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  • Luís, Maria Agustina Bessa (Portuguese author)

    Portuguese literature: After 1974: Agustina Bessa Luís, a prolific writer who first came to notice after she published the novel A Sibila (1954; “The Sibyl”), continued publishing works through the turn of the 21st century. She extended the psychological insight evident in her drawing of fictional characters to enhance…

  • Luís, Washington (president of Brazil)

    Washington Luís, president of Brazil (1926–30) who was unable to strengthen his country’s debilitated economy on the eve of the Great Depression. Reared in the state of S?o Paulo and identified with it as a career politician for more than 30 years, Luís held numerous public offices, including those

  • Luisa Fernanda (work by Torroba)

    theatre music: Zarzuela: …zarzuela, such as Moreno Torroba’s Luisa Fernanda (1932), have achieved popular success in Latin American countries, where local contributions to the genre have notably been made by Juan Bautista Massa in Argentina, Andrés Martínez Montoya in Colombia, Luis Delgadillo in Nicaragua, and Teodoro Valcárcel in Peru.

  • Luisa Fernanda (sister of Isabella II)

    house of Bourbon: Solidarity and discord: …Queen Isabella and her sister Luisa remained unmarried, the Spanish succession was an open prospect of great interest to governments concerned with maintaining the balance of power in Europe. If both sisters would marry princes of the house of Orléans, as Louis-Philippe and the sisters’ mother, Maria Cristina, originally suggested,…

  • Luise (work by Voss)

    Johann Heinrich Voss: Voss’s idyll Luise (1795), which portrays with naturalistic ease the life of a country pastor’s family, inspired Goethe to write Hermann und Dorothea.

  • Luise?o (people)

    Luise?o, North American Indians who spoke a Uto-Aztecan language and inhabited a region extending from what is now Los Angeles to San Diego, Calif., U.S. Some of the group were named Luise?o after the Mission San Luis Rey de Francia; others were called Juane?o because of their association with the

  • Luisetti, Angelo Enrico (American basketball player)

    Hank Luisetti, American collegiate basketball player who revolutionized the sport by introducing the one-handed shot. Luisetti honed his running one-handed shot (technically not a jump shot, as he kept his feet on the ground) on the playgrounds of his native San Francisco. The 6-foot 2-inch

  • Luisetti, Hank (American basketball player)

    Hank Luisetti, American collegiate basketball player who revolutionized the sport by introducing the one-handed shot. Luisetti honed his running one-handed shot (technically not a jump shot, as he kept his feet on the ground) on the playgrounds of his native San Francisco. The 6-foot 2-inch

  • Luish language

    Luwian language, one of several ancient extinct Anatolian languages. The language is preserved in two closely related but distinct forms, one using cuneiform script and the other using hieroglyphic writing. Luwian influence on the vocabulary of the Hittite language began before the earliest

  • Luisi, Fabio (Italian conductor)

    Orchestre de la Suisse Romande: Stein (1980–85), Armin Jordan (1985–97), Fabio Luisi (1997–2002), Pinchas Steinberg (2002–05), Marek Janowski (2005–12), and Neeme J?rvi (2012–15). Jonathan Nott came to the podium as music and artistic director in 2017.

  • Luisian Stage (geology)

    Luisian Stage, major division of Miocene rocks and time in the Pacific Coast region of North America (the Miocene Epoch began about 26,000,000 years ago and lasted about 19,000,000 years). The Luisian Stage, which precedes the Mohnian Stage and follows the Relizian Stage, was named for exposures

  • Luite (ancient Anatolian people)

    Luwian, member of an extinct people of ancient Anatolia. The Luwians were related to the Hittites and were the dominant group in the Late Hittite culture. Their language is known from cuneiform texts found at the Hittite capital, Bo?azk?y. (See Luwian language.) Luwiya is mentioned as a foreign

  • Luitpold (prince regent of Bavaria)

    Luitpold, prince regent of Bavaria from 1886 to 1912, in whose reign Bavaria prospered under a liberal government and Munich became a cultural centre of Europe. The third son of King Louis (Ludwig) I, Luitpold chose a military career and fought on Austria’s side against Prussia in the Seven Weeks’

  • Luitpoldinger (German history)

    Germany: Rise of the duchies: Similarly, the Luitpoldings, originally named as Carolingian commanders, became dukes of Bavaria. Thuringia fell increasingly under the protection and lordship of the Liudolfings. In Swabia (Alemannia) several clans disputed control with one another and with regional ecclesiastical lords. Throughout the kingdom the only force for preserving unity…

  • Lujack, Larry (American disc jockey)

    Larry Lujack: “I’m just plain fantastic—the best damn rock-and-roll DJ of our time or any other time!” wrote Larry Lujack, a Chicago radio kingpin in the 1960s and ’70s, in his autobiography, Super Jock (1975). Lujack had the ratings to back up his braggadocio. Sweeping in from…

  • Luján (Argentina)

    Luján, city and national pilgrimage site on the Luján River, in the Pampa of northern Buenos Aires provincia (province), eastern Argentina. The city was named for the conquistador Pedro Luján, who died there (1536) in a battle with Indians. According to tradition, in 1630 a statue of the Virgin

  • Luján, Micaela de (Spanish actress)

    Lope de Vega: Life: …illiterate and singularly beautiful actress Micaela de Luján, who was to be for nearly 20 years the poet’s most peaceful love; she was the “Camila Lucinda” of numerous magnificent verses composed for her by Vega. He took a second wife, Juana de Guardo, the daughter of a wealthy pork butcher,…

  • Lujiang (Taiwan)

    Lu-kang, town and port in Chang-hua (Zhanghua) county, western coastal Taiwan. It is situated on the Taiwan Strait west of the city of Chang-hua, with which its fortunes have been closely linked. Lu-kang was formerly one of the chief ports of Taiwan, and it absorbed many immigrants from the Chinese

  • Luka (people)

    Lycia: Known as Luka, they participated in the Sea Peoples’ attempt to invade Egypt in the late 13th century. Nothing more is known of the Lycians until the 8th century bc, when they reappear as a thriving maritime people confederated in at least a score of cities that…

  • Luka and the Fire of Life (novel by Rushdie)

    Salman Rushdie: The children’s book Luka and the Fire of Life (2010) centres on the efforts of Luka—younger brother to the protagonist of Haroun and the Sea of Stories—to locate the titular fire and revive his ailing father. Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights (2015) depicts the chaos ensuing…

  • Lukács, Gy?rgy (Hungarian philosopher)

    Gy?rgy Lukács, Hungarian Marxist philosopher, writer, and literary critic who influenced the mainstream of European communist thought during the first half of the 20th century. His major contributions include the formulation of a Marxist system of aesthetics that opposed political control of

  • Lukács, Pál (Hungarian actor)
  • Lukanov, Andrey (prime minister of Bulgaria)

    Andrey Lukanov, Bulgarian politician (born Sept. 26, 1938, Moscow, U.S.S.R.—died Oct. 2, 1996, Sofia, Bulg.), was prime minister (1990) during the first stage of Bulgaria’s transition from communism to democracy and later became a powerful critic of the government. Educated in the Soviet Union, L

  • Lukas, D. Wayne (American horse trainer)

    D. Wayne Lukas, American Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse trainer whose horses captured numerous races and amassed record earnings. Lukas was raised on a farm in Wisconsin. He raced his pony at the local fairgrounds and at age eight began buying, selling, and training horses. He continued training

  • Lukas, Darrell Wayne (American horse trainer)

    D. Wayne Lukas, American Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse trainer whose horses captured numerous races and amassed record earnings. Lukas was raised on a farm in Wisconsin. He raced his pony at the local fairgrounds and at age eight began buying, selling, and training horses. He continued training

  • Lukas, Jay Anthony (American journalist)

    J. Anthony Lukas, American journalist and author (born April 25, 1933, New York, N.Y.—died June 5, 1997, New York), wrote meticulous examinations of the societal and racial fissures in the U.S. He was known and highly regarded for his tenacity, perfectionism, and painstaking research and won a n

  • Lukas, Paul (Hungarian actor)
  • Lukasbund (German art society)

    Nazarene, one of an association formed by a number of young German painters in 1809 to return to the medieval spirit in art. Reacting particularly against 18th-century Neoclassicism, the brotherhood was the first effective antiacademic movement in European painting. The Nazarenes believed that all

  • Lukashenka, Alexander (president of Belarus)

    Alexander Lukashenko, Belarusian politician who espoused communist principles and who became president of the country in 1994. Lukashenko graduated from the Mogilyov Teaching Institute and the Belarusian Agricultural Academy. In the mid-1970s he was an instructor in political affairs, and he spent

  • Lukashenka, Alyaksandr Hrygorevich (president of Belarus)

    Alexander Lukashenko, Belarusian politician who espoused communist principles and who became president of the country in 1994. Lukashenko graduated from the Mogilyov Teaching Institute and the Belarusian Agricultural Academy. In the mid-1970s he was an instructor in political affairs, and he spent

  • Lukashenko, Alexander (president of Belarus)

    Alexander Lukashenko, Belarusian politician who espoused communist principles and who became president of the country in 1994. Lukashenko graduated from the Mogilyov Teaching Institute and the Belarusian Agricultural Academy. In the mid-1970s he was an instructor in political affairs, and he spent

  • ?ukasiewicz, Jan (Polish philosopher)

    Stanis?aw Le?niewski: Life: …vocation to the influence of Jan ?ukasiewicz, also a pupil of Twardowski and then a privat dozent at the University of Lwów. Already learned in the history of logic, to which he was to make outstanding contributions, ?ukasiewicz was at the time studying the work of the German logicians Gottlob…

  • ?ukasiński, Walerian (Polish rebel)

    Poland: Early Russian rule: Nevertheless, its leader, Major Walerian ?ukasiński, became a national martyr when he was thrown into prison, where he languished half-forgotten for more than 40 years until his death. Other conspiracies of more radical character began to spread. The economy of the kingdom, however, developed, and its finances were put…

  • Lukasz, Paul (Hungarian actor)
  • Luke Skywalker (fictional character)

    Darth Vader: …father of the young rebel Luke Skywalker, and at the climax of the next film, Return of the Jedi (1983; Star Wars: Episode VI—Return of the Jedi), Vader turns against the Empire to save his son’s life, sacrificing his own in the process.

  • Luke the Evangelist, Saint (biblical author)

    St. Luke, ; feast day October 18), in Christian tradition, the author of the Gospel According to Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, a companion of St. Paul the Apostle, and the most literary of the New Testament writers. Information about his life is scanty. Tradition based on references in the

  • Luke, Gospel According to (biblical literature)

    Gospel According to Luke, third of the four New Testament Gospels (narratives recounting the life and death of Jesus Christ) and, with The Gospels According to Mark and Matthew, one of the three Synoptic Gospels (i.e., those presenting a common view). It is traditionally credited to St. Luke, “the

  • Luke, Saint (biblical author)

    St. Luke, ; feast day October 18), in Christian tradition, the author of the Gospel According to Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, a companion of St. Paul the Apostle, and the most literary of the New Testament writers. Information about his life is scanty. Tradition based on references in the

  • Luke, Sir Samuel (English military officer)

    Samuel Butler: …passed into the service of Sir Samuel Luke, a rigid Presbyterian, a colonel in the Parliamentary army, and scoutmaster general for Bedfordshire. In his service Butler undoubtedly had firsthand opportunity to study some of the fanatics who attached themselves to the Puritan army and whose antics were to form the…

  • Lukens, Mount (mountain, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: City site: …beach community of Venice to Mount Lukens, which rises above 5,100 feet (1,550 metres). The city started in 1781 as a tiny village of 28 square miles (73 square km) but expanded greatly through a series of annexations when it first established an ironclad legal monopoly over the Los Angeles…

  • Lukin, Lionel (British engineer)

    Lionel Lukin, pioneer in the construction of the modern “unsinkable” lifeboat. While he was working as a London coachbuilder, Lukin began experimenting with a Norwegian yawl in 1784, testing his alterations in the River Thames. In 1785 he patented his method of constructing small boats that would

  • Lukins, Sheila Gail Block (American cookbook author, gourmet, and entrepreneur)

    Sheila Gail Block Lukins, American cookbook author, gourmet, and entrepreneur(born Nov. 18, 1942, Philadelphia, Pa.—died Aug. 30, 2009, New York, N.Y.), served as the food editor (1986–2009) of Parade magazine and wrote four best-selling cookbooks. With the advent of her innovative grocery store

  • Luks, George (American artist)

    George Luks, one of a group of American painters popularly known as the Ashcan school because of their realistic treatment of urban scenes. Born in a coal-mining region of north-central Pennsylvania, Luks studied first at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, and later in

  • Luks, George Benjamin (American artist)

    George Luks, one of a group of American painters popularly known as the Ashcan school because of their realistic treatment of urban scenes. Born in a coal-mining region of north-central Pennsylvania, Luks studied first at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, and later in

  • Luksic Abaroa, Andrónico (Chilean business magnate)

    Andrónico Luksic Abaroa, Chilean business magnate (born Nov. 5, 1926, Antofagasta, Chile—died Aug. 18, 2005, Santiago, Chile), amassed a fortune after building one of the largest business empires in Latin America. Luksic’s first investment was a copper mine in Antofagasta, which he sold to a J

  • Luksic, Igor (prime minister of Montenegro)

    Montenegro: Independence: Djukanovi?’s finance minister, Igor Luksic, succeeded him as prime minister, and Luksic continued his predecessor’s efforts to achieve greater integration with the rest of Europe and with the West.

  • Lukuas-Andreas (Cyrenian king-messiah)

    Judaism: Judaism under Roman rule: …revolt under a Cyrenian king-messiah, Lukuas-Andreas, aimed at freeing Palestine from Roman rule. In 132–135 the same spirit of freedom inspired another uprising, the Second Jewish Revolt, led by Bar Kokhba, who may have had the support of the greatest rabbi of the time, Akiba ben Joseph (40–c. 135). The…

  • Lukuga (Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Kalemi, town, southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, central Africa. It is a port on the west bank of Lake Tanganyika where the Lukuga River exits, and it has an airport and rail links to Lubumbashi and Kananga. In 1915 Kalemi, then the site of a British-Belgian military base, was chosen as

  • Lukuga River (river, Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Lukuga River, tributary of the Lualaba River in eastern Congo (Kinshasa). It issues from the western shore of Lake Tanganyika at Kalemie, Congo, and flows 200 miles (320 km) west to the Lualaba River 25 miles (40 km) north of Kabalo. There are low-grade coal deposits along its tributaries, north

  • Lukyanenko, Levko (Ukrainian statesman)

    Ukraine: Ukraine on the path to independence: Headed by Levko Lukyanenko, with Vyacheslav Chornovil as an important leader, the Ukrainian Helsinki Union had branches in all regions of Ukraine by 1989.

  • Lukyanenko, Sergey (Russian author)

    Sergey Lukyanenko, Russian author of science fiction and fantasy, best known for his six-volume Night Watch series, a seminal body of work in the genre of urban fantasy. Lukyanenko was the son of a Russian Ukrainian father and a Tatar mother. He completed his secondary education in the town of

  • Lukyanenko, Sergey Vasilyevich (Russian author)

    Sergey Lukyanenko, Russian author of science fiction and fantasy, best known for his six-volume Night Watch series, a seminal body of work in the genre of urban fantasy. Lukyanenko was the son of a Russian Ukrainian father and a Tatar mother. He completed his secondary education in the town of

  • Lukyanov, Anatoly (Soviet political leader)

    Soviet Union: Political restructuring: …group under the chairmanship of Anatoly Lukyanov. The latter proposed a two-stage approach to the election of a Supreme Soviet. Legal authority was to be vested in local soviets, but the relationship between the party and the soviets was left vague. Burlatsky proposed direct elections of the Supreme Soviet, president,…

  • Lula (president of Brazil)

    Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Brazilian politician who served as president of Brazil from 2003 to 2011. Born in Pernambuco state to sharecropping parents, Luiz Inácio da Silva (“Lula” was a nickname that he later added to his legal name) worked as a shoe-shine boy, street vendor, and factory worker to

  • Lula da Silva, Luiz Inácio (president of Brazil)

    Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Brazilian politician who served as president of Brazil from 2003 to 2011. Born in Pernambuco state to sharecropping parents, Luiz Inácio da Silva (“Lula” was a nickname that he later added to his legal name) worked as a shoe-shine boy, street vendor, and factory worker to

  • LULAC (American organization)

    League of United Latin American Citizens, one of the oldest and largest Latino organizations in the United States. Since its founding in 1929, it has focused on education, employment, and civil rights for Hispanics. The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) was formally established in

  • Lulach (king of Scotland)

    Macbeth: His followers installed his stepson, Lulach, as king; when Lulach was killed on March 17, 1058, Malcolm III was left supreme in Scotland.

  • Lule River (river, Sweden)

    Lule River, river in the l?n (county) of Norrbotten, northern Sweden. It flows southeast from the Norwegian border for 280 miles (450 km) to the Gulf of Bothnia at Lule?. Between the river’s two main headstreams, the Stora (Big) Lule and the Lilla (Little) Lule, is Mount Sarek National Park, rising

  • Lule, Yusufu (president of Uganda)

    Idi Amin: …was succeeded as president by Yusufu Lule two days later. After escaping first to Libya, Amin finally settled in Saudi Arabia.

  • Lule? (Sweden)

    Lule?, city and seaport, seat of Norrbotten l?n (county), northern Sweden. The city lies at the mouth of the Lule River, where it enters the Gulf of Bothnia. Gustavus II Adolphus founded the town in 1621, 7 miles (11 km) farther up the river; it was moved to its present site in 1649. In 1887 it was

  • Lule?lv (river, Sweden)

    Lule River, river in the l?n (county) of Norrbotten, northern Sweden. It flows southeast from the Norwegian border for 280 miles (450 km) to the Gulf of Bothnia at Lule?. Between the river’s two main headstreams, the Stora (Big) Lule and the Lilla (Little) Lule, is Mount Sarek National Park, rising

  • Luli (king of Phoenicia)

    Luli, Phoenician king of the cities of Tyre and Sidon who rebelled against Assyrian rule following the death of the Assyrian king Sargon II (705). Concurrent with the insurrection of Babylon under Merodach-Baladan, Luli joined with Shabaka of Egypt and Hezekiah of Judah in a revolt against

  • Lüli yuanyuan (Chinese compendium)

    Mei Juecheng: …of the chief editors of Lüli yuanyuan (c. 1723; “Source of Mathematical Harmonics and Astronomy”), a compendium on music, mathematics, and astronomy. Unlike earlier such endeavours, this was purely a work of Chinese authorship; Jesuits were not involved in the compilation. The Lüli yuanyuan reapportioned credit to Chinese scholars for…

  • Lüliang Mountains (mountains, China)

    Lüliang Mountains, range in Shanxi province, China. The name Lüliang Mountains generally refers to the whole system of ranges in the west and southwest of Shanxi, separating the north-south section of the Huang He (Yellow River) to the west from the valley of its tributary, the Fen River to the

  • Lüliang Shan (mountains, China)

    Lüliang Mountains, range in Shanxi province, China. The name Lüliang Mountains generally refers to the whole system of ranges in the west and southwest of Shanxi, separating the north-south section of the Huang He (Yellow River) to the west from the valley of its tributary, the Fen River to the

  • Luling (China)

    Ji’an, city, west-central Jiangxi sheng (province), southeastern China. Ji’an is situated on the west bank of the Gan River, at the head of navigation for small steamboats from Nanchang. The city is a highway centre located on the north-south route up the Gan valley at the point where it is joined

  • Lull, Ramón (Catalan mystic)

    Ramon Llull, Catalan mystic and poet whose writings helped to develop the Romance Catalan language and widely influenced Neoplatonic mysticism throughout medieval and 17th-century Europe. He is best known in the history of ideas as the inventor of an “art of finding truth” (ars inveniendi

  • Lullaby (work by Gershwin)

    George Gershwin: Early career and influences: …his first “serious” work, the Lullaby for string quartet. A study in harmony that Gershwin composed as an exercise for Kilenyi, Lullaby’s delicate beauty transcends its academic origins. Ira Gershwin published the work several years after George’s death, and it has gone on to become a favourite with string quartets…

  • Lullaby of Broadway (song by Warren and Dubin)
  • Lulli, Folco (Italian actor)

    The Wages of Fear: Cast:

  • Lulli, Giovanni Battista (French composer)

    Jean-Baptiste Lully, Italian-born French court and operatic composer who from 1662 completely controlled French court music and whose style of composition was imitated throughout Europe. Born of Italian parents, Lully gallicized his name when he became a naturalized Frenchman. His early history is

  • Lullubi (people)

    Lullubi, ancient group of tribes that inhabited the Sherizor plain in the Zagros Mountains of western Iran. A warlike people, they were especially active during the reign of the Akkadian king Naram-Sin (reigned c. 2254–c. 2218 bc) and at the end of the dynasty of Akkad (2334–2154 bc). The Lullubi

  • Lully, Jean-Baptiste (French composer)

    Jean-Baptiste Lully, Italian-born French court and operatic composer who from 1662 completely controlled French court music and whose style of composition was imitated throughout Europe. Born of Italian parents, Lully gallicized his name when he became a naturalized Frenchman. His early history is

  • Lully, Raymond (Catalan mystic)

    Ramon Llull, Catalan mystic and poet whose writings helped to develop the Romance Catalan language and widely influenced Neoplatonic mysticism throughout medieval and 17th-century Europe. He is best known in the history of ideas as the inventor of an “art of finding truth” (ars inveniendi

  • Lulonga River (river, Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Lulonga River, stream formed by the union of the Lopori and the Maringa rivers near Basankusu in north-central Congo (Kinshasa), central Africa. It flows 125 miles (200 km) west and southwest to its confluence with the Congo River north of Lulonga. It is navigable for steamboats along its entire

  • Lulu (album by Reed and Metallica)

    Metallica: …the audacious but critically reviled Lulu (2011), a two-disc collection inspired by the plays of German dramatist Frank Wedekind. Hardwired…to Self-Destruct (2016), another two-disc release, was a return to form that won over many critics. In 2009 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

  • Lulu (fictional character)

    Lulu, fictional character, an amoral femme fatale who is the protagonist of German dramatist Frank Wedekind’s plays Der Erdgeist (1895; Earth Spirit) and Die Büchse der Pandora (1904; Pandora’s Box). German director G.W. Pabst’s silent film of Die Büchse der Pandora (1929), starring the American

  • Lulu (opera by Berg)

    Lulu: …Wedekind’s plays in his opera Lulu (1937).

  • Lulu (British singer and actress)

    To Sir, with Love: …song, which was performed by Lulu, was an international hit. In 1996 Poitier reprised the role of Thackeray in the television movie To Sir, with Love II.

  • Lulu in Hollywood (essays by Brooks)

    Louise Brooks: …intelligent collection of autobiographical essays, Lulu in Hollywood, was published in 1982.

  • Luluabourg (Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Kananga, city, south-central Democratic Republic of the Congo, situated just east of the Lulua River, a tributary of the Kasai. It is on road and rail routes to Lubumbashi (southeast) and the Kasai River port of Ilebo (northwest) and has air links to those and other Congolese cities. It was named

  • Lulworthiales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Lulworthiales (incertae sedis; not placed in any subclass) Saprotrophic; ascomata subglobose to pear-shaped, paraphyses absent; asci unitunicate, thin-walled; example genera include Lulworthia and Lindra. Order Meliolales (incertae sedis; not placed in any subclass) Lives on other organisms (biotrophic) in tropical

  • lumbago (pathology)

    Lumbago, pain in the lower (lumbar) portion of the back. Lumbago is considered by health professionals to be an antiquated term that designates nothing more than lower back pain caused by any of a number of underlying conditions. The pain may be mild or severe, acute or chronic, confined to the

  • lumbang tree (plant)

    tung tree: cordata), and lumbang tree (A. trisperma), are decorative and are planted as shade trees or as sources of tung oil in the subtropical and tropical areas of many countries, including the American Deep South, where they grow rapidly under favourable soil conditions.

  • lumbar artery (anatomy)

    human cardiovascular system: The aorta and its principal branches: The lumbar arteries are arranged in four pairs and supply the muscles of the abdominal wall, the skin, the lumbar vertebrae, the spinal cord, and the meninges (spinal-cord coverings).

  • lumbar curve (anatomy)

    vertebral column: …is raised, and (3) a lumbar curve, also anterior, which develops as the child sits and walks. The lumbar curve is a permanent characteristic only of humans and their bipedal forebears, though a temporary lumbar curve appears in other primates in the sitting position. The cervical curve disappears in humans…

  • lumbar nerve (anatomy)

    human nervous system: The spinal cord: … (C), 12 thoracic (T), 5 lumbar (L), 5 sacral (S), and 1 coccygeal (Coc). Spinal nerve roots emerge via intervertebral foramina; lumbar and sacral spinal roots, descending for some distance within the subarachnoid space before reaching the appropriate foramina, produce a group of nerve roots at the conus medullaris known…

  • lumbar plexus (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Lumbar plexus: Spinal nerves from lumbar levels L1–L4 contribute to the formation of the lumbar plexus, which, along with the sacral plexus, provides motor, sensory, and autonomic fibres to gluteal and inguinal regions and to the lower extremities. Lumbar roots are organized into dorsal and…

  • lumbar puncture (medical procedure)

    Lumbar puncture, direct aspiration (fluid withdrawal) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through a hollow needle. The needle is inserted in the lower back, usually between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae, into the subarachnoid space of the spinal cord, where the CSF is located. Lumbar puncture is

  • lumbar vein (anatomy)

    human cardiovascular system: Superior vena cava and its tributaries: …the diaphragm, the right ascending lumbar vein continues upward as the azygous vein, principal tributaries of which are the right intercostal veins, which drain the muscles of the intercostal spaces. It also receives tributaries from the esophagus, lymph nodes, pericardium, and right lung, and it enters into the superior vena…

  • lumbar vertebra (bone anatomy)

    vertebral column: …articulates with the ribs, (3) lumbar, in the lower back, more robust than the other vertebrae, (4) sacral, often fused to form a sacrum, which articulates with the pelvic girdle, (5) caudal, in the tail. The atlas and axis vertebrae, the top two cervicals, form a freely movable joint with…

  • lumber (harvested wood)

    Lumber, collective term for harvested wood, whether cut into logs, heavy timbers, or members used in light-frame construction. Lumber is classified as hardwood or softwood. The term often refers specifically to the products derived from logs in a sawmill. Conversion of logs to sawed lumber involves

  • Lumberton (North Carolina, United States)

    Lumberton, city, seat (1788) of Robeson county, southern North Carolina, U.S., on the Lumber (Lumbee) River about 30 miles (50 km) south of Fayetteville. Founded about 1787 by John Willis, an officer of the American Revolution, it began as a shipping point for lumber and naval supplies floated

  • Lumbineris (polychaete genus)

    annelid: Annotated classification: Stauronereis, Lumbineris, Onuphis. Order Orbiniida Sedentary; head pointed or rounded without appendages; proboscis eversible and unarmed; body divided into distinct thorax and abdomen; gills arise dorsally from thoracic region; size, minute to 40 cm; examples of genera: Scoloplos,

  • Lumbini (grove, Nepal)

    Lumbini, grove near the southern border of modern-day Nepal where, according to Buddhist legend, Queen Maha Maya stood and gave birth to the future Buddha while holding onto a branch of a sal tree. There are two references to Lumbini as the birthplace of the Buddha in the Pali scripture, the first

  • Lumbrales de Sá Carneiro, Francisco Manuel (prime minister of Portugal)

    Francisco Sá Carneiro, Portuguese politician who served as prime minister of Portugal (1979–80). A lawyer by profession, Sá Carneiro was elected to the National Assembly in 1969 but resigned in 1973. After a military coup in April 1974, he founded the Partido Popular Democrático (PPD) and

  • Lumbreras, Luis G. (Peruvian archaeologist)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: The Initial Period: …Formative by the Peruvian archaeologist Luis G. Lumbreras, began with the introduction of pottery. The earliest ceramics have yielded radiocarbon dates of about 1800 bc, although Rowe has suggested that even a date of 2100 bc is plausible. Ceramics from this period have been found on the central coast between…

  • Lumbriculida (oligochaete order)

    annelid: Annotated classification: Order Lumbriculida (earthworms) Male gonopores several segments behind segments containing the testes or, when 2 pairs of testes are present, in more posterior segment; size, minute to 30–40 cm; examples of genera: Haplotaxis, Eisenia, Lumbricus (earthworm),

  • Lumbricus (oligochaete genus)

    annelid: Annotated classification: Eisenia, Lumbricus (earthworm), Megascolides. Order Moniligastrida Male gonopores, 1 or 2 pairs on segment posterior to testes; clitellum 1 cell thick; 4 pairs of setae per segment; size, minute to 3 m; examples of genera: Moniligaster, Drawida.

  • Lumbricus terrestris (earthworm)

    oligochaete: ), Lumbricus terrestris. Oligochaetes are common all over the world. They live in the sea, in fresh water, and in moist soil.

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