<var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"><listing id="79jxb"></listing></video></cite><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem></span></cite><cite id="79jxb"><noframes id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><cite id="79jxb"></cite></span></cite><var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<menuitem id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></menuitem><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Lost Horizon (novel by Hilton)

    Lost Horizon, novel by James Hilton, published in 1933. Hugh Conway, a veteran member of the British diplomatic service, finds inner peace, love, and a sense of purpose in Shangri-La, a utopian lamasery high in the Himalayas in

  • Lost Illusions (work by Balzac)

    French literature: Balzac: …journalist, in Illusions perdues [1837–43; Lost Illusions]) and the subjection of women, particularly in marriage, are used as eloquent markers of the moral impasse into which bourgeois liberalism led the French Revolution. Most presciently, he emphasized the paradox of money—its dissolving power and its dynamic force—and of the every-man-for-himself individualism…

  • Lost in America (film by Brooks [1985])

    Albert Brooks: …comedies Modern Romance (1981) and Lost in America (1985), but it was his largely noncomedic performance in Broadcast News (1987) that brought him an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor. Brooks later wrote, directed, and acted in Defending Your Life (1991); Mother (1996), which starred Debbie Reynolds in the…

  • Lost in La Mancha (film by Fulton and Pepe [2002])

    Terry Gilliam: …was chronicled in the documentary Lost in La Mancha (2002).

  • Lost in the Arctic (work by Mikkelsen)

    Ejnar Mikkelsen: Mikkelsen recounted this adventure in Lost in the Arctic (1913).

  • Lost in the Cosmos: The Last Self-Help Book (work by Percy)

    Walker Percy: …philosophical treatment of semantics, and Lost in the Cosmos: The Last Self-Help Book (1985), an offbeat amalgam of a self-help-book parody and a philosophical treatise.

  • Lost in the Funhouse (novel by Barth)

    John Barth: His work Lost in the Funhouse (1968) consists of short, experimental pieces, some designed for performance, interspersed with short stories based on his own childhood. It was followed by Chimera (1972), a volume of three novellas, and Letters (1979), an experimental novel. The novels Sabbatical (1982) and…

  • Lost in Translation (film by Coppola [2003])

    Sofia Coppola: Coppola’s next feature, Lost in Translation (2003)—which she wrote, directed, and produced—earned her an Academy Award for best original screenplay, a nomination for best picture, and a historic nomination for best director, the first American woman to receive that recognition. That film, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson,…

  • Lost in Yonkers (play by Simon)

    Kevin Spacey: Se7en, L.A. Confidential, and American Beauty: …Louie in Neil Simon’s hit Lost in Yonkers. Following his theatrical success, he earned praise for his work in such films as Glengarry Glen Ross (1992), Swimming with Sharks (1994), and Se7en (1995). His performance in The Usual Suspects (1995) as a double-talking con man earned him an Academy Award…

  • Lost in Yonkers (film by Coolidge [1993])

    Martha Coolidge: …films included Rambling Rose (1991); Lost in Yonkers (1993), based on Neil Simon’s award-winning play; Angie (1994), a feminist film that examines the friendship between two women as one of them faces single motherhood; Out to Sea (1997), starring Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon; The Prince &amp; Me (2004); and…

  • lost instrument bond (insurance)

    insurance: Major types of surety bonds: Lost instrument bonds guarantee that if a lost stock certificate, money order, warehouse receipt, or other financial instrument falls into unauthorized hands and causes a loss to the issuer of a substitute instrument, this loss will be reimbursed. License and permit bonds are issued on…

  • Lost Lady, A (work by Cather)

    A Lost Lady, novel by Willa Cather, published in 1923, depicting the decline of the American pioneer spirit and the aridity of small-town life. The title character, Marian Forrester, is portrayed through the adoring eyes of young Niel Herbert. He initially views Marian—the beautiful, gracious, and

  • Lost Lady, The (work by Berkeley)

    Sir William Berkeley: He wrote a play, The Lost Lady, for the London stage in 1638, was knighted by Charles I in 1639, and was appointed governor of Virginia in 1641.

  • Lost Legions; Three Italian War Novels, The (work by Stern)

    Italian literature: Social commitment and the new realism: …by Mario Rigoni Stern (Il sergente nella neve [1952; The Sergeant in the Snow]). By contrast, there were humorous recollections of provincial life under fascism—for example, Mario Tobino’s Bandiera nera (1950; “Black Flag”) and Goffredo Parise’s Prete bello (1954; “The Handsome Priest”; Eng. trans. The Priest Among the Pigeons).…

  • Lost Manuscript, The (work by Freytag)

    Gustav Freytag: …with Die verlorene Handschrift (1864; The Lost Manuscript, 1865), which depicts Leipzig university life in the same realistic manner, but the plot is much weaker and the effect less successful. His most ambitious literary work was the novel-cycle Die Ahnen, 6 vol. (1873–81), which unfolded the story of a German…

  • Lost Memory of Skin (bildungsroman by Banks)

    Russell Banks: …story and murder mystery, and Lost Memory of Skin (2011), a bildungsroman about a young sex offender. Further short fiction was published in the collections The Angel on the Roof (2000) and A Permanent Member of the Family (2013). Dreaming Up America (2008) is a nonfiction work scrutinizing the history…

  • Lost Musicians, The (work by Heinesen)

    Faroese literature: Development during the 20th century: …masterpiece De fortabte spillem?nd (1950; The Lost Musicians). Here, as in the rest of his varied writings, Heinesen renders Faroese life as a microcosm illustrative of social, psychological, and cosmic themes. The other three authors—Christian Matras, Heein Brú (Hans Jakob Jacobsen), and Martin Joensen—wrote in Faroese. The works of Matras…

  • Lost Patrol, The (film by Ford [1934])

    John Ford: 1930s to World War II: …approach is as effective in The Lost Patrol (1934) or The Prisoner of Shark Island (1936) as it is in the westerns that he shot in Utah and Arizona’s Monument Valley. Ford’s stately, carefully staged and composed medium and long shots of groups of characters interacting (with a relatively spare…

  • Lost Pilot, The (poetry by Tate)

    James Tate: …his collection of poems entitled The Lost Pilot was selected for publication in the Yale Series of Younger Poets. The title poem addressed the death of his father, a bomber pilot who was shot down over Germany in 1944, when Tate was an infant; Tate later took the surname of…

  • Lost Season, A (work by Fuller)

    Roy Fuller: …of a War (1942) and A Lost Season (1944) chronicle his wartime service and show him intensely concerned with the social and political conditions of his time. Epitaphs and Occasions (1949) satirized the postwar world, but in Brutus’s Orchard (1957) and Collected Poems, 1936–61 (1962), Fuller adopted a more reflective…

  • Lost Sheep, Parable of the (New Testament)

    Jesus: Sources for the life of Jesus: …Matthew and Luke relate the Parable of the Lost Sheep. In Matthew 18:12–14, the parable is told to the disciples, and the meaning is that they, like the shepherd, should go in search of the lost. In Luke 15:4–7 the same story is directed at the Pharisees, this time to…

  • Lost Sirens (album by New Order)

    Joy Division/New Order: Lost Sirens, which salvaged additional songs recorded during the sessions that produced Waiting for the Sirens’ Call, was released in 2013. The band returned to its signature synth-heavy sound with Music Complete (2015). A live album, NOMC15, followed two years later.

  • Lost Steps, The (work by Carpentier y Valmont)

    Alejo Carpentier: …novel Los pasos perdidos (1953; The Lost Steps), his best-known work, is the first-person account of a character who travels to the Orinoco jungle in search of the meaning of life and the origins of time.

  • Lost Symbol, The (novel by Brown)

    Dan Brown: …of his tweedy protagonist in The Lost Symbol (2009), which centres on Freemasons, and Inferno (2013), which saw Langdon following clues related to Dante’s poem The Divine Comedy in an effort to stop the release of a plague. The latter book was also adapted for the big screen, in 2016,…

  • Lost Weekend, The (film by Wilder [1945])

    Billy Wilder: Films of the 1940s: …success of Double Indemnity with The Lost Weekend (1945), a stark, harrowing portrait of one man’s battle with alcoholism. Milland gave a career-defining performance as an aspiring writer whose weekend drinking binge nearly costs him his life. Both critics and audiences embraced this powerful cautionary tale, which won the Academy…

  • Lost World: Jurassic Park, The (film by Spielberg [1997])

    Steven Spielberg: The 1990s: On the directorial front, Spielberg’s The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) failed to attain the majesty of Jurassic Park, but it had many compelling moments. Based on a 1995 best seller by Crichton, who reportedly wrote the book at the behest of Spielberg himself, the film repeats the Jurassic Park…

  • lost-wax process (metal casting)

    Lost-wax process, method of metal casting in which a molten metal is poured into a mold that has been created by means of a wax model. Once the mold is made, the wax model is melted and drained away. A hollow core can be effected by the introduction of a heat-proof core that prevents the molten

  • Lostwithiel (England, United Kingdom)

    Lostwithiel, town (parish), Cornwall unitary authority, southwestern England. It is built on a medieval grid plan by the River Fowey, spanned there at the lowest bridge point by a 14th-century bridge. The town developed near Restormel Castle, which dates from about 1100. It is the best-preserved

  • Lot (biblical figure)

    Abraham: The biblical account: named Sarah (“Princess”), his nephew Lot, and other companions to the land of Canaan (between Syria and Egypt).

  • lot (astrology)

    astrology: Astrology in the Hellenistic period (3rd century bc to 3rd century ad): One is the system of lots, which are influential points as distant from some specified points in the horoscopic diagram as two planets are from each other. A second is the prorogator, a point on the ecliptic that, traveling at the rate of one degree of oblique ascension a year…

  • Lot (department, France)

    Midi-Pyrénées: …encompassed the southwestern départements of Lot, Aveyron, Tarn, Tarn-et-Garonne, Gers, Hautes-Pyrénées, Haute-Garonne, and Ariège. In 2016 Midi-Pyrénées was joined with the région of Languedoc-Roussillon to form the new administrative entity of Occitanie.

  • Lot Kamehameha (king of Hawaii)

    Kamehameha V, king of Hawaii from 1863 to 1872. Succeeding to the throne on the death of his younger brother, Kamehameha IV, he immediately revealed his intention to rule with a strong hand, refusing at his inauguration to take the oath to maintain the existing, comparatively liberal constitution.

  • Lot River (river, France)

    Lot River, river, rising in the Cévennes mountains, near Mont Lozère, in Lozère département, southern France, flowing about 300 mi (480 km) generally west to join the Garonne River near Aiguillon, draining a basin of about 4,400 sq mi (11,400 sq km). In its sinuous course, the Lot crosses the

  • Lot’s Daughters (painting by Carrà)

    Carlo Carrà: Lot’s Daughters (1915), for example, represents an attempt to recapture the solidity of form and the stillness of the 13th-century painter Giotto. Carrà’s new style was crystallized in 1917 when he met the painter Giorgio de Chirico, who taught him to paint everyday objects imbued…

  • Lot’s wife (biblical figure)

    Lot’s wife, biblical character, a disobedient woman who was turned into a pillar of salt for looking back to see the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah as she and her family were fleeing. Her story is seen as an example of what happens to those who choose a worldly life over salvation. Writers who

  • Lot, Ferdinand (French historian)

    Ferdinand Lot, French historian of the early Middle Ages and the later Roman Empire. He is best known for his important monographs on the transition from Roman to medieval civilization. Lot taught at the école Pratique des Hautes études (1900), later becoming professor at the University of Paris

  • Lot-et-Garonne (department, France)

    Aquitaine: Geography: …extensively cultivated in Dordogne, and Lot-et-Garonne is one of France’s main tobacco-growing areas. Périgord is world-famous for its highly prized black truffles. Some livestock is raised in Aquitaine, mainly for meat. A significant number of farms raise ducks and geese for the production of foie gras.

  • Lota (Chile)

    Lota, city, southern Chile. It lies on the Golfo (gulf) de Arauco. Although Lota was founded in 1662, sustained development did not begin until 1852, when the industrialist Matías Cousi?o started a coal-mining enterprise. Completion of a railway from Concepción, 20 miles (32 km) north, in 1888

  • Lota lota (fish)

    Burbot, (Lota lota), elongated fish of the family Lotidae that inhabits cold rivers and lakes of Europe, Asia, and North America. A bottom dweller found in both fresh and brackish waters, it descends as deep as 700 metres (about 2,300 feet). It is a mottled greenish or brown fish and may grow as

  • Lota maculosa (fish)

    burbot: …American burbot in the species Lota maculosa.

  • Lotan (Middle Eastern mythology)

    Leviathan, in Jewish mythology, a primordial sea serpent. Its source is in prebiblical Mesopotamian myth, especially that of the sea monster in the Ugaritic myth of Baal (see Yamm). In the Old Testament, Leviathan appears in Psalms 74:14 as a multiheaded sea serpent that is killed by God and given

  • Lotario di Segni (pope)

    Innocent III, the most significant pope of the Middle Ages. Elected pope on January 8, 1198, Innocent III reformed the Roman Curia, reestablished and expanded the pope’s authority over the Papal States, worked tirelessly to launch Crusades to recover the Holy Land, combated heresy in Italy and

  • Loterie nationale (French lottery)

    lottery: Early history: …century later (1933) a new Loterie Nationale was established; it closed just before World War II and later reopened.

  • Lo?f ?Alī Khān Zand (Zand ruler)

    Lo?f ?Alī Khān Zand, last ruler of the Zand dynasty of Iran, who was defeated in the civil war of 1779–94. With the death of Lo?f ?Alī Khān’s grandfather, Karīm Khān Zand, a 15-year civil war ensued between his descendants and āghā Mo?ammad Khān Qājār. Although the Zand forces were weakened by

  • Lo?follāh Mosque (mosque, E?fahān, Iran)

    Islamic arts: Architecture: …sides were the small funerary mosque of Shaykh Lu?f Allāh and, facing it, the ?Alī Qāpū, the “Lofty Gate,” the first unit of a succession of palaces and gardens that extended beyond the maydān, most of which have now disappeared except for the Chehel Sotūn (“Forty Columns”), a palace built…

  • Lotha (people)

    Nagaland: Cultural life: structures of the Angamis, Aos, Lothas, and Rengmas. A prominent village institution is the morung (a communal house or dormitory for young unmarried men), where skulls and other trophies of war formerly were hung. The pillars are still carved with striking representations of tigers, hornbills, and human and other figures.…

  • Lothagam (anthropological and archaeological site, Kenya)

    Lothagam, site of paleoanthropological excavations in northern Kenya southwest of Lake Turkana (Lake Rudolf), best known for a piece of jaw found there in 1967 that appears to be one of the oldest known fossils of a hominin (member of the human lineage). The fossil is too fragmentary to be

  • Lothagam mandible (hominin fossil)

    Lothagam: …known for a piece of jaw found there in 1967 that appears to be one of the oldest known fossils of a hominin (member of the human lineage). The fossil is too fragmentary to be identified with certainty, but the roots of its teeth and its general proportions resemble those…

  • Lothair (king of France)

    Lothar, Carolingian king of France from 954 to 986, the eldest son of Louis IV. He was elected king without opposition after his father’s death but was dominated first by Hugh the Great and then, from 956 to 965, by his uncle, Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, whose support was invaluable but who used

  • Lothair (king of Italy)

    Lothar, king of Italy in the chaotic post-Carolingian period. He was named after his great-grandfather Lothar II and ruled as co-king with his father, Hugh of Provence, from 931 until Hugh’s exile and death in 947. Lothar remained in Italy when his father, harassed by the powerful Lombard Berengar

  • Lothair (work by Disraeli)

    Benjamin Disraeli: Conservative leader: …his followers, and his novel Lothair (3 vol., 1870), a political comedy, seemed to some of them undignified.

  • Lothair I (Holy Roman emperor)

    Lothar I, Frankish emperor, whose attempt to gain sole rule over the Frankish territories was checked by his brothers. The eldest son of the emperor Louis I the Pious and a grandson of Charlemagne, Lothar was made king in Bavaria after Louis succeeded Charlemagne in 814, and in 817 he was made

  • Lothair I (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar I, Merovingian king of Soissons from 511 and of the whole Frankish kingdom from 558, who played an important part in the extension of Frankish hegemony. The youngest of Clovis I’s sons, Chlotar shared in the partition of his father’s kingdom in 511, receiving the old heartlands of the

  • Lothair II (Holy Roman emperor)

    Lothar II (or III), German king (1125–37) and Holy Roman emperor (1133–37). He is reckoned as Lothar III by those who count not only Lothar I but also his son Lothar in their numeration of German kings. Lothar II’s election as king in 1125 represented a triumph for the principle of elective

  • Lothair II (king of Lotharingia)

    Lothar (II), Frankish king of the area known as Lotharingia whose attempts to have his marriage dissolved so that he could marry his mistress caused much controversy and led to a bitter struggle between himself and Pope Nicholas I. Lothar was the second son of the Frankish emperor Lothar I, ruler

  • Lothair II (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar II, Merovingian king of Neustria and sole ruler of the Franks from 613. An infant when his father, Chilperic I, was assassinated in 584, he was assured the succession by the power of his mother, Fredegund, and by the protection of his uncle, Guntram, king of Burgundy. Fighting off an attack

  • Lothair III (Holy Roman emperor)

    Lothar II (or III), German king (1125–37) and Holy Roman emperor (1133–37). He is reckoned as Lothar III by those who count not only Lothar I but also his son Lothar in their numeration of German kings. Lothar II’s election as king in 1125 represented a triumph for the principle of elective

  • Lothair III (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar III, Merovingian king of Neustria and Burgundy, who succeeded his father, Clovis II, in 657. After the retirement of his mother, Balthild, to a monastery in 664 or 665, he came—and remained—under the domination of the Neustrian mayor of the palace,

  • Lothair IV (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar IV, allegedly the Merovingian king of Austrasia, placed on the throne by the mayor of the palace, Charles Martel, in 718/719 in order to check the pretensions of the Neustrian Chilperic II. His exact genealogy is

  • Lothair of Supplinburg (Holy Roman emperor)

    Lothar II (or III), German king (1125–37) and Holy Roman emperor (1133–37). He is reckoned as Lothar III by those who count not only Lothar I but also his son Lothar in their numeration of German kings. Lothar II’s election as king in 1125 represented a triumph for the principle of elective

  • Lothair, Gospels of (codex)

    Carolingian minuscule: …the mid-9th century in the Gospels of Lothair, produced by Alcuin’s successors.

  • Lothaire I (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar I, Merovingian king of Soissons from 511 and of the whole Frankish kingdom from 558, who played an important part in the extension of Frankish hegemony. The youngest of Clovis I’s sons, Chlotar shared in the partition of his father’s kingdom in 511, receiving the old heartlands of the

  • Lothaire II (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar II, Merovingian king of Neustria and sole ruler of the Franks from 613. An infant when his father, Chilperic I, was assassinated in 584, he was assured the succession by the power of his mother, Fredegund, and by the protection of his uncle, Guntram, king of Burgundy. Fighting off an attack

  • Lothaire III (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar III, Merovingian king of Neustria and Burgundy, who succeeded his father, Clovis II, in 657. After the retirement of his mother, Balthild, to a monastery in 664 or 665, he came—and remained—under the domination of the Neustrian mayor of the palace,

  • Lothaire IV (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar IV, allegedly the Merovingian king of Austrasia, placed on the throne by the mayor of the palace, Charles Martel, in 718/719 in order to check the pretensions of the Neustrian Chilperic II. His exact genealogy is

  • Lothal (archaeological site, India)

    origins of agriculture: The Indian subcontinent: There, at Lothal and Rangpur, has been found the earliest South Asian evidence of rice cultivation, in the later Harappan period. Subsequently, wheat, cotton, flax, and lentils spread into the region from the Indus valley, and pulses and millets from the south.

  • Lothar (king of Italy)

    Lothar, king of Italy in the chaotic post-Carolingian period. He was named after his great-grandfather Lothar II and ruled as co-king with his father, Hugh of Provence, from 931 until Hugh’s exile and death in 947. Lothar remained in Italy when his father, harassed by the powerful Lombard Berengar

  • Lothar (king of France)

    Lothar, Carolingian king of France from 954 to 986, the eldest son of Louis IV. He was elected king without opposition after his father’s death but was dominated first by Hugh the Great and then, from 956 to 965, by his uncle, Bruno, archbishop of Cologne, whose support was invaluable but who used

  • Lothar I (Holy Roman emperor)

    Lothar I, Frankish emperor, whose attempt to gain sole rule over the Frankish territories was checked by his brothers. The eldest son of the emperor Louis I the Pious and a grandson of Charlemagne, Lothar was made king in Bavaria after Louis succeeded Charlemagne in 814, and in 817 he was made

  • Lothar I (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar I, Merovingian king of Soissons from 511 and of the whole Frankish kingdom from 558, who played an important part in the extension of Frankish hegemony. The youngest of Clovis I’s sons, Chlotar shared in the partition of his father’s kingdom in 511, receiving the old heartlands of the

  • Lothar II (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar II, Merovingian king of Neustria and sole ruler of the Franks from 613. An infant when his father, Chilperic I, was assassinated in 584, he was assured the succession by the power of his mother, Fredegund, and by the protection of his uncle, Guntram, king of Burgundy. Fighting off an attack

  • Lothar II (king of Lotharingia)

    Lothar (II), Frankish king of the area known as Lotharingia whose attempts to have his marriage dissolved so that he could marry his mistress caused much controversy and led to a bitter struggle between himself and Pope Nicholas I. Lothar was the second son of the Frankish emperor Lothar I, ruler

  • Lothar II (Holy Roman emperor)

    Lothar II (or III), German king (1125–37) and Holy Roman emperor (1133–37). He is reckoned as Lothar III by those who count not only Lothar I but also his son Lothar in their numeration of German kings. Lothar II’s election as king in 1125 represented a triumph for the principle of elective

  • Lothar III (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar III, Merovingian king of Neustria and Burgundy, who succeeded his father, Clovis II, in 657. After the retirement of his mother, Balthild, to a monastery in 664 or 665, he came—and remained—under the domination of the Neustrian mayor of the palace,

  • Lothar III (Holy Roman emperor)

    Lothar II (or III), German king (1125–37) and Holy Roman emperor (1133–37). He is reckoned as Lothar III by those who count not only Lothar I but also his son Lothar in their numeration of German kings. Lothar II’s election as king in 1125 represented a triumph for the principle of elective

  • Lothar IV (Merovingian king)

    Chlotar IV, allegedly the Merovingian king of Austrasia, placed on the throne by the mayor of the palace, Charles Martel, in 718/719 in order to check the pretensions of the Neustrian Chilperic II. His exact genealogy is

  • Lothar of Segni (pope)

    Innocent III, the most significant pope of the Middle Ages. Elected pope on January 8, 1198, Innocent III reformed the Roman Curia, reestablished and expanded the pope’s authority over the Papal States, worked tirelessly to launch Crusades to recover the Holy Land, combated heresy in Italy and

  • Lotharingia (historical region, Europe)

    Lorraine, medieval region, present-day northeastern France. By the Treaty of Verdun (843), it became part of the realm of Lothar I. Inherited by his son Lothar, it became the kingdom of Lotharingia. After Lothar’s death, it was contested by Germany and France and came under German control in 925.

  • Lothario (fictional character)

    Lothario, fictional character, an unfeeling rake and libertine whose chief interest is seducing women. He appeared in The Fair Penitent (1703), a tragedy in blank verse by Nicholas Rowe. Writer Samuel Richardson used “haughty, gallant, gay Lothario” as the model for the profligate Robert Lovelace

  • Lothian (ancient province, Scotland)

    Lothian, a primitive province of Scotland lying between the Rivers Tweed and Forth. The name, of Welsh origin but uncertain meaning, is retained in the names of the modern Scottish council areas of East and West Lothian and Midlothian and the historic region of Lothian. Occupied in the 3rd and 4th

  • Lothringen (region, France)

    Lorraine, historical region and former région of France, incorporated since January 2016 into the région of Grand Est. As an administrative entity it encompassed the northeastern départements of Vosges, Meuse, Meurthe-et-Moselle, and Moselle. Much of Lorraine is forested and hilly. The Vosges

  • loti (currency)

    Lesotho: Finance and trade: Lesotho’s currency, the loti (plural: maloti), is issued by the Central Bank of Lesotho. The currency was introduced in 1980 as a way to establish monetary independence from South Africa. Lesotho is a member of the Common Monetary Area, comprising Lesotho, Swaziland, South Africa, and (since 1990) Namibia.…

  • Loti, Pierre (French author)

    Pierre Loti, novelist whose exoticism made him popular in his time and whose themes anticipated some of the central preoccupations of French literature between World Wars. Loti’s career as a naval officer took him to the Middle and Far East, thus providing him with the exotic settings of his novels

  • lotic ecosystem (ecological niche)

    Riverine ecosystem, any spring, stream, or river viewed as an ecosystem. The waters are flowing (lotic) and exhibit a longitudinal gradation in temperatures, concentration of dissolved material, turbidity, and atmospheric gases, from the source to the mouth. There are two major zones: rapids,

  • Lotichius Secundus, Petrus (German poet)

    Petrus Lotichius Secundus, one of Germany’s outstanding neo-Latin Renaissance poets. Lotichius studied in Frankfurt, Marburg, and Wittenberg. He participated in the Protestant defense of Magdeburg (1547) and later studied at Montpellier and Padua, where he received his medical degree. Appointed

  • Lotka-Volterra equation (mathematics)

    population ecology: Lotka-Volterra equations: The effects of species interactions on the population dynamics of the species involved can be predicted by a pair of linked equations that were developed independently during the 1920s by American mathematician and physical scientist Alfred J. Lotka and Italian physicist Vito Volterra.…

  • loto (game of chance)

    Bingo, game of chance using cards on which there is a grid of numbers, a row of which constitute a win when they have been chosen at random. Bingo is one of the most popular forms of low-priced gambling in the world. To play bingo, which is a form of lottery, each player purchases one or more c

  • Lotophagi (Greek mythology)

    Lotus-Eater, in Greek mythology, one of a tribe encountered by the Greek hero Odysseus during his return from Troy, after a north wind had driven him and his men from Cape Malea (Homer, Odyssey, Book IX). The local inhabitants, whose distinctive practice is indicated by their name, invited

  • Lotophagoi (Greek mythology)

    Lotus-Eater, in Greek mythology, one of a tribe encountered by the Greek hero Odysseus during his return from Troy, after a north wind had driven him and his men from Cape Malea (Homer, Odyssey, Book IX). The local inhabitants, whose distinctive practice is indicated by their name, invited

  • Lotos-Eaters, The (poem by Tennyson)

    The Lotos-Eaters, poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, published in the collection Poems (1832; dated 1833). The poem is based on an episode in Book 9 of Homer’s Odyssey. Odysseus’s sailors, returning home after the fall of Troy, are forced to land in a strange country after a strong wind propels them

  • lots, divination by (occult practice)

    augury: …(cartomancy), dice or lots (cleromancy), dots and other marks on paper (geomancy), fire and smoke (pyromancy), the shoulder blades of animals (scapulimancy), entrails of sacrificed animals (haruspicy), or their livers, which were considered to be the seat of life (hepatoscopy).

  • Lots, Feast of (Judaism)

    Purim, (Hebrew: “Lots”) a joyous Jewish festival commemorating the survival of the Jews who, in the 5th century bce, were marked for death by their Persian rulers. The story is related in the biblical Book of Esther. Haman, chief minister of King Ahasuerus, incensed that Mordecai, a Jew, held him

  • L?tschberg Base Tunnel (tunnel, Italy-Switzerland)

    railroad: Operations: The L?tschberg Base Tunnel, the world’s longest overland tunnel—a 34.6-km (21.5-mile) rail link—took eight years to build, and when full rail service began in 2007, it slashed the train journey between Germany and Italy from 3.5 hours to less than 2 hours. The 57-km (35-mile) Gotthard…

  • L?tschen Pass (glacier pass, Switzerland)

    L?tschen Pass, glacier pass (8,825 feet [2,690 metres]) in the Bernese Alps, southern Switzerland, leading from Kandersteg in southern Bern canton (north) to the L?tschental (L?tschen Valley) in Valais canton (south). First mentioned in 1352, the pass was probably crossed earlier by the people of

  • Lott, Chester Trent (American politician)

    Trent Lott, American Republican politician who represented Mississippi in the U.S. House of Representatives (1973–89) and in the U.S. Senate (1989–2007). The son of a shipyard worker, Lott grew up in the coastal town of Pascagoula, Miss. He earned both bachelor’s (1963) and law (1967) degrees from

  • Lott, Ronald Mandel (American football player)

    Ronnie Lott, American gridiron football player who earned first-team All-Pro honours at all three defensive backfield positions during his standout 14-year National Football League (NFL) career. The preternaturally tough Lott is regarded as one of the hardest hitters in NFL history. Lott attended

  • Lott, Ronnie (American football player)

    Ronnie Lott, American gridiron football player who earned first-team All-Pro honours at all three defensive backfield positions during his standout 14-year National Football League (NFL) career. The preternaturally tough Lott is regarded as one of the hardest hitters in NFL history. Lott attended

  • Lott, Teixeira (Brazilian politician)

    Brazil: Kubitschek’s administration: However, Teixeira Lott, the war minister, and Marshal Odílio Denys, who commanded army troops in Rio de Janeiro, staged a “countercoup” on November 11, 1955, in order to guarantee the president elect’s inauguration, and Kubitschek took office as scheduled on January 31, 1956.

  • Lott, Trent (American politician)

    Trent Lott, American Republican politician who represented Mississippi in the U.S. House of Representatives (1973–89) and in the U.S. Senate (1989–2007). The son of a shipyard worker, Lott grew up in the coastal town of Pascagoula, Miss. He earned both bachelor’s (1963) and law (1967) degrees from

  • Lotta di Classe, La (Italian newspaper)

    Benito Mussolini: Early life: …a newspaper of his own, La Lotta di Classe (“The Class Struggle”). So successful was this paper that in 1912 he was appointed editor of the official Socialist newspaper, Avanti! (“Forward!”), whose circulation he soon doubled; and as its antimilitarist, antinationalist, and anti-imperialist editor, he thunderously opposed Italy’s intervention in…

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
91国产福利在线观看