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  • Little Men (novel by Alcott)

    Little Women: The novel has two sequels: Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo’s Boys (1871) and Jo’s Boys and How They Turned Out (1886). Little Women also inspired numerous movies, including the 1933 classic, which starred Katharine Hepburn as Jo, and a 1994 film directed by Gillian Armstrong. In addition, director-screenwriter…

  • Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo’s Boys (novel by Alcott)

    Little Women: The novel has two sequels: Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo’s Boys (1871) and Jo’s Boys and How They Turned Out (1886). Little Women also inspired numerous movies, including the 1933 classic, which starred Katharine Hepburn as Jo, and a 1994 film directed by Gillian Armstrong. In addition, director-screenwriter…

  • Little Mermaid (statue)

    Copenhagen: …at Langelinie Pier is the Little Mermaid statue (1913), which is based on a story by Hans Christian Andersen. A Danish national symbol, it is one of the city’s most popular tourist attractions.

  • Little Mermaid, The (film by Harris [2018])

    Shirley MacLaine: Her subsequent movies included The Little Mermaid (2018), based on the Hans Christian Andersen story.

  • Little Mermaid, The (American animated film [1989])

    Alan Menken: …Hans Christian Andersen story “The Little Mermaid,” which was released in 1989. The resulting collaboration earned Menken two Academy Awards and his first of numerous Grammy Awards, among other accolades. The team’s next Disney project, Beauty and the Beast (1991), was nominated for best picture and earned Menken another…

  • little millet (plant)

    panicum: …proso millet (Panicum miliaceum) and little millet (P. sumatrense), are important food crops in Asia and Africa. See also millet.

  • Little Minch (strait, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    The Minch: The Little Minch, its southerly extension, lies between the island groups of the Outer and Inner Hebrides, separating the islands of Harris and North Uist in the west from the island of Skye in the east.

  • Little Minister, The (novel by Barrie)

    The Little Minister, popular sentimental novel by J.M. Barrie, published in 1891 and dramatized in 1897. The Little Minister is set in Thrums, a Scottish weaving village based on Barrie’s birthplace, and concerns Gavin Dishart, a young impoverished minister with his first congregation. The weavers

  • Little Miquelon (island, Saint Pierre and Miquelon)

    Saint-Pierre and Miquelon: …in the Miquelons (Miquelon and Langlade, sometimes known as Great and Little Miquelon, connected by the slim, sandy Isthmus of Langlade). But the island of Saint-Pierre, only 10 square miles (26 square km) in area, has almost 90 percent of the total population and is the administrative and commercial centre.

  • Little Miss Broadway (film by Cummings [1938])

    Irving Cummings: …Cummings reteamed with Temple on Little Miss Broadway (1938), a typically sentimental outing for the young actress, enlivened by her duets with Jimmy Durante. The film was a box-office success, and the director and actress then made the Depression-era comedy Just Around the Corner (1938), which also starred Bill Robinson.…

  • Little Miss Marker (film by Hall [1934])

    Alexander Hall: Early work: …of Shirley Temple’s best showcases, Little Miss Marker (1934). Other films released in 1934 were The Pursuit of Happiness, a period piece starring Joan Bennett, and the melodrama Limehouse Blues, with Raft and Anna May Wong. In 1935 Hall directed Goin’ to Town, a comedy starring Mae West as a…

  • Little Miss Sunshine (film by Dayton [2006])

    Alan Arkin: …blunt, cantankerous, heroin-sniffing grandfather in Little Miss Sunshine (2006), a comedy about a dysfunctional family driving cross-country to attend a child beauty pageant, earned him the Academy Award for best supporting actor. His subsequent films included The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause (2006), the thriller Rendition (2007), the 2008…

  • Little Missouri National Grassland (grassland region, North Dakota, United States)

    Little Missouri National Grassland, prairie grassland region of western North Dakota, U.S. Created in 1960, it is one of four grassland areas included within the Dakota Prairie Grasslands. It covers an area of more than 1,600 square miles (4,140 square km), making it the largest of the country’s

  • Little Missouri River (river, northwestern United States)

    Little Missouri River, river, northwestern United States. It rises along the western slopes of the Missouri Buttes formation (just west of Devils Tower National Monument) in northeastern Wyoming. The river then flows northeast across the southeastern corner of Montana and, after entering the

  • Little Missouri River (river, Arkansas, United States)

    Little Missouri River, river rising in southwestern Arkansas, U.S., in the Ouachita Mountains. It flows about 150 miles (240 km) southeast into the Ouachita River, 27 miles (43 km) above Camden. Narrows Dam, 7 miles (11 km) northwest of Murfreesboro, impounds Lake Greeson for flood control and

  • Little Mo (American tennis player)

    Maureen Connolly, American tennis player who in 1953 became the first woman to win the Grand Slam of tennis: the British (Wimbledon), United States, Australian, and French singles championships. Connolly began playing tennis at the age of 10. After a few months of training under a professional

  • Little Monsters (film by Forsythe [2019])

    Lupita Nyong'o: …doppelg?ngers, and the zombie comedy Little Monsters. Also that year she reprised her role as Maz Kanata in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker.

  • Little Muddy (North Dakota, United States)

    Williston, city, seat (1891) of Williams county, northwestern North Dakota, U.S. It lies on the Missouri River, 20 miles (30 km) east of the Montana state line and 65 miles (105 km) south of the Canadian border. The Lewis and Clark Expedition passed through the area in 1804–05. Assiniboin, Crow,

  • Little Murders (film by Arkin [1971])

    Alan Arkin: …and acted in the film Little Murders (1971), having earlier (1969) directed an Off-Broadway revival of that play, written by Jules Feiffer. He later received a Tony Award (1973) for his staging of Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys (1972–74). He also appeared in the 1972 film adaptation of the Simon’s…

  • Little Musgrave (ballad)

    ballad: Crime: …sweetheart poisons “Lord Randal”; “Little Musgrave” is killed by Lord Barnard when he is discovered in bed with Lady Barnard, and the lady, too, is gorily dispatched. The murders of “Jim Fisk,” Johnny of “Frankie and Johnny,” and many other ballad victims are prompted by sexual jealousy. One particular…

  • Little Namaqualand (region, South Africa)

    Namaqualand: …by the Orange River into Little Namaqualand in South Africa and Great Namaqualand in Namibia. The region is primarily desert, with annual precipitation averaging between 2 and 8 inches (50 and 200 mm).

  • Little Napoleon (American baseball player and manager)

    John McGraw, American professional baseball player and manager who led the New York Giants to 10 National League championships. During the 1890s McGraw was a star infielder for the Baltimore National League club. (Both the American and the National League Baltimore teams of this era were named the

  • Little Nell (fictional character)

    Little Nell, fictional character, a frail child who is a major figure in Charles Dickens’s novel The Old Curiosity Shop (1840–41). Dickens’s account of her death after many vicissitudes is often considered the apotheosis of Victorian

  • Little Nemo in Slumberland (comic strip by McCay)

    animation: Early history: Winsor McCay, whose elegant, surreal Little Nemo in Slumberland and Dream of the Rarebit Fiend remain pinnacles of comic-strip art. McCay created a hand-coloured short film of Little Nemo for use during his vaudeville act in 1911, but it was Gertie the Dinosaur, created for McCay’s 1914 tour, that transformed…

  • Little Night Music, A (film by Prince [1977])
  • Little Noddy (work by Blyton)

    Enid Blyton: …and in the 1950s her Little Noddy series, featuring the adventures of Little Noddy, Mr. Plod the policeman, Big Ears, and other characters of Toyland Village, enjoyed enormous popularity and made her a household name. Blyton’s books feature clearly delineated good and bad characters and have exciting plots that illustrate…

  • Little Northern Dvina River (river, Russia)

    Northern Dvina River, river formed by the junction of the Sukhona and Yug rivers at the city of Velikiy Ustyug, in Vologod oblast (province) of Russia. The Northern Dvina is one of the largest and most important waterways of the northern European portion of Russia. It flows 462 miles (744 km) in a

  • Little Ob (river, Russia)

    Ob River: Physiography: …from the right, and the Little (Malaya) Ob, which receives the Northern (Severnaya) Sosva, the Vogulka, and the Synya rivers from the left. These main channels are reunited below Shuryshkary into a single stream that is up to 12 miles (19 km) wide and 130 feet (40 metres) deep; but…

  • Little Octobrists (Communist organization)

    Little Octobrist, member of a Communist organization for children aged nine and under, closely associated with the Komsomol (q.v.) for youth aged 14 to

  • Little Ones, Theatre of the (Italian theatrical company)

    puppetry: Styles of puppet theatre: …in this tradition was the Theatre of the Little Ones of Vittorio Podrecca, which introduced the marionette pianist and the soprano with heaving bosom that have been widely copied ever since.

  • Little Oratory, Brotherhood of the (Roman Catholic confraternity)

    Oratorian: Associated with it is the Brotherhood of the Little Oratory, a confraternity of clerics and laymen. Although the seat of government is in Rome, there are other foundations elsewhere, notably in Italy, in Spain, and in England.

  • Little Orphan Annie (American comic strip)

    Little Orphan Annie, American newspaper comic strip depicting the adventures of a plucky street urchin. Little Orphan Annie enjoyed an extraordinarily long life in newspapers, on stage, and in film. Making her first appearance on Aug. 5, 1924, Annie—who was conceived as an 11-year-old escapee from

  • Little Orphan Annie (radio program)

    radio: Juvenile action and adventure series: …adventures for youngsters began with Little Orphan Annie, first broadcast over WGN radio in Chicago in 1930. Annie was first a comic strip, created in 1924 by Harold Gray for the Chicago Tribune, which owned WGN. The radio series graduated to NBC-Blue in April 1931. The show’s format set the…

  • Little Orphant Annie (poem by Riley)

    Little Orphant Annie, one of the best-known poems of James Whitcomb Riley, first published under the pseudonym “Benj. F. Johnson, of Boone” in the popular collection The Old Swimmin’ Hole and ’Leven More Poems (1883). “Little Orphant Annie” was written in the Hoosier dialect of Riley’s native

  • Little Otik (film by ?vankmajer)

    Jan ?vankmajer: …example, his film Otesánek (2000; Little Otik) is a dark comedy based on “The Wooden Baby” (1865) by Czech folklorist Karel Erben. The premise of the film follows that of the tale, which is about a wooden baby who comes to life and devours his parents. However, ?vankmajer put a…

  • little owl (bird)

    Little owl, (Athene noctua), brownish bird about 20 centimetres (about 8 inches) long, belonging to the family Strigidae (order Strigiformes). Little owls occur in Europe, central Asia, and northern Africa and have been introduced into New Zealand. They are active during the day and often perch in

  • Little Parliament (English history)

    Barebones Parliament, (July 4–Dec. 12, 1653), a hand-picked legislative group of “godly” men convened by Oliver Cromwell following the Puritan victory in the English Civil Wars. Its name was derived from one of its obscure members, Praise-God Barbon. After Cromwell expelled the Rump Parliament

  • little penguin (bird)

    Blue penguin, (Eudyptula minor), species of penguin (order Sphenisciformes) characterized by its diminutive stature and pale blue to dark gray plumage. It is the smallest of all known penguin species, and it is the only species of the genus Eudyptula. There are, however, six subspecies: E. minor

  • little people (human anatomy)

    Midget, in human anatomy, a person of very small stature whose bodily proportions, intelligence, and sexual development are within the normal range. Diminutive stature occurs sporadically in families the rest of whose members are of ordinary size. The children of midgets are usually of ordinary

  • Little Piano Girl, the (American musician, composer and educator)

    Mary Lou Williams, jazz pianist who performed with and composed for many of the great jazz artists of the 1940s and ’50s. Williams received early instruction from her mother, a classically trained pianist. Picking out simple tunes at age two, Mary Lou was a prodigy with perfect pitch and a highly

  • Little Placentia (former community, Newfoundland, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Argentia, former unincorporated community, southeastern Newfoundland, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. It is situated along the west coast of the Avalon Peninsula just to the north of the town of Placentia (into which Argentia was administratively incorporated in 1994) and overlooks Placentia

  • Little Poison (American athlete)

    Paul and Lloyd Waner: …long balls (doubles and triples); Little Poison, who batted left-handed and threw right-handed, was known for the number of singles he hit.

  • Little Poland (historical region, Poland)

    Partitions of Poland: Austria acquired the regions of Little Poland (Ma?opolska) south of the Vistula River, western Podolia, and the area that subsequently became known as Galicia.

  • Little Poland Uplands (geographical region, Poland)

    Little Poland Uplands, highland area, southern Poland, having an area of 10,000 square miles (25,000 sq km). Located south of the Polish Lowlands, it embraces the territory from the Kraków-Cz?stochowa scarplands (Polish Jura) to the Vistula River. The region includes the Silesian-Kraków uplands,

  • Little Polish (language)

    Polish language: and Pomeranian, Silesian, Little Polish, and Mazovian. Kashubian (Cassubian), often classified as a Polish dialect, is, historically, a separate language.

  • Little Pretty Pocket-Book, A (work by Newbery)

    baseball: Origin: …in John Newbery’s children’s book A Little Pretty Pocket-Book. The book has a brief poem and an illustration depicting a game called base-ball. Interestingly, the bases in the illustration are marked by posts instead of the bags and flat home plate now so familiar in the game. The book was…

  • Little Prince, The (fable by Saint-Exupéry)

    The Little Prince, fable and modern classic by French aviator and writer Antoine de Saint-Exupéry that was published with his own illustrations in French as Le Petit Prince in 1943. The simple tale tells the story of a child, the little prince, who travels the universe gaining wisdom. The novella

  • Little Princess, The (film by Lang [1939])

    Walter Lang: Films of the 1920s and ’30s: The Little Princess (1939) was a handsomely mounted Technicolor version of the Frances Hodgson Burnett children’s classic, starring Shirley Temple as the waif who is cruelly treated in a boarding school until her father returns from the Boer War to rescue her.

  • Little Professor, The (American baseball player)

    Dom DiMaggio, (Dominic Paul DiMaggio; “The Little Professor”), American baseball player (born Feb. 12, 1917, San Francisco, Calif.—died May 8, 2009, Marion, Mass.), enjoyed a stellar career in Major League Baseball as a centrefielder for the Boston Red Sox, despite being overshadowed by the prowess

  • little quaking grass (plant)

    quaking grass: …and little quaking grass, or shivery grass (B. minor).

  • Little Rascals, The (short-film series)

    Gordon Douglas: Early work: …Our Gang (also known as Little Rascals) series, which centred on the antics of a group of children that included Spanky, Alfalfa, and Buckwheat. Douglas helmed more than 30 Our Gang shorts, including the Academy Award-winning Bored of Education (1936). He also codirected the Our Gang feature General Spanky (1936),…

  • Little Rascals, The (film by Spheeris [1994])

    Reba McEntire: …in the films North and The Little Rascals; and won both a Grammy Award and a CMA Award for her collaboration with Linda Davis on “Does He Love You.” She starred in a number of made-for-television movies over the next few years before landing her own television sitcom, Reba, which…

  • little red book (edition by Lin Biao)

    China: Readjustment and reaction, 1961–65: …of the “Little Red Book,” Quotations from Chairman Mao—to popularize Maoist ideology among the relatively uneducated military recruits. As the military forces under Lin increasingly showed that they could combine ideological purity with technical virtuosity, Mao tried to expand the PLA’s organizational authority and its political role. Beginning in 1963,…

  • Little Red Chairs, The (novel by O’Brien)

    Edna O'Brien: The Little Red Chairs (2015) was widely praised for its acutely observed characterization of an Irish villager who has an ill-fated affair with a war criminal in hiding. In 2019 O’Brien published Girl, which was inspired by the Nigerian schoolgirls who were kidnapped by members…

  • Little Red Corvette (song by Prince)

    Prince: “Little Red Corvette” (1983) was Prince’s first big crossover hit, gaining airplay on MTV at a time when virtually no black artists appeared on the influential new medium. Purple Rain (1984) made him one of the major stars of the 1980s and remains his biggest-selling…

  • Little Red School House (educational program)

    Elisabeth Antoinette Irwin: …an experiment dubbed the “Little Red School House” (1921). This program continued for 10 years. It revised the standard curriculum, incorporating elements of play and group activities and varying the teaching methods, placing less emphasis on strictly academic learning. Financial considerations and other objections finally forced Irwin’s program out…

  • Little Rest (Rhode Island, United States)

    Kingston, village in South Kingstown town (township), Washington county, southern Rhode Island, U.S. It developed after 1700 at the crossroads of the Pequot Indian Trail and the road to Tower Hill settlement and served as the county seat from 1752 to 1900. Until 1885 it was known as Little Rest

  • Little Review (American magazine)

    Margaret Anderson: …founder and editor of the Little Review magazine, the “little magazine” in which she introduced works by many of the best-known American and British writers of the 20th century.

  • Little Richard (American musician)

    Little Richard, flamboyant American singer and pianist whose hit songs of the mid-1950s were defining moments in the development of rock and roll. Born into a family of 12 children, Penniman learned gospel music in Pentecostal churches of the Deep South. As a teenager, he left home to perform

  • Little Rock (Arkansas, United States)

    Little Rock, city, capital of Arkansas, U.S. It is the seat of Pulaski county, on the Arkansas River in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains in the central part of the state. In 1722 Bernard de la Harpe, a French explorer, saw on the bank of the Arkansas River two conspicuous rock formations,

  • Little Rock Nine (American activists)

    Little Rock Nine, group of African American high-school students who challenged racial segregation in the public schools of Little Rock, Arkansas. The group—consisting of Melba Pattillo, Ernest Green, Elizabeth Eckford, Minnijean Brown, Terrence Roberts, Carlotta Walls, Jefferson Thomas, Gloria

  • Little Romance, A (film by Hill [1979])

    George Roy Hill: Later work: …success with the charming comedy A Little Romance, featuring Diane Lane as an American teenager in Paris whose first romance is orchestrated by a roguish thief (Laurence Olivier).

  • Little Russian

    Ukrainian language, East Slavic language spoken in Ukraine and in Ukrainian communities in Kazakhstan, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Lithuania, and Slovakia and by smaller numbers elsewhere. Ukrainian is a lineal descendant of the colloquial language used in Kievan Rus (10th–13th century). It is

  • Little Saint Bernard Pass (pass, France)

    Little Saint Bernard Pass, pass (7,178 ft [2,188 m]) situated just southwest of the Italian border in Savoie département of southeastern France; it lies between the Mont Blanc Massif (north) and the Graian Alps (south-southeast). The road across the pass connects Bourg-Saint-Maurice (7 mi [11 km]

  • Little Sarah (ship)

    Citizen Genêt Affair: …dispatching of the prize ship Little Sarah (refitted as La Petite Démocrate), Washington and his cabinet demanded Genêt’s recall. With the radical Jacobins newly in power in France, his arrest was ordered, and he faced possible death if he returned home. Washington declined to extradite him, and in 1794 Genêt…

  • Little Schools of Port-Royal (school, Paris, France)

    education: The teaching congregations: …a briefer career, were the Little Schools of Port-Royal. Their founder was Jean Duvergier de Hauranne, better known as the abbot of Saint-Cyran, who was one of France’s chief advocates of Jansenism, a movement opposed to Jesuitry and Scholasticism and favouring bold reforms of the church and a turn to…

  • Little Science (science)

    Big Science: …an expression of nostalgia for “Little Science,” a world of independent, individual researchers free to work alone or with graduate students on problems of their own choosing. Whether or not the world of Little Science as imagined by Weinberg ever existed became irrelevant; high-technology warfare had turned support of scientific…

  • Little Shoes, The (work by Tchaikovsky)

    Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Middle years: …Smith (1874), later revised as Cherevichki (1885; The Little Shoes), was similarly judged. In his early operas the young composer experienced difficulty in striking a balance between creative fervour and his ability to assess critically the work in progress. However, his instrumental works began to earn him his reputation, and,…

  • Little Shop of Horrors (film by Oz [1986])

    Steve Martin: …appeal in such films as Little Shop of Horrors (1986), Roxanne (1987), Planes, Trains and Automobiles (1987), Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (1988), Parenthood (1989), Father of the Bride (1991), and Father of the Bride, Part II (1995).

  • Little Shop of Horrors, The (film by Corman [1960])

    Roger Corman: …and directed the cult classic The Little Shop of Horrors, which was shot in two days and one night on a leftover set, with a memorable cameo by Nicholson. At AIP, he sought out young (and thus inexpensive) filmmakers, many of whom went on to stellar careers. Coppola and Bogdanovich…

  • Little Sister, The (novel by Chandler)

    hard-boiled fiction: …Farewell, My Lovely (1940), and The Little Sister (1949), deal with corruption and racketeering in Southern California. Other important writers of the hard-boiled school are George Harmon Coxe (1901–84), author of such thrillers as Murder with Pictures (1935) and Eye Witness (1950), and W.R. Burnett (1899–1982), who wrote Little Caesar…

  • little skate (fish)
  • Little Soldier, The (film by Godard [1960])

    Jean-Luc Godard: Breathless and filmmaking style and themes: …notably Le Petit Soldat (1963; The Little Soldier), an ironically flippant tragedy, banned for many years, about torture and countertorture. Vivre sa vie (1962; My Life to Live), a study of a young Parisian prostitute, used, with ironical solipsism, pastiches of documentary form and clinical jargon. Godard’s 1963 film Le…

  • little spotted kiwi (bird)

    kiwi: …the Northern Fiordland tokoeka; the little spotted kiwi (A. oweni); the great spotted kiwi (A. haasti); the Okarito brown kiwi (A. rowi), also called the Rowi kiwi; and the brown kiwi (A. mantelli), also called the North Island brown kiwi.

  • Little Street, The (painting by Vermeer)

    Johannes Vermeer: Artistic training and early influences: 1658; also called The Little Street) is one such work: as with de Hooch’s courtyard scenes, Vermeer has here portrayed a world of domestic tranquillity, where women and children go about their daily lives within the reassuring setting of their homes.

  • little striped skunk (mammal)

    skunk: Spotted skunks (genus Spilogale) live from southwestern Canada to Costa Rica. Except for a white spot between the eyes, their spots are actually a series of interrupted stripes running down the back and sides. These are about the size of a tree squirrel and are…

  • Little Tennessee River (river, United States)

    Little Tennessee River, river rising in the Blue Ridge Mountains of northeastern Georgia, U.S., and flowing about 150 mi (240 km) north and northwest, through southwestern North Carolina and across Tennessee to the Tennessee River just below Fort Loudoun Dam. Tennessee Valley Authority dams on the

  • little tern (bird)

    tern: The least, or little, tern (S. albifrons), under 25 cm (10 inches) long, is the smallest tern. It breeds on sandy coasts and river sandbars in temperate to tropical regions worldwide except South America. The sooty tern (S. fuscata), about 40 cm (16 inches) long, has…

  • Little Thames (Ontario, Canada)

    Stratford, city, seat (1853) of Perth county, southeastern Ontario, Canada. It lies along the Avon River in the heart of dairy-farming country. The settlement was founded during the winter of 1831–32 by William Seargeant (or Sargint), who erected the Shakespeare Hotel near the Avon; both the river

  • little theatre (American theatrical movement)

    Little theatre, movement in U.S. theatre to free dramatic forms and methods of production from the limitations of the large commercial theatres by establishing small experimental centres of drama. The movement was initiated at the beginning of the 20th century by young dramatists, stage designers,

  • Little Theatre (theatre, Paris, France)

    puppetry: Styles of puppet theatre: …when Henri Signoret founded the Little Theatre; this theatre used rod puppets mounted on a base that ran on rails below the stage, the movement of the limbs being controlled by strings attached to pedals. The plays presented were pieces by classic authors—Cervantes, Aristophanes, Shakespeare—and new plays by French poets.…

  • Little Tobago (island, Trinidad and Tobago)

    Trinidad and Tobago: Little Tobago lies about a mile off Tobago’s northeastern coast. Also called Bird of Paradise Island, Little Tobago was once noted as the only wild habitat of the greater bird of paradise outside of New Guinea; however, the bird is no longer found there.

  • Little Town, The (work by Mann)

    Heinrich Mann: …is Die kleine Stadt (1909; The Little Town).

  • Little Town, The (work by Asch)

    Sholem Asch: …and with Dos Shtetl (1905; The Little Town, 1907) he began a career outstanding for both output and impact. His tales, novels, and plays filled 29 volumes in a collected Yiddish edition published in 1929–38. By their vitality and vigorous naturalism, his works attracted sizable reading publics in Europe and…

  • Little Tramp (film character)

    The Kid: …film with his popular “Little Tramp” character. It elevated Jackie Coogan to the status of the film industry’s first child superstar.

  • Little Turtle (Miami chief)

    Little Turtle, American Indian, chief of the Miami, who achieved fame during the turbulent period when the U.S. Congress launched a punitive campaign against the Indians who were raiding settlers in the Northwest Territory. In 1790 he routed Gen. Josiah Harmar’s poorly trained militia. The next

  • Little Walter (American musician)

    Little Walter, American blues singer and harmonica virtuoso who was one of the most influential harmonica improvisers of the late 20th century. Raised on a Louisiana farm, Little Walter began playing harmonica in childhood, and by the time he was 12 he was playing for a living on New Orleans street

  • Little War Gods (American Indian culture heroes)

    Native American literature: Southwest: …pair of culture heroes, the Twins, also called the Little War Gods, who help stabilize the surface of the Earth and teach the people many features of their culture, including ceremonials. When the people were weary during the migration, powerful spirit-beings known as kachinas came and danced until someone made…

  • Little Willie (British tank)

    tank: World War I: …the first tank, called “Little Willie.” A second model, called “Big Willie,” quickly followed. Designed to cross wide trenches, it was accepted by the British Army, which ordered 100 tanks of this type (called Mark I) in February 1916.

  • Little Willies (American musical group)

    Norah Jones: …Jones formed the side project Little Willies, a band of five friends who shared a taste for classic American music such as that of Willie Nelson and Hank Williams. Little Willies—comprising Jones, Lee Alexander, Richard Julian, Dan Rieser, and Jim Campilongo—performed mostly cover songs. An eponymous album appeared in 2006,…

  • Little Wolf (Cheyenne chief)

    Dull Knife: …out, Dull Knife, along with Little Wolf, a war chief of the northern Cheyenne, determined to go home, despite Army opposition. On Sept. 9, 1878, he and Little Wolf led what was left of their people from the reservation. Their combined band consisted of 89 warriors and 246 women and…

  • little wolf (mammal)

    Coyote, (Canis latrans), New World member of the dog family (Canidae) that is smaller and more lightly built than the wolf. The coyote, whose name is derived from the Aztec coyotl, is found from Alaska southward into Central America, but especially on the Great Plains. Historically, the eastern

  • Little Women (film by Cukor [1933])

    George Cukor: Early life and work: That triumph was followed by Little Women (1933), based on Louisa May Alcott’s Civil War-era novel, with Hepburn, Bennett, Jean Parker, and Francis Dee. It was a major box-office success and earned Cukor his first Academy Award nomination for best director.

  • Little Women (film by Armstrong [1994])

    Little Women: …Hepburn as Jo, and a 1994 film directed by Gillian Armstrong. In addition, director-screenwriter Greta Gerwig’s adaptation earned wide acclaim in 2019.

  • Little Women (film by Gerwig [2019])

    Little Women: In addition, director-screenwriter Greta Gerwig’s adaptation earned wide acclaim in 2019.

  • Little Women (novel by Alcott)

    Little Women, novel for children by Louisa May Alcott, published in two parts in 1868 and 1869. Her sister May illustrated the first edition. It initiated a genre of family stories for children. Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March are raised in genteel poverty by their loving mother, Marmee, in a quiet

  • Little Women (film by LeRoy [1949])

    Mervyn LeRoy: At Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer: Random Harvest, Thirty Seconds over Tokyo, and Quo Vadis: LeRoy remade Little Women (1949) with Janet Leigh, Elizabeth Taylor, June Allyson, and Margaret O’Brien as the March sisters.

  • Little Women, or Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy (novel by Alcott)

    Little Women, novel for children by Louisa May Alcott, published in two parts in 1868 and 1869. Her sister May illustrated the first edition. It initiated a genre of family stories for children. Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March are raised in genteel poverty by their loving mother, Marmee, in a quiet

  • Little Wonder (English boxer)

    Tom Sayers, boxer who participated in the first international heavyweight championship match and was one of England’s best-known 19th-century pugilists. Standing 5 feet 8 12 inches and weighing 155 pounds, Sayers was known as the Little Wonder and the Napoleon of the Prize Ring. He often fought

  • little woodswallow (bird)

    woodswallow: …examples are the 15-cm (6-inch) little woodswallow (Artamus minor) and the 22-cm (9-inch) white-browed woodswallow (A. superciliosus)—among the smallest and largest members of the family.

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