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  • Ladies Man, The (film by Lewis [1961])

    Jerry Lewis: …at a girls’ school in The Ladies Man (1961). His films displayed an inventive use of locations, such as the Florida hotel in The Bellboy, and sets, such as the full-size 60-room school built for The Ladies Man. His comedy version of the Jekyll and Hyde story, The Nutty Professor…

  • Ladies of Leisure (film by Capra [1930])

    Frank Capra: The early 1930s: Ladies of Leisure (1930) was the first of Capra’s films to star Barbara Stanwyck. In it she played a gold digger reformed by her love for a sensitive painter. When Capra adapted the 1928 Broadway hit Rain or Shine for film in 1930, he retained…

  • Ladies of the Chorus (film by Karlson [1948])

    Phil Karlson: Early films: The musical Ladies of the Chorus (1948) is of historical interest for featuring Marilyn Monroe in her first major role.

  • Ladies Professional Golf Association (sports organization)

    Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA), organization that provides professional tournament golf for women and annually holds the LPGA Championship tournament. Several professional tournaments for women were staged during the 1920s and ’30s; important players from this era include Glenna

  • Ladies’ British Open (golf)

    Women’s British Open, golf tournament conducted annually that is recognized by the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) as one of the four major tournaments in women’s golf. The event is open to all qualified amateur and professional female golfers and is held at a variety of golf courses

  • Ladies’ Delight (work by Zola)

    émile Zola: Les Rougon-Macquart: Au Bonheur des Dames (1883; Ladies’ Delight) depicts the mechanisms of a new economic entity, the department store, and its impact on smaller merchants. The sweeping descriptions of crowds and dry-goods displays justify Zola’s characterization of the novel as “a poem of modern activity.”

  • ladies’ fingers (plant)

    Kidney vetch, (Anthyllis vulneraria), perennial herb of the pea family (Fabaceae), found in meadows, alpine pastures, and dry places of Europe and northern Africa. It was formerly used as a remedy for kidney disorders but is now frequently cultivated in rock gardens. Kidney vetch is a low hairy

  • Ladies’ Home Journal (American magazine)

    Ladies’ Home Journal, American monthly magazine, one of the longest-running in the country and long the trendsetter among women’s magazines. It was founded in 1883 as a women’s supplement to the Tribune and Farmer (1879–85) of Cyrus H.K. Curtis and was edited by his wife, Louisa Knapp. The Journal

  • Ladies’ Mercury (English periodical)

    history of publishing: Beginnings in the 17th century: …magazine specifically for women, the Ladies’ Mercury. Finally, another note, taken up time and again later, was struck by The London Spy (1698–1700), issued by a tavern keeper, Ned Ward, and containing a running narrative of the sights and sounds of London.

  • ladies’ tobacco (plant)

    pussy-toes: The plantain-leaved pussy-toes (A. plantaginifolia), also called ladies’ tobacco, has longer and broader basal leaves.

  • ladies’ tresses (plant)

    Ladies’ tresses, (genus Spiranthes), genus of about 45 species of terrestrial orchids (family Orchidaceae), found in woods and grasslands throughout most of the world. Ladies’ tresses have a fleshy root system, and most species have narrow basal leaves. Species of Spiranthes vary greatly in size

  • Ladik (Turkey)

    Denizli, city, southwestern Turkey. It lies near a tributary of the Menderes River. Set among the gardens at the foot of Mount G?kbel (7,572 feet [2,308 metres]), Denizli inherited the economic position of ancient Laodicea ad Lycum, 4 miles (6 km) away, when that town was deserted during wars

  • Ladik carpet (prayer rug)

    Ladik carpet, handwoven floor covering usually in a prayer design and made in or near Ladik, a town in the Konya Plain of south-central Turkey. Ladik prayer rugs have either a high, stepped arch design or a triple arch with a dominating central portion. In a separate panel above or below the

  • Ladin (people)

    Ladinian Stage: …name is derived from the Ladini people of the Dolomites in northern Italy. The stratotypes for the Ladinian are the Buchenstein and Wengen beds of the Dolomites. The Ladinian is subdivided into two substages, which in ascending order are the Fassanian and Longobardian. Ladinian marine strata are correlated worldwide by…

  • Ladin language (Romance language)

    Rhaetian dialects: …Italy, some 30,000 persons speak Ladin (not to be confused with Ladino). Some Italian scholars have claimed that it is really an Italian (Veneto-Lombard) dialect. The other main language spoken in this now semiautonomous region, much of which was Austrian until 1919, is German, a non-Romance language. Although sometimes said…

  • lading, bill of (law)

    Bill of lading, document executed by a carrier, such as a railroad or shipping line, acknowledging receipt of goods and embodying an agreement to transport the goods to a stated destination. Bills of lading are closely related to warehouse receipts, which contain an agreement for storage rather

  • Ladini (people)

    Ladinian Stage: …name is derived from the Ladini people of the Dolomites in northern Italy. The stratotypes for the Ladinian are the Buchenstein and Wengen beds of the Dolomites. The Ladinian is subdivided into two substages, which in ascending order are the Fassanian and Longobardian. Ladinian marine strata are correlated worldwide by…

  • Ladinian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Ladinian Stage, upper of two divisions of the Middle Triassic Series, representing those rocks deposited worldwide during Ladinian time (242 million to 235 million years ago) in the Triassic Period. The stage name is derived from the Ladini people of the Dolomites in northern Italy. The stratotypes

  • ladino (people)

    Ladino, Westernized Central American person of predominantly mixed Spanish and indigenous descent. In that sense, ladino is synonymous with mestizo. The word ladino is Spanish (meaning “Latin”), and the ladinos of Central America are not to be confused with those Sephardic Jews who speak the Ladino

  • Ladino language

    Ladino language, Romance language spoken by Sephardic Jews living mostly in Israel, the Balkans, North Africa, Greece, and Turkey. Ladino is very nearly extinct in many of these areas. A very archaic form of Castilian Spanish mixed somewhat with Hebrew elements (as well as Aramaic, Arabic, Turkish,

  • Ladipo, Duro (Nigerian dramatist and composer)

    Duro Ladipo, Nigerian dramatist whose innovative folk operas incorporating ritual poetry and traditional rhythms performed on indigenous instruments were based on Yoruba history. As a teacher in a church school at Oshogbo in 1960, Ladipo scandalized church members by including bata drums in the

  • Lādīq (Turkey)

    Denizli, city, southwestern Turkey. It lies near a tributary of the Menderes River. Set among the gardens at the foot of Mount G?kbel (7,572 feet [2,308 metres]), Denizli inherited the economic position of ancient Laodicea ad Lycum, 4 miles (6 km) away, when that town was deserted during wars

  • Ladislas (king of Naples)

    Ladislas, king of Naples (from 1386), claimant to the throne of Hungary (from 1390), and prince of Taranto (from 1406). He became a skilled political and military leader, taking advantage of power struggles on the Italian peninsula to greatly expand his kingdom and his power. Succeeding his father,

  • Ladislas I (king of Hungary)

    Ladislas I, ; canonized 1192; feast day June 27), king of Hungary who greatly expanded the boundaries of the kingdom and consolidated it internally; no other Hungarian king was so generally beloved by the people. The son of Béla I of Hungary and the Polish princess Rycheza (Ryksa), Ladislas was

  • Ladislas II (king of Hungary)

    Hungary: The early kings: …by two of his uncles, Ladislas II (1162–63) and Stephen IV (1163–65). Happily, the death of Stephen IV exhausted the supply of uncles, and Stephen III’s brother, Béla III (1173–96), had no domestic rivals to the throne. However, the short reign of Béla’s elder son, Emeric (1196–1204), was spent largely…

  • Ladislas IV (king of Hungary)

    Ladislas IV, king of Hungary who, by his support of the German king Rudolf I at the Battle of Dürnkrut, helped to establish the future power of the Habsburg dynasty in Austria. The son of Stephen V, Ladislas IV became king of Hungary on his father’s death in 1272. His minority (until 1277) was

  • Ladislas Posthumus (king of Hungary and Bohemia)

    Ladislas V, boy king of Hungary and of Bohemia (from 1453), who was caught up in the feud between his guardian Ulrich, count of Cilli, and the Hunyadi family of Hungary. Ladislas was the posthumous only son of the Habsburg German king Albert II, who had also been king of Hungary and Bohemia. The e

  • Ladislas the Cuman (king of Hungary)

    Ladislas IV, king of Hungary who, by his support of the German king Rudolf I at the Battle of Dürnkrut, helped to establish the future power of the Habsburg dynasty in Austria. The son of Stephen V, Ladislas IV became king of Hungary on his father’s death in 1272. His minority (until 1277) was

  • Ladislas the Kuman (king of Hungary)

    Ladislas IV, king of Hungary who, by his support of the German king Rudolf I at the Battle of Dürnkrut, helped to establish the future power of the Habsburg dynasty in Austria. The son of Stephen V, Ladislas IV became king of Hungary on his father’s death in 1272. His minority (until 1277) was

  • Ladislas V (king of Hungary and Bohemia)

    Ladislas V, boy king of Hungary and of Bohemia (from 1453), who was caught up in the feud between his guardian Ulrich, count of Cilli, and the Hunyadi family of Hungary. Ladislas was the posthumous only son of the Habsburg German king Albert II, who had also been king of Hungary and Bohemia. The e

  • Ladislas, Saint (king of Hungary)

    Ladislas I, ; canonized 1192; feast day June 27), king of Hungary who greatly expanded the boundaries of the kingdom and consolidated it internally; no other Hungarian king was so generally beloved by the people. The son of Béla I of Hungary and the Polish princess Rycheza (Ryksa), Ladislas was

  • Ladislav Pohrobek (king of Hungary and Bohemia)

    Ladislas V, boy king of Hungary and of Bohemia (from 1453), who was caught up in the feud between his guardian Ulrich, count of Cilli, and the Hunyadi family of Hungary. Ladislas was the posthumous only son of the Habsburg German king Albert II, who had also been king of Hungary and Bohemia. The e

  • Ladislaw, Will (fictional character)

    Will Ladislaw, fictional character, a young headstrong idealist in who is one of the protagonists of the novel Middlemarch (1871–72) by George Eliot. Ladislaw is set in stark contrast to Edward Casaubon, his middle-aged and pedantic cousin, both of whom are attracted to Dorothea

  • ladle (metallurgy)

    steel: The process: …converter by a special iron-charging ladle; this ladle receives the iron at a transfer station from transport ladles, which bring the iron from the blast furnace. Many plants lower the sulfur content of the iron just before it is charged into the converter by injecting a lime-magnesium mixture or calcium…

  • ladle furnace (metallurgy)

    steel: Controlling temperature: …can be achieved in a ladle furnace (LF). This is a small electric-arc furnace with an 8- to 25-megavolt-ampere transformer, three electrodes for arc heating, and the ladle acting as the furnace shell—as shown in A in the figure. Argon or electromagnetic stirring is applied for better heat transfer. Most…

  • Lado Enclave (region, Africa)

    Lado Enclave, region in central Africa, bordering on Lake Albert and situated on the west bank of the Upper Nile, that was administered by the Congo Free State in 1894–1909 and was incorporated thereafter into the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. Europeans first visited the northern part of the region in

  • Ladoga, Lake (lake, Russia)

    Lake Ladoga, largest lake in Europe, located in northwestern Russia about 25 miles (40 km) east of St. Petersburg. It is 6,700 square miles (17,600 square km) in area—exclusive of islands—and 136 miles (219 km) long, with an average width of 51 miles (82 km) and an average depth of 167 feet (51 m).

  • Ladozhskoe Ozero (lake, Russia)

    Lake Ladoga, largest lake in Europe, located in northwestern Russia about 25 miles (40 km) east of St. Petersburg. It is 6,700 square miles (17,600 square km) in area—exclusive of islands—and 136 miles (219 km) long, with an average width of 51 miles (82 km) and an average depth of 167 feet (51 m).

  • Ladozhskoye Ozero (lake, Russia)

    Lake Ladoga, largest lake in Europe, located in northwestern Russia about 25 miles (40 km) east of St. Petersburg. It is 6,700 square miles (17,600 square km) in area—exclusive of islands—and 136 miles (219 km) long, with an average width of 51 miles (82 km) and an average depth of 167 feet (51 m).

  • Ladri di biciclette (film by De Sica [1948])

    Vittorio De Sica: …Italy; Ladri di biciclette (1948; The Bicycle Thief), an Oscar winner for best foreign film; Miracolo a Milano (1951; Miracle in Milan), a comic parable about the clash of rich and poor in Milan; and Umberto D. (1952), a tragedy about a lonely pensioner, his dog, and a young maid…

  • Ladrones Islands (islands, Pacific Ocean)

    Mariana Islands, island arc, a series of volcanic and uplifted coral formations in the western Pacific Ocean, about 1,500 miles (2,400 km) east of the Philippines. They are the highest slopes of a massive undersea mountain range, rising some 6 miles (9.5 km) from the Marianas Trench in the ocean

  • lady (British peerage)

    Lady, in the British Isles, a general title for any peeress below the rank of duchess and also for the wife of a baronet or of a knight. Before the Hanoverian succession, when the use of “princess” became settled practice, royal daughters were styled Lady Forename or the Lady Forename. “Lady” is

  • Lady Amherst’s pheasant (bird)

    pheasant: …ruffed pheasants: Lady Amherst’s (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and the golden pheasant (C. pictus).

  • Lady and the Tramp (film by Geronimi, Jackson, and Luske [1955])

    Lady and the Tramp, American animated musical film, released in 1955, that, with its affecting love story featuring dogs, became one of Walt Disney’s most endearing movies. A sweet-natured celebration of love—even by Disney standards—the story concerns the romance between Lady, an upper-class

  • Lady and the Unicorn, The (tapestry)

    tapestry: 15th century: …Hunt of the Unicorn or The Lady and the Unicorn. The origin of millefleurs tapestries is disputed, but it is thought that they were woven in the Flemish workshops of Brussels and Bruges and by itinerant weavers in the Loire Valley of France.

  • Lady Audley’s Secret (work by Braddon)

    Mary Elizabeth Braddon: …Richmond, Surrey), English novelist whose Lady Audley’s Secret (1862) was the most successful of the sensation novels of the 1860s.

  • Lady Be Good (film by McLeod [1941])

    Norman Z. McLeod: Middle years: With Lady Be Good (1941), he returned to the more comfortable territory of musical comedy. It featured such top-name performers as Eleanor Powell, Ann Sothern, Red Skelton, and Robert Young, and Busby Berkeley staged the impressive dance numbers. Next was Jackass Mail

  • Lady Bird (film by Gerwig [2017])

    Tracy Letts: …and the acclaimed coming-of-age tale Lady Bird. In 2019 Letts starred in the Broadway revival of Arthur Miller’s All My Sons and appeared in Little Women, a film adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s beloved classic.

  • Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center (American organization)

    Lady Bird Johnson: …Wildflower Research Center (now the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center). Although she occasionally made political appearances for her son-in-law, Virginia governor (and later senator) Charles Robb, she dedicated most of her time to the family business and her grandchildren.

  • Lady Byng Memorial Trophy (sports award)

    ice hockey: The National Hockey League: …the top point scorer; the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy, for the player best combining clean play with a high degree of skill; the Conn Smythe Trophy, for the play-offs’ outstanding performer; the Frank J. Selke Trophy, for the best defensive forward; the Jack Adams Award, for the coach of the…

  • Lady chapel (architecture)

    Lady chapel, chapel attached to a church and dedicated to the Blessed Virgin. As the development of the chevet, or radiating system of apse chapels, progressed during the 12th and 13th centuries, custom began to dictate that the chapel dedicated to the Blessed Virgin be given the most important

  • Lady Chatterley’s Lover (novel by Lawrence)

    Lady Chatterley’s Lover, novel by D. H. Lawrence, published in a limited English-language edition in Florence (1928) and in Paris (1929). It was first published in England in an expurgated version in 1932. The full text was published only in 1959 in New York City and in 1960 in London, when it was

  • Lady Clara Vere de Vere (poem by Tennyson)

    Kind Hearts and Coronets: …from Alfred Tennyson’s poem “Lady Clara Vere de Vere”: “Kind hearts are more than coronets, and simple faith than Norman blood.”

  • Lady Day (American jazz singer)

    Billie Holiday, American jazz singer, one of the greatest from the 1930s to the ’50s. Eleanora (her preferred spelling) Harris was the daughter of Clarence Holiday, a professional musician who for a time played guitar with the Fletcher Henderson band. She and her mother used her maternal

  • Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill (play by Robertson)

    Audra McDonald: …starred in the Broadway play Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar &amp; Grill and won a Tony Award (2014) for her performance as jazz singer Billie Holiday in that production, which tells of the singer’s final months of performance before her death in 1959. McDonald was the first person to win…

  • Lady Di (British princess)

    Diana, princess of Wales, former consort (1981–96) of Charles, prince of Wales; mother of the heir second in line to the British throne, Prince William, duke of Cambridge (born 1982); and one of the foremost celebrities of her day. (For more on Diana, especially on the effect of her celebrity

  • Lady Elizabeth’s Men (English theatrical troupe)

    Hope Theatre: …Jonson’s Bartholomew Fair, performed by Lady Elizabeth’s Men in the fall of 1614. Although the agreement with this troupe stipulated that bearbaiting would occupy the Hope only once every two weeks, that sport proved to be more profitable than the plays, and disputes soon developed over priorities, provoking players to…

  • Lady Eve, The (film by Sturges [1941])

    Preston Sturges: Films of the early 1940s: The Lady Eve (1941) was Sturges’s first true “A” production, and he was equal to the task, creating a tart romantic-comedy classic that starred Barbara Stanwyck as a con artist who first fleeces and then falls for a naive herpetologist (Henry Fonda).

  • lady fern (fern)

    Lady fern, (Athyrium filix-femina), a large, feathery fern classified in the family Woodsiaceae, widely cultivated for ornamentation. Leaves are about 75 cm (30 inches) long and 25 cm (10 inches) wide and grow in circular clusters. Characteristic of the genus are curved or horseshoe-shaped

  • Lady for a Day (film by Capra [1933])

    Frank Capra: The early 1930s: …Capra’s next film, the sentimental Lady for a Day (1933), was. Capra both produced and directed Riskin’s adaptation of Damon Runyon’s short story “Madame La Gimp.” It concerned a decrepit peddler, Apple Annie (May Robson), who enlists a sympathetic gangster (Warren William) to transform her into a society matron so…

  • Lady Frederica Stanhope at Chevening Church (sculpture by Chantrey)

    Sir Francis Legatt Chantrey: …works, he considered his sculpture Lady Frederica Stanhope at Chevening Church (1824) to be the best.

  • Lady from Shanghai, The (film by Welles [1947])

    The Lady from Shanghai, American film noir, released in 1947, that was adapted from the Sherwood King novel If I Die Before I Wake. Director, writer, and star Orson Welles cast his estranged wife, Rita Hayworth, opposite himself in a film that became famous for its confounding plot and for the

  • Lady from the Sea, The (play by Ibsen)

    The Lady from the Sea, play in five acts by Henrik Ibsen, published in Norwegian as Fruen fra havet in 1888 and first performed in early 1889. It was the first of several mystical psychological dramas by Ibsen. The play traces the increasing distraction of Ellida Wangel, the second wife of Dr.

  • Lady Gaga (American singer-songwriter)

    Lady Gaga, American singer-songwriter and performance artist, known for her flamboyant costumes, provocative lyrics, and strong vocal talents, who achieved enormous popular success with songs such as “Just Dance,” “Bad Romance,” and “Born This Way.” Germanotta was born into an Italian American

  • Lady in Cement (film by Douglas [1968])

    Gordon Douglas: Later films: …Rome (1967) and its sequel Lady in Cement (1968) and (arguably the best of the trio) The Detective (1968), which featured the notable cast of Robert Duvall, Lee Remick, Ralph Meeker, and Jack Klugman.

  • Lady in Question, The (film by Vidor [1940])

    Charles Vidor: Rita Hayworth: Cover Girl and Gilda: In 1940 Vidor made The Lady in Question, the first of several films to star Rita Hayworth. It was one of the actress’s early showcases; she starred as an accused murderer who, after being acquitted, moves in with the family of one of the jurors. Ladies in Retirement (1941)…

  • Lady in the Dark (film by Leisen [1944])

    Mitchell Leisen: Films of the 1940s: Leisen next took on Lady in the Dark (1944), an ambitious but flawed attempt to adapt the inventive Broadway musical of the same by Moss Hart, Kurt Weill, and Ira Gershwin to the big screen. Its depiction of a character undergoing psychoanalysis and its meditation on women in the…

  • Lady in the Dark (musical by Hart and Gershwin and Weill)

    Kurt Weill: …followed by the musical play Lady in the Dark (1941; libretto and lyrics by Moss Hart and Ira Gershwin), the musical comedy One Touch of Venus (1943; with S.J. Perelman and Ogden Nash), the musical version of Elmer Rice’s Street Scene (1947), and the

  • Lady in the Lake (film by Montgomery)

    motion picture: Shooting angle and point of view: …by the actor Robert Montgomery, Lady in the Lake, in which the camera actually plays the main character. The entire film is seen from the camera/character’s point of view so that the audience sees only what the camera/character sees. The movie is an interesting experiment in the use of subjective…

  • Lady in the Van, The (film by Hytner [2015])

    Alan Bennett: …the stage in 1999 and film in 2015. A best-selling collection of his diaries and reminiscences, titled Writing Home, appeared in 1994. In the memoir Untold Stories (2005), he looked back affectionately at his parents, poignantly reflected on his mother’s descent into senility and her death in a nursing home,…

  • Lady Jane (film by Nunn [1986])

    Helena Bonham Carter: …title role of his film Lady Jane (1986). Around the same time, she was cast in A Room with a View (1985) as Edwardian heroine Lucy Honeychurch, a young socialite who is conflicted by her feelings for two men. The film was widely praised by critics and was nominated for…

  • Lady Julie (play by Strindberg)

    Miss Julie, full-length drama in one act by August Strindberg, published in Swedish as Fr?ken Julie in 1888 and performed in 1889. It was also translated into English as Countess Julie (1912) and Lady Julie (1950). The play substitutes such interludes as a peasant dance and a pantomime for the

  • Lady Killer (film by Del Ruth [1933])

    Roy Del Ruth: Early films: …perhaps best of the lot, Lady Killer, with Cagney in one of his finest comic roles as a gangster on the lam who draws on his experience as a movie theatre usher to become a Hollywood star. After making the drama Upper World (1934), his first under the Production Code,…

  • Lady Killer, The (album by Green)

    CeeLo Green: …of his lushly orchestrated album The Lady Killer (2010) and earned four Grammy nominations; it won for best urban/alternative performance. In 2012 his sultry single “Fool for You” won Grammy Awards for best R&amp;B song and best traditional R&amp;B performance. Heart Blanche (2015), however, was uneven and received mixed reviews.

  • Lady L (film by Ustinov [1965])

    Sophia Loren: …1958), and Paul Newman (Lady L, 1965). Such exposure was undoubtedly instrumental in helping her win an Academy Award for best actress in De Sica’s La ciociara (1960; Two Women), in which she delivered a powerful performance as the courageous mother of a teenage girl during World War II.

  • Lady Lazarus (poem by Plath)

    Sylvia Plath: …the poems “Daddy” and “Lady Lazarus” and the novel The Bell Jar, starkly express a sense of alienation and self-destruction closely tied to her personal experiences and, by extension, the situation of women in mid-20th-century America.

  • Lady Lever Art Gallery (museum, Bebington, England, United Kingdom)

    Lever Art Gallery, in Port Sunlight, a model village founded for workers in Bebington, Cheshire (now in Merseyside), Eng. The museum was a gift to the public of the 1st Viscount Leverhulme, as a memorial to his wife, who died in 1913. The building was begun in 1914 and opened in December 1922. The

  • lady lupine (plant)

    lupine: diffusus) and lady lupine (L. villosus) are distributed throughout the southern United States. Bigleaf lupine (L. polyphyllus), from the Pacific Northwest, is an invasive species in parts of Europe and New Zealand, where its ornamental Russell hybrids have escaped cultivation.

  • Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District (opera by Shostakovich)

    Dmitry Shostakovich: Early life and works: … (composed 1930–32; revised and retitled Katerina Izmaylova), marked a stylistic retreat. Yet even this more accessible musical language was too radical for the Soviet authorities.

  • Lady Macgregors bird-of-paradise (bird)

    bird-of-paradise: …golden-silky, bird-of-paradise (Loboparadisea sericea); and Loria’s, or Lady Macgregor’s, bird-of-paradise (Loria loriae)—three species formerly classified as bowerbirds.

  • Lady Madonna (song by Lennon and McCartney)

    Paul McCartney: The Beatles: …rock songs, such as “Lady Madonna,” “Back in the USSR,” and “Helter Skelter” (all 1968), but above all he has an extraordinary gift for melodies and sometimes tags an entirely new one on to the end of a song, as he did with “Hey Jude” (1968). This facility extends…

  • Lady Maiko (film by Suo [2014])

    Suo Masayuki: …Suo directed the musical comedy Maiko wa red? (2014; Lady Maiko).

  • Lady Maisry (ballad)

    ballad: Romantic tragedies: …father and brothers or “Lady Maisry,” pregnant by an English lord, is burned by her fanatically Scottish brother. Incest, frequent in ballads recorded before 1800 (“Lizie Wan,” “The Bonny Hind”), is shunned by modern tradition.

  • Lady Marmalade (song by Crewe and Nolan)

    Christina Aguilera: …LaBelle’s 1974 funk classic “Lady Marmalade.” Soon after, Aguilera released Stripped (2002), on which she cast off her ingenue image and took on a more provocative sexualized persona, epitomized by her hit single “Dirrty.” Reminiscent of the work of Etta James and Billie Holiday, Back to Basics (2006) paid…

  • Lady of Elche, The (sculpture)

    Elche: …La dama de Elche (“The Lady of Elche”), was found on a nearby archaeological site in 1897; a mosaic floor with Latin inscriptions was also uncovered there in 1959. A local custom—declared a national artistic monument in 1931—is observed annually on August 14–15 in the 17th-century church of Santa…

  • Lady of Light (poetry by Wakoski)

    Diane Wakoski: …Bay of Angels (2013), and Lady of Light (2018). The Butcher’s Apron (2000) features poems about food. Wakoski also published several essay collections.

  • Lady of Massachusetts, A (American writer)

    Hannah Webster Foster, American novelist whose single successful novel, though highly sentimental, broke with some of the conventions of its time and type. Hannah Webster received the genteel education prescribed for young girls of that day. In April 1785 she married the Reverend John Foster, a

  • Lady of Shalott, The (poem by Tennyson)

    The Lady of Shalott, narrative poem in four sections by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, published in 1832 and revised for his 1842 collection Poems. Typically Victorian in its exaltation of an imprisoned maiden who dies for a chaste love, the poem tells of Elaine of Arthurian legend, shut in her father’s

  • Lady of Shalott, The (painting by Crane)

    Walter Crane: …early paintings such as “The Lady of Shalott” (1862). He came to oppose the policies of the academy, which steadily refused his later work. In 1864 he began to illustrate an admirable series of sixpenny toy books of nursery rhymes for Edmund Evans, the colour printer. A new series, beginning…

  • Lady of the Camellias, The (play by Dumas)

    La traviata: Alexandre Dumas fils (La Dame aux camélias), the opera marked a large step forward for Verdi in his quest to express dramatic ideas in music. La traviata means “the fallen woman” or “the one who goes astray” and refers to the main character, Violetta Valéry, a courtesan. The…

  • Lady of the Dead (Aztec deity)

    Day of the Dead: Led by the goddess Mictecacihuatl, known as “Lady of the Dead,” the celebration lasted a month. After the Spanish arrived in Mexico and began converting the native peoples to Roman Catholicism, the holiday was moved to coincide with All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day (November 1 and 2,…

  • Lady of the Dynasty (film by Zhang [2015])

    Zhang Yimou: …nu ren: Yang Guifei (2015; Lady of the Dynasty), about the tragic love affair between concubine Yang Guifei and Emperor Xuanzong, and then helmed the English-language thriller The Great Wall (2016). Ying (2018; Shadow) is an action drama inspired by China’s Three Kingdoms.

  • Lady of the Lake, The (poem by Scott)

    The Lady of the Lake, poem in six cantos by Sir Walter Scott, published in 1810. Composed primarily in octosyllabic tetrameter couplets, it mines Gaelic history to retell a well-known legend about the graceful feudal heroine Ellen Douglas. The poem, which is set in the Scottish Highlands in the

  • Lady of the Lamp (British nurse, statistician, and social reformer)

    Florence Nightingale, British nurse, statistician, and social reformer who was the foundational philosopher of modern nursing. Nightingale was put in charge of nursing British and allied soldiers in Turkey during the Crimean War. She spent many hours in the wards, and her night rounds giving

  • Lady Redgrave (British actress)

    Rachel Kempson, (Lady Redgrave), British actress (born May 28, 1910, Dartmouth, Eng.—died May 24, 2003, Millbrook, N.Y.), had a distinguished stage, film, and television career in Great Britain but, especially in the U.S., became better known as the matriarch of the Redgrave acting family—the w

  • Lady Sings the Blues (film by Furie [1972])

    Berry Gordy, Jr.: …and began producing films, including Lady Sings the Blues (1972), featuring Ross in her film debut as Billie Holiday. By the mid-1980s the company boasted annual revenues in excess of $100 million, and Motown acts had recorded more than 50 number one hits on the Billboard pop singles chart. Facing…

  • Lady Sings the Blues (autobiography by Holiday)

    Billie Holiday: …1956 she wrote an autobiography, Lady Sings the Blues (with William Dufty), that was made into a motion picture starring Diana Ross in 1972. Holiday’s health began to fail because of drug and alcohol abuse, and she died in 1959.

  • lady slipper (plant)

    Lady’s slipper, (subfamily Cypripedioideae), subfamily of five genera of orchids (family Orchidaceae), in which the lip of the flower is slipper-shaped. Lady’s slippers are found throughout Eurasia and the Americas, and some species are cultivated. Lady’s slipper orchids are usually terrestrial,

  • Lady Susan (novel by Austen)

    Jane Austen: Life: …earliest writings is evident in Lady Susan, a short epistolary novel written about 1793–94 (and not published until 1871). This portrait of a woman bent on the exercise of her own powerful mind and personality to the point of social self-destruction is, in effect, a study of frustration and of…

  • Lady Takes a Flyer, The (film by Arnold [1958])

    Jack Arnold: The Lady Takes a Flyer (1958), a mainstream romance, featured Chandler alongside Lana Turner, who played a pilot who dislikes the prospect of being domesticated. High School Confidential! (1958), a tongue-in-cheek juvenile-delinquent film starring Mamie Van Doren and Russ Tamblyn, returned Arnold to B-film territory.…

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