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  • Lelong, Lucien (French designer)

    Pierre Balmain: …he joined the firm of Lucien Lelong, where he worked with Christian Dior, who was to become his main rival during their heyday in the postwar years. The House of Balmain was an immediate success, its clothes characterized by superb quality, particularly in evening wear, which combined femininity with an…

  • Lelouch, Claude (French director)

    Claude Lelouch, French director and screenwriter who was noted chiefly for his lush visual style. He achieved prominence in 1966 with his film Un Homme et une femme (A Man and a Woman), which shared the Grand Prize at the Cannes film festival and won two Academy Awards (for best foreign film and

  • Lely, Cornelis (Dutch engineer)

    Lelystad: It was named after Cornelis Lely (d. 1929), an engineer-statesman who designed the Zuiderzee reclamation project. It became the capital of the newly created Flevoland province in 1986. Located next to a land-reclamation dike, Lelystad has a small fishing harbour; boats have access to Amsterdam through the Oostvaarder Canal.…

  • Lely, Sir Peter (Dutch painter)

    Sir Peter Lely, Baroque portrait painter known for his Van Dyck-influenced likenesses of the mid-17th-century English aristocracy. The origin of the name Lely is said to be the lily carved into the gable of the van der Faes family’s house in The Hague. The young artist was early known as Pieter

  • Lelye, Pieter (Dutch painter)

    Sir Peter Lely, Baroque portrait painter known for his Van Dyck-influenced likenesses of the mid-17th-century English aristocracy. The origin of the name Lely is said to be the lily carved into the gable of the van der Faes family’s house in The Hague. The young artist was early known as Pieter

  • Lelystad (Netherlands)

    Lelystad, gemeente (municipality), north-central Netherlands, on the IJsselmeer (Lake IJssel). After the East Flevoland Polder was drained in 1957, the town was built on a foundation of piles driven into the subsoil. It was named after Cornelis Lely (d. 1929), an engineer-statesman who designed the

  • Lelyveld, Arthur (American rabbi)

    Arthur Lelyveld, U.S. rabbi and Reform Judaism leader whose social activism embraced support for recognition of Israel two years before that country’s birth, the fostering of closer relations between Jews and African-Americans, and civil rights work that included the registration of black voters in

  • Lelyveld-Haasse, Hélène Serafia Van (Dutch author)

    Hella S. Haasse, Dutch novelist noted for her innovative historical fiction. Haasse studied at the Amsterdam Toneelschool, a dramatic arts school, and published a volume of poetry, Stroomversnelling (1945; “Fast Current”). In her first novella, Oeroeg (1948), she explored race relations in the

  • Lem Ethiopia (Ethiopian organization)

    Girma Wolde-Giorgis: …founded an environmental organization called Lem Ethiopia.

  • Lem, Stanis?aw (Polish author)

    Stanis?aw Lem, Polish author of science fiction that veers between humanism and despair about human limitations. His books have been translated into more than 35 languages. The son of a doctor, Lem studied medicine at Lvov Medical Institute (now Lviv State Medical University) during 1940–41, but

  • Lema trilineata (insect)

    Potato beetle, (Lema trilineata), one of the most destructive potato beetles until the advent of the Colorado potato beetle (q.v.) in the 1850s. The potato beetle belongs to the subfamily Criocerinae of the leaf beetle family Chrysomelidae (order Coleoptera). About 6 mm (less than 0.25 inch) long,

  • Lemaan ha-Yeled (American organization)

    Henrietta Szold: …was renamed Mosad Szold (The Szold Foundation). Szold died in Jerusalem, in the Hadassah-Hebrew University Hospital she had helped make possible.

  • Lemain Island (island, The Gambia)

    MacCarthy Island, island, in the Gambia River, 176 miles (283 km) upstream from Banjul, central Gambia. It was ceded in 1823 to Captain Alexander Grant of the African Corps, who was acting for the British crown. Designated as a site for freed slaves, the island was renamed for Sir Charles M

  • Lemaire de Belges, Jean (Belgian poet)

    Jean Lemaire de Belges, Walloon poet, historian, and pamphleteer who, writing in French, was the last and one of the best of the school of poetic rhétoriqueurs (“rhetoricians”) and the chief forerunner, both in style and in thought, of the Renaissance humanists in France and Flanders. Lemaire led a

  • Lemaire, Jacques (Canadian hockey player and coach)

    New Jersey Devils: In 1993 the Devils hired Jacques Lemaire as their coach. He established a defense-oriented strategy with players such as Stephane Richer, Scott Stevens (who captained the team from 1992 to 2004), and Ken Daneyko. Contributing to the Devils’ dominance was goaltender Martin Brodeur, who won the Calder Memorial Trophy as…

  • Lema?tre, Fran?ois-élie-Jules (French critic and dramatist)

    Jules Lema?tre, French critic, storyteller, and dramatist, now remembered for his uniquely personal and impressionistic style of literary criticism. After leaving the école Normale, Lema?tre was a schoolmaster and then professor at the University of Grenoble before resigning to devote himself to

  • Lema?tre, Frédéric (French actor)

    Paris: The Rue de Rivoli and Right Bank environs: The Théatre de l’Ambigu, where Frédéric Lema?tre, the celebrated actor in boulevard melodrama, thrilled all Paris in the mid-19th century, was demolished in the 1960s.

  • Lema?tre, Georges (Belgian astronomer)

    Georges Lema?tre, Belgian astronomer and cosmologist who formulated the modern big-bang theory, which holds that the universe began in a cataclysmic explosion of a small, primeval “super-atom.” A civil engineer, Lema?tre served as an artillery officer in the Belgian Army during World War I. After

  • Lema?tre, Jules (French critic and dramatist)

    Jules Lema?tre, French critic, storyteller, and dramatist, now remembered for his uniquely personal and impressionistic style of literary criticism. After leaving the école Normale, Lema?tre was a schoolmaster and then professor at the University of Grenoble before resigning to devote himself to

  • Léman, Lac (lake, Europe)

    Lake Geneva, largest Alpine lake in Europe (area 224 square miles [581 square km]), lying between southwestern Switzerland and Haute-Savoie département, southeastern France. About 134 square miles (347 square km) of the lake’s area are Swiss, and 90 square miles (234 square km) are French. Crescent

  • Lemanus, Lacus (lake, Europe)

    Lake Geneva, largest Alpine lake in Europe (area 224 square miles [581 square km]), lying between southwestern Switzerland and Haute-Savoie département, southeastern France. About 134 square miles (347 square km) of the lake’s area are Swiss, and 90 square miles (234 square km) are French. Crescent

  • Lemarque, Francis (French singer and songwriter)

    Francis Lemarque, (Nathan Korb), French singer and songwriter (born Nov. 25, 1917, Paris, France—died April 20, 2002, La Varenne-Saint-Hilaire, France), during a nearly 70-year career, wrote some 1,000 chansons, notably à Paris, Marjolaine, Bal petit bal, and the ardent pacifist anthem Quand un s

  • Lemass, Seán F. (prime minister of Ireland)

    Seán F. Lemass, Irish patriot and politician, who served as taoiseach (prime minister) of Ireland from 1959 to 1966. As early as the age of 16, Lemass became a freedom fighter in the streets of Dublin, engaging in the Easter Rising (April 1916) and other hostilities and landing in jail again and

  • Lemass, Sean Francis (prime minister of Ireland)

    Seán F. Lemass, Irish patriot and politician, who served as taoiseach (prime minister) of Ireland from 1959 to 1966. As early as the age of 16, Lemass became a freedom fighter in the streets of Dublin, engaging in the Easter Rising (April 1916) and other hostilities and landing in jail again and

  • LeMay, Curtis E. (United States general)

    Curtis E. LeMay, U.S. Air Force officer whose expertise in strategic bombardment techniques was important during World War II and afterward. Entering the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1928, LeMay advanced to the position of bombardment group commander by 1942. Flying with the 8th Air Force from England

  • LeMay, Curtis Emerson (United States general)

    Curtis E. LeMay, U.S. Air Force officer whose expertise in strategic bombardment techniques was important during World War II and afterward. Entering the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1928, LeMay advanced to the position of bombardment group commander by 1942. Flying with the 8th Air Force from England

  • Lemay, Pamphile (Canadian author)

    Canadian literature: The literary movement of 1860: …numerous collections of verse by Pamphile Lemay (Les Gouttelettes [1904; "The Droplets"]) and Louis-Honoré Fréchette (La Légende d’un peuple [1887; “The Legend of a People”]) illustrate the nostalgic and didactic preoccupations of the time. More original works were nevertheless attempted: Eudore Evanturel’s Premières poésies (1878; “First Poems”) broke with conventional…

  • Lemberg (Ukraine)

    Lviv, city, western Ukraine, on the Roztochchya Upland. Founded in the mid-13th century by Prince Daniel Romanovich of Galicia, Lviv has historically been the chief centre of Galicia, a region now divided between Ukraine and Poland. Its position controlling east-west routes and passes across the

  • Lemberg (mountain, Germany)

    Swabian Alp: …to its highest peak, the Lemberg (3,330 feet [1,015 m]), but slopes gradually toward the Danube River valley in the southeast. Composed of limestones, the range is characterized by karstic features such as sinkholes, caves, dry valleys, and underground watercourses. The region has a raw climate and poor upland soils…

  • Lemdiyya (Algeria)

    Médéa, town, north-central Algeria. It is situated on a plateau in the Tell Atlas Mountains 56 miles (90 km) south of Algiers. Shadowed by Mount Nador (3,693 feet [1,126 metres]) to the northwest, the town is surrounded by fertile, well-watered soil that forms the watershed for the Chelif River and

  • Leme, Fern?o Dias Pais (Portuguese explorer)

    Minas Gerais: History: …Gerais was first explored by Fern?o Dias Pais Leme between 1664 and 1677, though he was not the first European to enter the area. The discovery of gold in 1692–95 by bands of adventurers from the S?o Paulo settlements led to a mad rush for the new mines. Minas Gerais…

  • Lemelin, Roger (Canadian author)

    Canadian literature: World War II and the postwar period, 1935–60: Roger Lemelin’s Les Plouffe (1948; The Plouffe Family), a family chronicle set in the poorer quarters of Quebec city, spawned a popular television serial.

  • Lemercier, Jacques (French architect)

    Jacques Lemercier, French architect who, along with Fran?ois Mansart and Louis Le Vau, shaped French architecture by introducing classical elements. Lemercier belonged to a famous family of builders. For several years between 1607 and 1614 he was in Rome, where he probably studied with Rosato

  • Lemercier, Louise-Jean Népomucène (French author)

    Népomucène Lemercier, poet and dramatist, a late proponent of classical tragedy over Romanticism, and the originator of French historical comedy. An accident caused Lemercier lifelong partial paralysis. He made a precocious literary debut, attempting a comedy at age 9 and having his first tragedy,

  • Lemercier, Népomucène (French author)

    Népomucène Lemercier, poet and dramatist, a late proponent of classical tragedy over Romanticism, and the originator of French historical comedy. An accident caused Lemercier lifelong partial paralysis. He made a precocious literary debut, attempting a comedy at age 9 and having his first tragedy,

  • Lémery, Nicolas (French physician and chemist)

    arsenic: History: Later, Nicolas Lémery, a French physician and chemist, observed the formation of arsenic when heating a mixture of the oxide, soap, and potash. By the 18th century, arsenic was well known as a unique semimetal.

  • Lemesós (Cyprus)

    Limassol, city and chief port of the Republic of Cyprus. The city lies on Akrotiri Bay, on the southern coast, southwest of Nicosia; it is the island’s second largest city and is also its chief tourist centre. Limassol’s rise from a humble market town between the ancient settlements of Amathus and

  • Lemieux, Lawrence (Canadian yachtsman)
  • Lemieux, Mario (Canadian ice hockey player)

    Mario Lemieux, Canadian professional ice hockey player who is considered one of the greatest players in the history of the sport. Lemieux starred in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League as a teenager, setting a league record by scoring 282 points in 70 games during the 1983–84 season. He was

  • Lemire (French sculptor)

    pottery: Faience, or tin-glazed ware: …probably modelled by the sculptor Charles Gabriel Sauvage, called Lemire (1741–1827), and some were sometimes taken from models by Paul-Louis Cyfflé (1724–1806). At Lunéville, not far away, Cyfflé worked in a pleasant but sentimental vein and used a semiporcelain biscuit body known as terre-de-Lorraine, which was intended to resemble the…

  • Lemkin, Raphael (American jurist and author)

    genocide: …cide (“killing”), was coined by Raphael Lemkin, a Polish-born jurist who served as an adviser to the U.S. Department of War during World War II.

  • Lemko (people)

    Rusyn, any of several East Slavic peoples (modern-day Belarusians, Ukrainians, and Carpatho-Rusyns) and their languages. The name Rusyn is derived from Rus (Ruthenia), the name of the territory that they inhabited. The name Ruthenian derives from the Latin Ruthenus (singular), a term found in

  • lemma (plant anatomy)

    Poaceae: Characteristic morphological features: The other scales, the lemma and the palea, occur in pairs. Generally the lemma is larger than the palea, which is hidden between the lemma and the spikelet axis. The lemma and palea surround and protect the flower, and all three of these structures form the floret. Grass spikelets…

  • lemming (rodent)

    Lemming, any of 20 species of small rodents, some of which undertake large, swarming migrations. Lemmings are found only in the Northern Hemisphere. They have short, stocky bodies with short legs and stumpy tails, a bluntly rounded muzzle, small eyes, and small ears that are nearly hidden in their

  • Lemming, Eric (Swedish athlete)

    Eric Lemming, Swedish track-and-field athlete who was the first great javelin thrower of the modern era. He won gold medals in the first two Olympic javelin contests. Lemming was the finest of the Scandinavian athletes who dominated the javelin throw in the early 20th century. A very strong javelin

  • Lemming, Eric Otto Valdemar (Swedish athlete)

    Eric Lemming, Swedish track-and-field athlete who was the first great javelin thrower of the modern era. He won gold medals in the first two Olympic javelin contests. Lemming was the finest of the Scandinavian athletes who dominated the javelin throw in the early 20th century. A very strong javelin

  • Lemming, Erik (Swedish athlete)

    Eric Lemming, Swedish track-and-field athlete who was the first great javelin thrower of the modern era. He won gold medals in the first two Olympic javelin contests. Lemming was the finest of the Scandinavian athletes who dominated the javelin throw in the early 20th century. A very strong javelin

  • Lemmink?inen (Finnish epic character)

    Lemmink?inen, hero of Finnish traditional songs. In these songs Lemmink?inen travels to an otherworldly place where he overcomes many obstacles such as a ditch full of burning rocks and a fence made of snakes. When he reaches his goal he must also succeed at a series of tests and best his host in a

  • Lemmon, Jack (American actor)

    Jack Lemmon, American screen and stage actor who was adept at both comedy and drama and was noted for his portrayals of high-strung or neurotic characters in American films from the 1950s onward. Lemmon attended Harvard University and was president of the school’s Hasty Pudding Club, an

  • Lemmon, John Uhler, III (American actor)

    Jack Lemmon, American screen and stage actor who was adept at both comedy and drama and was noted for his portrayals of high-strung or neurotic characters in American films from the 1950s onward. Lemmon attended Harvard University and was president of the school’s Hasty Pudding Club, an

  • Lemmus (rodent)

    lemming: Natural history: Collared and brown lemmings (Dicrostonyx and Lemmus) make nests on the tundra surface or beneath the snow. Breeding from spring to fall, females can produce up to 13 young after a gestation period of about 20 to 30 days.

  • Lemmus lemmus (rodent)

    lemming: Natural history: …only short distances, but the Norway lemmings (Lemmus lemmus) in Scandinavia are a dramatic exception. From a central point, they move in growing numbers outward in all directions, at first erratically and under cover of darkness but later in bold groups that may travel in daylight. Huge hordes overrun broad…

  • Lemnia sphragis (medicine)

    Lemnos: In Classical times Lemnian earth (Lemnia sphragis) was used as an astringent for snakebites and wounds and in the 16th century for the plague. This medicinal soil was dug ceremonially once a year from a mound near Hephaestia. Pop. (2001) 17,545; (2011) 16,992.

  • Lemnian Athena (sculpture by Phidias)

    Phidias: The so-called Lemnian Athena was dedicated as an offering by Athenian colonists who were sent to Lemnos between 451 and 448. A head of Athena in Bologna and two statues of Athena in Dresden are thought to be copies, in marble, of Phidias’s original work in bronze.

  • Lemnian earth (medicine)

    Lemnos: In Classical times Lemnian earth (Lemnia sphragis) was used as an astringent for snakebites and wounds and in the 16th century for the plague. This medicinal soil was dug ceremonially once a year from a mound near Hephaestia. Pop. (2001) 17,545; (2011) 16,992.

  • lemniscate of Bernoulli (mathematics)

    mathematics: History of analysis: …of the rectification of the lemniscate, a ribbon-shaped curve discovered by Jakob Bernoulli in 1694, Giulio Carlo Fagnano (1682–1766) introduced ingenious analytic transformations that laid the foundation for the theory of elliptic integrals. Nikolaus I Bernoulli (1687–1759), the nephew of Johann and Jakob, proved the equality of mixed second-order partial…

  • lemniscus (anatomy)

    human ear: Ascending pathways: The lemniscus is a major tract, most of the fibres of which end in the inferior colliculus, the auditory centre of the midbrain, although some fibres may bypass the colliculus and end, together with the fibres from the colliculus, at the next higher level, the medial…

  • Lemnitzer, Lyman Louis (United States general)

    Lyman Lemnitzer, U.S. Army general, commander of the United Nations forces in the Korean War (1955–57), chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1960–62), and supreme allied commander in Europe (1963–69). Lemnitzer was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, N.Y. (1920), the Command and

  • Lemnos (island, Greece)

    Lemnos, isolated Greek island and dímos (municipality), North Aegean (Modern Greek: Vóreio Aigaío) periféreia (region), Greece. It is situated in the Aegean Sea, midway between Mount áthos (ágio) in northeastern mainland Greece and the Turkish coast. Composed mainly of volcanic rock, its western

  • Lemoigne, Maurice (French researcher)

    bioplastic: …1926 by a French researcher, Maurice Lemoigne, from his work with the bacterium Bacillus megaterium. The significance of Lemoigne’s discovery was overlooked for many decades, in large part because, at the time, petroleum was inexpensive and abundant. The petroleum crisis of the mid-1970s brought renewed interest in finding alternatives to…

  • Lemoine, Georges (French chemist)

    catalysis: History: In 1877 Georges Lemoine had shown that the decomposition of hydriodic acid to hydrogen and iodine reached the same equilibrium point at 350 °C (660 °F), 19 percent, whether the reaction was carried out rapidly in the presence of platinum sponge or slowly in the gas phase.…

  • lemon (fruit)

    Lemon, (Citrus ×limon), small tree or spreading bush of the rue family (Rutaceae) and its edible fruit. Lemon juice is a characteristic ingredient in many pastries and desserts, such as tarts and the traditional American lemon meringue pie. The distinctive astringent flavour of the fruit, either

  • lemon balm (herb species)
  • lemon basil (herb)
  • lemon bee balm (plant)

    bergamot: Lemon bergamot, or lemon bee balm (M. citriodora), and wild bergamot (M. fistulosa) are also used as flavourings and in teas.

  • lemon bergamot (plant)

    bergamot: Lemon bergamot, or lemon bee balm (M. citriodora), and wild bergamot (M. fistulosa) are also used as flavourings and in teas.

  • Lemon Drop Kid (racehorse)

    Charismatic: …two long shots, the 29–1 Lemon Drop Kid and the 54–1 Vision and Verse. Jockey Chris Antley got little response from Charismatic and felt the colt drop and dip underneath him—a sign that the horse was in pain. Charismatic finished the race in third place; Lemon Drop Kid was the…

  • lemon leaf (plant)

    Gaultheria: Salal (G. shallon), or lemonleaf in the floral industry, is a diffuse slender shrub of the Pacific Northwest; it grows 0.3–1.8 metres (1–6 feet) tall and has dark purple edible fruits. Wintergreen (G. procumbens), also called checkerberry or teaberry, is a creeping shrub with white…

  • lemon orchid (plant)

    sun orchid: The lemon orchid (Thelymitra antennifera), the twisted sun orchid (T. flexuosa), the custard orchid (T. violosa), and the scented sun orchid (T. avistata) are common Australian species.

  • lemon shark (fish)

    Lemon shark, species of shark in the family Carcharhinidae. See

  • lemon sumac (plant)

    sumac: copallinum) and the lemon, or fragrant, sumac (R. aromatica). The former is often grown for its shiny leaves, the leaflets of which are connected by ribs along the axis, and showy reddish fruits. The fragrant sumac has three-parted leaves, scented when bruised; it forms a dense low shrub…

  • Lemon Table, The (short stories by Barnes)

    Julian Barnes: …new depth of emotion in The Lemon Table (2004), a collection of short stories in which most of the characters are consumed by thoughts of death. He explored why some people are remembered after their death and others are not in the historical novel Arthur &amp; George (2005), in which…

  • Lemon test (law case)

    Agostini v. Felton: Background: In Lemon v. Kurtzman (1971), the Supreme Court had incorporated that excessive-entanglement standard into a test for establishment-clause violation, which was later known as the Lemon test.

  • Lemon v. Kurtzman (law case)

    Agostini v. Felton: Background: In Lemon v. Kurtzman (1971), the Supreme Court had incorporated that excessive-entanglement standard into a test for establishment-clause violation, which was later known as the Lemon test.

  • lemon verbena (plant)

    Lemon verbena, (Aloysia citriodora or Lippia citriodora), tropical perennial shrub belonging to the family Verbenaceae, originating in Argentina and Chile. Growing more than 3 metres (10 feet) high in warm climates, it is also grown as a potted plant reaching a height of about 25.4 cm (10 inches).

  • Lemon, George Meadow (American basketball player)

    Meadowlark Lemon, (Meadow Lemon III, or Meadow George Lemon, or George Meadow Lemon), American basketball player (born April 25, 1932, Wilmington, N.C.?—died Dec. 27, 2015, Scottsdale, Ariz.), was perhaps the most popular member of the entertainment basketball team the Harlem Globetrotters during

  • Lemon, Meadow George (American basketball player)

    Meadowlark Lemon, (Meadow Lemon III, or Meadow George Lemon, or George Meadow Lemon), American basketball player (born April 25, 1932, Wilmington, N.C.?—died Dec. 27, 2015, Scottsdale, Ariz.), was perhaps the most popular member of the entertainment basketball team the Harlem Globetrotters during

  • Lemon, Meadow, III (American basketball player)

    Meadowlark Lemon, (Meadow Lemon III, or Meadow George Lemon, or George Meadow Lemon), American basketball player (born April 25, 1932, Wilmington, N.C.?—died Dec. 27, 2015, Scottsdale, Ariz.), was perhaps the most popular member of the entertainment basketball team the Harlem Globetrotters during

  • Lemon, Meadowlark (American basketball player)

    Meadowlark Lemon, (Meadow Lemon III, or Meadow George Lemon, or George Meadow Lemon), American basketball player (born April 25, 1932, Wilmington, N.C.?—died Dec. 27, 2015, Scottsdale, Ariz.), was perhaps the most popular member of the entertainment basketball team the Harlem Globetrotters during

  • lemon-drop mangosteen (plant)

    Clusiaceae: Waika plum, or lemon drop mangosteen (G. intermedia), native to Central America, has a small, oval, yellow fruit. There are about 250 species in the tropics, especially common in Indo-Malesia.

  • Lemonade (album by Beyonce)

    Beyoncé: …the expansive and musically variegated Lemonade (2016), Beyoncé focused on themes of betrayal and perseverance. Conceived as another visual album, it debuted as an HBO television special. Lemonade attracted considerable acclaim, and it netted Beyoncé two Grammys, including a best music-video award for the anthemic “Formation.” In 2018 Beyoncé and…

  • lemonade (beverage)

    lemon: Lemonade, made with lemon, sugar, and water, is a popular warm-weather beverage, and the juice itself is commonly added to tea. Citric acid may amount to 5 percent or more by weight of the lemon’s juice, which is also rich in vitamin C and contains…

  • LeMond, Greg (American athlete)

    Greg LeMond, American bicycle racer who was the first non-European rider to win the Tour de France, the most celebrated and challenging event in cycling. In his career he won the Tour de France three times (1986, 1989, 1990) and twice won the World Road Race Championship (1983, 1989). As a teenager

  • LeMond, Gregory James (American athlete)

    Greg LeMond, American bicycle racer who was the first non-European rider to win the Tour de France, the most celebrated and challenging event in cycling. In his career he won the Tour de France three times (1986, 1989, 1990) and twice won the World Road Race Championship (1983, 1989). As a teenager

  • lemongrass (plant)

    oil grass: Lemongrass, or sweet rush (Cymbopogon citratus), contains citral, obtained by steam distillation of the leaves. The plant is common in Asian cuisine and is also used in scented cosmetics and medicine. Citronella grass (C. nardus) contains geraniol (citronella oil), used in cosmetics and insect repellents.

  • lemonleaf (plant)

    Gaultheria: Salal (G. shallon), or lemonleaf in the floral industry, is a diffuse slender shrub of the Pacific Northwest; it grows 0.3–1.8 metres (1–6 feet) tall and has dark purple edible fruits. Wintergreen (G. procumbens), also called checkerberry or teaberry, is a creeping shrub with white…

  • Lemonnier, Antoine-Louis-Camille (Belgian writer)

    Camille Lemonnier, novelist, short-story writer, and art critic, one of the outstanding personalities of the 19th-century French literary renaissance in Belgium. Lemonnier wrote his first outstanding novel, Un Male (1881; “A Male”), under the influence of the naturalism of émile Zola. Like his

  • Lemonnier, Camille (Belgian writer)

    Camille Lemonnier, novelist, short-story writer, and art critic, one of the outstanding personalities of the 19th-century French literary renaissance in Belgium. Lemonnier wrote his first outstanding novel, Un Male (1881; “A Male”), under the influence of the naturalism of émile Zola. Like his

  • Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (film by Silberling [2004])

    Daniel Handler: …contributed to the screenplay for Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004). He later adapted the novels for the Netflix show A Series of Unfortunate Events (2017–19), starring Neil Patrick Harris.

  • Lemosí language

    Occitan language: …the area itself, the names Lemosí (Limousin) and Proensal (Proven?al) were formerly used, but those names were too localized to designate the whole range of dialects. The name Proven?al originally referred to the Occitan dialects of the Provence region and is used also to refer to the standardized medieval literary…

  • Lemoyne, Jean-Baptiste (French sculptor)

    Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne, French sculptor chiefly important for his portrait busts. The pupil of his father, Jean-Louis Lemoyne, and of Robert Le Lorrain, he was appointed sculptor to Louis XV. Lemoyne executed many likenesses of the king, either as large sculptures—the statues in the royal squares at

  • Lempa River (river, Central America)

    Lempa River, river in Central America. It rises in Guatemala near Esquipulas, crosses a corner of Honduras, and enters El Salvador at Citalá. After cutting across El Salvador’s northern mountain range, it flows eastward for over 80 miles (130 km) and then southward for 65 miles (105 km) across the

  • Lempel, Abraham (Israeli mathematician)

    telecommunication: The Lempel-Ziv algorithm: …the 1970s by the Israelis Abraham Lempel and Jacob Ziv. The Lempel-Ziv algorithm works by constructing a codebook out of sequences encountered previously. For example, the codebook might begin with a set of four 12-bit code words representing four possible signal levels. If two of those levels arrived in sequence,…

  • Lempel-Ziv algorithm (communications)

    data compression: The Lempel-Ziv algorithm, invented by Israeli computer scientists Abraham Lempel and Jacob Ziv, uses the text itself as the dictionary, replacing later occurrences of a string by numbers indicating where it occurred before and its length. Zip and gzip use variations of the Lempel-Ziv algorithm.

  • Lemper, Ute (German singer and actress)

    Ute Lemper, German singer, composer, and actress considered to be the foremost modern interpreter of the music of 1920s Germany. Lemper’s mother was an opera singer, and she started her daughter on piano, voice, and ballet lessons at an early age. Lemper took children’s parts in operettas and

  • lemur (primate suborder)

    Lemur, (suborder Strepsirrhini), generally, any primitive primate except the tarsier; more specifically, any of the indigenous primates of Madagascar. In the broad sense, the term lemur applies not only to the typical lemurs (family Lemuridae) but also to the avahis, sifakas, indri, and aye-aye of

  • Lemur catta (primate)

    lemur: Lemur diversity: …known of these is the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), commonly seen in zoos. It is unique both in its habitat (some dry and rocky areas of Madagascar) and for its striped tail (all other lemurs have solid-coloured tails). Troops are made up of several males and females, and the females…

  • Lemur macaco (primate)

    lemur: Lemur diversity: …related genus Eulemur include the black lemur (E. macaco), in which the male is black and the female is reddish brown. The rare black-and-white or black-and-red ruffed lemurs (genus Varecia) live in rainforests on the eastern side of Madagascar. The gentle lemurs, or lesser bamboo lemurs (genus Hapalemur), and the…

  • Lemures (Roman religion)

    Lemures, in Roman religion, wicked and fearsome spectres of the dead. Appearing in grotesque and terrifying forms, they were said to haunt their living relatives and cause them injury. To propitiate these ghosts and keep them from the household, ritual observances called Lemuria were held yearly o

  • Lemuria (mythological continent)

    Stone Age: Oceania: , Lemuria, Mu) or direct relations with the Middle East (e.g., the Ten Lost Tribes, migrations of Children of the Sun from Egypt), early India (e.g., Indus Valley–Easter Island connections), or Japan (e.g., supposed language relations). They also insist that, while eastern-voyaging Polynesians could well have…

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