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  • leeuw van Vlaanderen, De (work by Conscience)

    Hendrik Conscience: …De leeuw van Vlaanderen (1838; The Lion of Flanders), the passionate epic of the revolt of the Flemish towns against France and the victory of the Flemish militia at the Battle of the Golden Spurs (1302), he not only created the Flemish novel but wrote an outstanding historical novel in…

  • Leeuw, Gerardus van der (Dutch theologian)

    Gerardus van der Leeuw, Dutch Reformed theologian and historian of religions, who contributed significantly to the phenomenological (descriptive) analysis of religious experience. Leeuw proposed that a nonrational (mystical) tradition underlies the evolution of religious manifestations. He affirmed

  • Leeuwarden (Netherlands)

    Leeuwarden, gemeente (municipality), northern Netherlands. Leeuwarden lies at the junction of the Harlinger-Trek Canal and the Dokkumer Ee Canal. Originally a port on the Middelzee (reclaimed since the 13th century), it was chartered in 1435, became the capital of Friesland in 1504, and was from

  • Leeuwen, Denys van (Flemish theologian)

    Dionysius the Carthusian, theologian and mystic, one of the important contributors to, and propagators of, the influential school of Rhenish spirituality originating in the 14th century. Educated at the University of Cologne, Dionysius entered the Carthusian order at the charterhouse of Roermond in

  • Leeuwenhoek, Antonie van (Dutch scientist)

    Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, Dutch microscopist who was the first to observe bacteria and protozoa. His researches on lower animals refuted the doctrine of spontaneous generation, and his observations helped lay the foundations for the sciences of bacteriology and protozoology. At a young age,

  • Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park (national park, Western Australia, Australia)

    Devil's Lair: …in the dune limestone of Leeuwin–Naturaliste Ridge during the the Quaternary Period (about 2.6 million years ago to the present). The cave’s floor, composed of dozens of distinct layers, is an amalgam of thin, lightly cemented sandy strata, flowstone, limestone fragments, and stalagmitic masses. Since the 1970s, excavation in the…

  • Leeuwis, Denys de (Flemish theologian)

    Dionysius the Carthusian, theologian and mystic, one of the important contributors to, and propagators of, the influential school of Rhenish spirituality originating in the 14th century. Educated at the University of Cologne, Dionysius entered the Carthusian order at the charterhouse of Roermond in

  • Leeward Islands (islands, Cabo Verde)

    Sotavento Islands, island group in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of western Africa and the southern of two island groups that constitute Cabo Verde. The archipelago consists of the islands of Brava, Fogo, Maio, and Santiago, as well as the islets of Grande, Luís Carneiro, and Cima, together

  • Leeward Islands (islands, French Polynesia)

    ?les Sous le Vent, archipelago of five inhabited volcanic islands and four uninhabited, low-lying coral atolls constituting the western part of the Society Islands, French Polynesia, in the central South Pacific. Raiatea, the principal island, and neighbouring Tahaa are part of a single submarine

  • Leeward Islands (islands, West Indies)

    Leeward Islands, an arc of West Indian islands that constitute the most westerly and northerly of the Lesser Antilles, at the northeastern end of the Caribbean Sea, between latitudes 16° and 19° N and longitudes 61° and 65° W. The history of British, French, Spanish, and Dutch colonialism in the

  • Lefèbvre, Alexandre (French-American inventor)

    bicycle: Treadles and pedals: powered velocipedes: Documents indicate that Alexandre Lefèbvre of Saint-Denis, France, built a two-wheeled velocipede powered by treadles connected to cranks on the rear wheel in 1842. Lefèbvre took his velocipede with him when he immigrated to California in 1861, and it still exists there in the History San José museum.…

  • Lefèbvre, Anne (French scholar and translator)

    Anne Dacier, classical commentator, translator, and editor, famous throughout Europe for her translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey, for her part in the French literary controversy between the “ancients and moderns,” and for her work, with her husband, André Dacier, on the famous Delphin series

  • Lefebvre, Eugène (pilot)

    stunt flying: Eugène Lefebvre was the first engineer and chief pilot of the Wright company in France. (On September 7, 1909, Lefebvre was the first pilot to die in an airplane crash. In the text following, pilots who died when their airplanes crashed or in aerial combat…

  • Lefebvre, Fran?ois-Joseph, duc de Dantzig (French general)

    Fran?ois-Joseph Lefebvre, duke de Dantzig, French general who was one of the 18 marshals of the empire appointed by Napoleon in May 1804. Lefebvre, the son of an Alsatian miller, worked for a time as a clerk before entering a military career in the French Guards in 1773. A sergeant at the outbreak

  • Lefebvre, Georges (French historian)

    Georges Lefebvre, French historian noted for his studies of various aspects of the French Revolution. Lefebvre’s major work, Les Paysans du Nord pendant la Révolution fran?aise (1924; “The Peasants of the North During the French Revolution”), was the result of 20 years of research into the role of

  • Lefebvre, Jean-Fran?ois (French noble)

    French literature: The Enlightenment: …of Jean Calas and the chevalier de La Barre.

  • Lefebvre, Marcel-Fran?ois (French archbishop)

    Marcel Lefebvre, ultraconservative Roman Catholic archbishop who opposed the liberalizing changes begun by the Second Vatican Council (1962–65) and who was excommunicated in 1988 for consecrating new traditionalist bishops without the approval of the Holy See in Rome. He created the bishops in

  • Lefebvre, Pierre-Fran?ois-Joseph, duc de Dantzig (French general)

    Fran?ois-Joseph Lefebvre, duke de Dantzig, French general who was one of the 18 marshals of the empire appointed by Napoleon in May 1804. Lefebvre, the son of an Alsatian miller, worked for a time as a clerk before entering a military career in the French Guards in 1773. A sergeant at the outbreak

  • Lefèvre d’étaples, Jacques (French humanist and theologian)

    Jacques Lefèvre d’étaples, outstanding French humanist, theologian, and translator whose scholarship stimulated scriptural studies during the Protestant Reformation. Ordained a priest, Lefèvre taught philosophy in Paris from about 1490 to 1507. During visits to Italy in 1492 and 1500, he studied

  • Lefevre, Pierre (French theologian)

    Peter Faber, French Jesuit theologian and a cofounder of the Society of Jesus, who was tutor and friend of Ignatius Loyola at Paris. He was appointed professor of theology at Rome by Pope Paul III (1537), founded Jesuit colleges at Cologne and in Spain, and was a delegate to the Council of

  • Lefká Mountains (mountains, Greece)

    Lefká Mountains, highest and most precipitous massif in western Crete (Modern Greek: Kríti), located a few miles south of the Cretan capital, Chaniá, in the nomós (department) of Chaniá, Greece. The limestone peaks have been hollowed out by erosion into high plains such as the Omalós (1,650–3,300

  • Lefká, Mount (mountain, Greece)

    Lefká Mountains: The highest is Mount Lefká at 8,045 ft (2,452 m). The major stream rising from the Lefká is the Plataniás, which flows past Lákkoi northwestward into the Kólpos (gulf) Khaníon. The region is believed to be the last habitat of the Cretan agrimi, a wild goat. The Lefká…

  • Lefkáda (island, Greece)

    Leucas, Greek island in the Ionian Sea (Modern Greek: Ióvio Pélagos). It constitutes a dímos (municipality) and with the island of Meganísi forms the perifereiakí enótita (regional unit) of Levkás in the Ionian Islands (Iónia Nisiá) periféreia (region), western Greece. The 117-square-mile

  • Lefkandi (grave, Euboea, Greece)

    ancient Greek civilization: The post-Mycenaean period and Lefkandi: …uncovered at a site called Lefkandi on Euboea, the island along the eastern flank of Attica (the territory controlled by Athens). The grave, which dates to about 1000 bce, contains the (probably cremated) remains of a man and a woman. The large bronze vessel in which the man’s ashes were…

  • Lefkofsky, Eric (American entrepreneur)

    Andrew Mason: …the company’s founder, Chicago entrepreneur Eric Lefkofsky. In 2006 Mason earned a scholarship to attend the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy after creating Policy Tree, a visualization tool for policy debates.

  • Lefko?a (national capital, Cyprus)

    Nicosia, city and capital of the Republic of Cyprus. It lies along the Pedieos River, in the centre of the Mesaoria Plain between the Kyrenia Mountains (north) and the Troodos range (south). The city is also the archiepiscopal seat of the autocephalous (having the right to elect its own archbishop

  • Lefkosía (national capital, Cyprus)

    Nicosia, city and capital of the Republic of Cyprus. It lies along the Pedieos River, in the centre of the Mesaoria Plain between the Kyrenia Mountains (north) and the Troodos range (south). The city is also the archiepiscopal seat of the autocephalous (having the right to elect its own archbishop

  • Lefkowitz, Mary (American scholar)

    Afrocentrism: Criticism of Afrocentrism: …History (1996), the American classicist Mary Lefkowitz attempted to refute most of the assertions made by Bernal, Diop, and others.

  • Lefkowitz, Robert J. (American physician and biologist)

    Robert J. Lefkowitz, American physician and molecular biologist who demonstrated the existence of receptors—molecules that receive and transmit signals for cells. His research on the structure and function of cell-surface receptors—particularly of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest

  • Lefkowitz, Robert Joseph (American physician and biologist)

    Robert J. Lefkowitz, American physician and molecular biologist who demonstrated the existence of receptors—molecules that receive and transmit signals for cells. His research on the structure and function of cell-surface receptors—particularly of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest

  • Lefschetz, Solomon (American mathematician)

    mathematics: Algebraic topology: …then by the American engineer-turned-mathematician Solomon Lefschetz, concerning the nature of manifolds of arbitrary dimension. Roughly speaking, a manifold is the n-dimensional generalization of the idea of a surface; it is a space any small piece of which looks like a piece of n-dimensional space. Such an object is often…

  • left (ideology)

    Left, in politics, the portion of the political spectrum associated in general with egalitarianism and popular or state control of the major institutions of political and economic life. The term dates from the 1790s, when in the French revolutionary parliament the socialist representatives sat to

  • Left Alone Revisited (album by Shepp and Waldron)

    Archie Shepp: …to release new material, including Left Alone Revisited (2002), a tribute with pianist Mal Waldron to jazz singer Billie Holiday, and Wo!man (2011), an album of duets with German pianist Joachim Kühn.

  • Left and Right Hand of Count Leo Tolstoy, The (essay by Mikhaylovsky)

    Nikolay Konstantinovich Mikhaylovsky: …most celebrated pieces were “The Left and Right Hand of Count Leo Tolstoy” (1873), which accurately predicted Tolstoy’s later social doctrines, and “A Cruel Talent” (1882), a criticism of Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s The Possessed.

  • Left Bank (district, Paris, France)

    Paris: City site: …designation of Right Bank and Left Bank (when facing downstream). Specific places, however, are usually indicated by arrondissement or by quarter (quartier).

  • Left Bank (historical region, Ukraine)

    Ukraine: The Ruin: …the east, known as the Left Bank, together with Kyiv (which actually was located west of the river); the arrangement was confirmed in 1686 by the Treaty of Eternal Peace between Poland and Russia.

  • Left Bank Outfall Drain (waterway, Pakistan)

    Pakistan: The Indus River plain: …the World Bank, constructed the Left Bank Outfall Drain (LBOD) in the 1980s and ’90s. The intent was to build a large artificial waterway roughly east of and parallel to the Indus to carry salt water from the plains of Punjab and Sind (Sindh) provinces to the Arabian Sea coast…

  • Left Bank school (French film movement)

    Alain Resnais: …milieu was that of the Left Bank school of filmmakers, so called for their political philosophy as well as for a formidable intellectuality related to the cosmopolitan bohemianism of the Saint-Germain-des-Prés district, on the Left Bank of the Seine, in Paris. The orientation of this group was opposite to that…

  • Left Behind (film by Armstrong [2014])

    Nicolas Cage: …of an airline pilot in Left Behind (2014), an adaptation of Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins’s highly successful novel (1995) about the Rapture, and in Oliver Stone’s Snowden (2016) he was cast as a former intelligence officer. Cage also lent his voice to such animated films as The Croods…

  • Left Book Club (political book club)

    Sir Victor Gollancz: Through the Left Book Club, which he founded in 1936, he mobilized intellectuals and the public in the fight against fascism, and after World War II he was a leader in organizing relief efforts in Europe, especially in Germany, through the Save Europe Now campaign. At home…

  • Left Chamber (Japanese government)

    Dajōkan: …1871, into three chambers: a Left Chamber (Sa-in), the legislative body; a Right Chamber (U-in), which directed the various ministries; and a Central Chamber (Sei-in), which subsumed the powers of the other two chambers.

  • Left Communist (Russian political faction)

    Left Communist, in Soviet history, one of a group within the Communist Party which in the first half of 1918 opposed Lenin’s practical policies for preserving Communist rule in Russia. The group was led by Nikolay I. Bukharin. Rather than make peace, the Left Communists favoured waging a

  • Left Eye (American singer)

    Lisa Nicole Lopes, (“Left Eye”), American rap singer and songwriter (born May 27, 1971, Philadelphia, Pa.—died April 25, 2002, near La Ceiba, Honduras), was a member of the ultrasuccessful female rhythm-and-blues group TLC, which had sales in the multimillions and whose albums CrazySexyCool (

  • left fielder (baseball)

    baseball: Outfielders: The three outfield positions are left fielder, centre fielder, and right fielder. Outfielders must be able to judge the trajectory of flies and have enough speed to run to the point where the ball will come down. Batted or thrown balls that pass beyond the infielders along the ground must…

  • Left Front (political organization, India)

    Communist Party of India: …leftist parties to create the Left Front coalition, which formed governments in the states of West Bengal, Tripura, and, intermittently, Kerala. In Tamil Nadu the CPI was part of the ruling Democratic Progressive Alliance formed there in 2004. The party was also politically influential in the states of Andhra Pradesh…

  • Left Hand of Darkness, The (novel by Le Guin)

    The Left Hand of Darkness, science-fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin, published in 1969. The book, set on a frigid planet called Gethen, or Winter, is a vehicle for Le Guin’s Daoist view of the complementary nature of all relationships. Gethen is inhabited by a race of androgynous humans who may

  • Left Hegelians

    Friedrich Engels: Early life: … as expounded by the “Young Hegelians,” a group of leftist intellectuals, including the theologian and historian Bruno Bauer and the anarchist Max Stirner. They accepted the Hegelian dialectic—basically that rational progress and historical change result from the conflict of opposing views, ending in a new synthesis. The Young Hegelians…

  • left hemisphere (region of the brain)

    human intelligence: Hemispheric studies: … and others found that the left hemisphere is superior in analytical tasks, such as are involved in the use of language, while the right hemisphere is superior in many forms of visual and spatial tasks. Overall, the right hemisphere tends to be more synthetic and holistic in its functioning than…

  • Left Party (political party, Germany)

    Left Party, German political party that ruled East Germany as the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (SED) and now contests elections in united Germany. At the behest of the Soviet Union, the SED was formed in April 1946 through a merger of the German Communist and Social Democratic parties. For the

  • Left Party (political party, Sweden)

    Sweden: Political process: …Democratic Labour Party) and the Left Party (former Communist Party). The SAP is closely allied with the trade unions and was in power for a considerable part of the 20th century (1932–76 [except briefly in 1936] and 1982–91). At the end of the century and into the 21st century, power…

  • Left Party.PDS (political party, Germany)

    Left Party, German political party that ruled East Germany as the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (SED) and now contests elections in united Germany. At the behest of the Soviet Union, the SED was formed in April 1946 through a merger of the German Communist and Social Democratic parties. For the

  • Left Reform Party (political party, Denmark)

    Denmark: The Right and the Left: …1901 election, however, when the Left Reform Party (Venstrereformparti), an offshoot of the Left, came to power and what has become known in Denmark as the “Change of System” was introduced.

  • Left Socialist Revolutionaries (political party, Russia)

    Socialist Revolutionary Party: Its radical wing (Left Socialist Revolutionaries) formed a splinter group that participated in the Bolshevik government until its representatives were expelled in July 1918 at the fifth Congress of the Soviets. The SR was suppressed by Lenin after the Bolshevik victory in the Civil War.

  • left ventricular assist device (medicine)

    cardiovascular disease: Therapy: …of obtaining a donor heart, left ventricular assist devices have been developed to increase patient survival while awaiting a transplant. These devices work by taking part of the blood from the left ventricle and mechanically pumping it into the arterial circulation. This mechanical assistance reduces the amount of work required…

  • left ventriculography (medicine)

    human cardiovascular system: Angiocardiography and arteriography: Left ventriculography (X-ray pictures of the left ventricle) provides information about the synchrony and adequacy of the forces of contraction in areas of the left ventricle. Arteriography (X-ray pictures of an artery after the injection of dyes that are opaque to X-rays) of the coronary…

  • left wing (ideology)

    Left, in politics, the portion of the political spectrum associated in general with egalitarianism and popular or state control of the major institutions of political and economic life. The term dates from the 1790s, when in the French revolutionary parliament the socialist representatives sat to

  • Left, the (political party, Denmark)

    Denmark: Political process: …Party (Konservative Folkeparti) and the Liberal Party (Venstre) ruled until 1993, when the Social Democrats regained power. A centre-right Liberal-Conservative coalition held power from 2001 to 2011, when a centre-left coalition led by the Social Democrats took the reins of government. Other prominent parties include the right-wing Danish People’s Party…

  • left-eyed flounder (fish family)

    pleuronectiform: Annotated classification: Family Bothidae (left-eyed flounders) Eyes sinistral; anus generally far up on blind side; gill membranes connected; dorsal and anal fin rays shortened posteriorly; two series of intramuscular bones; pelvic fin bases on ocular side long, on blind side shorter, 6-fin rays in all but 1 species.…

  • Left-Handed Gun, The (film by Penn [1958])

    Arthur Penn: Early films: …his screen directing debut with The Left Handed Gun (1958), a psychological retelling of the legend of gunfighter Billy the Kid. Paul Newman essayed the title role, which he had played in the 1955 Philco Playhouse production on which the film was based (Gore Vidal wrote both versions). Although the…

  • Left-Handed Liberty (work by Arden)

    John Arden: Left-Handed Liberty (1965), written to mark the 750th anniversary of the signing of Magna Carta, characteristically dwells on the failure of the document to achieve liberty. His writing became more politically committed, as evidenced in the two radio plays The Bagman (1972) and Pearl (1978).…

  • left-handed quartz (mineral)

    silica mineral: Quartz: …to occur as two types: left-handed or right-handed (enantiomorphism). Left-handed quartz is less than 1 percent more abundant than right-handed quartz. The structural tetrahedrons spiral upward through the crystal in the sense of the handedness parallel to the c axis. Similarly, if polarized light is transmitted by a quartz crystal…

  • Left-Handed Woman, The (novel by Handke)

    Peter Handke: Die linksh?ndige Frau (1976; The Left-Handed Woman) is a dispassionate description of a young mother coping with the disorientation she feels after she has separated from her husband. Handke’s memoir about his deceased mother, Wunschloses Unglück (1972; “Wishless Un-luck”; Eng. trans. A Sorrow Beyond Dreams), is also an effective…

  • left-handedness (physiology)

    laterality: …to classify persons as right-handed, left-handed, or ambidextrous (two-handed). People differ considerably in the range of activities for which they prefer a given hand as well as in the degree of disparity in skill between their two hands. Probably no one favours either the right or left hand exclusively.

  • left-heart catheterization (medicine)

    human cardiovascular system: Left-heart catheterization: Left-heart catheterization is accomplished by introducing a catheter into the brachial or femoral artery (in the upper arm and thigh, respectively) and advancing it through the aorta across the aortic valve and into the left ventricle. Mitral and aortic valvular defects and myocardial…

  • Left-Wing Writers, League of (Chinese literary society)

    Chinese literature: 1927–37: …the Zuoyi Zuojia Lianmeng (“League of Left-Wing Writers”), whose membership included many influential writers. Lu Xun, the prime organizer and titular head throughout the league’s half decade of activities, had stopped writing fiction in late 1925 and, after moving from Beijing to Shanghai in 1927, directed most of his…

  • Leftist Surge in Latin America, A

    The visit of Venezuelan Pres. Hugo Chávez (see Biographies) to New York City in September 2005 provided a dramatic illustration of the growing power of populist leaders in Latin America. Having positioned himself as a champion of the poor throughout the region, Chávez sought to take the same

  • Leftist Writers, League of (Chinese literary society)

    Chinese literature: 1927–37: …the Zuoyi Zuojia Lianmeng (“League of Left-Wing Writers”), whose membership included many influential writers. Lu Xun, the prime organizer and titular head throughout the league’s half decade of activities, had stopped writing fiction in late 1925 and, after moving from Beijing to Shanghai in 1927, directed most of his…

  • Lefuel, Hector-Martin (French architect)

    Hector-Martin Lefuel, French architect who completed the new Louvre in Paris, a structure that was seen as a primary symbol of Second Empire architecture in the late 19th century. Lefuel was the son of a building contractor. He studied with Jean-Nicolas Huyot and received the Prix de Rome of the

  • leg (anatomy)

    Leg, limb or appendage of an animal, used to support the body, provide locomotion, and, in modified form, assist in capturing and eating prey (as in certain shellfish, spiders, and insects). In four-limbed vertebrates all four appendages are commonly called legs, but in bipedal animals, including

  • leg before wicket (cricket)

    cricket: Methods of dismissal: The batsman is out “leg before wicket” (lbw) if he intercepts with any part of his person (except his hand) that is in line between wicket and wicket a ball that has not first touched his bat or his hand and that has or would have pitched (hit the…

  • leg bye (sport)

    cricket: Extras: …make good a run); (2) leg byes (when in similar circumstances the ball has touched any part of the batsman’s body except his hand); (3) wides (when a ball passes out of reach of the striker); (4) no balls (improperly bowled balls; for a fair delivery the ball must be…

  • leg glance (cricket)

    cricket: Batting: …back before playing the ball; leg glance (or glide), in which the ball is deflected behind the wicket on the leg side; cut, in which the batsman hits a ball on the uprise (after it has hit the ground on the off side), square with or behind the wicket; and…

  • leg side (cricket)

    cricket: Strategy and technique: …divided lengthwise into off and on, or leg, sides in relation to the batsmen’s stance, depending upon whether he bats right- or left-handed; the off side is the side facing the batsman, and the on, or leg, side is the side behind him as he stands to receive the ball.…

  • Leg to Stand On, A (work by Sacks)

    Oliver Sacks: …a saga he related in A Leg to Stand On (1984). Sacks took care to illuminate the existential as well as pathological conditions of his patients in works such as The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1986). While most critics found his descriptions of the often strange…

  • leg tricep (anatomy)

    Gastrocnemius muscle, large posterior muscle of the calf of the leg. It originates at the back of the femur (thighbone) and patella (kneecap) and, joining the soleus (another muscle of the calf), is attached to the Achilles tendon at the heel. Action of the gastrocnemius pulls the heel up and thus

  • leg-spin (cricket)

    Shane Warne: …promoted the almost-forgotten art of leg-spin and brought variety to a sport that had been dominated by fast bowling. In 2006 he became the first bowler to take 700 Test wickets.

  • Lega (people)

    African art: Northern cultural area: The Lega, who inhabit the area between the Luba and the northernmost peoples, have produced figures and masks, mostly carved from ivory in a schematic style. These objects are used, together with a vast assemblage of artifacts and natural objects, in the initiation to successive grades…

  • Lega Italica (Italian history)

    Peace of Lodi: …maintain existing boundaries, and an Italian League (Lega Italica) was set up. The states of the league promised to defend one another in the event of attack and to support a contingent of soldiers to provide military aid. The league, officially proclaimed by Pope Nicholas V on March 2, 1455,…

  • Lega Lombarda (Italian history)

    Lombard League, league of cities in northern Italy that, in the 12th and 13th centuries, resisted attempts by the Holy Roman emperors to reduce the liberties and jurisdiction of the communes of Lombardy. Originally formed for a period of 20 years on Dec. 1, 1167, the Lombard League initially

  • Lega Nord (political party, Italy)

    Umberto Bossi: …was leader (1991–2012) of the Northern League (Lega Nord) party.

  • Lega, Silvestro (Italian artist)

    Macchiaioli: …his usually socially conscious scenes; Silvestro Lega (1826–95), who combined a clearly articulated handling of colour patches with a poetic feeling for his subject; and Raffaello Sernesi (1838–66) and Giuseppe Abbati (1836–68), both of whom also used colour in a highly original manner.

  • legacy (law)

    Legacy, in law, generally a gift of property by will or testament. The term is used to denote the disposition of either personal or real property in the event of death. In Anglo-American law, a legacy of an identified object, such as a particular piece of real estate, or a described object of p

  • Legacy of Cain, The (work by The Living Theatre)

    The Living Theatre: A collaborative play cycle entitled The Legacy of Cain was the focus of The Living Theatre’s performances in the 1970s. For this work, they shunned the usual theatrical venues, instead performing for free in public spaces and in such unusual places as the site of a Pittsburgh steel mill, a…

  • Legacy of Spies, A (novel by le Carré)

    John le Carré: A Legacy of Spies (2017) revisits The Spy Who Came In from the Cold and features both old and new characters. Agent Running in the Field (2019) is an espionage tale set in 2018, and it incorporates such topical events as “Brexit” (the British withdrawal…

  • Legacy, The (poem by Villon)

    Fran?ois Villon: Life: …himself entitled Le Lais (The Legacy). It takes the form of a list of “bequests,” ironically conceived, made to friends and acquaintances before leaving them and the city. To his barber he leaves the clippings from his hair; to three well-known local usurers, some small change; to the clerk…

  • legal aid (law)

    Legal aid, the professional legal assistance given, either at no charge or for a nominal sum, to indigent persons in need of such help. In criminal cases most countries—especially those in which a person accused of a crime enjoys a presumption of innocence—provide the services of a lawyer for

  • Legal and Social Studies, Centre for (Argentine organization)

    Emilio Fermin Mignone: … (“disappeared persons”), Mignone founded the Centre for Legal and Social Studies in 1979. His wife became a founding member of the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo, a group of mothers of the disappeared who held weekly vigils for their children in a plaza opposite the presidential palace in Buenos…

  • legal anthropology (anthropology)

    anthropology: Political and legal anthropology: While the intellectual and methodological roots of political anthropology can be traced to Montesquieu and Alexis de Tocqueville, who viewed politics and governance as cultural constructs, Elizabeth Colson dated the modern field of political anthropology to 1940 and the publication of African Political…

  • legal association (law)

    Bar association, group of attorneys, whether local, national, or international, that is organized primarily to deal with issues affecting the legal profession. In general, bar associations are concerned with furthering the best interests of lawyers. This may mean the advocacy of reforms in the l

  • legal code (law)

    Law code, a more or less systematic and comprehensive written statement of laws. Law codes were compiled by the most ancient peoples. The oldest extant evidence for a code is tablets from the ancient archives of the city of Ebla (now at Tell Mardikh, Syria), which date to about 2400 bc. The best

  • Legal Debate over Same-Sex Marriages, The

    Same-sex marriage came to the United States in 2004. The Massachusetts Supreme Court decided in November 2003 that the denial of marriage licenses to same-sex couples violated the state constitution and gave the state six months to comply with its order. The state consequently started issuing the

  • legal deposit

    library: National libraries: Most national libraries receive, by legal right (known in English as legal, or copyright, deposit), one free copy of each book and periodical printed in the country. Certain other libraries throughout the world share this privilege, though many of them receive their legal deposit only by requesting it.

  • Legal Eagles (film by Reitman [1986])

    Brian Dennehy: (1985), Cocoon (1985), F/X (1986), Legal Eagles (1986), and Presumed Innocent (1990).

  • legal education

    Legal education, preparation for the practice of law. Instruction in law has been offered in universities since medieval times, but, since the advent of university-based law schools in the 18th and 19th centuries, legal education has faced the challenge of reconciling its aim of teaching law as one

  • legal ethics

    Legal ethics, principles of conduct that members of the legal profession are expected to observe in their practice. They are an outgrowth of the development of the legal profession itself. Practitioners of law emerged when legal systems became too complex for all those affected by them to fully

  • legal fiction

    Legal fiction, a rule assuming as true something that is clearly false. A fiction is often used to get around the provisions of constitutions and legal codes that legislators are hesitant to change or to encumber with specific limitations. Thus, when a legislature has no legal power to sit beyond

  • Legal Framework Order (Pakistan [1970])

    Pakistan: Military government: He also issued a Legal Framework Order (LFO) that broke up the single unit of West Pakistan and reconstituted the original four provinces of Pakistan—i.e., Punjab, Sind, North-West Frontier Province, and Balochistan. The 1970 election therefore was not only meant to restore parliamentary government to the country, it was…

  • Legal Framework Order (Pakistan [2002])

    Pakistan: Reinstated constitution: …in a document called the Legal Framework Order (LFO). In addition to extending Musharraf’s term, the LFO expanded the president’s powers and increased the number of members of both houses of the legislature. Parliamentary elections followed in October under the limitations imposed by the LFO, and Musharraf’s adopted political party,…

  • legal glossator (medieval jurist)

    Legal glossator, in the Middle Ages, any of the scholars who applied methods of interlinear or marginal annotations (glossae) and the explanation of words to the interpretation of Roman legal texts. The age of the legal glossators began with the revival of the study of Roman law at Bologna at the

  • legal hypothec (law)

    hypothec: Legal hypothecs are rights given to married women over the property of their husbands, and to children and incapacitated individuals over the property of their guardians. This is to protect them against any mismanagement by the husband or guardian of their own or common property.

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