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  • Lee Myung-Bak (president of South Korea)

    Lee Myung-Bak, South Korean business executive and politician who was president of South Korea from 2008 to 2013. He previously served as mayor of Seoul (2002–06). Lee was born in wartime Japan and was the fifth of seven children. In 1946 his family returned to Korea, but their boat capsized during

  • Lee Teng-hui (president of Taiwan)

    Lee Teng-hui, first Taiwan-born president of the Republic of China (Taiwan; 1988–2000). Lee attended Kyōto University in Japan and National Taiwan University (B.A., 1948) and studied agricultural economics in the United States at Iowa State University (M.A., 1953) and Cornell University (Ph.D.,

  • Lee Ufan (Korean artist, critic, philosopher, and poet)

    Lee Ufan, Korean artist, critic, philosopher, and poet who was a prominent theorist and proponent of the Tokyo-based movement of young artists from the late 1960s through the early ’70s known as Mono-ha (Japanese: “School of Things”). Lee built a body of artistic achievement across a wide range of

  • Lee v. Weisman (law case)

    Lee v. Weisman, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24, 1992, ruled (5–4) that it was unconstitutional for a public school in Rhode Island to have a member of the clergy deliver a prayer at graduation ceremonies. The court held that it violated the First Amendment’s establishment clause,

  • lee wave (air current)

    Lee wave, vertical undulation of airstreams on the lee side of a mountain. (The lee side is the side that is downstream from the wind.) The first wave occurs above the mountain that causes it, with a series of waves of equal horizontal wavelength extending downstream. Numerous equally spaced lee

  • Lee Woo-Hwan (Korean artist, critic, philosopher, and poet)

    Lee Ufan, Korean artist, critic, philosopher, and poet who was a prominent theorist and proponent of the Tokyo-based movement of young artists from the late 1960s through the early ’70s known as Mono-ha (Japanese: “School of Things”). Lee built a body of artistic achievement across a wide range of

  • Lee, Alan (British fantasy artist and set decorator)
  • Lee, Alvin (British musician)

    Alvin Lee, (Graham Alvin Barnes), British musician (born Dec. 19, 1944, Nottingham, Eng.—died March 6, 2013, Spain), as the lead singer and guitarist with the blues-rock band Ten Years After, wowed the massive crowd at the Woodstock Music and Art Fair in August 1969 with his scorching 11-minute

  • Lee, Andrew (American author)

    Louis Auchincloss, American novelist, short-story writer, and critic, best known for his novels of manners set in the world of contemporary upper-class New York City. Auchincloss studied at Yale University from 1935 to 1939 and graduated from the University of Virginia Law School in 1941. He was

  • Lee, Ang (Taiwan-born film director)

    Ang Lee, Taiwan-born film director who transitioned from directing Chinese films to major English-language productions. After high school Lee enrolled in the Taiwan Academy of Art, where he became interested in acting. In 1978 he moved to the United States to study theatre at the University of

  • Lee, Ann (American religious leader)

    Ann Lee, religious leader who brought the Shaker sect from England to the American Colonies. Lee was the unlettered daughter of a blacksmith who was probably named Lees. In her youth she went to work in a textile mill. At the age of 22 she joined a sect known as the Shaking Quakers, or Shakers,

  • Lee, Arthur (American musician)

    Arthur Lee, American singer-songwriter (born March/May 7, 1945, Memphis, Tenn.—died Aug. 3, 2006, Memphis), formed the influential interracial rock band Love, which bridged the gap between the shamanistic psychedelia of the Doors and the folk rock of the Byrds and Buffalo Springfield, its c

  • Lee, Arthur (American diplomat)

    Arthur Lee, diplomat who sought recognition and aid in Europe for the Continental Congress during the American Revolution. Lee gave up a medical practice for the study of law and then became interested in colonial politics. He wrote political tracts, among them a series of 10 essays called “The

  • Lee, Bernard (British actor)

    Dr. No: …by his boss, M (Bernard Lee), to Jamaica after a fellow agent is murdered while looking into the activities of a mysterious man named Dr. No (Joseph Wiseman), who owns a bauxite mine off the island’s coast. After arriving in Kingston, Bond meets CIA agent Felix Leiter (Jack Lord),…

  • Lee, Brandon (American actor)

    Bruce Lee: His son, Brandon, followed Lee into acting, and he died after being shot with a misloaded prop gun while filming The Crow (1994).

  • Lee, Bruce (American-born actor)

    Bruce Lee, American-born film actor who was renowned for his martial arts prowess and who helped popularize martial arts movies in the 1970s. Lee was born in San Francisco, but he grew up in Hong Kong. He was introduced to the entertainment industry at an early age, as his father was an opera

  • Lee, Byron (Jamaican bandleader)

    Byron Lee, (“The Dragon”), Jamaican bandleader (born June 27, 1935, Jamaica—died Nov. 4, 2008, Kingston, Jam.), helped take ska and soca music to a global audience with his band Byron Lee and the Dragonaires, which also included reggae in its repertoire. Lee, who initially began (1956) his musical

  • Lee, Chang-rae (Korean-American author)

    American literature: Multicultural writing: …and frustration; the Korean American Chang-rae Lee, who focused on family life, political awakening, and generational differences in Native Speaker (1995) and A Gesture Life (1999); and Ha Jin, whose Waiting (1999; National Book Award), set in rural China during and after the Cultural Revolution, was a powerful tale of…

  • Lee, Charles (American musician)

    Charlie Byrd, (Charles Lee), American jazz musician (born September 16, 1925, Chuckatuck, Virginia, U.S.—died December 2, 1999, Annapolis, Maryland), was schooled in both jazz and classical music; he played modern jazz on the (unamplified) Spanish guitar before the hit Stan Getz–Charlie Byrd album

  • Lee, Charles (American military officer)

    Ridgewood: …married (1782) and where General Charles Lee was court-martialed after his retreat at the Battle of Monmouth Court House (1778) during the American Revolution. In 1810 the community was called Newton, but its name was changed to Godwinville in 1829 to honour Abraham Godwin, a Revolutionary War hero. The coming…

  • Lee, Chris (Chinese singer and actor)

    Li Yuchun, Chinese singer and actress who became one of the country’s top pop stars after winning a nationally televised talent contest in 2005. Li (who calls herself Chris Lee or Chris Li in English) was born and raised in Chengdu, capital of Sichuan province in southern China. The daughter of a

  • Lee, Christopher (English actor)

    Christopher Lee, English actor known for his film portrayals of villains ranging from Dracula to J.R.R. Tolkien’s wizard Saruman. Lee was born to an Italian contessa and a British army officer. After a stint at Wellington College (1936–39), he joined the Royal Air Force (1941–46), attaining the

  • Lee, Cynthia (American poet)

    Cynthia Macdonald, American poet who employed a sardonic, often flippant tone and used grotesque imagery to comment on the mundane. Lee was educated at Bennington (Vermont) College (B.A., 1950); Mannes College of Music, New York City; and Lawrence College, Bronxville, New York (M.A., 1970). She

  • Lee, David M. (American physicist)

    David M. Lee, American physicist who, with Robert C. Richardson and Douglas D. Osheroff, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1996 for their joint discovery of superfluidity in the isotope helium-3. Lee received a bachelor’s degree from Harvard University in 1952 and a Ph.D. in physics from

  • Lee, David Morris (American physicist)

    David M. Lee, American physicist who, with Robert C. Richardson and Douglas D. Osheroff, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1996 for their joint discovery of superfluidity in the isotope helium-3. Lee received a bachelor’s degree from Harvard University in 1952 and a Ph.D. in physics from

  • Lee, Don Luther (American author, publisher and educator)

    Haki R. Madhubuti, African American author, publisher, and teacher. Lee attended several colleges in Chicago and graduate school at the University of Iowa (M.F.A., 1984); he also served in the U.S. Army (1960–63). He taught at various colleges and universities, in 1984 becoming a faculty member at

  • Lee, Edmund (British inventor)

    windmill: In 1745 Edmund Lee in England invented the automatic fantail. This consists of a set of five to eight smaller vanes mounted on the tailpole or the ladder of a post mill at right angles to the sails and connected by gearing to wheels running on a…

  • Lee, George Washington Custis (American educator)

    Arlington National Cemetery: …Civil War, Lee’s eldest son, George Washington Custis Lee, sued the federal government for confiscating the plantation. In 1882 the U.S. Supreme Court declared (5–4) that the federal government was a trespasser. Rather than disinter the more than 16,000 people buried at Arlington, however, the U.S. Congress purchased the land…

  • Lee, Gypsy Rose (American entertainer)

    Gypsy Rose Lee, American striptease artist, a witty and sophisticated entertainer who was one of the first burlesque artists to imbue a striptease with grace and style. Lee’s stage-mother manager, Madam Rose, put her daughters Rose (Gypsy) and June on stage at lodge benefits. Later, without June,

  • Lee, Harper (American writer)

    Harper Lee, American writer nationally acclaimed for her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960). Harper Lee is the daughter of Amasa Coleman Lee, a lawyer who was by all accounts apparently rather like the hero-father of her novel in his sound citizenship and warmheartedness. The plot of To Kill a

  • Lee, Henry (United States military officer)

    Henry Lee, American cavalry officer during the American Revolution. He was the father of Robert E. Lee and the author of the resolution passed by Congress upon the death of George Washington containing the celebrated apothegm “first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his

  • Lee, Ivy Ledbetter (American publicist)

    Ivy Ledbetter Lee, American pioneer of 20th-century public-relations methods, who persuaded various business clients to woo public opinion. A graduate of Princeton University, Lee worked as a newspaper reporter in New York City from 1899 to 1903, when he joined the staff of the Citizens’ Union. In

  • Lee, Janet (British politician)

    Jennie Lee, baroness of Asheridge, British politician, member of Parliament and of the Labour Party, known for promoting the arts as a serious government concern. Lee, the daughter of a coal miner who was active in the Independent Labour Party (ILP), graduated from the University of Edinburgh

  • Lee, Jason (Methodist leader)

    Oregon Trail: Missionaries, Mormons, and others: Led by Jason Lee, its members joined a party headed by New England merchant Nathaniel Wyeth. They largely followed the Platte River. At the Snake River, Wyeth built a post, Fort Hall, in Idaho (near present-day Pocatello), which was later bought by the Hudson’s Bay Company; it…

  • Lee, Jennie, Baroness of Asheridge (British politician)

    Jennie Lee, baroness of Asheridge, British politician, member of Parliament and of the Labour Party, known for promoting the arts as a serious government concern. Lee, the daughter of a coal miner who was active in the Independent Labour Party (ILP), graduated from the University of Edinburgh

  • Lee, John Clifford Hodges (United States Army officer)

    John Clifford Hodges Lee, U.S. Army logistics officer who oversaw the buildup of American troops and supplies in Great Britain in preparation for the Normandy Invasion (1944) during World War II. He was an early and outspoken proponent of racial integration of the U.S. armed forces. During a

  • Lee, John Doyle (American criminal)

    Mountain Meadows Massacre: …some Mormon settlers led by John Doyle Lee. The attackers, promising safe conduct, persuaded the emigrants to lay down their arms. Then, as the band of 137 proceeded southward toward Cedar City, they were ambushed, and all except the young children were massacred. Details of the atrocity leaked out, but…

  • Lee, Laurie (British author)

    Laurie Lee, English poet and prose writer best known for Cider with Rosie (1959), a memoir of the author’s boyhood in the Cotswold countryside. Educated in his home village and in nearby Stroud, Lee eventually moved to London and traveled in Spain in the mid-1930s. Upon his return to England, he

  • Lee, Light-Horse Harry (United States military officer)

    Henry Lee, American cavalry officer during the American Revolution. He was the father of Robert E. Lee and the author of the resolution passed by Congress upon the death of George Washington containing the celebrated apothegm “first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his

  • Lee, Lilian (Chinese author)

    Hong Kong literature: Some of the works of Li Bihua (English pen name: Lilian Lee) in the 1980s and 1990s can also be considered historical. The more renowned ones are Bawang bie ji (1985; Farewell My Concubine; film 1993), Qinyong (1989; “A Terra-cotta Warrior”), and Chuandao fangzi (1990; The Last Princess of Manchuria).

  • Lee, Madeleine (fictional character)

    Henry Adams: The heroine, Madeleine Lee, like Adams himself, becomes an intimate of Washington’s political circles. As confidante of a Midwestern senator, Madeleine is introduced to the democratic process. She meets the President and other figures who are equally vacuous. After her contact with the power brokers, Madeleine concluded:…

  • Lee, Manfred B. (American author)

    Ellery Queen, American cousins who were coauthors of a series of more than 35 detective novels featuring a character named Ellery Queen. Dannay and Lee first collaborated on an impulsive entry for a detective-story contest; the success of the result, The Roman Hat Mystery (1929), started Ellery

  • Lee, Mary Ann (American dancer)

    Mary Ann Lee, one of the first American ballet dancers. Her 10-year career included the first American performance of the classic ballet Giselle (Boston, 1846). Trained in Philadelphia by Paul Hazard of the Paris Opéra, Lee made her debut in 1837 with a fellow student, Augusta Maywood, in The Maid

  • Lee, Mary Ann Randolph Custis (wife of Robert E. Lee)

    Arlington National Cemetery: …Lee married Custis’s only daughter, Mary Ann Randolph, who inherited the Arlington estate upon her father’s death in 1857. On April 22, 1861, at the onset of the American Civil War, Lee left Arlington to join the army of the Confederacy. The area was quickly occupied by federal troops, who…

  • Lee, Michael Shumway (United States senator)

    Mike Lee, American politician who was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 2010 and began representing Utah in that body the following year. Lee was born into a Mormon family, and, while he was still an infant, they moved to Utah, where his father, Rex Lee, became the first dean of the

  • Lee, Mike (United States senator)

    Mike Lee, American politician who was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 2010 and began representing Utah in that body the following year. Lee was born into a Mormon family, and, while he was still an infant, they moved to Utah, where his father, Rex Lee, became the first dean of the

  • Lee, Nathaniel (English dramatist)

    Nathaniel Lee, English playwright whose heroic plays were popular but marred by extravagance. The son of a Presbyterian minister, Lee was educated at Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge. In London he tried to earn his living as an actor, but acute stage fright made this impossible.

  • Lee, Nelle Harper (American writer)

    Harper Lee, American writer nationally acclaimed for her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960). Harper Lee is the daughter of Amasa Coleman Lee, a lawyer who was by all accounts apparently rather like the hero-father of her novel in his sound citizenship and warmheartedness. The plot of To Kill a

  • Lee, Peggy (American singer and songwriter)

    Peggy Lee, American popular singer and songwriter, known for her alluring, delicately husky voice and reserved style. Lee lost her mother when she was very young, and the rest of her childhood was difficult. As a teenager, she began singing professionally on a Fargo, N.D., radio station, where a

  • Lee, Reginald (British ship lookout)

    Titanic: Final hours: Reginald Lee, were stationed in the crow’s nest of the Titanic. Their task was made difficult by the fact that the ocean was unusually calm that night: because there would be little water breaking at its base, an iceberg would be more difficult to spot.…

  • Lee, Richard Henry (United States statesman)

    Richard Henry Lee, American statesman. Educated in England at Wakefield Academy, Lee returned to America in 1751 and served as a justice of the peace in Westmoreland county, Va. He also served in the Virginia House of Burgesses (1758–75). Lee opposed arbitrary British policies at the time of the

  • Lee, River (river, England, United Kingdom)

    River Lea, river rising north of Luton in the county of Bedfordshire, England. It flows for 46 miles (74 km) east and then south to enter the River Thames near Bromley-by-Bow, in the London borough of Tower Hamlets. In the 17th century an important aqueduct known as the New River was constructed in

  • Lee, Robert E. (Confederate general)

    Robert E. Lee, Confederate general, commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, the most successful of the Southern armies during the American Civil War (1861–65). In February 1865 he was given command of all the Southern armies. His surrender at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, is commonly

  • Lee, Robert Edward (Confederate general)

    Robert E. Lee, Confederate general, commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, the most successful of the Southern armies during the American Civil War (1861–65). In February 1865 he was given command of all the Southern armies. His surrender at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, is commonly

  • Lee, Robert Edward (Confederate general)

    Robert E. Lee, Confederate general, commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, the most successful of the Southern armies during the American Civil War (1861–65). In February 1865 he was given command of all the Southern armies. His surrender at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, is commonly

  • Lee, Rowland V. (American director)

    Rowland V. Lee, American film director of silent and sound pictures who worked in a variety of genres. Born to stage-veteran parents, Lee began performing at an early age. In 1917 he started acting in films, but, after serving in the military during World War I, he returned to Hollywood intent on

  • Lee, Rowland Vance (American director)

    Rowland V. Lee, American film director of silent and sound pictures who worked in a variety of genres. Born to stage-veteran parents, Lee began performing at an early age. In 1917 he started acting in films, but, after serving in the military during World War I, he returned to Hollywood intent on

  • Lee, Sammy (American diver)

    Sammy Lee, American diver, the first Asian American man to win an Olympic gold medal and the first diver to win consecutive Olympic gold medals in the platform event. While growing up, Lee, the son of Korean immigrants, faced racial prejudice and was permitted to use his community’s public pool

  • Lee, Shelton Jackson (American director)

    Spike Lee, American filmmaker known for his uncompromising, provocative approach to controversial subject matter. The son of the jazz composer Bill Lee, he was reared in a middle-class Brooklyn neighbourhood. He majored in communications at Atlanta’s Morehouse College, where he directed his first

  • Lee, Sherman Emery (American museum director)

    Sherman Emery Lee, American museum director (born April 19, 1918, Seattle, Wash.—died July 9, 2008, Chapel Hill, N.C.), elevated the Cleveland Museum of Art from a relatively obscure institution to an internationally renowned art museum by expanding its collection to include exquisite Asian

  • Lee, Sir Christopher Frank Carandini (English actor)

    Christopher Lee, English actor known for his film portrayals of villains ranging from Dracula to J.R.R. Tolkien’s wizard Saruman. Lee was born to an Italian contessa and a British army officer. After a stint at Wellington College (1936–39), he joined the Royal Air Force (1941–46), attaining the

  • Lee, Spike (American director)

    Spike Lee, American filmmaker known for his uncompromising, provocative approach to controversial subject matter. The son of the jazz composer Bill Lee, he was reared in a middle-class Brooklyn neighbourhood. He majored in communications at Atlanta’s Morehouse College, where he directed his first

  • Lee, Stan (American comic book writer)

    Stan Lee, American comic book writer best known for his work with Marvel Comics. Among the hundreds of characters and teams that he helped to create were the Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, the Avengers, and the X-Men. After graduating from high school at age 16, Lieber was hired as an editorial

  • Lee, Tancy (Scottish boxer)

    Jimmy Wilde: …during the 17th round against Tancy Lee of Scotland. After regaining the European title, Wilde fought the American flyweight champion, Young Zulu Kid (Giuseppe Di Melfi), on Dec. 18, 1916. With his 11th-round knockout, Wilde became the first world flyweight champion, a title that he held until he was knocked…

  • Lee, Tsung-Dao (Chinese-American physicist)

    Tsung-Dao Lee, Chinese-born American physicist who, with Chen Ning Yang, received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1957 for work in discovering violations of the principle of parity conservation (the quality of space reflection symmetry of subatomic particle interactions), thus bringing about major

  • Lee, Vernon (English essayist)

    Vernon Lee, English essayist and novelist who is best known for her works on aesthetics. Paget was born to cosmopolitan and peripatetic intellectuals who in 1873 settled their family in Florence. In 1878 she determined to publish under a masculine pseudonym in order to be taken seriously, and in

  • Lee, William (English inventor)

    William Lee, English inventor who devised the first knitting machine (1589), the only one in use for centuries. Its principle of operation remains in use. Lee, a clergyman at Calverton, is said to have developed the machine because a woman whom he was courting showed more interest in knitting than

  • Lee, William (American writer)

    William S. Burroughs, American writer of experimental novels that evoke, in deliberately erratic prose, a nightmarish, sometimes wildly humorous world. His sexual explicitness (he was an avowed and outspoken homosexual) and the frankness with which he dealt with his experiences as a drug addict won

  • Lee, Witness (Chinese religious leader)

    the Local Church: …one of the church’s elders, Witness Lee (1905–97), to lead the mission in Taiwan. Under Lee’s direction the church flourished and spread to neighbouring countries, eventually reaching the United States. There it attracted members from Chinese American communities and later from the general population. In 1962 Lee moved to California,…

  • Lee, Yuan T. (Taiwanese-American chemist)

    Yuan T. Lee, Taiwanese-American chemist who, with Dudley R. Herschbach and John C. Polanyi, received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1986 for his role in the development of chemical-reaction dynamics. Lee was educated in Taiwan and at the University of California at Berkeley (Ph.D., 1965). He did

  • Lee-Enfield rifle (weapon)

    Lee-Enfield rifle, rifle adopted by the British army as its basic infantry weapon in 1902. The short, magazine-loaded Lee-Enfield (Mark I, or SMLE) superseded the longer Lee-Enfield that was first produced in 1895. The short rifle had a length of 44.5 inches (111.6 cm) and combined the bolt action

  • Lee-Potter, Lynda (British journalist)

    Lynda Lee-Potter, (Lynda Higginson), British journalist (born May 2, 1935, Leigh, Lancashire, Eng.—died Oct. 20, 2004, Stoborough, Dorset, Eng.), was admired for her sharp wit, notorious for her derisive criticism of celebrities and other notable persons, and controversial for her attacks on such

  • Leeb, Wilhelm von (German general)

    Battle of France: Allied defenses and the German plan of attack: Wilhelm von Leeb’s Army Group C would demonstrate against the Maginot Line, and Gen. Fedor von Bock’s Army Group B would carry out the invasion of Belgium and the Netherlands. Allied armies would thus be drawn forward into Belgium in accordance with their expectations of…

  • leech (annelid)

    Leech, (subclass Hirudinea), any of about 650 species of segmented worms (phylum Annelida) characterized by a small sucker, which contains the mouth, at the anterior end of the body and a large sucker located at the posterior end. All leeches have 34 body segments. The length of the body ranges

  • Leech, John (British caricaturist)

    John Leech, English caricaturist notable for his contributions to Punch magazine. Leech was educated at Charterhouse, where he met William Makepeace Thackeray, who was to be his lifelong friend. He then began to study medicine but soon drifted into the artistic profession and in 1835 published

  • leechcraft (medical procedure)

    Leeching, the application of a living leech to the skin in order to initiate blood flow or deplete blood from a localized area of the body. Through the 19th century leeching was frequently practiced in Europe, Asia, and America to deplete the body of quantities of blood, in a manner similar to

  • leechee (fruit)

    Lychee, (Litchi chinensis), evergreen tree of the soapberry family (Sapindaceae), grown for its edible fruit. Lychee is native to Southeast Asia and has been a favourite fruit of the Cantonese since ancient times. The fruit is usually eaten fresh but can also be canned or dried. The flavour of the

  • leeching (medical procedure)

    Leeching, the application of a living leech to the skin in order to initiate blood flow or deplete blood from a localized area of the body. Through the 19th century leeching was frequently practiced in Europe, Asia, and America to deplete the body of quantities of blood, in a manner similar to

  • LEED (physics)

    electron diffraction: …techniques, such as LEEDX (low-energy electron diffraction), depend on these diffraction patterns to examine solids, liquids, and gases.

  • LEED standards (architecture)

    LEED? standards, a certification program devised in 1994 by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC; founded 1993) to encourage sustainable practices design and development by means of tools and criteria for performance measurement. It is “a voluntary, consensus-based, market-driven building rating

  • Leeder, Sigurd (British dancer)

    Rudolf Laban: Sigurd Leeder and Kurt Jooss, also pupils, further developed and made extensive use of eukinetics in their teaching and choreography.

  • Leedes, William (British explorer)

    Ralph Fitch: with John Newberry, John Eldred, William Leedes, and James Story, Fitch embarked in the Tiger and reached Syria in late April. (Act I, scene 3 of William Shakespeare’s Macbeth alludes to the trip.) From Aleppo (Syria), they went overland to the Euphrates, which they descended to Al-Fallūjah, now in Iraq,…

  • Leeds (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Leeds: …built-up area), city, and metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, historic county of Yorkshire, northern England. It lies along the River Aire about 30 miles (48 km) northeast of Manchester. The coal and iron ore deposits in the locality, a plentiful supply of soft water from the Aire’s tributaries,…

  • Leeds (England, United Kingdom)

    Leeds, urban area (from 2011 built-up area), city, and metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, historic county of Yorkshire, northern England. It lies along the River Aire about 30 miles (48 km) northeast of Manchester. The coal and iron ore deposits in the locality, a

  • Leeds and Liverpool Canal (canal, England, United Kingdom)

    canals and inland waterways: Technological development: …Bingley, for example, on the Leeds and Liverpool Canal, a lock staircase was built; and on the hilly areas at Ketley in Shropshire, inclined planes were constructed in 1788 to haul tugboats from one level to another. The longest plane, about 225 feet, was on the Hobbacott Down plane of…

  • Leeds Civic Hall (building, Leeds, England, United Kingdom)

    Leeds: …nearby on Millennium Square is Leeds Civic Hall (1933), which contains the city council chambers, the lord mayor’s office, and a banqueting hall. A newer and larger performance venue, first direct arena, opened in 2013. Another significant 21st-century addition to Leeds’s architectural landscape is the Trinity Leeds shopping centre, which…

  • Leeds Corn Exchange (building, Leeds, England, United Kingdom)

    Leeds: The Leeds Corn Exchange (1864), a masterpiece of Victorian architecture, was designed by Cuthbert Brodrick—as was Leeds Town Hall (1858), envisioned as a municipal palace and dedicated by Queen Victoria but now principally a concert and performance venue. Located nearby on Millennium Square is Leeds Civic…

  • Leeds Intelligencer (British newspaper)

    Yorkshire Post, daily newspaper that is the chief Conservative paper published in England outside London. It is one of the most prestigious provincial papers in Britain. The Post is descended from the Leeds Intelligencer, a four-page weekly founded in Leeds, Yorkshire, England, by Griffith Knight

  • Leeds Times (British publication)

    Samuel Smiles: …edited the progressive and reformist Leeds Times. His radicalism was a practical application of the doctrines of the utilitarian philosophers (“philosophical radicals”) Jeremy Bentham and James Mill. He was a zealous advocate of material progress based on individual enterprise and free trade. From 1845 to 1866 he was engaged in…

  • Leeds Town Hall (building, Leeds, England, United Kingdom)

    Leeds: …designed by Cuthbert Brodrick—as was Leeds Town Hall (1858), envisioned as a municipal palace and dedicated by Queen Victoria but now principally a concert and performance venue. Located nearby on Millennium Square is Leeds Civic Hall (1933), which contains the city council chambers, the lord mayor’s office, and a banqueting…

  • Leeds, Thomas Osborne, 1st Duke of (English statesman)

    Thomas Osborne, 1st duke of Leeds, English statesman who, while chief minister to King Charles II, organized the Tories in Parliament. In addition he played a key role in bringing William and Mary to the English throne in 1689. The son of a Royalist Yorkshire landowner, Osborne did not become

  • Leeds, Thomas Osborne, 1st Duke of, Marquess of Carmarthen, Earl of Danby, Viscount Latimer of Danby, Viscount Osborne of Dunblane, Baron Osborne of Kiveton (English statesman)

    Thomas Osborne, 1st duke of Leeds, English statesman who, while chief minister to King Charles II, organized the Tories in Parliament. In addition he played a key role in bringing William and Mary to the English throne in 1689. The son of a Royalist Yorkshire landowner, Osborne did not become

  • LEEDX (physics)

    electron diffraction: …techniques, such as LEEDX (low-energy electron diffraction), depend on these diffraction patterns to examine solids, liquids, and gases.

  • Leedy, U. G. (American musician)

    marimba: Deagan and U.G. Leedy. It is a tube-resonated instrument pitched an octave below the orchestral xylophone; its range varies, but 312octaves upward from the C below middle C is common. Players may hold two sticks in each hand to play up to four notes at a time.…

  • leek (plant)

    Leek, (Allium porrum), hardy biennial plant of the amaryllis family (Amaryllidaceae), grown as a vegetable. The leek is an ancient crop and is native to eastern Mediterranean lands and the Middle East. The plant is related to the onion and has a mild, sweet, onionlike flavour. Leek stalks are

  • Leek, Harold Clifford (American actor and singer)

    Howard Keel, (Harold Clifford Leek), American actor-singer (born April 13, 1919, Gillespie, Ill.—died Nov. 7, 2004, Palm Desert, Calif.), had a booming baritone voice that, combined with his good looks, gained him the lead roles in a succession of Hollywood musicals in the early 1950s opposite t

  • Leerdam (Netherlands)

    glassware: Belgium and the Netherlands: The Dutch glassworks at Leerdam played an important part in the modern movement and followed a line of development distinct from that of the Scandinavian factories. In 1915 the decision was made to invite designs from artists, and by the early 1920s excellent simple tablewares were being made to…

  • lees (fermentation sediment)

    wine: Postfermentation treatment: …found in the sediment, or lees. Separation of the supernatant wine from the lees is called racking. The containers are kept full from this time on by “topping,” a process performed frequently, as the temperature of the wine, and hence its volume, decreases. During the early stages, topping is necessary…

  • Leese, Oliver (British general)

    World War II: The Italian front, 1944: …commanded by Major General Sir Oliver Leese, from the Adriatic flank of the peninsula to the west, where it was to strengthen the 5th Army’s pressure around Monte Cassino and on the approaches to the valley of the Liri (headstream of the Garigliano). The combined attack, which was started in…

  • Leeser, Isaac (American rabbi)

    Judaism: American Judaism: …head of the traditionalists was Isaac Leeser (1806–68), a native of Germany, who had attempted to create an indigenous American community along the lines of a modernized traditionalism. After his death, Conservative forces became disorganized, but, in reaction to Reform, they defined themselves by their attachment to the Sabbath, the…

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