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  • Laon and Cythna; or, The Revolution of the Golden City (poem by Shelley)

    Percy Bysshe Shelley: …Shelley wrote his twelve-canto romance-epic Laon and Cythna; or, The Revolution of the Golden City and Mary Shelley finished Frankenstein. They compiled History of a Six Weeks’ Tour jointly from the letters and journals of their trips to Switzerland, concluding with “Mont Blanc.” In November, Laon and Cythna was suppressed…

  • Laon cathedral (cathedral, Laon, France)

    stained glass: France: 1200–05) of Laon Cathedral is stylistically related to the contemporary sculptures of the facade and to manuscript painting such as the Ingeborg Psalter (Musée Condé, Chantilly). The work of this atelier is extremely distinguished, with an elegance and purity of style and a knowledge of Classical art…

  • Laos

    Laos, landlocked country of northeast-central mainland Southeast Asia. It consists of an irregularly round portion in the north that narrows into a peninsula-like region stretching to the southeast. Overall, the country extends about 650 miles (1,050 km) from northwest to southeast. The capital is

  • Laos gymnure (mammal)

    gymnure: The long-eared, or Laos, gymnure (H. megalotis) is restricted to limestone karst in the central part of Laos. The Hainan gymnure (Neohylomys hainanensis) is endemic to Hainan Island off the coast of southern China.

  • Laos, flag of

    horizontally striped red-blue-red national flag with a central white disk. The width-to-length ratio of the flag is 2 to 3.In 1353 King Fa Ngum proclaimed the “Kingdom of the Million Elephants and White Parasol,” basing the name on those traditional symbols of the Lao people. The mythical first

  • Laos, history of

    Laos: History: This section focuses specifically on the history and development of the area and country now known as Laos. For a discussion of the history of Laos in its broader, regional context, see Southeast Asia, history of.

  • Laotian language

    Lao language, one of the Tai languages of Southeast Asia, and the official language of Laos. Lao occurs in various dialects, which differ among themselves at least as much as Lao as a group differs from the Tai dialects of northeastern Thailand. The latter are usually called Northeastern Thai, but

  • laouto (musical instrument)

    stringed instrument: The production of sound: …the guitar and the Greek laouto (a type of lute with moveable frets), for example—operate according to a combination of ear and rule of thumb when they insert or adjust frets (note-position markers—e.g., of gut or wire) in the fingerboard. Such instruments are fretted according to the “rule of the…

  • Laozi (Chinese literature)

    Tao-te Ching, (Chinese [Wade-Giles romanization]: “Classic of the Way of Power”) classic of Chinese philosophical literature. The name was first used during the Han dynasty (206 bce–220 ce). It had previously been called Laozi in the belief that it was written by Laozi, identified by the historian

  • Laozi (Chinese Daoist philosopher)

    Laozi, (Chinese: “Master Lao” or “Old Master”) the first philosopher of Chinese Daoism and the alleged author of the Daodejing, a primary Daoist writing. Modern scholars discount the possibility that the Daodejing was written by only one person but readily acknowledge the influence of Daoism on the

  • Laozi bianhuajing (Daoist text)

    Daoism: Texts on the cult of Laozi: …the Transformations of Laozi (Laozi bianhuajing), shows him in cosmic perspective, omnipresent and omnipotent, the origin of all life. His human manifestations are listed, followed by his successive roles in legendary history, as the sage counsellor of emperors. Next, five of his more recent appearances are mentioned, dated 132–155…

  • Laozi huhuajing (Daoist work)

    Laozi: Hagiographical legends: This book, the Laozi huhuajing (“Laozi’s Conversion of the Barbarians”), in which Buddhism was presented as an inferior kind of Daoism, was often condemned by the Chinese imperial authorities.

  • lap (metallurgy)

    metallurgy: Metallurgy: Laps are another type of flaw in which part of a metal piece is inadvertently folded over on itself but the two sides of the fold are not completely welded together. If a force tending to open this fold is applied during the forming operation,…

  • lap siding (construction)

    Clapboard, type of board bevelled toward one edge, used to clad the exterior of a frame building. Clapboards are attached horizontally, each one overlapping the next one down. They are six to eight inches in width, diminishing from about a 58 inch thickness at the lower edge to a fine upper edge

  • lapa (African architecture)

    African architecture: The 20th century: …and Pedi, with their decorated lapa (courtyard) walls and facades and their ziggurat details, have a colourful vitality. Although these decorations are mistakenly often thought to represent “traditional” architecture, such adornment emerged after the resettlement of populations during the apartheid era. Elsewhere, notably in Maputo, in Mozambique, and in Johannesburg,…

  • Lapai (Nigeria)

    Lapai, town and traditional emirate, southeastern Niger state, west-central Nigeria. It lies near the Gurara River, which is a tributary to the Niger River. It was originally inhabited by the Gbari (Gwari) people, who were subject to the Hausa kingdom of Zazzau and, after 1804, to the Fulani

  • laparoscope (medical device)

    laparoscopy: …an optical instrument called a laparoscope, which is inserted through a small incision made in the abdominal wall. The term comes from the Greek words laparo, meaning “flank,” and skopein, meaning “to examine.”

  • laparoscopic surgery (medicine)

    Laparoscopy, procedure that permits visual examination of the abdominal cavity with an optical instrument called a laparoscope, which is inserted through a small incision made in the abdominal wall. The term comes from the Greek words laparo, meaning “flank,” and skopein, meaning “to examine.” The

  • laparoscopy (medicine)

    Laparoscopy, procedure that permits visual examination of the abdominal cavity with an optical instrument called a laparoscope, which is inserted through a small incision made in the abdominal wall. The term comes from the Greek words laparo, meaning “flank,” and skopein, meaning “to examine.” The

  • laparotomy (surgery)

    Laparotomy, opening of the abdominal (or peritoneal) cavity. After laparotomy became reasonably safe, the whole field of abdominal surgery unfolded. Laparotomy requires (1) a safe cutting into the abdominal cavity through the skin, fat, muscles, muscular aponeuroses, and peritoneum in that order

  • Lapchick, Joe (American basketball player and coach)

    Joe Lapchick, American professional and collegiate basketball player and coach who was a major influence in both professional and collegiate basketball. Lapchick left high school in Yonkers in 1914 and played semiprofessional and professional basketball so successfully that at one point he was

  • Lapchick, Joseph Bohomiel (American basketball player and coach)

    Joe Lapchick, American professional and collegiate basketball player and coach who was a major influence in both professional and collegiate basketball. Lapchick left high school in Yonkers in 1914 and played semiprofessional and professional basketball so successfully that at one point he was

  • LAPD (law enforcement agency, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: Municipal services: The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) was, until about 1965, considered one of the most highly professional and best-run law agencies in the country. In the 1950s and early ’60s the department prided itself on its ability “to protect and to serve” the sprawling metropolis and…

  • Lapham, Lewis (American editor)

    Harper's Magazine: Under the editorship of Lewis Lapham, the magazine changed its format during the 1980s, adding a “Readings” section that featured an eclectic collection of reprints of interesting documents. It continued to publish original essays and fiction by prominent authors and maintained a generally liberal political philosophy. “Harper’s Index,” a…

  • Lapham, Silas (fictional character)

    Silas Lapham, fictional character, the self-made protagonist of William Dean Howells’s novel The Rise of Silas Lapham

  • Lapi (region, Europe)

    Lapland, region of northern Europe largely within the Arctic Circle, stretching across northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland and into the Kola Peninsula of Russia. It is bounded by the Norwegian Sea on the west, the Barents Sea on the north, and the White Sea on the east. Lapland, the conventional

  • lapiaz (geology)

    Lapiés, weathered limestone surface found in karst regions and consisting of etched, fluted, and pitted rock pinnacles separated by deep grooves. This rugged surface is formed by the solution of rock along joints and areas of greater solubility by water containing carbonic and humic acids. It is

  • Lapid, Tommy (Israeli journalist and politician)

    Yosef Lapid, (Tomislav Lampel; “Tommy”), Israeli journalist and politician (born Dec. 27, 1931, Novi Sad, Yugos. [now in Serbia]—died June 1, 2008, Tel Aviv, Israel), enjoyed a successful career in journalism that spanned print media, radio, and television; he used his reputation as a journalist as

  • Lapid, Yair (Israeli journalist, television personality, and politician)

    Yair Lapid, Israeli journalist, television personality, and politician. He served as Israel’s minister of finance from 2013 to 2014. Lapid was raised in Tel Aviv. His mother, Shulamit Lapid, was a writer, and his father, Yosef (Tommy) Lapid, was a journalist and commentator known for his outspoken

  • Lapid, Yosef (Israeli journalist and politician)

    Yosef Lapid, (Tomislav Lampel; “Tommy”), Israeli journalist and politician (born Dec. 27, 1931, Novi Sad, Yugos. [now in Serbia]—died June 1, 2008, Tel Aviv, Israel), enjoyed a successful career in journalism that spanned print media, radio, and television; he used his reputation as a journalist as

  • lapidary style (calligraphy)

    Lapidary style, in calligraphy, style of lettering characteristically used for inscription in marble or other stone by chisel strokes, as, for example, on Trajan’s Column in the Forum at Rome. The words of the inscription may be painted upon the stone slab first as a guide for the stonecutter, and

  • Lapidus, Edmond (French fashion designer)

    Ted Lapidus, (Edmond Lapidus), French fashion designer (born June 23, 1929, Paris, France—died Dec. 29, 2008, Cannes, France), revolutionized the Paris fashion world in the 1960s with the introduction of high-style blue jeans, ready-to-wear unisex clothing, the tailored military look for women,

  • Lapidus, Morris (American architect)

    Morris Lapidus, Ukrainian-born U.S. architect. He went to the U.S. as a child and grew up in New York City. After earning an architectural degree, he worked in New York architectural firms from 1928 to 1942. In 1942 Lapidus moved to Miami Beach, where he ran his own firm until 1986. He designed

  • Lapidus, Ted (French fashion designer)

    Ted Lapidus, (Edmond Lapidus), French fashion designer (born June 23, 1929, Paris, France—died Dec. 29, 2008, Cannes, France), revolutionized the Paris fashion world in the 1960s with the introduction of high-style blue jeans, ready-to-wear unisex clothing, the tailored military look for women,

  • LaPierre, Wayne (American gun rights activist)

    Oliver North: …struggle with NRA chief executive Wayne LaPierre as regulators investigated the organization’s tax-exempt status amid allegations of financial improprieties. In 2019 North announced that he was resigning as president, noting that the NRA was in the midst of a “clear crisis.”

  • lapiés (geology)

    Lapiés, weathered limestone surface found in karst regions and consisting of etched, fluted, and pitted rock pinnacles separated by deep grooves. This rugged surface is formed by the solution of rock along joints and areas of greater solubility by water containing carbonic and humic acids. It is

  • lapilli (volcanic ejecta)

    Lapillus, unconsolidated volcanic fragment with a diameter between 4 and 32 mm (0.16 and 1.26 inches) that was ejected during a volcanic explosion. Lapilli may consist of fresh magma, solid magma from a prior eruption, or basement rocks through which the eruption passed. Accretionary lapilli are

  • lapillistone (geology)

    igneous rock: Important textural types: …lapilli and the rock is lapillistone; fragments greater than 64 millimetres are called bombs if rounded or blocks if angular, and the corresponding rock is termed agglomerate or pyroclastic breccia, respectively. Commonly, many of these pyroclastic rocks have been formed by dense hot clouds that hug the ground and behave…

  • lapillus (volcanic ejecta)

    Lapillus, unconsolidated volcanic fragment with a diameter between 4 and 32 mm (0.16 and 1.26 inches) that was ejected during a volcanic explosion. Lapilli may consist of fresh magma, solid magma from a prior eruption, or basement rocks through which the eruption passed. Accretionary lapilli are

  • lapin (animal fibre)

    Rabbit hair, animal fibre obtained from the Angora rabbit and the various species of the common rabbit. Rabbits have coats consisting of both long, protective guard hairs and a fine insulating undercoat. The fibre of the Angora rabbit (so named for the resemblance of its pelt to that of the Angora

  • Lapine, James (American playwright and director)

    Stephen Sondheim: Sondheim next collaborated with playwright-director James Lapine to create Sunday in the Park with George (1984), a musical inspired by the painting Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte by pointillist Georges Seurat. Sondheim and Lapine paired again for Into the Woods (1987; film 2014), which deconstructs and…

  • lapis lazuli (gemstone)

    Lapis lazuli, semiprecious stone valued for its deep blue colour. The source of the pigment ultramarine (q.v.), it is not a mineral but a rock coloured by lazurite (see sodalite). In addition to the sodalite minerals in lapis lazuli, small amounts of white calcite and of pyrite crystals are

  • Lapita culture

    Lapita culture, cultural complex of what were presumably the original human settlers of Melanesia, much of Polynesia, and parts of Micronesia, and dating between 1600 and 500 bce. It is named for a type of fired pottery that was first extensively investigated at the site of Lapita in New Caledonia.

  • Lapita ware (pottery)

    Fiji: History: …style of pottery known as Lapita ware. That pottery is generally associated with peoples who had well-developed skills in navigation and canoe building and were horticulturists. From Fiji the Lapita culture was carried to Tonga and Samoa, where the first distinctively Polynesian cultures evolved. Archaeological evidence suggests that two other…

  • Lapith (Greek mythology)

    Pirithous: Pirithous originally belonged to the Lapiths, a northern mountain tribe, and probably his earliest legend was that of his marriage to Hippodamia (daughter of Butes the beemaster). The Centaurs, who had come to the wedding as guests, in drunken fury tried to violate the bride and her attendants; this led…

  • Lapithos (ancient city, Cyrpus)

    Cyprus: Greek immigration: Soli (Greek: Soloi), Lapithos, and Salamis. About 800 bce a Phoenician colony was founded at Citium (Greek: Kition), near modern Larnaca, as a dependency of the mother city, Tyre. A seventh kingdom, Amathus, remained for some time under the control of the earlier indigenous

  • Laplace operator (mathematics)

    Navier-Stokes equation: …viscosity, and ?2 is the Laplacian operator (see Laplace’s equation).

  • Laplace transform (mathematics)

    Laplace transform, in mathematics, a particular integral transform invented by the French mathematician Pierre-Simon Laplace (1749–1827), and systematically developed by the British physicist Oliver Heaviside (1850–1925), to simplify the solution of many differential equations that describe

  • Laplace’s equation (mathematics)

    Laplace’s equation, second-order partial differential equation widely useful in physics because its solutions R (known as harmonic functions) occur in problems of electrical, magnetic, and gravitational potentials, of steady-state temperatures, and of hydrodynamics. The equation was discovered by

  • Laplace, Pierre-Simon, marquis de (French scientist and mathematician)

    Pierre-Simon, marquis de Laplace, French mathematician, astronomer, and physicist who was best known for his investigations into the stability of the solar system. Laplace successfully accounted for all the observed deviations of the planets from their theoretical orbits by applying Sir Isaac

  • Laplacian operator (mathematics)

    Navier-Stokes equation: …viscosity, and ?2 is the Laplacian operator (see Laplace’s equation).

  • Lapland (region, Europe)

    Lapland, region of northern Europe largely within the Arctic Circle, stretching across northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland and into the Kola Peninsula of Russia. It is bounded by the Norwegian Sea on the west, the Barents Sea on the north, and the White Sea on the east. Lapland, the conventional

  • Lapland Nature Reserve (reserve, Russia)

    Lapland Nature Reserve, natural area set aside for research in the natural sciences in the western part of the Kola Peninsula, northwestern Russia. It lies west of Lake Imandra and has an area of 1,075 square miles (2,784 square km). The reserve was established (1930) mainly to protect the n

  • Lapland spitz (breed of dog)

    spitz: …the Greenland dog, and the Lapland spitz.

  • Laplander (people)

    Sami, any member of a people speaking the Sami language and inhabiting Lapland and adjacent areas of northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland, as well as the Kola Peninsula of Russia. The three Sami languages, which are mutually unintelligible, are sometimes considered dialects of one language. They

  • Laplandsky Zapovednik (reserve, Russia)

    Lapland Nature Reserve, natural area set aside for research in the natural sciences in the western part of the Kola Peninsula, northwestern Russia. It lies west of Lake Imandra and has an area of 1,075 square miles (2,784 square km). The reserve was established (1930) mainly to protect the n

  • Laporte, Pierre (Canadian statesman)

    Canada: Quebec separatism: …Cross, and Quebec’s labour minister, Pierre Laporte, who was subsequently murdered. Quebec’s government asked for federal intervention, prompting enactment of the War Measures Act, which suspended the usual civil liberties. Subsequently some 500 people were arrested, and troops were moved into Quebec. The Canadian public generally approved of the act,…

  • Laportea (plant genus)

    Urticaceae: …(Urtica), the wood nettles (Laportea), and the Australian stinging trees (Dendrocnide)—have stinging trichomes (plant hairs) that cause a painful rash upon contact. The long fibres in the stems of some species, such as ramie (Boehmeria nivea), are used in the textile industry.

  • Laportea moroides (plant)
  • Lapp (people)

    Sami, any member of a people speaking the Sami language and inhabiting Lapland and adjacent areas of northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland, as well as the Kola Peninsula of Russia. The three Sami languages, which are mutually unintelligible, are sometimes considered dialects of one language. They

  • Lapp language (language)

    Sami language, any of three members of the Finno-Ugric group of the Uralic language family, spoken by the Sami (Lapp) people in northern Finland, Sweden, and Norway and on the Kola Peninsula in Russia. The Sami languages, which are mutually unintelligible, are sometimes considered dialects of one l

  • Lappeenranta (Finland)

    Lappeenranta, city, southeastern Finland. Lappeenranta lies at the southern end of Lake Saimaa, northeast of Kotka. It was a major trade centre during the Middle Ages, with a municipal charter granted by Per Brahe, the Swedish governor-general of Finland, in 1649. A border fortress and the

  • Lappenberg, Johann Martin (German archivist)

    Johann Martin Lappenberg, German archivist who was also a prolific scholar of German and English history. Lappenberg was intended for his father’s profession, medicine, and studied in Edinburgh and London, where he conceived the ambition of entering British politics or serving in that country’s

  • lappet (insect)

    Lappet, any member of the insect genus Tolype of the Lasiocampidae family of moths (order Lepidoptera). The genus includes the eggars, named for their egg-shaped cocoons, and the tent caterpillars, which spin huge, tent-shaped communal webs in trees. Lappets in the larval stage have lateral lobes,

  • lappet weaving

    textile: Inlaid weave: Lappet weaving is generally confined to coarse pattern yarns and can be distinguished from swivel by its interlacing with weft rather than with warp yarns.

  • lappet-faced vulture (bird)

    vulture: Old World vultures: The lappet-faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotus), sometimes called the eared, or Nubian, vulture, is a huge Old World vulture of arid Africa. Being a metre tall, with a 2.7-metre (8.9-foot) wingspan, it dominates all other vultures when feeding. It is black and brown above and has a…

  • Lappi (region, Europe)

    Lapland, region of northern Europe largely within the Arctic Circle, stretching across northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland and into the Kola Peninsula of Russia. It is bounded by the Norwegian Sea on the west, the Barents Sea on the north, and the White Sea on the east. Lapland, the conventional

  • lapping abrasive

    abrasive: Other abrasive products: …more suitable for use as lapping abrasive or perhaps as sandblasting grain. For use in lapping and polishing, the abrasive is usually mixed with a vehicle such as mineral or seal oil. Polishing sticks consist of waxes or greases impregnated with various-sized abrasive grains, depending on the particular requirements of…

  • lapping machine

    machine tool: Lapping and honing machines: Lapping and honing operations are classified under the basic art of grinding. Lapping is a process in which a soft cloth impregnated with abrasive pastes or compounds is rubbed against the surface of a workpiece. Lapping is used to produce a high-quality…

  • Lappish (language)

    Sami language, any of three members of the Finno-Ugric group of the Uralic language family, spoken by the Sami (Lapp) people in northern Finland, Sweden, and Norway and on the Kola Peninsula in Russia. The Sami languages, which are mutually unintelligible, are sometimes considered dialects of one l

  • Lappland (region, Europe)

    Lapland, region of northern Europe largely within the Arctic Circle, stretching across northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland and into the Kola Peninsula of Russia. It is bounded by the Norwegian Sea on the west, the Barents Sea on the north, and the White Sea on the east. Lapland, the conventional

  • Lappland (province, Sweden)

    Lappland, landskap (province) of northern Sweden. Lappland is bounded on the west by Norway, on the north by Finland, on the east by the landskap (provinces) of Norrbotten and V?sterbotten, and on the south by those of ?ngermanland and J?mtland. Administratively it lies within the l?n (counties) of

  • lappmark (territorial subdivision, Sweden)

    Lappland: Territorial subdivisions called lappmark were established for the regulation and taxation of the fur trade. As Swedish cultivators settled the coastal provinces (V?sterbotten and Norrbotten) and began to move up the rivers into the interior, conflicts arose with the indigenous Sami. Twice, “limits of cultivation” were established by…

  • Lappo Movement (Finnish fascist movement)

    Lapua Movement, (1929–32), fascist movement in Finland that threatened the young state’s democratic institutions and for a time dictated the policies of the government. It was named for the parish of Lapua, where a fascist group disrupted a meeting of communists late in 1929. The movement,

  • lapse rate (meteorology)

    Lapse rate, rate of change in temperature observed while moving upward through the Earth’s atmosphere. The lapse rate is considered positive when the temperature decreases with elevation, zero when the temperature is constant with elevation, and negative when the temperature increases with

  • lapse, doctrine of (rules of succession)

    Doctrine of lapse, in Indian history, formula devised by Lord Dalhousie, governor-general of India (1848–56), to deal with questions of succession to Hindu Indian states. It was a corollary to the doctrine of paramountcy, by which Great Britain, as the ruling power of the Indian subcontinent,

  • Laptev Sea (sea, Arctic Ocean)

    Laptev Sea, marginal sea of the Arctic Ocean off the coast of Northern Siberia (Russia), bounded by the Taymyr Peninsula (Poluostrov) and the islands of Severnaya Zemlya on the west and by the New Siberian Islands and Kotelny Island on the east. It is connected in the west with the Kara Sea and i

  • Laptev, Dmitry (Russian explorer)

    Great Northern Expedition: …and the cousins Khariton and Dmitry Laptev charted the Siberian coast from the Taymyr Peninsula to the Kolyma River.

  • Laptev, Khariton (Russian explorer)

    Great Northern Expedition: …Siberian mainland, and the cousins Khariton and Dmitry Laptev charted the Siberian coast from the Taymyr Peninsula to the Kolyma River.

  • laptop computer

    electronics: Flat-panel displays: …strong demand for them in laptop computers, where the thinness of a flat-panel display is essential. Such displays have more than three million separate elements in the picture array, each of which must have separate means for its control. The control electronics is integrated into the display, for otherwise the…

  • Laptops v. Learning

    “Could you repeat the question?” As I discussed in a Washington Post op-ed more than 10 years ago, that used to be the most common response from my law students at Georgetown University. It was inevitably asked while the student, called upon for a response in the Socratic method that I, like most

  • Lapu-Lapu (Philippines)

    Lapu-Lapu, city, northwestern Mactan Island, Philippines. It is located on a narrow channel of the Bohol Strait opposite Cebu City. Formerly called Opon, the city was renamed in honour of Chief Lapulapu, who, on April 27, 1521, killed the Portuguese navigator and explorer Ferdinand Magellan. The

  • Lapua Movement (Finnish fascist movement)

    Lapua Movement, (1929–32), fascist movement in Finland that threatened the young state’s democratic institutions and for a time dictated the policies of the government. It was named for the parish of Lapua, where a fascist group disrupted a meeting of communists late in 1929. The movement,

  • lapwing (bird)

    Lapwing, any of numerous species of birds of the plover family, Charadriidae (order Charadriiformes), especially the Eurasian lapwing, Vanellus vanellus, of farmlands and grassy plains. The name lapwing, which refers to the birds’ slow wingbeat, is sometimes applied broadly to members of the

  • Lapworth, Charles (British geologist)

    Charles Lapworth, English geologist who proposed what came to be called the Ordovician Period (about 488 million to 444 million years old) of geologic strata. In 1864 Lapworth became a schoolmaster at Galashiels and began his studies of the early Paleozoic strata of the Southern Uplands. He used

  • laqabi ware (pottery)

    Kāshān ware, in Islamic ceramics, a style of lustreware pottery associated with Kāshān, Persia (Iran), from about the beginning of the 11th century until the mid-14th century. It was derived from motifs in earlier textiles and is especially noted for the density and delicate execution of its

  • laqin (musical instrument)

    Yueqin, Chinese lute, one of a family of flat, round-bodied lutes found in Central and East Asia. The yueqin, which evolved from the ruan, has a length of some 18 inches (about 45 cm), with a short neck and a round resonator that is some 12 inches (30 cm) in diameter. It has two pairs of silk

  • laque burgauté (decorative art)

    Laque burgauté, in the decorative arts, East Asian technique of decorating lacquer ware with inlaid designs employing shaped pieces of the iridescent blue-green shell of the sea-ear (Haliotis). This shell inlay is sometimes engraved and occasionally combined with gold and silver. Workmanship is e

  • laquearius (gladiator class)

    gladiator: …suit of armour; and the laquearii (“lasso men”), who tried to lasso their antagonists.

  • lar (primate)

    gibbon: The lars, a group of species classified in the genus Hylobates, are the smallest and have the densest body hair. The dark-handed gibbon (H. agilis), which lives on Sumatra south of Lake Toba and on the Malay Peninsula between the Perak and Mudah rivers, may be…

  • Lār (Iran)

    Laristan: Lār, the chief town, lies at some 3,000 feet (900 metres) above sea level on a plain bordered by mountains separating the town from the Persian Gulf and on the road from Shīrāz to Bandar ?Abbās. Lār contains the Qaisarieh, a travelers’ lodge, and the…

  • Lar (Roman deities)

    Lar, in Roman religion, any of numerous tutelary deities. They were originally gods of the cultivated fields, worshipped by each household at the crossroads where its allotment joined those of others. Later the Lares were worshipped in the houses in association with the Penates, the gods of the s

  • Lara (state, Venezuela)

    Lara, estado (state), northwestern Venezuela. It was named for independence hero Gen. Juan Jacinto Lara. Bordered on the north by Falcón, east by Yaracuy, south by Portuguesa and Trujillo, and west by Zulia, the state lies in the Segovia Highlands, a hilly region plagued by recurring droughts.

  • Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life (film by de Bont [2003])

    Gerard Butler: In the adventure film Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life (2003), Butler garnered notice as a British marine-turned-mercenary, Terry Sheridan, opposite actress Angelina Jolie. He later starred as the title character in The Phantom of the Opera (2004), the film adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical, and…

  • Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (film by West [2001])

    Jon Voight: daughter, Angelina Jolie) in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider. Voight received a supporting actor Oscar nomination for his portrayal of the sports broadcaster Howard Cosell in the biopic Ali (2001). Voight’s later films included the fantasy Holes (2003) and the adventure movies National Treasure (2004) and Transformers

  • Lara Jonggrang (temple, Prambanan, Indonesia)

    Prambanan: …the complex is that of Lara Jonggrang, also called Candi Prambanan (Prambanan Temple) because of its close proximity to the village. These temples were designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1999.

  • Lara, Brian (Trinidadian cricketer)

    Brian Lara, West Indian cricketer, one of the sport’s most renowned contemporary players. The compact left-handed batsman is the record holder for most runs scored in an innings in both Test (international) and first-class cricket. One of a family of 11, a natural athlete, and a member of the

  • Lara, Brian Charles (Trinidadian cricketer)

    Brian Lara, West Indian cricketer, one of the sport’s most renowned contemporary players. The compact left-handed batsman is the record holder for most runs scored in an innings in both Test (international) and first-class cricket. One of a family of 11, a natural athlete, and a member of the

  • Lara, Gabriel de (Portuguese emissary)

    Paraná: …forces of a Portuguese emissary, Gabriel de Lara, in the 1640s. Gold was discovered at several locations in the 17th century and attracted settlers. Eventually recognized as belonging to Portugal’s sphere of influence, rather than Spain’s, the territory was attached at first to the captaincy of S?o Paulo and subsequently…

  • Lara, Guillermo Rodríguez (president of Ecuador)

    Alfredo Poveda Burbano: …the regime of Ecuadorian President Guillermo Rodríguez Lara in a bloodless coup on Jan. 11, 1976, and held power until the return to civilian rule in 1979. Poveda was vice admiral of the navy at the time.

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