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  • Landscape with the Fall of Icarus (painting by Bruegel)
  • Landscape: The Marriage of Isaac and Rebekah (work by Lorrain)

    Claude Lorrain: Stylistic development: …as can be seen in Landscape: The Marriage of Isaac and Rebekah (also called The Mill), dated 1648.

  • Landscapes of the Four Seasons (painting by Liu)

    Liu Songnian: …paintings attributed to him are Landscapes of the Four Seasons and Traveling in Autumn Mountains. Even though the figures in these works are small, the idea of a human in harmony with nature is clear. Landscapes of the Four Seasons, which was remounted as a hand scroll, echoes the new…

  • Landscapes Within, The (novel by Okri)

    Ben Okri: …Flowers and Shadows (1980) and The Landscapes Within (1981), employ surrealistic images to depict the corruption and lunacy of a politically scarred country. Two volumes of short stories, Incidents at the Shrine (1986) and Stars of the New Curfew (1988), portray the essential link in Nigerian culture between the physical…

  • Landseer, Sir Edwin (British painter)

    Sir Edwin Landseer, British painter and sculptor best known for his paintings of animals. Landseer learned drawing from his father, an engraver and writer, and also studied at the Royal Academy. His paintings of animals were based on sound anatomical knowledge and, at first, were marked by healthy

  • Landseer, Sir Edwin Henry (British painter)

    Sir Edwin Landseer, British painter and sculptor best known for his paintings of animals. Landseer learned drawing from his father, an engraver and writer, and also studied at the Royal Academy. His paintings of animals were based on sound anatomical knowledge and, at first, were marked by healthy

  • Landsgemeinden (Swiss government)

    canton: …their ancient democratic assemblies (Landsgemeinden), in which all citizens of full age meet annually for the purpose of legislation, taxation, and the election of an annual administrative council and of the members of the cantonal supreme court. In the remaining cantons the legislature (Kantonsrat, Grosser Rat, or Grand Conseil)…

  • Landshut (Germany)

    Landshut, city, Bavaria Land (state), southeastern Germany. It lies on the Isar River northeast of Munich. Named for its early position as the protector (Hut) of the neighbouring district, it was founded in 1204, when the duke of Bavaria built a fortress there, and was chartered in 1279. It

  • landside facility

    airport: Modern airports: Landside facilities are the passenger and cargo terminals and the access system, which includes parking, roads, public transport facilities, and loading and unloading areas.

  • landskap (traditional subdivision, Sweden)

    Landskap, traditional subdivision (province) of Sweden. The 25 landskap (provinces) developed during the pre-Viking and Viking eras and were independent political units with their own laws, judges, and councils. The division was based on geographical and cultural characteristics with which many

  • Landsknecht (German mercenary pikeman)

    Landsknecht, German mercenary pikeman of the late 15th and early 16th centuries. At the height of their success, the Landsknechte ranked among the most-effective foot soldiers in the world. Though there is no consensus on the origins of the word Landsknecht, it likely meant “servant of the land.”

  • Landsknechte (German mercenary pikeman)

    Landsknecht, German mercenary pikeman of the late 15th and early 16th centuries. At the height of their success, the Landsknechte ranked among the most-effective foot soldiers in the world. Though there is no consensus on the origins of the word Landsknecht, it likely meant “servant of the land.”

  • Landsknechts (German mercenary pikeman)

    Landsknecht, German mercenary pikeman of the late 15th and early 16th centuries. At the height of their success, the Landsknechte ranked among the most-effective foot soldiers in the world. Though there is no consensus on the origins of the word Landsknecht, it likely meant “servant of the land.”

  • Landskrona (Sweden)

    Landskrona, town and port, Sk?ne l?n (county), southern Sweden, on The Sound (?resund), north-northwest of the city of Malm?. It has the only natural harbour on The Sound. The town was founded by Erik of Pomerania, king of Sweden, Denmark, and Norway, and chartered in 1413. Although it was

  • Landslide (work by Betti)

    Ugo Betti: , Landslide, 1964), the story of a natural disaster and collective guilt; Delitto all’Isola delle Capre (first performed 1950; Eng. trans., Crime on Goat Island, 1960), a violent tragedy of love and revenge; La regina e gli insorti (first performed 1951; Eng. trans., The Queen and…

  • landslide (geology)

    Landslide, the movement downslope of a mass of rock, debris, earth, or soil (soil being a mixture of earth and debris). Landslides occur when gravitational and other types of shear stresses within a slope exceed the shear strength (resistance to shearing) of the materials that form the slope. Shear

  • landslip (geology)

    Landslide, the movement downslope of a mass of rock, debris, earth, or soil (soil being a mixture of earth and debris). Landslides occur when gravitational and other types of shear stresses within a slope exceed the shear strength (resistance to shearing) of the materials that form the slope. Shear

  • Landsm?l (language)

    Norwegian language: …called Dano-Norwegian, or Riksm?l) and New Norwegian (Nynorsk).

  • Landsorganisasjonen i Norge (Norwegian labour organization)

    Norway: Labour and taxation: …influential labour union is the Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions (Landsorganisasjonen i Norge; LO), which was established in 1899 and has more than 800,000 members. Other important labour unions are the Confederation of Vocational Unions (Yrkesorganisasjonenes Sentralforbund; YS) and the Federation of Norwegian Professional Associations (Akademikerne).

  • Landsort Deep (geographical feature, Baltic Sea)

    Baltic Sea: Physiography: …(459 metres) is reached in Landsort Deep; between Gotland and Latvia in Gotland Deep (817 feet [249 metres]); and also in the Gulf of Bothnia in the ?land Sea between Sweden and the ?land Islands. A deepwater channel also extends along most of the Gulf of Finland. The Baltic Sea…

  • landspout (meteorology)

    waterspout: …some of which are called landspouts because of this similarity. The rotation occurs at low levels in the atmosphere, so the resulting vortex does not extend very far up into the cloud. Indeed, the rotation is not often detectable by radar, another indication that waterspouts are a phenomenon largely confined…

  • Landstad, Magnus Brostrup (Norwegian poet)

    Magnus Brostrup Landstad, pastor and poet who published the first collection of authentic Norwegian traditional ballads (1853). After ordination, Landstad served in several parishes in the Telemark district, an area known for its rich folk tradition, before going to Christiania (later Kristiania),

  • Landst?nde (German assembly)

    Germany: The princes and the Landst?nde: In the various principalities the outcome of the struggle between the territorial princes and the assemblies of estates (Landst?nde) was not fully decided by 1500. The vigour of the conflict arose partly out of the contrasting conceptions of government held by the protagonists. The…

  • Landsteiner, Karl (Austrian immunologist and pathologist)

    Karl Landsteiner, Austrian American immunologist and pathologist who received the 1930 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of the major blood groups and the development of the ABO system of blood typing that has made blood transfusion a routine medical practice. After receiving

  • Landsting (Danish parliament)

    Denmark: The liberal movement: …chambers: the Folketing and the Landsting. Both were elected by popular vote, but seats in the Landsting had a relatively high property-owning qualification. The parliament shared legislative power with the king and the cabinet, while the courts independently exercised judicial power. The constitution also secured the freedom of the press,…

  • Landsting (Greenland parliament)

    Greenland: Government and society: …power in Greenland is the Landsting, a parliament elected to four-year terms by all adults age 18 and older. A number of parties have been represented in the Landsting. Among them are Siumut, a social democratic party that favours self-determination while maintaining close relations with Denmark; the Demokratiit party, created…

  • Landtag (German government)

    Rhineland-Palatinate: Geography: …to the state parliament, the Landtag. The Landtag elects a prime minister. Under the state’s judicial system, civil and criminal cases are tried by the provincial court of appeal and the county courts.

  • Landtage (German government)

    Rhineland-Palatinate: Geography: …to the state parliament, the Landtag. The Landtag elects a prime minister. Under the state’s judicial system, civil and criminal cases are tried by the provincial court of appeal and the county courts.

  • Landulf I (count of Capua)

    Italy: The south, 774–1000: The gastald of Capua, Landulf I (815–843), also was interested in independence, and by the end of the century Capua was in effect a third state in the old Beneventan principality.

  • Landuma (people)

    Landuma, group of some 20,000 people located principally in Guinea, 30 to 60 miles (50 to 100 km) inland along the border of Guinea-Bissau. Their language, also called Landuma or Tyapi, belongs to the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo family and is related to Baga. The Landuma are

  • Landuma language

    Landuma: Their language, also called Landuma or Tyapi, belongs to the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo family and is related to Baga. The Landuma are agriculturalists—corn (maize), millet, groundnuts (peanuts), and rice being the major crops. Social organization centres in a paramount chief, with villages governed by subordinate chiefs. Marriage…

  • Landus (pope)

    Lando, pope from July/August 913 to early 914. He reigned during one of the most difficult periods in papal history—from c. 900 to 950. The Holy See was then dominated by the relatives and dependents of the senior

  • landvaettir (mythology)

    Germanic religion and mythology: Guardian spirits: …good deal is told of land spirits (landv?ttir). According to the pre-Christian law of Iceland, no one must approach the land in a ship bearing a dragonhead, lest he frighten the land spirits. An Icelandic poet, cursing the king and queen of Norway, enjoined the landv?ttir to drive them from…

  • Lane’s law (astrophysics)

    Jonathan Homer Lane: His solar studies culminated in Lane’s law, which states that as a gaseous body contracts (under the influence of gravity, for example), the contraction generates heat. He used this law to explain how the Sun built up its intense heat over the eons. His most important publication is On the…

  • Lane, Ann (American author and journalist)

    Ann Petry, African-American novelist, journalist, and biographer whose works offered a unique perspective on black life in small-town New England. Born into a family of pharmacists in a small Connecticut town, Petry graduated in 1931 with a degree in pharmacy from the University of Connecticut.

  • Lane, Burton (American composer)

    Burton Lane, American composer (born Feb. 2, 1912, New York, N.Y.—died Jan. 5, 1997, New York), created melodies for musical stage shows and motion pictures for more than 50 years. Though he was not the best known of show business composers, his songs graced a number of popular and highly r

  • Lane, Carrie (American feminist leader)

    Carrie Chapman Catt, American feminist leader who led the women’s rights movement for more than 25 years, culminating in the adoption of the Nineteenth Amendment (for women’s suffrage) to the U.S. Constitution in 1920. Carrie Lane grew up in Ripon, Wisconsin, and from 1866 in Charles City, Iowa.

  • Lane, Dame Elizabeth Kathleen (British jurist)

    Dame Elizabeth Kathleen Lane, British jurist who was the first woman judge appointed to the British High Court. Lane also headed a controversial inquiry (1971–73) that upheld the 1967 Abortion Act. Coulborn attended McGill University, Montreal, and became interested in a legal career while helping

  • Lane, Diane (American actress)

    Richard Gere: …with his Unfaithful (2002) costar Diane Lane in Nights in Rodanthe, a romantic drama based on a novel by Nicholas Sparks. Gere’s later films include Amelia (2009), a biopic about the American aviator Amelia Earhart (played by Hilary Swank), and the crime drama Brooklyn’s Finest (2009). He also appeared in

  • Lane, Dick (American football player)

    Dick Lane, American gridiron football player who is widely considered one of the greatest cornerbacks in National Football League (NFL) history. Lane was named to seven Pro Bowls over the course of his career, and his 14 interceptions during the 1952 season are an NFL record. Abandoned by his

  • Lane, F. C. (American sportswriter and editor)

    sabermetrics: Early analytic efforts: …Baseball Magazine about 1911, writer F.C. Lane began railing about the inadequacy of batting average as an indicator of performance. As Lane noted, it made little sense to count a single the same as a home run, and eventually he devised his own (generally accurate) values for singles, doubles, triples,…

  • Lane, Fitz Henry (American painter and lithographer)

    Fitz Henry Lane, American painter and lithographer known for his marine and coastal scenes of Massachusetts and Maine. His work came to represent the “luminist” style, an offshoot of the Hudson River School and a strain of realism that was known for its meticulous brushwork and an incandescent

  • Lane, Fitz Hugh (American painter and lithographer)

    Fitz Henry Lane, American painter and lithographer known for his marine and coastal scenes of Massachusetts and Maine. His work came to represent the “luminist” style, an offshoot of the Hudson River School and a strain of realism that was known for its meticulous brushwork and an incandescent

  • Lane, Franklin K. (American politician)

    Franklin K. Lane, U.S. lawyer and politician who, as secretary of the interior (1913–20) made important contributions to conservation. The Lane family moved from Canada to California in 1871. Lane worked as a journalist to finance his college education and later (1891) became a part owner and the

  • Lane, Franklin Knight (American politician)

    Franklin K. Lane, U.S. lawyer and politician who, as secretary of the interior (1913–20) made important contributions to conservation. The Lane family moved from Canada to California in 1871. Lane worked as a journalist to finance his college education and later (1891) became a part owner and the

  • Lane, Harlan L. (American psychologist and speech researcher)

    audism: …American psychologist and speech researcher Harlan L. Lane. Lane described audism as a way for the hearing to dominate the deaf community. This notion was supported by the fact that environments tailored for deaf persons were limited in their visual stimulation and continued to give advantage to hearing persons. Thus,…

  • Lane, Harriet (American first lady)

    Harriet Lane, acting American first lady (1857–61), niece of bachelor James Buchanan, 15th president of the United States. For both her popularity and her advocacy work, she has been described as the first of the modern first ladies. Harriet Lane was the youngest child of Elliott Tole Lane, a

  • Lane, Harriet Rebecca (American first lady)

    Harriet Lane, acting American first lady (1857–61), niece of bachelor James Buchanan, 15th president of the United States. For both her popularity and her advocacy work, she has been described as the first of the modern first ladies. Harriet Lane was the youngest child of Elliott Tole Lane, a

  • Lane, James (American musician)

    Jimmy Rogers, American blues musician who played rhythm guitar in the Muddy Waters band of the 1950s, considered the finest electric blues band, and achieved renown with his own ’50s recordings, including "Walking by Myself," "Chicago Bound," and "Sloppy Drunk," in which his genial singing was

  • Lane, John (British publisher)

    typography: Mechanical composition: Companies such as those of John Lane and Elkin Mathews, who published Oscar Wilde and the periodical The Yellow Book; J.M. Dent, who commissioned Aubrey Beardsley to illustrate Malory and who used Kelmscott-inspired endpapers for his Everyman’s Library; Stone and

  • Lane, Jonathan Homer (American astrophysicist)

    Jonathan Homer Lane, U.S. astrophysicist who was the first to investigate mathematically the Sun as a gaseous body. His work demonstrated the interrelationships of pressure, temperature, and density inside the Sun and was fundamental to the emergence of modern theories of stellar evolution. Lane

  • Lane, Joseph (American actor)

    Nathan Lane, American stage, film, and television actor, best known for his work in musical comedies, notably the Broadway production of The Producers. Lane discovered his flair for musical comedy when he appeared in a high-school production of No, No, Nanette, and after graduation he embarked on a

  • Lane, Joseph (American statesman)

    United States presidential election of 1860: The conventions: Joseph Lane of Oregon as his running mate. Both Douglas and Breckinridge claimed to be the official Democratic candidates.

  • Lane, Libby (British bishop)

    Church of England: Gender and sexuality: Libby Lane, was consecrated in January 2015.

  • Lane, Lois (fictional character)

    Superman: The Man of Steel in the Golden Age: …romantic interest in fellow reporter Lois Lane (a character modeled in part on Siegel’s future wife, Joanne). She, however, dazzled by the courageous crime-fighting exploits of Superman and unaware of his dual identity, continually rejects Kent’s overtures. The audience, privy to the secret that continually eluded Lois, identified with Clark…

  • Lane, Louisa (American actress)

    Louisa Lane Drew, noted American actress and manager of Mrs. John Drew’s Arch Street Theatre company in Philadelphia, which was one of the finest in American theatre history. Louisa Lane was the daughter of actors and at an early age began playing child parts. In June 1827 she arrived in New York

  • Lane, Lupino (English actor)

    Lupino family: …under the stage name of Lupino Lane. Lane became a well-known cockney comedian and toured extensively in variety, musical comedy, and pantomime. In 1937 he scored a tremendous success as Bill Snibson in the British musical Me and My Girl, in which he created the “Lambeth walk,” a ballroom dance…

  • Lane, Mark (American conspiracy theorist)

    Mark Lane, American conspiracy theorist (born Feb. 24, 1927, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died May 10, 2016, Charlottesville, Va.), was one of the first and best-known proponents of the theory that the Nov. 22, 1963, assassination of U.S. Pres. John. F. Kennedy was not carried out single-handedly by Lee Harvey

  • Lane, Nathan (American actor)

    Nathan Lane, American stage, film, and television actor, best known for his work in musical comedies, notably the Broadway production of The Producers. Lane discovered his flair for musical comedy when he appeared in a high-school production of No, No, Nanette, and after graduation he embarked on a

  • Lane, Nathaniel Rogers (American painter and lithographer)

    Fitz Henry Lane, American painter and lithographer known for his marine and coastal scenes of Massachusetts and Maine. His work came to represent the “luminist” style, an offshoot of the Hudson River School and a strain of realism that was known for its meticulous brushwork and an incandescent

  • Lane, Priscilla (American actress)

    The Roaring Twenties: …married to Jean Sherman (Priscilla Lane), the woman Bartlett once loved.

  • Lane, Richard (American football player)

    Dick Lane, American gridiron football player who is widely considered one of the greatest cornerbacks in National Football League (NFL) history. Lane was named to seven Pro Bowls over the course of his career, and his 14 interceptions during the 1952 season are an NFL record. Abandoned by his

  • Lane, Ronald (British musician)

    Ronnie Lane, ), British rock bass guitarist, singer, and songwriter who was cofounder of the influential 1960s band the Small Faces (later the Faces), which gave a boost to the careers of a number of musicians, including Ron Wood and Rod Stewart; in 1983 Lane organized a concert featuring many top

  • Lane, Ronnie (British musician)

    Ronnie Lane, ), British rock bass guitarist, singer, and songwriter who was cofounder of the influential 1960s band the Small Faces (later the Faces), which gave a boost to the careers of a number of musicians, including Ron Wood and Rod Stewart; in 1983 Lane organized a concert featuring many top

  • Lane, Sir Allen (British publisher)

    Sir Allen Lane, 20th-century pioneer of paperback publishing in England, whose belief in a market for high-quality books at low prices helped to create a new reading public and also led to improved printing and binding techniques. In 1919 Lane was apprenticed to his uncle, publisher John Lane of

  • Lane, Sir Hugh Percy (Irish art dealer)

    Sir Hugh Percy Lane, Irish art dealer known for his collection of Impressionist paintings. Lane travelled extensively in Europe as a boy. He began to work in art galleries in London in 1893, and in 1898 set up his own. He established a gallery of modern art in Dublin to advance Irish painting,

  • lane, traffic

    roads and highways: Alignment and profile: A traffic lane is the portion of pavement allocated to a single line of vehicles; it is indicated on the pavement by painted longitudinal lines or embedded markers. The shoulder is a strip of pavement outside an outer lane; it is provided for emergency use by…

  • Lane, William Henry (American dancer and actor)

    Master Juba, known as the “father of tap dance” and the first African American to get top billing over a white performer in a minstrel show. He invented new techniques of creating rhythm by combining elements of African American vernacular dance, Irish jigs, and clogging. William Henry Lane was

  • Lanfield, Sidney (American film and television director)

    Sidney Lanfield , American film and television director who specialized in comedies—notably a series of Bob Hope movies—but his best work was arguably the Sherlock Holmes mystery The Hound of the Baskervilles (1939). Trained on the vaudeville and jazz circuits, in 1926 Lanfield went to Hollywood,

  • Lanfranc (archbishop of Canterbury)

    Lanfranc, Italian Benedictine who, as archbishop of Canterbury (1070–89) and trusted counsellor of William the Conqueror, was largely responsible for the excellent church–state relations of William’s reign after the Norman Conquest of England. Originally a lawyer, Lanfranc won a reputation as a

  • Lanfranco, Giovanni (Italian painter)

    Giovanni Lanfranco, Italian painter, an important follower of the Bolognese school. He was a pupil of Agostino Carracci in Parma (1600–02) and later studied with Annibale Carracci in Rome. A decisive influence on his work, however, was not just the Baroque classicism of the Carracci brothers but

  • Lang Bian, Plateau du (plateau, Vietnam)

    Da Lat: …on a lake on the Lam Vien Plateau at 4,920 feet (1,500 metres) above sea level, Da Lat sits among pine-covered hills with picturesque waterfalls nearby. Founded in the 19th century and named for the Da (now Cam Ly) River, which traverses the city, and the Lat population, it was…

  • Lang Glacier (glacier, Iceland)

    Langj?kull, (Icelandic: “Long Glacier”) large ice field, west-central Iceland. Langj?kull is 40 miles (64 km) long and 15 miles (24 km) wide and covers an area of 395 square miles (1,025 square km). It rises to 4,757 feet (1,450 metres) above sea level in the centre and feeds several rivers,

  • Lang Lang (Chinese musician)

    Lang Lang, Chinese virtuoso pianist. He won international acclaim while a teenager, and his expressiveness and charisma made him one of the most sought-after performers in the early 21st century. Lang began taking piano lessons at age three and gave his first public recital two years later. In 1991

  • Lang Mountains (mountains, Norway)

    Lang Mountains, mountainous area lying south and west of the Dovre Mountains in west-central Norway. The Lang Mountains include the Jotunheim Mountains, the Jostedals Glacier, the Hardanger Ice Cap, the Hardanger Plateau, the Bykle Hills, and many lesser features. The highest mountains in

  • Lang of Lambeth, William Cosmo Gordon Lang, Baron (archbishop of Canterbury)

    Cosmo Gordon Lang, Baron Lang, influential and versatile Anglican priest who, as archbishop of Canterbury, was a close friend and adviser to King George VI. He also played a role in the abdication in 1936 of King Edward VIII, whose relationship with the American divorcée Wallis Simpson would, Lang

  • Lang Ping (Chinese athlete and coach)

    Lang Ping, volleyball player and coach who was the lead spiker on the Chinese national teams that dominated women’s international volleyball in the early 1980s. Known as the “Iron Hammer,” she was revered for her elegant athleticism, fierce spiking, and tactical brilliance. Lang began playing

  • Lang Shih-ning (Jesuit missionary and artist)

    Chinese architecture: The Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12): …the Jesuit missionary and artist Giuseppe Castiglione (known in China as Lang Shining) designed for Qianlong a series of extraordinary Sino-Rococo buildings, set in Italianate gardens ornamented with mechanical fountains designed by the Jesuit priest Michel Benoist. Today the Yuanmingyuan has almost completely disappeared, as the foreign-style buildings were burned…

  • Lang’s Crossing Place (New South Wales, Australia)

    Hay, town, south-central New South Wales, Australia. It lies on the Murrumbidgee River. The settlement originated in 1840 as a coach station known as Lang’s Crossing Place. It was surveyed in 1858 and became a town the following year, named for John Hay, a district parliamentary representative.

  • Lang, Alexander Matheson (Canadian actor)

    Matheson Lang, English romantic actor and dramatist whose imposing presence, commanding features, and fine voice were as well suited to Othello as to such popular and picturesque characters as Mr. Wu and the Wandering Jew. Lang began his career as a Shakespearean actor in 1897, first played in

  • Lang, Andrew (British scholar)

    Andrew Lang, Scottish scholar and man of letters noted for his collections of fairy tales and translations of Homer. Educated at St. Andrews University and at Balliol College, Oxford, he held an open fellowship at Merton College until 1875, when he moved to London. He quickly became famous for his

  • Lang, Charles Bryant, Jr. (American cinematographer)

    Charles Bryant Lang, Jr., American cinematographer whose stunning mastery of both black-and-white and colour photography and imaginative, flattering lighting graced such films as A Farewell to Arms (1932), for which he won an Academy Award, and The Magnificent Seven (1960); he was given the

  • Lang, Christa (American author and actress)

    Samuel Fuller: Films of the 1960s and ’70s: …by a woman played by Christa Lang. (Lang was Fuller’s real-life wife; Fuller himself played a U.S. senator.)

  • Lang, Cosmo Gordon Lang, Baron (archbishop of Canterbury)

    Cosmo Gordon Lang, Baron Lang, influential and versatile Anglican priest who, as archbishop of Canterbury, was a close friend and adviser to King George VI. He also played a role in the abdication in 1936 of King Edward VIII, whose relationship with the American divorcée Wallis Simpson would, Lang

  • Lang, Eddie (American musician)

    Eddie Lang, American musician, among the first guitar soloists in jazz and an accompanist of rare sensitivity. Lang began playing violin in boyhood; his father, who made fretted stringed instruments, taught him to play guitar. In the early 1920s he played with former schoolmate Joe Venuti in

  • Lang, Fritz (German director)

    Fritz Lang, Austrian-born American motion-picture director whose films, dealing with fate and people’s inevitable working out of their destinies, are considered masterpieces of visual composition and expressionistic suspense. Lang had already created an impressive body of work in the German cinema

  • Lang, Gladys (German sociologist)

    collective behaviour: Panic: sociologists Kurt Lang and Gladys E. Lang view panic as the end point in a process of demoralization in which behaviour becomes privatized and there is a general retreat from the pursuit of group goals.

  • Lang, Helmut (Austrian fashion designer and artist)

    Helmut Lang, On May 4, 2012, in an exhibition space in a town house in New York City’s Greenwich Village, Austrian fashion-designer-turned-artist Helmut Lang opened a solo art show, his first major show in New York City. The more than 20 sculptures—made mostly from rubber discs, foam, plastic, and

  • Lang, Jack (Australian statesman)

    Jack Lang, Australian statesman and Labor premier of New South Wales (1925–27, 1930–32) whose defiance of Australia’s Labor prime minister James Henry Scullin’s economic policies contributed to Scullin’s defeat in 1931 and to the decline of the Labor Party from national power. After entering the

  • Lang, Jennings (American producer)

    Riot in Cell Block 11: …involving producers Walter Wanger and Jennings Lang. In 1951 Wanger suspected Lang of having an affair with his wife, Joan Bennett, and shot him. Lang survived and went on to produce a number of hit films, and Wanger served four months in prison, where he was appalled by the horrendous…

  • Lang, John Dunmore (Australian clergyman)

    John Dunmore Lang, Australian churchman and writer, founder of the Australian Presbyterian Church, and an influence in shaping colonization of that continent. Lang studied at the University of Glasgow, was ordained in September 1822, and was sent to Australia in 1823 on behalf of the established

  • Lang, John Thomas (Australian statesman)

    Jack Lang, Australian statesman and Labor premier of New South Wales (1925–27, 1930–32) whose defiance of Australia’s Labor prime minister James Henry Scullin’s economic policies contributed to Scullin’s defeat in 1931 and to the decline of the Labor Party from national power. After entering the

  • lang, k. d. (Canadian singer-songwriter)

    Anne Murray: musicians, among them Céline Dion, k.d. lang, Carole King, and Emmylou Harris. Murray staged a final tour in 2008 and effectively retired from the music industry. She published her biography, All of Me (co-written with Michael Posner), in 2009.

  • Lang, Katherine Dawn (Canadian singer-songwriter)

    Anne Murray: musicians, among them Céline Dion, k.d. lang, Carole King, and Emmylou Harris. Murray staged a final tour in 2008 and effectively retired from the music industry. She published her biography, All of Me (co-written with Michael Posner), in 2009.

  • Lang, Kurt (German sociologist)

    collective behaviour: Panic: sociologists Kurt Lang and Gladys E. Lang view panic as the end point in a process of demoralization in which behaviour becomes privatized and there is a general retreat from the pursuit of group goals.

  • Lang, Matheson (Canadian actor)

    Matheson Lang, English romantic actor and dramatist whose imposing presence, commanding features, and fine voice were as well suited to Othello as to such popular and picturesque characters as Mr. Wu and the Wandering Jew. Lang began his career as a Shakespearean actor in 1897, first played in

  • Lang, Matth?us (German statesman and cardinal)

    Matth?us Lang, German statesman and cardinal, counsellor of the emperor Maximilian I. Of bourgeois origin, Lang studied law, entered Maximilian’s service about 1494, and became indispensable as the emperor’s secretary. He received numerous benefices and ecclesiastical offices prior to his

  • Lang, Pearl (American dancer and choreographer)

    Pearl Lang, (Pearl Lack), American dancer and choreographer (born May 29, 1921, Chicago, Ill.—died Feb. 24, 2009, New York, N.Y.), was a sterling member of the Martha Graham Dance Company and the first dancer whom Graham allowed to perform some of her own roles. Lang displayed her dancing talent at

  • Lang, Walter (American director)

    Walter Lang, American film director best known for films such as The Little Princess (1939), The King and I (1956), and Desk Set (1957). Lang made over 50 sound pictures, most at Twentieth Century-Fox over a 25-year span. Lang served in France with the U.S. Army during World War I. In the early

  • Lang, William Henry (British paleobotanist)

    Robert Kidston: With William Henry Lang of Victoria University in Manchester, he studied the silicified plants of the Rhynie Chert bed of the Devonian period. Kidston and Lang discovered a new class of vascular cryptogams (plants that do not produce flowers or seeds) and three new genera. This…

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