos Caminos (Venezuela)

    Los Dos Caminos, city, northwestern Miranda estado (state), northern Venezuela. It is situated just east of Caracas. Nestled in the central highlands, the city was formerly a commercial centre in a fertile agricultural area producing coffee, cacao, and sugarcane. With the growth of the national

  • Los Glaciares National Park (national park, Argentina)

    Los Glaciares National Park, national park in Santa Cruz provincia, southwestern Argentina, in the Andes surrounding the western extensions of Lakes Argentino and Viedma, at the Chilean border. It has an area of 1,722 square miles (4,459 square km) and was established in 1937. The park has two

  • Los Islands (archipelago, Guinea)

    Los Islands, small archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean, off Conakry, the capital of Guinea, West Africa. They provide protection for the port of Conakry and include Tamara (Factory), Kassa, Roume (Crawford), Blanche (White), and De Corail (Coral) and several smaller islets. Tamara, the largest (8 m

  • Los Katíos National Park (national park, Colombia)

    Darién: …National Park in Panama and Los Katíos National Park in Colombia. The Panamanian park was established as the Alto Darién Forest Reserve in 1972 and elevated to national park status in 1980; it covers some 2,305 square miles (5,970 square km). The Colombian park was established in 1974 and extended…

  • Los Lagos (region, Chile)

    Los Lagos, región, southern Chile, bordering Argentina to the east and facing the Pacific Ocean to the west. It was created in 1974 and comprises Valdivia, Osorno, Llanquihue, Palena, and Chiloé provincias. In the northern part of the region are the forested coastal mountain range, the

  • Los Mil Días, La Guerra de (Colombian history)

    The War of a Thousand Days, (1899–1903), Colombian civil war between Liberals and Conservatives that resulted in between 60,000 and 130,000 deaths, extensive property damage, and national economic ruin. The Liberal Party represented coffee plantation owners and import-export merchants who favoured

  • Los Millares (archaeological site, Spain)

    history of Europe: The Copper Age: …Culture, after the site of Los Millares. Like contemporary sites in the region, Los Millares was located so as to overlook a river from a promontory in the foothills of higher mountains. The sides and plateau of the hill were fortified with massive stone walls, regularly placed semicircular bastions, and…

  • Los Mochis (Mexico)

    Los Mochis, city, northwestern Sinaloa estado (state), northwestern Mexico. It lies on the coastal plain, inland from Topolobampo Bay on the Gulf of California. The creation of the Fuerte River irrigation district in the 1950s led to the growth of Los Mochis as an agricultural (corn [maize],

  • Los Pijiguaos (mine, Venezuela)

    Los Pijiguaos, bauxite deposit and associated mining development, on the Pijiguaos Plateau, in western Bolívar state, Venezuela. Discovered in 1974, this large, high-quality, laterite-type deposit underlies some 2,000 square miles (5,000 square km) and is located approximately 25 miles (40 km)

  • Los Roques Islands National Park (national park, Venezuela)

    Venezuela: Conservation: Los Roques archipelago, famous for its bird and marine species, was made a national park in 1972. El Avila National Park (1958) is popular among hikers and campers from the Caracas area; including Naiguatá Peak and other formations in the Coastal Range, the park supports…

  • Los Teques (Venezuela)

    Los Teques, city, capital of Miranda estado (state), north-central Venezuela. It occupies a strategic pass in the northern coastal range, just southwest of Caracas along the San Pedro River. Named after local Indians, the city was the birthplace of their chief, Guaicaipuro (died c. 1560), known for

  • Los Toros de Guisando, Pact of (Spain [1468])

    Spain: Castile and León, 1252–1479: …to the throne in the Pact of Los Toros de Guisando in 1468. Although Villena and his supporters hoped to control Isabella, they soon learned that they could not. Without first seeking her brother’s consent as she had promised, in 1469 Isabella married Ferdinand, son and heir of John II…

  • Los Tuxtlas (Mexico)

    San Andrés Tuxtla, city, southeastern Veracruz estado (state), south-central Mexico. It lies on the slopes of San Martín Tuxtla volcano, along the Tuxtla River at an elevation of 1,181 feet (360 metres) above sea level. The town was founded by Ixtlecos Indians in 1664, after an eruption of the

  • Los, ?les de (archipelago, Guinea)

    Los Islands, small archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean, off Conakry, the capital of Guinea, West Africa. They provide protection for the port of Conakry and include Tamara (Factory), Kassa, Roume (Crawford), Blanche (White), and De Corail (Coral) and several smaller islets. Tamara, the largest (8 m

  • Losada, Diego de (Spanish explorer)

    Caracas: History: …region began in 1566, and Diego de Losada is credited with the actual founding of the city in 1567. He named it Santiago de León de Caracas in honour of the apostle James, who is the patron saint of Spain, Don Pedro Ponce de León, who was the provincial governor,…

  • Losantiville (Ohio, United States)

    Cincinnati, city, seat of Hamilton county, southwestern Ohio, U.S. It lies along the Ohio River opposite the suburbs of Covington and Newport, Kentucky, 15 miles (24 km) east of the Indiana border and about 50 miles (80 km) southwest of Dayton. Cincinnati is Ohio’s third largest city, after

  • Losar (festival)

    Lunar New Year, festival typically celebrated in China and other Asian countries that begins with the first new moon of the lunar calendar and ends on the first full moon of the lunar calendar, 15 days later. The lunar calendar is based on the cycles of the moon, so the dates of the holiday vary

  • L?sch, August (German location theorist)

    central-place theory: The German economist August L?sch expanded on Christaller’s work in his book The Spatial Organization of the Economy (1940). Unlike Christaller, whose system of central places began with the highest-order, L?sch began with a system of lowest-order (self-sufficient) farms, which were regularly distributed in a triangular-hexagonal pattern. From…

  • Losch, Marie Magdalene von (German American actress)

    Marlene Dietrich, German American motion-picture actress whose beauty, voice, aura of sophistication, and languid sensuality made her one of the world’s most glamorous film stars. Dietrich’s father, Ludwig Dietrich, a Royal Prussian police officer, died when she was very young, and her mother

  • Loschmidt diffusion tube (physics)

    gas: Diffusion: …is now usually called a Loschmidt diffusion tube after Loschmidt, who used a modified version of the tube in 1870 to make a series of accurate diffusion measurements on a number of gas pairs.

  • Loschmidt number (chemistry)

    gas: Summary of numerical magnitudes: …is often referred to as Loschmidt’s number for this reason. In current English-language scientific literature, Loschmidt’s number is usually taken to mean the number of gas molecules in one cubic centimetre at 0° C and one atmosphere pressure (2.687 × 1019 molecules per cubic centimetre).

  • Loschmidt’s number (chemistry)

    gas: Summary of numerical magnitudes: …is often referred to as Loschmidt’s number for this reason. In current English-language scientific literature, Loschmidt’s number is usually taken to mean the number of gas molecules in one cubic centimetre at 0° C and one atmosphere pressure (2.687 × 1019 molecules per cubic centimetre).

  • Loschmidt, Johann Joseph (Austrian chemist)

    Joseph Loschmidt, German chemist who made advances in the study of aromatic hydrocarbons. The son of poor peasants, Loschmidt gained an education through the help of his village priest, and by 1839 he was a student at the German University in Prague. Moving to Vienna in 1841, he completed his

  • Loschmidt, Joseph (Austrian chemist)

    Joseph Loschmidt, German chemist who made advances in the study of aromatic hydrocarbons. The son of poor peasants, Loschmidt gained an education through the help of his village priest, and by 1839 he was a student at the German University in Prague. Moving to Vienna in 1841, he completed his

  • Lose Control (song by Elliott)

    Missy Elliott: …contained the Grammy-winning single “Lose Control.”

  • Lose Yourself (song by Eminem, Bass, and Resto)
  • Loser (song by Beck)

    Beck: “Loser,” recorded as a cheap demo for Bong Load Custom Records, became a radio hit in Los Angeles and eventually, after Beck had signed with major label DGC, a national phenomenon. A rapped lyric performed over a slide-guitar sample, with impressive poetic juxtapositions such as…

  • Losey, Joseph (American director)

    Joseph Losey, American motion-picture director, whose highly personal style was often manifested in films centring on intense and sometimes violent human relationships. After graduating from Dartmouth College (B.A., 1929) and Harvard University (M.A., 1930), Losey wrote book and theatre reviews. In

  • Losey, Joseph Walton (American director)

    Joseph Losey, American motion-picture director, whose highly personal style was often manifested in films centring on intense and sometimes violent human relationships. After graduating from Dartmouth College (B.A., 1929) and Harvard University (M.A., 1930), Losey wrote book and theatre reviews. In

  • Losing Battles (novel by Welty)

    American literature: Southern fiction: …with a large family novel, Losing Battles (1970), and a fine novella, The Optimist’s Daughter (1972), which was awarded the 1973 Pulitzer Prize. McCullers is best remembered for her first book, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (1940), an intricate gothic novel set in a small town in the Deep…

  • Losing My Religion (song by R.E.M.)

    R.E.M.: …charts and the single “Losing My Religion” became an enormous hit and also earned a Grammy.

  • Loskop Dam Nature Reserve (nature reserve, South Africa)

    Loskop Dam Nature Reserve, nature preserve in Mpumalanga province, South Africa, on the Olifants River, north of Middelburg. The reserve has an area of 57 square miles (148 square km) and lies around a dam on the Olifants River in a scenic valley that has been restocked with animals once

  • loss apportionment (law)

    contributory negligence: One solution is loss apportionment—charging both parties when both were at fault. This practice operates in maritime law in Canada and Australia and in most civil-law countries (e.g., France and Germany). See also negligence.

  • loss of biodiversity (ecology)

    Biodiversity loss, a decrease in biodiversity within a species, an ecosystem, a given geographic area, or Earth as a whole. Biodiversity, or biological diversity, is a term that refers to the number of genes, species, individual organisms within a given species, and biological communities within a

  • Loss of Roses, A (play by Inge)

    Franklin J. Schaffner: …based on William Inge’s play A Loss of Roses. Joanne Woodward starred as a struggling actress who accepts a job as a striptease performer, and Richard Beymer was cast as the wide-eyed teenager who is initially infatuated with her. The Best Man (1964) was a knowing dissection of political conventions…

  • loss-aversion theory (psychology)

    Prospect theory, psychological theory of decision-making under conditions of risk, which was developed by psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky and originally published in 1979 in Econometrica. The model has been imported into a number of fields and has been used to analyze various aspects

  • Lossiemouth (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Lossiemouth, North Sea fishing port and holiday resort, Moray council area and historic county, Scotland. The town developed from several old fishing villages including Seatown, Branderburgh—built around a new harbour (1830) and now Lossiemouth’s business centre—and the later settlement of

  • Lossky, Nikolay Onufriyevich (Russian philosopher)

    Nikolay Onufriyevich Lossky, Russian intuitionist philosopher who studied the nature of cognition, causation, and morals. His philosophy was a compound of many influences, especially Leibnizian monadology and Bergsonian intuitionism. Lossky graduated from the University of St. Petersburg, received

  • lossless data compression (computer science)

    data compression: Data compression may be lossless (exact) or lossy (inexact). Lossless compression can be reversed to yield the original data, while lossy compression loses detail or introduces small errors upon reversal. Lossless compression is necessary for text, where every character is important, while lossy compression may be acceptable for images…

  • lossy data compression (computer science)

    data compression: …every character is important, while lossy compression may be acceptable for images or voice (the limitation of the frequency spectrum in telephony being an example of lossy compression). The three most common compression programs for general data are Zip (on computers using Windows operating system), StuffIt (on Apple computers), and…

  • Lost (American television program)

    Lost, American television drama that aired on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) network. The show, which ran from 2004 to 2010, was one of ABC’s most successful series, enjoying top-20 Nielsen rankings and winning a number of Emmy Awards, including best drama series (2005). Lost is a

  • Lost and Found (novel by Steel)

    Danielle Steel: … (2016), Beauchamp Hall (2018), and Lost and Found (2019).

  • lost asteroid (astronomy)

    asteroid: Names and orbits of asteroids: …were referred to as “lost” asteroids. The final lost numbered asteroid, (719) Albert, was recovered in 2000 after a lapse of 89 years. Many newly discovered asteroids still become “lost” because of an insufficiently long span of observations, but no new asteroids are assigned numbers until their orbits are…

  • Lost City of the Kalahari, the (work by Paton)

    Alan Paton: The Lost City of the Kalahari (2005) was a brief, previously unpublished chronicle of his participation in an unsuccessful 1956 expedition to find an apocryphal ruin in the desert; it was expanded with images and maps. The Hero of Currie Road (2008) collected his short…

  • Lost Colony (English settlement, North America)

    Lost Colony, early English settlement on Roanoke Island (now in North Carolina, U.S.) that mysteriously disappeared between the time of its founding (1587) and the return of the expedition’s leader (1590). In hopes of securing permanent trading posts for England, Sir Walter Raleigh had initiated

  • Lost Command (film by Robson [1966])

    Mark Robson: Later films: Robson had less success with Lost Command (1966), a drama about the Algerian War, starring Anthony Quinn, George Segal, and Alain Delon.

  • Lost Domain, The (work by Alain-Fournier)

    Alain-Fournier: …novel, Le Grand Meaulnes (1913; The Wanderer, or The Lost Domain), is a modern classic.

  • Lost Generation (American literature)

    Lost Generation, a group of American writers who came of age during World War I and established their literary reputations in the 1920s. The term is also used more generally to refer to the post-World War I generation. The generation was “lost” in the sense that its inherited values were no longer

  • Lost Girls (graphic novel by Moore)

    graphic novel: The graphic novel grows up: Satrapi, From Hell (1991–98) and Lost Girls (1991–2006) by Alan Moore, with artwork by Eddie Campbell and Melinda Gebbie, respectively, and Y: The Last Man (2002–08) and Pride of Baghdad (2006) by Brian K. Vaughan, with artwork by Pia Guerra and Niko Henrichon, respectively. These comics, along with a host…

  • Lost Haven (novel by Tennant)

    Kylie Tennant: …a boat builder before publishing Lost Haven (1946), a story of wartime shipbuilders. Her best-known play Tether a Dragon (1952), about the early Australian prime minister Alfred Deakin, was conceived while she was in the process of researching her first nonfiction piece, Australia: Her Story: Notes on a Nation (1953;…

  • Lost Highway (song by Williams)

    Hank Williams: ” His extraordinary “Lost Highway” peaked at number 12.

  • Lost Highway (film by Lynch [1997])

    Patricia Arquette: …notable appearances in David Lynch’s Lost Highway (1997), Martin Scorsese’s Bringing Out the Dead (1999), the children’s film Holes (2003), and Linklater’s Fast Food Nation (2006). She acted in the latter film while already working with Linklater on Boyhood. Arquette’s later movies included Permanent (2017), a coming-of-age tale set in…

  • Lost Honor of Katharina Blum, The (work by B?ll)

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  • Lost Honor of Katharina Blum: or, How Violence Develops and Where It Can Lead, The (work by B?ll)

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  • Lost Horizon (film by Capra [1937])

    Lost Horizon, American fantasy film, released in 1937, that was directed by Frank Capra and based on James Hilton’s 1933 novel of the same name. The fictional land of Shangri-La, where the film is set, became a common reference for an earthly paradise. Ronald Colman played Robert Conway, a British

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