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  • Nasi (people)

    Naxi, ethnic group of China who live mainly in Yunnan and Sichuan provinces; some live in Tibet. They speak a Tibeto-Burman language that is closely related to that of the Yi and were estimated in the early 21st century to number more than 300,000. The Naxi have two indigenous writing systems:

  • nasi goreng (rice dish)
  • Nasi, Joseph (Jewish statesman)

    Joseph Nasi, Jewish statesman and financier who rose to a position of power in the Ottoman Empire under the sultans Süleyman the Magnificent and Selim II. As a young man he gained a thorough knowledge of commercial and financial affairs in the service of his relatives, the bankers Mendes of

  • N?si, Lake (lake, Finland)

    Lake N?si, lake in southwestern Finland. It extends northward from the city of Tampere, northwest of Helsinki. Approximately 20 mi (32 km) long and 2 to 8 mi (3.2 to 13 km) wide, it is the largest of the Pyh? lakes and the central lake of the western branch of the system. Lake Vanka, the northern

  • na?īb (Arabic literature)

    Arabic literature: Categories and forms: …an opening section, called the na?īb, the poem’s speaker comes across a deserted encampment and muses nostalgically about times past and especially about his absent beloved. Via a transition, a second section (the ra?īl) recounts a desert journey, thus affording the opportunity for descriptions of animals—especially the camel and horse…

  • Nasier, Alcofribas (French author)

    Fran?ois Rabelais, French writer and priest who for his contemporaries was an eminent physician and humanist and for posterity is the author of the comic masterpiece Gargantua and Pantagruel. The four novels composing this work are outstanding for their rich use of Renaissance French and for their

  • N?sij?rvi (lake, Finland)

    Lake N?si, lake in southwestern Finland. It extends northward from the city of Tampere, northwest of Helsinki. Approximately 20 mi (32 km) long and 2 to 8 mi (3.2 to 13 km) wide, it is the largest of the Pyh? lakes and the central lake of the western branch of the system. Lake Vanka, the northern

  • Nasik (India)

    Nashik, city, northwestern Maharashtra state, western India. It lies in the Western Ghats along the Godavari River and is situated along major road and rail routes at a point about 110 miles (180 km) northeast of Mumbai (Bombay). Nashik is an important religious centre and attracts thousands of

  • Nasili

    Hittite language, most important of the extinct Indo-European languages of ancient Anatolia. Hittite was closely related to Carian, Luwian, Lydian, Lycian, and Palaic (see also Anatolian languages). Hittite is known primarily from the approximately 30,000 cuneiform tablets or fragments of tablets

  • Nā?ir ad-Dawlah al-?asan (Muslim ruler)

    ?amdānid Dynasty: …course under ?Abd Allāh’s son Nā?ir ad-Dawlah al-?asan (reigned 929–969) and expanded westward into Syria. In 979 the ?amdānids were driven out of Mosul by the Būyid ?A?ud ad-Dawlah, who was then annexing Iraq to his domains, and Abū Taghlib (reigned 969–979) was forced to seek refuge and help from…

  • Na?īr ad-Dīn a?-?ūsī (Persian scholar)

    Na?īr al-Dīn al-?ūsī, outstanding Persian philosopher, scientist, and mathematician. Educated first in ?ūs, where his father was a jurist in the Twelfth Imam school, the main sect of Shī?ite Muslims, al-?ūsī finished his education in Neyshābūr, about 75 kilometres (50 miles) to the west. This was

  • Nā?ir ad-Dīn Ma?mūd (Zangid ruler)

    Zangid Dynasty: …regent for the last Zangid, Nā?ir ad-Dīn Ma?mūd (reigned 1219–22), marked the end of the dynasty. Lu?lu? ruled Mosul as atabeg from 1222 to 1259; soon afterward the city fell to the Mongols.

  • Nā?ir al-Dīn Mu?ammad Shah (Mughal emperor)

    Mu?ammad Shah, ineffective, pleasure-seeking Mughal emperor of India from 1719 to 1748. Roshan Akhtar was the grandson of the emperor Bahādur Shah I (ruled 1707–12) and the son of Jahān Shah, Bahādur Shah’s youngest son. Jahān Shah was killed in 1712, early in the succession struggle following

  • Nā?ir al-Dīn Shāh (Qājār shah of Iran)

    Nā?er al-Dīn Shāh, Qājār shah of Iran (1848–96) who began his reign as a reformer but became increasingly conservative, failing to understand the accelerating need for change or for a response to the pressures brought by contact with the Western nations. Although a younger son of Mo?ammad Shāh,

  • Nā?ir Jang (ruler of Hyderābād)

    India: The Anglo-French struggle, 1740–63: …nizam (now a hereditary title), Nā?ir Jang, ended with the nizam’s murder in December 1750. French troops conducted Mu?affar Jang toward Hyderabad; when Mu?affar in turn was murdered three months later, the French succeeded in placing the late nizam’s third son, ?alābat Jang, on the Hyderabad throne. Thenceforward, in the…

  • Nā?ir Khān (ruler of Baluchistan)

    Brahui: Under Na?īr Khān, the confederacy attained its zenith in the 18th century. Their subsequent history centred on the state of Kalāt, which joined Pakistan in 1948.

  • Nā?ir li-Dīn Allāh, al- (Umayyad caliph)

    ?Abd al-Ra?mān III, first caliph and greatest ruler of the Umayyad Arab Muslim dynasty of Spain. He reigned as hereditary emir (“prince”) of Córdoba from October 912 and took the title of caliph in 929. ?Abd al-Ra?mān succeeded his grandfather ?Abd Allāh as emir of Córdoba in October 912 at the age

  • Nā?ir li-Dīn Allāh, al- (?Abbāsid caliph)

    Al-Nā?ir, 34th ?Abbāsid caliph (reigned 1180–1225), the last powerful ?Abbāsid caliph before the destruction of the dynasty by the Mongols. Al-Nā?ir devoted himself almost exclusively to restoring the former temporal power of the caliphate, turning his attention particularly to the east. In the

  • Nā?ir ?Alī Sirhindī (Indian poet)

    Islamic arts: Indian literature in Persian: …leading poets of this age, Nā?ir ?Alī Sirhindī (died 1697) and Mīrzā Bēdil (died 1721), is convoluted and obscure, prompting the Persian poet ?azīn (died 1766), who went to India in the early 18th century, to write ironic comments about its incomprehensibility. Bēdil, however, was a very interesting writer. His…

  • Nā?ir, al- (?Abbāsid caliph)

    Al-Nā?ir, 34th ?Abbāsid caliph (reigned 1180–1225), the last powerful ?Abbāsid caliph before the destruction of the dynasty by the Mongols. Al-Nā?ir devoted himself almost exclusively to restoring the former temporal power of the caliphate, turning his attention particularly to the east. In the

  • Nā?ir, al-Malik an- (Mamlūk sultan)

    Mūsā I of Mali: Pilgrimage to Mecca: …the Mamlūk sultans, Al-Malik al-Nā?ir. The black emperor’s great civility notwithstanding, the meeting between the two rulers might have ended in a serious diplomatic incident, for so absorbed was Mansa Mūsā in his religious observances that he was only with difficulty persuaded to pay a formal visit to the…

  • Nā?ir, Bu?ayrat (lake, Africa)

    Lake Nasser, reservoir on the Nile River, in Upper Egypt and northern Sudan. It was created by the impounding of the Nile’s waters by the Aswan High Dam, which was built in the 1960s and dedicated in 1971. Lake Nasser has a gross capacity of 136,927,000 acre-feet (168,900,000,000 cubic metres), and

  • Nasir, Ibrahim (Maldivian politician)

    Ibrahim Nasir, Maldivian politician (born Sept. 2, 1926, Male, British Maldives—died Nov. 22, 2008, Singapore), dominated life in the Indian Ocean archipelago of some 1,200 islands for more than 20 years. In 1957 Nasir was named prime minister under the British protectorate’s ruling sultan, and in

  • Nā?īr, Jamal ?Abd al- (president of Egypt)

    Gamal Abdel Nasser, Egyptian army officer, prime minister (1954–56), and then president (1956–70) of Egypt who became a controversial leader of the Arab world, creating the short-lived United Arab Republic (1958–61), twice fighting wars with Israel (1956, 1967), and engaging in such inter-Arab

  • Nā?ir, Mu?ammad ibn Abī Yūsuf Ya??ūb al- (Almohad caliph)

    North Africa: The Maghrib under the Almoravids and the Almohads: The Almohad caliph al-Nā?ir (Mu?ammad ibn Abī Yūsuf Ya?qūb) restored the empire’s authority in the region with several large military campaigns from 1205 to 1207. Before returning to Marrakech, he appointed a ?af?id to govern the reconquered eastern Maghrib. The ?af?ids were able to squelch the…

  • Nā?ir-al-Dīn Mu?ammad (Mughal emperor)

    Humāyūn, second Mughal ruler of India, who was more an adventurer than a consolidator of his empire. The son and successor of Bābur, who had founded the Mughal dynasty, Humāyūn ruled from 1530 to 1540 and again from 1555 to 1556. Humāyūn inherited the hope rather than the fact of empire, because

  • Nā?ir-i Khusraw (Persian author)

    Nā?er-e Khusraw, poet, theologian, and religious propagandist, one of the greatest writers in Persian literature. Nā?er-e Khusraw came of a family of government officials who belonged to the Shī?ite branch of Islam, and he attended school for only a short while. In 1045 he went on a pilgrimage to

  • Nā?ira, an- (Israel)

    Nazareth, historic city of Lower Galilee, in northern Israel; it is the largest Arab city of the country. In the New Testament Nazareth is associated with Jesus as his boyhood home, and in its synagogue he preached the sermon that led to his rejection by his fellow townsmen. The city is now a

  • Nasirabad (Bangladesh)

    Mymensingh, city, north-central Bangladesh. It lies on the north bank of the Old Brahmaputra River. Once known for its glass-bangle manufacture, it now has textile and steel mills. It was incorporated as a municipality in 1869. Mymensingh is noted for its many educational institutions, including

  • Nā?irīyah, An- (Iraq)

    Al-Nā?iriyyah, city, capital of Dhī Qār mu?āfa?ah (governorate), southeastern Iraq. It lies along the Euphrates River in a flat date-growing area. Built largely of sun-dried brick and enclosed by a mud wall, the city is a local market and a rail terminus. Its traditional industries include

  • Nā?iriyyah, Al- (Iraq)

    Al-Nā?iriyyah, city, capital of Dhī Qār mu?āfa?ah (governorate), southeastern Iraq. It lies along the Euphrates River in a flat date-growing area. Built largely of sun-dried brick and enclosed by a mud wall, the city is a local market and a rail terminus. Its traditional industries include

  • Nasjonal Samling (political group, Norway)

    fascism: National fascisms: …led by Ante Paveli?; the National Union (Nasjonal Samling) in Norway, which was in power for only a week—though its leader, Vidkun Quisling, was later made minister president under the German occupation; and the military dictatorship of Admiral Tojo Hideki in Japan.

  • Nasjonalgalleriet (museum, Oslo, Norway)

    National Gallery, in Oslo, Norwegian national art museum, built in 1836 and enlarged in 1903–07, devoted primarily to Norwegian paintings and sculpture of the 19th and 20th centuries. In 2003 the National Gallery joined with three other Norwegian museums to become the National Museum of Art,

  • Naskapi (people)

    Innu: The northern Innu, or Naskapi, lived on the vast Labrador plateau of grasslands and tundra, hunted caribou for both food and skins to cover their wickiups, and supplemented their diet with fish and small game. The name Montagnais is French, meaning “mountaineers”; Naskapi is an indigenous name thought to…

  • naskhī script (calligraphy)

    Naskhī script, Islāmic style of handwritten alphabet developed in the 4th century of the Islāmic era (i.e., the 10th century ad). From the beginning of Islāmic writing, two kinds of scripts existed side by side—those used for everyday correspondence and business and those used for copying the

  • NASL

    football: North and Central America and the Caribbean: The North American Soccer League (NASL) formed a year later and struggled until the New York Cosmos signed the Brazilian superstar Pelé in 1975. Other aging international stars soon followed, and crowds grew to European proportions, but a regular fan base remained elusive, and NASL folded…

  • Naslund, Markus (Swedish hockey player)

    Vancouver Canucks: …various seasons) of left wing Markus Naslund, goaltender Roberto Luongo, and identical-twin forwards Daniel and Henrik Sedin, the Canucks failed to advance beyond the second round of the play-offs over that span. In 2010–11 Vancouver captured the Presidents’ Trophy for posting the NHL’s best regular-season record that season, which the…

  • Nasmyth, James (Scottish engineer)

    James Nasmyth, British engineer known primarily for his invention of the steam hammer. Nasmyth showed an extraordinary mechanical inclination while still a schoolboy in Edinburgh, building successful model steam engines. For two years he worked in Henry Maudslay’s machine shop in London and

  • Naso (fish, genus Naso)

    Unicorn fish, any of certain exclusively marine fishes belonging to the genus Naso, in the family Acanthuridae (order Perciformes), occurring in the tropical Indo-Pacific region. The 17 species are herbivorous algae eaters. Unicorn fishes have a pair of sharp forward-pointing spines that protrude

  • Naso, Publius Ovidius (Roman poet)

    Ovid, Roman poet noted especially for his Ars amatoria and Metamorphoses. His verse had immense influence both by its imaginative interpretations of Classical myth and as an example of supreme technical accomplishment. Publius Ovidius Naso was, like most Roman men of letters, a provincial. He was

  • nasociliary nerve (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Ophthalmic nerve: …and the conjunctiva, (2) the nasociliary nerve, serving the mucosal lining of part of the nasal cavity, the tentorium cerebelli and some of the dura mater of the anterior cranial fossa, and skin on the dorsum and tip of the nose, and (3) the frontal nerve, serving the skin on…

  • nasolacrimal duct (anatomy)

    eye disease: Inflammatory conditions of the orbit: …to the nose by the nasolacrimal duct, and infection may ascend this passage from the nose and cause an acute painful swelling at the inner corner of the eye (called dacryocystitis). Blockage of the nasolacrimal duct prevents the passage of tears into the nose and results in a watery eye.…

  • nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Epstein-Barr virus: lymphoid cancer called Burkitt lymphoma; nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a cancer of the nasal sinuses and throat that is common in southern China, Southeast Asia, and northern Africa and among Eskimos; and certain neurological illnesses, including encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) and paralyses of various nerve groups (for example, Bell palsy, which…

  • nasopharyngeal diphtheria

    diphtheria: In the most fatal form, nasopharyngeal diphtheria, the tonsillar infection spreads to the nose and throat structures, sometimes completely covering them with the membrane and causing septicemia (blood poisoning). Laryngeal diphtheria usually results from the spread of the infection downward from the nasopharynx to the larynx; the airway may become…

  • nasopharyngolaryngoscope (medical instrument)

    nasopharyngolaryngoscopy: …medical procedure that uses a flexible fibre-optic endoscope to visualize the structures inside the nasal passages, including the sinus openings, the larynx, and the vocal cords. The type of endoscope used for this procedure is called a nasopharyngolaryngoscope. This instrument enables a more thorough examination to be performed than is…

  • nasopharyngolaryngoscopy (medicine)

    Nasopharyngolaryngoscopy, diagnostic medical procedure that uses a flexible fibre-optic endoscope to visualize the structures inside the nasal passages, including the sinus openings, the larynx, and the vocal cords. The type of endoscope used for this procedure is called a nasopharyngolaryngoscope.

  • nasopharynx (anatomy)

    nose: …palate, extends back into the nasopharynx, the nasal portion of the throat, and during swallowing is pressed upward, thus closing off the nasopharynx so that food is not lodged in the back of the nose.

  • Nasorean

    Mandaeanism: …ad of a group called Nasoreans (the Mandaean priestly caste as opposed to Mandaiia, the laity). They also call attention to certain Mandaean affinities to Judaism: familiarity with Old Testament writings; parallels to Jewish ethics, particularly the high value placed on marriage and procreation; concern for cultic purity; and the…

  • Nasorolevu (mountain, Vanua Levu Island, Fiji)

    Vanua Levu Island: …central mountain range, culminating at Nasorolevu (3,386 feet [1,032 metres]), divides the island into wet (southeastern) and dry (northwestern) sections. Natewa Bay, on the east coast, cuts deeply into the island to make a peninsula of its southeastern corner, while the south coast is indented by the broad Savusavu and…

  • Na?r I (Sāmānid ruler)

    Iran: The Iranian renaissance: …875, when the Sāmānid emir, Na?r I, received the license to govern all of Transoxania. Sāmānid emirs succeeded the ?āhirid-?affārid power in Khorāsān, and under them the Iranian renaissance at last came to fruition. Shaped out of the vernacular of northeastern Iranian courts and households and making skillful use of…

  • Na?r ibn Sayyār (governor of Khorāsān)

    Na?r ibn Sayyār, governor of Khorāsān (now part of Iran) and other eastern provinces from 738 to 748, under the last of the Umayyad caliphs. Na?r distinguished himself by his military leadership and clever, humane diplomacy. Having led a campaign against two rebellious tribes, Na?r was appointed

  • Na?r II (Sāmānid ruler)

    Iran: The Iranian renaissance: …the epic, patrons such as Na?r II (reigned 914–943) attracted poets and scholars to Bukhara, many producing literary and academic works in both Persian and Arabic. A written Persian evolved that has survived with remarkably little change.

  • Nasr, Sheikh Muhammad Hamid Abu an- (Egyptian religious leader)

    Sheikh Muhammad Hamid Abu an-Nasr, Egyptian religious leader who from 1986 was the supreme guide of the country’s largest Islamic fundamentalist group, the Muslim Brotherhood, as it grew in power and influence (b. Jan. 20, 1913--d. Jan. 20,

  • Nasralla, Salvador (Honduran politician and sports journalist)

    Honduras: The 21st century: …his principal challenger, onetime sportscaster Salvador Nasralla, the candidate of the opposition Alliance coalition. Nasralla stunned observers when, with some 57 percent of the vote counted, he led the incumbent by 5 percent. At this point, Luis Zelaya, the candidate of the Liberal Party, conceded and called on Hernández to…

  • Nasrallah, Hassan (Lebanese leader)

    Hassan Nasrallah, Lebanese militia and political leader who served as leader (secretary-general) of Hezbollah (Arabic: “Party of God”) from 1992. Nasrallah was raised in the impoverished Karantina district of eastern Beirut, where his father ran a small grocery store. As a boy Nasrallah was an

  • Nasrallah, Hassan Abdel Karim (Lebanese leader)

    Hassan Nasrallah, Lebanese militia and political leader who served as leader (secretary-general) of Hezbollah (Arabic: “Party of God”) from 1992. Nasrallah was raised in the impoverished Karantina district of eastern Beirut, where his father ran a small grocery store. As a boy Nasrallah was an

  • Nasrat (Pakistan)

    Nawābshāh, town, Sindh province, southern Pakistan. The town, originally called Nasrat, is connected by road and rail with Karāchi, Hyderābād, and Sukkur. A growing industrial centre, it manufactures small boats, refined sugar, soap, and cotton and silk textiles. A government college in the town is

  • Nasreddin Hoca (legendary figure)

    Islamic arts: Popular literature: …type of low-class theologian, called Nasreddin Hoca in Turkish, Ju?ā in Arabic, and Mushfiqī in Tajik. Anecdotes about this character, which embody the mixture of silliness and shrewdness displayed by this “type,” have amused generations of Muslims.

  • Na?rid dynasty (Muslim dynasty)

    Na?rid dynasty, last of the Muslim dynasties in Spain, rising to power following the defeat of the Almohads at the Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, in 1212. They ruled Granada from 1238 to 1492. The first Na?rid ruler, Mu?ammad I al-Ghālib (d. 1273), a tributary vassal of the Christian king Ferdinand

  • Nasrin, Taslima (Bangladeshi author)

    Taslima Nasrin, Bangladeshi feminist author who was forced out of her country because of her controversial writings, which many Muslims felt discredited Islam. Her plight was often compared to that of Sir Salman Rushdie, author of The Satanic Verses (1988). The daughter of a doctor, Nasrin also

  • Nasroddin, Mullah (legendary figure)

    Islamic arts: Popular literature: …type of low-class theologian, called Nasreddin Hoca in Turkish, Ju?ā in Arabic, and Mushfiqī in Tajik. Anecdotes about this character, which embody the mixture of silliness and shrewdness displayed by this “type,” have amused generations of Muslims.

  • Nassar, Larry (American physician)

    Simone Biles: …had been a victim of Larry Nassar, a former doctor for the U.S. national gymnastics team who was convicted of sexually abusing numerous athletes. That year Biles returned to competition. At the 2018 U.S. national championships, she became the first female gymnast in nearly 25 years to win all five…

  • Nassarawa (Nigeria)

    Nasarawa, town, Nassarawa state, central Nigeria. The town lies just north of a fork in the Okwa River, which is a tributary of the Benue River. Nasarawa was founded in about 1838 in the Afo (Afao) tribal territory by Umaru, a dissident official from the nearby town of Keffi, as the seat of the new

  • Nassariidae (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: …for boring; dove shells (Columbellidae), mud snails (Nassariidae), tulip shells (Fasciolariidae), whelks (Buccinidae), and crown conchs (Galeodidae) mainly cool-water species; but dove and tulip shells have many tropical representatives. Superfamily Volutacea Harp shells (Harpidae),

  • Nassau (county, New York, United States)

    Nassau, county, southeastern New York state, U.S., on central Long Island just east of the borough (and county) of Queens, New York City. It consists of a coastal lowland region bordered to the north by Long Island Sound and to the south by the Atlantic Ocean. Embayments along the north shore

  • Nassau (historical region, Germany)

    Nassau, historical region of Germany, and the noble family that provided its hereditary rulers for many centuries. The present-day royal heads of the Netherlands and Luxembourg are descended from this family, called the house of Nassau. The region of Nassau is located in what is now the western

  • Nassau (national capital, The Bahamas)

    Nassau, capital of The Bahamas, West Indies, a port on the northeastern coast of New Providence Island, and one of the world’s chief pleasure resorts. The climate is temperate and the sandy beaches and scenery are beautiful. Although the city proper is comparatively small, suburbs and residential

  • Nassau agreement (British-United States history)

    Harold Macmillan: The Nassau agreement (December 1962) between Macmillan and Kennedy, that the United States should furnish nuclear missiles for British submarines, enraged Charles de Gaulle, who then was head of the French state and who insisted on a Europe uncontrolled by the United States. The subsequent French…

  • Nassau Island (island, Cook Islands, Pacific Ocean)

    Nassau Island, coral formation of the Cook Islands, a self-governing state in free association with New Zealand in the South Pacific Ocean. Nassau is the only island of the northern Cooks that is not an atoll and is oval in shape. The island is surrounded by a fringing reef and has sand dunes 35

  • Nassau Memorandum (work by Stein)

    Karl, Reichsfreiherr vom und zum Stein: Achievements as minister and prime minister.: …to compose the now famous Nassau Memorandum (Nassauer Denkschrift). A comprehensive program for the reform of the Prussian state, this memorandum constitutes the best and most reliable account of Stein’s ideas. His basic principle is that, for a healthy and efficient state, an organic relationship must be established between population…

  • Nassau Range (mountains, Indonesia)

    Sudirman Range, western section of the Maoke Mountains of the central highlands of New Guinea. The Sudirman Range is located in the Indonesian province of Papua. The rugged range, which may have no pass lower than 13,000 feet (4,000 metres), rises to Jaya Peak (formerly Puntjak Sukarno or Mount

  • Nassau, Adolf, Duke von (grand duke of Luxembourg)

    Adolf, duke of Nassau from 1839 to 1867, who, as grand duke of Luxembourg from 1890 to 1905, was the first ruler of that autonomous duchy. The son of Duke William of Nassau-Weilburg and Charlotte of Saxony, Adolf became duke of Nassau upon his father’s death (1839). Educated in Vienna and a

  • Nassau, House of (German dynasty)

    Nassau: …region of Germany, and the noble family that provided its hereditary rulers for many centuries. The present-day royal heads of the Netherlands and Luxembourg are descended from this family, called the house of Nassau.

  • Nassau, Louis of (Dutch political leader)

    Louis of Nassau, nobleman who provided key military and political leadership in the early phases (1566–74) of the Netherlands’ revolt against Spanish rule and who served as a valued ally of his older brother William, Prince of Orange (William I the Silent). A Lutheran from birth, Louis lived in

  • Nassau, Maurice, Count of (stadholder of The Netherlands)

    Maurice, hereditary stadtholder (1585–1625) of the United Provinces of the Netherlands, or Dutch Republic, successor to his father, William I the Silent. His development of military strategy, tactics, and engineering made the Dutch army the most modern in the Europe of his time. Maurice was the

  • Nassau, Willem, prins van Oranje, graaf van (stadholder of United Provinces of The Netherlands)

    William I, first of the hereditary stadtholders (1572–84) of the United Provinces of the Netherlands and leader of the revolt of the Netherlands against Spanish rule and the Catholic religion. William, the eldest son of William, count of Nassau-Dillenburg, grew up in a cultivated Lutheran

  • Nassau, William, prince of Orange, count of (stadholder of United Provinces of The Netherlands)

    William I, first of the hereditary stadtholders (1572–84) of the United Provinces of the Netherlands and leader of the revolt of the Netherlands against Spanish rule and the Catholic religion. William, the eldest son of William, count of Nassau-Dillenburg, grew up in a cultivated Lutheran

  • Nassau-Siegen, Johan Maurits, graaf van (count of Nassau-Siegen)

    John Maurice Of Nassau, Dutch colonial governor and military commander who consolidated Dutch rule in Brazil (1636–44), thereby bringing the Dutch empire in Latin America to the peak of its power. The son of John, count of Nassau-Siegen-Dillenburg, John Maurice fought in the campaigns of his

  • Nassauer Denkschrift (work by Stein)

    Karl, Reichsfreiherr vom und zum Stein: Achievements as minister and prime minister.: …to compose the now famous Nassau Memorandum (Nassauer Denkschrift). A comprehensive program for the reform of the Prussian state, this memorandum constitutes the best and most reliable account of Stein’s ideas. His basic principle is that, for a healthy and efficient state, an organic relationship must be established between population…

  • Nasser, Gamal Abdel (president of Egypt)

    Gamal Abdel Nasser, Egyptian army officer, prime minister (1954–56), and then president (1956–70) of Egypt who became a controversial leader of the Arab world, creating the short-lived United Arab Republic (1958–61), twice fighting wars with Israel (1956, 1967), and engaging in such inter-Arab

  • Nasser, Lake (lake, Africa)

    Lake Nasser, reservoir on the Nile River, in Upper Egypt and northern Sudan. It was created by the impounding of the Nile’s waters by the Aswan High Dam, which was built in the 1960s and dedicated in 1971. Lake Nasser has a gross capacity of 136,927,000 acre-feet (168,900,000,000 cubic metres), and

  • Nassonoff gland (zoology)

    hymenopteran: Internal structure: The so-called Nassonow gland, opening on the dorsal side of the abdomen, produces a substance that is used to mark the entrance to the bee hive as well as food sources away from the hive. Honeybees, bumblebees, stingless bees, and many solitary bees have wax glands on…

  • Nassonow gland (zoology)

    hymenopteran: Internal structure: The so-called Nassonow gland, opening on the dorsal side of the abdomen, produces a substance that is used to mark the entrance to the bee hive as well as food sources away from the hive. Honeybees, bumblebees, stingless bees, and many solitary bees have wax glands on…

  • Nassula (protozoan genus)

    protozoan: Mechanisms of food ingestion: Nassula has a complex cytostome and cytopharynx supported by a basketlike cytopharyngeal structure composed of microtubules. This species ingests filamentous algae by grasping the filament, bending it like a hairpin, and drawing it into the cytopharynx, where it is broken up into fragments and enclosed…

  • Nast, Condé Montrose (American publisher)

    Vogue: Condé Montrose Nast, the founder of Condé Nast Publications, bought Vogue in 1909 and transformed it into a women’s fashion magazine focused on beauty, composure, and etiquette.

  • Nast, Thomas (American political caricaturist)

    Thomas Nast, American cartoonist, best known for his attack on the political machine of William M. Tweed in New York City in the 1870s. Nast arrived in New York as a boy of six. He studied art at the National Academy of Design and at the age of 15 became a draftsman for Frank Leslie’s Illustrated

  • Nastanovich, Bob (American musician)

    Pavement: Percussionist Bob Nastanovich (b. August 27, 1967, Rochester, New York) and bassist Mark Ibold (b. 1962, Cincinnati, Ohio) joined in 1991 and 1990, respectively.

  • Nastase, Adrian (prime minister of Romania)

    Romania: New constitution: …in the streets of Bucharest, Adrian Nastase, a former prime minister (2000–04), was sentenced to two years in prison for misusing campaign funds. After almost a month of civil unrest, the Romanian government collapsed. On February 6, 2012, Boc resigned as prime minister, and B?sescu appointed Justice Minister C?t?lin Predoiu…

  • Nastase, Ilie (Romanian tennis player)

    Ilie Nastase, Romanian tennis player known for his on-court histrionics and outstanding Davis Cup play. He was the first European to surpass $1 million in career prize money, and he was ranked number one in the world in 1973. A Davis Cup player since 1966, Nastase almost single-handedly powered

  • nasta?līq script (calligraphy)

    Nasta?līq script, predominant style of Persian calligraphy during the 15th and 16th centuries. The inventor was Mīr ?Alī of Tabrīz, the most famous calligrapher of the Timurid period (1402–1502). A cursive script, nasta?līq was a combination of the naskhī and ta?līq styles, featuring elongated

  • nāstika (Indian philosophy)

    Indian philosophy: …of philosophy, and unorthodox (nastika) systems, such as Buddhism and Jainism. Indian thought has been concerned with various philosophical problems, significant among which are the nature of the world (cosmology), the nature of reality (metaphysics), logic, the nature of knowledge (epistemology),

  • Nástr?nd (Norse mythology)

    Hel: …sections, one of which was Nástr?nd, the shore of corpses. There stood a castle facing north; it was filled with the venom of serpents, in which murderers, adulterers, and perjurers suffered torment, while the dragon Nidhogg sucked the blood from their bodies. Mention is made in an early poem of…

  • nasturtium (plant, Tropaeolum genus)

    Nasturtium, any of various annual plants of the genus Tropaeolum, in the family Tropaeolaceae, native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America and introduced into other regions as cultivated garden plants. Nasturtium is also a genus of aquatic herbs of the family Cruciferae (see

  • nasturtium family (plant family)

    Brassicales: Akaniaceae and Tropaeolaceae: Akaniaceae and Tropaeolaceae both have large zygomorphic flowers with eight stamens and an ovary with three compartments, with the ovules at the apex of each. Geographically and morphologically they might otherwise seem an unlikely pair.

  • Nasturtium officinale (plant)

    Watercress, (Nasturtium officinale), perennial aquatic plant of the mustard family (Brassicaceae), native to Eurasia and naturalized throughout North America. Watercress thrives in cool flowing streams, where it grows submerged, floating on the water, or spread over mud surfaces. It is often

  • Nasty Nas (American rapper and songwriter)

    Nas, American rapper and songwriter who became a dominant voice in 1990s East Coast hip-hop. Nas built a reputation as an expressive chronicler of inner-city street life. Nasir Jones, the son of a jazz musician, grew up in public housing in Queens, New York. He dropped out of school in the eighth

  • Nasua (mammal)

    Coati, (genus Nasua), any of three species of omnivore related to raccoons (family Procyonidae). Coatis are found in wooded regions from the southwestern United States through South America. The coati has a long, flexible snout and a slender, darkly banded tail that it often carries erect as it

  • Nasution, Abdul (Indonesian politician)

    Abdul Nasution, Indonesian politician (born Dec. 3, 1918, Kotanopan, North Sumatra, Dutch East Indies—died Sept. 6, 2000, Jakarta, Indon.), was a leader in winning (1949) Indonesian independence from The Netherlands and thereafter served in a number of capacities, including defense minister (

  • nat (Burmese religion)

    Nat, in Burmese folk religion, any of a group of spirits that are the objects of an extensive, probably pre-Buddhist cult; in Thailand a similar spirit is called phi. Most important of the nats are a group collectively called the “thirty-seven,” made up of spirits of human beings who have died

  • Nat King Cole Show, The (American television program)

    Nat King Cole: …host a network variety program, The Nat King Cole Show, which debuted on NBC television in 1956. The show fell victim to the bigotry of the times, however, and was canceled after one season; few sponsors were willing to be associated with a black entertainer. Cole had greater success with…

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