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  • ND (political party, Greece)

    New Democracy (ND), conservative political party in Greece. New Democracy was founded in 1974 by Konstantinos Karamanlis, who oversaw the country’s transition from military dictatorship to democracy. It generally supports greater economic liberalization, including privatization and lower taxes, and

  • NDA (political organization, India)

    All India Dravidian Progressive Federation: …joined the Bharatiya Janata Party-led National Democratic Alliance (NDA) national government, only to withdraw its support a year later and switch back to Congress (then in opposition). The AIADMK again sided with the NDA during the 2004 Lok Sabha elections but lost all the races that it contested for that…

  • NDA

    pharmaceutical industry: The New Drug Application: The second important regulatory document required by the FDA is the New Drug Application (NDA). The NDA contains all of the information and data that the FDA requires for market approval of a drug. Depending on the intended use of the drug…

  • Ndadaye, Melchior (president of Burundi)

    Melchior Ndadaye, Burundian banker and politician (born March 28, 1953, Nyabihanga, Muramvya, Burundi—died Oct. 21, 1993, Near Bujumbura, Burundi), became Burundi’s president and the first member of the Hutu ethnic majority to rule after his Front for Democracy in Burundi (Frodebu) and two allied p

  • Ndaka (people)

    Ituri Forest: The village-living agriculturalists: …including the Bila, Budu, and Ndaka, speak one of the numerous Bantu languages spoken in sub-Saharan Africa, but others, such as the Mamvu and Lese, speak tonal Central Sudanic dialects. In general, the agriculturalists live in small villages with 10 to 150 residents, all members of the same patriclan. Houses…

  • ndako gboya (African mythology)

    African art: Nupe: The ndako gboya appears to be indigenous; a spirit that affords protection from witches, it is controlled by a small secret society that cleanses communities by invitation. The mask consists of a tall tube of white cotton supported inside on a bamboo pole about 12 feet…

  • Ndar (Senegal)

    Saint-Louis, island city and seaport near the mouth of the Sénégal River, and rail terminus north-northeast of Dakar, Senegal. The island and city are connected to the mainland by a land bridge. Saint-Louis, founded in 1659, is the oldest colonial city on the western African coast and was the

  • Ndayishimiye, Evariste (Burundian politician)

    Burundi: The 2020 elections: …early 2020 the CNDD-FDD named Evariste Ndayishimiye as their presidential candidate for the upcoming election scheduled for May. This appeared to lay to rest lingering fears that Nkurunziza intended to stand for another term as president.

  • Ndayizeye, Domitien (president of Burundi)

    Burundi: The path toward peace: …and a Hutu president (Domitien Ndayizeye) for the next 18 months. Sporadic fighting continued between Hutu rebel groups and the government, however.

  • NDC (North Korean government)

    Kim Jong-Un: Childhood and rise to power: …a post on the powerful National Defense Commission (NDC); the chairmanship of the NDC, defined in the constitution as the country’s highest office, was held by Kim Jong Il. By mid-2009 Kim Jong-Un was being referred to within the country by the title “Brilliant Comrade,” and in June it was…

  • NDC (political party, Ghana)

    John Mahama: …under the banner of the National Democratic Congress (NDC); he was reelected in 2000 and 2004. While in Parliament he held several posts, including Minister of Communications (1998–2001), before being chosen as the vice presidential candiate on the NDC ticket in 2008 with John Evans Atta Mills. Mills won the…

  • NDC (political party, Grenada)

    Grenada: Independence: …in March 1990, Braithwaite, whose National Democratic Congress (NDC) fell one seat shy of a parliamentary majority, was appointed prime minister by Scoon.

  • NDCS (United States government document)

    drug use: National controls: …also responsible for producing the National Drug Control Strategy (NDCS). The NDCS is designed to facilitate effective drug-control measures at local levels by providing information on drugs and drug abuse for community members and by making various resources for drug control available to local officials.

  • NDE

    materials testing: Nondestructive testing: The tensile-strength test is inherently destructive; in the process of gathering data, the sample is destroyed. Though this is acceptable when a plentiful supply of the material exists, nondestructive tests are desirable for materials that are costly or difficult to fabricate or that…

  • NDEA (United States [1958])

    National Defense Education Act (NDEA), U.S. federal legislation passed by Congress and signed into law by Pres. Dwight D. Eisenhower on September 2, 1958, that provided funding to improve American schools and to promote postsecondary education. The goal of the legislation was to enable the

  • Ndebele (South African people)

    Ndebele, any of several Bantu-speaking African peoples who live primarily in the Limpopo and Mpumalanga provinces in South Africa. The Ndebele are ancient offshoots of the main Nguni-speaking peoples and began migrations to the Transvaal region in the 17th century. The main group of Transvaal

  • Ndebele (Zimbabwean people)

    Ndebele, Bantu-speaking people of southwestern Zimbabwe who now live primarily around the city of Bulawayo. They originated early in the 19th century as an offshoot of the Nguni of Natal. Mzilikazi, an Nguni military commander under Shaka, king of the Zulu, came into conflict with Shaka and in 1823

  • Ndebele of Zimbabwe (Zimbabwean people)

    Ndebele, Bantu-speaking people of southwestern Zimbabwe who now live primarily around the city of Bulawayo. They originated early in the 19th century as an offshoot of the Nguni of Natal. Mzilikazi, an Nguni military commander under Shaka, king of the Zulu, came into conflict with Shaka and in 1823

  • Ndebele Proper (Zimbabwean people)

    Ndebele, Bantu-speaking people of southwestern Zimbabwe who now live primarily around the city of Bulawayo. They originated early in the 19th century as an offshoot of the Nguni of Natal. Mzilikazi, an Nguni military commander under Shaka, king of the Zulu, came into conflict with Shaka and in 1823

  • Ndembu (people)

    African religions: Mythology: For the Ndembu of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, by contrast, twins represent an excess of fertility more characteristic of the animal world than the human, and rituals are undertaken to protect the community from this anomalous condition.

  • Ndeni Island (island, Solomon Islands)

    Santa Cruz Islands: The main islands are Nend? (also called Ndeni Island or Santa Cruz Island), Utupua, Vanikolo, and Tinakula. Nend? is 25 miles (40 km) long and 14 miles (22 km) wide, with heavily wooded slopes rising to 1,800 feet (550 metres). The Spanish navigator álvaro de Menda?a de Neira tried…

  • Ndereba, Catherine (Kenyan athlete)

    Kenya: Sports and recreation: Catherine Ndereba, for example, repeatedly won marathons in Boston and Chicago.

  • NDH (historical nation, Europe [1941–1945])

    fascism: Acceptance of racism: …a German puppet state, the Independent State of Croatia (NDH), and established a one-party regime. The NDH moved against the more than one million Orthodox Serbs in Croatia, forcing some to convert and expelling or killing others in campaigns of genocide. About 250,000 Serbs in Croatia were eventually liquidated, many…

  • NDI (medical disorder)

    diabetes insipidus: Types and causes: …of the disease is called nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which results when the supplies of vasopressin are adequate but the kidney tubules are unresponsive—either genetically or because of an acquired condition. The most severe form of this disorder is congenital hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. This condition is caused by mutations in…

  • Ndiaye, Iba (Senegalese painter)

    Iba Ndiaye, Senegalese painter (born 1928, Saint-Louis, French West Africa [now in Senegal]—died Oct. 5, 2008, Paris, France), was one of Senegal’s leading Modernist artists and a cofounder of the negritude art movement known as the école de Dakar, but his richly coloured semiabstract paintings

  • Ndlambe (people)

    Xhosa: Rharhabe, Ngqika, Ndlambe, and the Gqunkhwebe (the latter being partly of Khoekhoe origin).

  • ndlovukazi (Swazi royal title)

    Eswatini: Settlement patterns: …at Ludzidzini and of the ndlovukazi (the queen mother) at Phondvo, both of which are in the “royal heart” of the country and not far from the old royal capital of Lobamba.

  • NDLP (United States government program)

    Library of Congress: …Library of Congress launched the National Digital Library Program (NDLP), making freely available on the Internet high-quality electronic versions of American historical material from the library’s special collections. By the end of the library’s bicentennial year in 2000, more than five million items (manuscripts, films, sound recordings, and photographs) had…

  • Ndola (Zambia)

    Ndola, city, capital of Copperbelt province, north-central Zambia. It is located on the border with the Democratic Republic of the Congo near Kitwe. Ndola is one of the largest cities in the country. It is linked by road and rail to the capital, Lusaka, and to Livingstone and thus to Zimbabwe, as

  • Ndondakasuka, Battle of (South African history)

    South Africa: The Zulu after Shaka: …the Zulu civil war (the Battle of Ndondakasuka on the lower Tugela River, close to the sea) elevated Mpande’s younger son, Cetshwayo, over Mpande’s older son, Mbuyazi. Although Cetshwayo formally became ruler of Zululand only upon his father’s death in 1872, he had in fact effectively ruled the kingdom since…

  • Ndongo (people)

    Mbundu: …the ngola (ruler) of the Ndongo people. This centralization was destroyed by the Portuguese, who from the late 16th to the late 17th century provoked warfare and slaving among the peoples of the region.

  • Ndongo (historical kingdom, Africa)

    Ndongo, historical African kingdom of the Mbundu people. The original core of the kingdom was in the highlands east of Luanda, Angola, between the Cuanza and Lucala rivers. At its height in the late 16th century, it stretched west to the Atlantic coast and south of the Cuanza. According to early

  • NDP (political party, Zimbabwe)

    Joshua Nkomo: …in 1960 and founded the National Democratic Party (NDP); in 1961, when the NDP was banned in turn, he founded ZAPU. The white-minority government of Rhodesia held Nkomo in detention from 1964 until 1974. After his release he traveled widely in Africa and Europe to promote ZAPU’s goal of black…

  • NDP (political party, Kenya)

    Raila Odinga: Early life and political activity: …left FORD–K and joined the National Development Party (NDP).

  • NDP (political party, Canada)

    New Democratic Party (NDP), Canadian democratic socialist political party favouring a mixed public-private economy, broadened social benefits, and an internationalist foreign policy. The New Democratic Party (NDP) grew out of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF), which was founded in 1933

  • NDP (political party, South Korea)

    South Korea: The Third Republic: Members of the opposition New Democratic Party (NDP), whose head was the twice-defeated Yun, claimed fraud and refused for some time to take their seats in the National Assembly.

  • NDP (Malaysian history)

    Malaysia: Economy: …(NEP) and later as the New Development Policy (NDP), that has sought to strike a balance between the goals of economic growth and the redistribution of wealth. The Malaysian economy has long been dominated by the country’s Chinese and South Asian minorities. The goal of the NEP and the NDP…

  • NDP (political party, Suriname)

    Suriname: Suriname since independence: …served as president of the National Democratic Party (Nationale Democratische Partij; NDP) and was widely viewed as the real power behind Jules Wijdenbosch, who was elected president of the country in 1996. In 1997 the government of the Netherlands issued an arrest warrant for Bouterse on charges of drug smuggling,…

  • NDP (political party, Germany)

    National Democratic Party of Germany (NPD), right-wing German nationalist party that called for German unification during the Cold War and advocated law and order as well as an end to German “guilt” for World War II. The party’s founders included many former supporters of the Nazis. In the 1950s,

  • NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra (German orchestra)

    Alan Gilbert: …became chief conductor-designate at the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra; he officially assumed the post in 2019.

  • NDR Symphony Orchestra of Hamburg (German orchestra)

    Alan Gilbert: …became chief conductor-designate at the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra; he officially assumed the post in 2019.

  • ’ndrangheta (organized crime)

    Calabria: …local Calabrian Mafia, called the ’ndrangheta, persists, and its long-established practice of kidnapping was a model for similar acts by others which plagued Italy during the 1970s. The region’s economic development is still hindered by rugged terrain, frequent earthquakes, and poor communications, and there is very little industry of any…

  • NDRC (United States government organization)

    Vannevar Bush: Architect of the military-industrial complex: …about forming an organization, the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC), to organize research of interest to the military and to inform the armed services about new technologies. The NDRC was formed with Bush as its chairman on June 27, 1940. One year later, the Office of Scientific Research and Development…

  • NDSV (political party, Bulgaria)

    Simeon Saxecoburggotski: …announced the formation of the National Movement for Simeon II, an organization that set out to field candidates in the national legislative elections scheduled in June. When the courts ruled that the party had not met all of the requirements for registration, it joined two minor parties’ coalition and was…

  • NDU (United States Department of Defense institutuion)

    National Defense University (NDU), American graduate-level institution of higher education for members of the U.S. military and allied countries’ militaries that was designed to prepare military and civilian leaders to face present and emerging security threats through education in military

  • Ndumu Game Reserve (park, South Africa)

    Ndumu Game Reserve, park in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. The reserve is located on the Mozambique border at the confluence of the Usutu and Pongolo rivers. Much of its 40-square-mile (100-square-km) area is occupied by Lake Nyamiti and other small bodies of water. The reserve, which was

  • Ndutu (anthropological and archaeological site, Tanzania)

    Ndutu, site in northern Tanzania known for a 400,000-year-old human cranium and associated Stone Age tools discovered there in 1973. The skull displays traits of both Homo erectus and H. sapiens, with a brain size intermediate between the two species. Like H. erectus, it has a large browridge,

  • Nduye (river, Africa)

    Ituri Forest: Climate and drainage: …the north, the Epulu and Nduye in the centre, and the Ibina in the south. None of these rivers is navigable, even by pirogue, for more than a few miles. The streams are fed by rains that are highly variable from month to month and from year to year. Average…

  • Ndwandwe (people)

    Ngoni, approximately 12 groups of people of the Nguni (q.v.) branch of Bantu-speaking peoples that are scattered throughout eastern Africa. Their dispersal was due to the rise of the Zulu empire early in the 19th century, during which many refugee bands moved away from Zululand. One Ngoni chief,

  • Ndzuwani (island, Comoros)

    Comoros: Relief, drainage, and soils: Anjouan is a triangular island rising centrally in a volcanic massif (Mount Ntingui) that reaches an elevation of about 5,200 feet (1,580 metres). Although the soil cover is good, much erosion has occurred, and many areas are no longer arable. There are no good natural…

  • NE (agriculture)

    feed: Determination: energy (DE), metabolizable energy (ME), net energy (NE), or total digestible nutrients (TDN). These values differ with species. The gross energy (GE) value of a feed is the amount of heat liberated when it is burned in a bomb calorimeter. The drawback of using this value is that a substance…

  • Ne (chemical element)

    Neon (Ne), chemical element, inert gas of Group 18 (noble gases) of the periodic table, used in electric signs and fluorescent lamps. Colourless, odourless, tasteless, and lighter than air, neon gas occurs in minute quantities in Earth’s atmosphere and trapped within the rocks of Earth’s crust.

  • NE (IUCN species status)

    endangered species: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: The IUCN system uses five quantitative criteria to assess the extinction risk of a given species. In general, these criteria…

  • Ne Win, U (Myanmar general and dictator)

    U Ne Win, Burmese general who was the leader of Burma (now Myanmar) from 1962 to 1988. Shu Maung studied at University College, Rangoon (now Yangon), from 1929 to 1931, and in the mid-1930s he became involved in the struggle for Burmese independence from the British. During World War II, after the

  • NEA (American organization)

    National Education Association (NEA), American voluntary association of teachers, administrators, and other educators associated with elementary and secondary schools and colleges and universities. It is the world’s largest professional organization. Its headquarters are in Washington, D.C. The

  • NEA (United States organization)

    National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), an independent agency of the U.S. government that supports the creation, dissemination, and performance of the arts. It was created by the U.S. Congress in the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965. The agency funds a variety of

  • NEA (news service)

    Edward Willis Scripps: The Newspaper Enterprise Association, the first syndicate to supply feature stories, illustrations, and cartoons to newspapers, was founded by Scripps in 1902. Five years later he combined the Scripps-McRae Press Association (established 1897) with another news service to form the United Press, which later became United…

  • Nea Dimokratia (political party, Greece)

    New Democracy (ND), conservative political party in Greece. New Democracy was founded in 1974 by Konstantinos Karamanlis, who oversaw the country’s transition from military dictatorship to democracy. It generally supports greater economic liberalization, including privatization and lower taxes, and

  • Nea grammata (Greek magazine)

    Odysseus Elytis: …in the 1930s, notably in Nea grammata. This magazine was a prime vehicle for the “Generation of the ’30s,” an influential school that included George Seferis, who in 1963 became the first Greek Nobel laureate for literature. Elytis’ earliest poems exhibited a strong individuality of tone and setting within the…

  • Nea Kameni (Greece)

    Thera: …are two active volcanic islets, Néa Kaméni (“New Burnt Island”) and Palaía Kaméni (“Old Burnt Island”). Thera proper consists largely of lava and pumice, the latter of which is the island’s main export. Red-wine grapes are also grown. The lagoon is rimmed by red-, white-, and black-striped volcanic cliffs rising…

  • Nea Psara (Greece)

    Eretria: The modern village Néa Psará, which occupies the site, was populated by inhabitants of Psará, off Khíos, in 1821.

  • Néa Spartí (ancient city, Greece)

    Sparta, ancient capital of the Laconia district of the southeastern Peloponnese, southwestern Greece. Along with the surrounding area, it forms the perifereiakí enótita (regional unit) of Laconia (Modern Greek: Lakonía) within the Peloponnese (Pelopónnisos) periféreia (region). The city lies on the

  • Neagh, Lough (lake, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Lough Neagh, lake in east-central Northern Ireland, about 20 miles (32 km) west of Belfast. It is the largest lake in the British Isles, covering 153 square miles (396 square km), with a catchment area of 2,200 square miles (5,700 square km). The chief feeders of the lake are the Upper River Bann,

  • Neagle, Dame Anna (British actress)

    Dame Anna Neagle, British actress and dancer, known for her work in stage plays, musicals, and films. Her motion-picture career was guided by her husband, producer-director Herbert Wilcox. Neagle debuted as a dancer in The Wonder Tales (London, 1917). Her first real lead was as a juvenile with Jack

  • Neagr?, Marea (sea, Eurasia)

    Black Sea, large inland sea situated at the southeastern extremity of Europe. It is bordered by Ukraine to the north, Russia to the northeast, Georgia to the east, Turkey to the south, and Bulgaria and Romania to the west. The roughly oval-shaped Black Sea occupies a large basin strategically

  • Neal Blaisdell Center (theatre complex, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States)

    Hawaii: Cultural institutions: Their home is the Neal Blaisdell Center, a municipal theatre–concert-hall–arena complex where touring theatrical companies and ballet troupes and musical artists of international renown also perform. Honolulu’s Chamber Music Society gives a concert series each year.

  • Neal, James Foster (American lawyer)

    James Foster Neal, American lawyer (born Sept. 7, 1929, Oak Grove, Tenn.—died Oct. 21, 2010, Nashville, Tenn.), litigated a series of high-profile cases. He joined the Justice Department in 1961 and led the prosecution team that in 1964 won a guilty verdict against Teamsters Union head Jimmy Hoffa.

  • Neal, Larry (American writer and editor)

    African American literature: The Black Arts movement: …Fire, edited by Baraka and Larry Neal. One of the most versatile leaders of the Black Arts movement, Neal summed up its goals as the promotion of self-determination, solidarity, and nationhood among African Americans.

  • Neal, Mary Sargeant (American writer and advocate)

    Mary Gove Nichols, American writer and advocate of women’s rights and health reform. Nichols is best known as a promoter of hydropathy—the use of water-cures, cold baths, and vegetarianism to cure illness. She edited the Health Journal and Advocate of Physiological Reform in 1840, and lectured

  • Neal, Patricia (American actress)

    Patricia Neal, American motion picture actress known for her deeply intelligent performances, usually as tough-minded independent women, and for her rehabilitation and triumphant return to films following a series of strokes. Neal studied theatre at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois,

  • Neal, Patsy Louise (American actress)

    Patricia Neal, American motion picture actress known for her deeply intelligent performances, usually as tough-minded independent women, and for her rehabilitation and triumphant return to films following a series of strokes. Neal studied theatre at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois,

  • Neal, Tom (American actor)

    Edgar G. Ulmer: Detour: …mystery set in a nightclub; Tom Neal starred as a doctor. Ulmer reunited with Neal on Detour (1945), a classic noir that the director claimed was shot in just six days. Neal played Al Roberts, an unemployed musician hitchhiking to California. He is picked up by a genial businessman, but…

  • Neale, Earle (American athlete and coach)

    Earle Neale, American collegiate and professional football coach and professional baseball player, who as a football coach was a great innovator. He was one of the first to use the five-man and the nine-man defensive line, man-to-man pass defense, the fake and triple reverse, and single-wing

  • Neale, Earle Alfred (American athlete and coach)

    Earle Neale, American collegiate and professional football coach and professional baseball player, who as a football coach was a great innovator. He was one of the first to use the five-man and the nine-man defensive line, man-to-man pass defense, the fake and triple reverse, and single-wing

  • Neale, Leonard (American priest)

    Mother Teresa Lalor: …under the guidance of Father Leonard Neale. They engaged in various types of charitable work and greatly assisted Father Neale during the yellow fever epidemic of 1797–98.

  • Neamathla (Seminole chief)

    Second Seminole War: …several Seminole leaders, headed by Neamathla, met with territorial governor William Duval and diplomat James Gadsden in September 1823. They signed the Treaty of Moultrie Creek, which obligated the Seminoles to move to a reservation of four million acres in central Florida, with the U.S. government to provide monies and…

  • Neame, Ronald (British filmmaker)

    Ronald Neame, British filmmaker (born April 23, 1911, London, Eng.—died June 16, 2010, Los Angeles, Calif.), was one of Britain’s most admired cinematographers in the 1930s and ’40s, notably on a series of acclaimed films with director David Lean. Neame himself later directed such hits as the drama

  • Neam? (county, Romania)

    Neam?, jude? (county), northeastern Romania. The Eastern Carpathian and sub-Carpathian mountains rise above settlement areas situated in the valleys of the county. Neam? is drained to the southeast by the Bistri?a and Moldova rivers. Piatra-Neam?, one of the oldest settlements in Romania, is the

  • Neam? Monastery (monastery, Neam?, Romania)

    Neam?: …Neam? (14th century) and the Neam? Monastery, including a 15th-century church, were built by Stephen (?tefan) the Great of Moldavia near Targu Neam?. Area 2,276 square miles (5,896 square km). Pop. (2007 est.) 566,059.

  • Neander Valley (valley, Germany)

    Neanderthal: … (or Neandertal) derives from the Neander Valley (German Neander Thal or Neander Tal) in Germany, where the fossils were first found.

  • Neandertal (archaic human)

    Neanderthal, (Homo neanderthalensis, Homo sapiens neanderthalensis), member of a group of archaic humans who emerged at least 200,000 years ago during the Pleistocene Epoch (about 2.6 million to 11,700 years ago) and were replaced or assimilated by early modern human populations (Homo sapiens)

  • Neanderthal (archaic human)

    Neanderthal, (Homo neanderthalensis, Homo sapiens neanderthalensis), member of a group of archaic humans who emerged at least 200,000 years ago during the Pleistocene Epoch (about 2.6 million to 11,700 years ago) and were replaced or assimilated by early modern human populations (Homo sapiens)

  • Neanderthals—the Latest News

    In the nearly 150 years since Neanderthal (or Neandertal) Fossil remains were first discovered in Germany, dozens of whole and partial skeletons of this hominid type have been recovered. Though many questions about their behaviour, ecology, and biology remained unanswered in 2004, researchers in a

  • neap tide (physics)

    Neap tide, tide of minimal range occurring near the time when the Moon and the Sun are in quadrature. This condition is geometrically defined as the time at which the line from the Earth to the Moon is at right angles to the line from the Earth to the Sun. Thus, the tide-producing effects of the

  • Neapolis (city, West Bank)

    Nāblus, city in the West Bank. It lies in an enclosed, fertile valley and is the market centre of a natural oasis that is watered by numerous springs. Founded under the auspices of the Roman emperor Vespasian in 72 ce and originally named Flavia Neapolis, the city prospered in particular because of

  • Neapolis (Italy)

    Naples, city, capital of Naples provincia, Campania regione, southern Italy. It lies on the west coast of the Italian peninsula, 120 miles (190 km) southeast of Rome. On its celebrated bay—flanked to the west by the smaller Gulf of Pozzuoli and to the southeast by the more extended indentation of

  • Neapolis (Greece)

    Kavála, commercial town and seaport, periféreia (region) of East Macedonia and Thrace (Modern Greek: Anatolikí Makedonía kai Thrakí), northeastern Greece. It lies along the Gulf of Kaválas in the northern Aegean Sea. Since 1924 it has been the seat of the metropolitan bishop of Fílippoi (ancient

  • Neápolis (Greece)

    Kavála, commercial town and seaport, periféreia (region) of East Macedonia and Thrace (Modern Greek: Anatolikí Makedonía kai Thrakí), northeastern Greece. It lies along the Gulf of Kaválas in the northern Aegean Sea. Since 1924 it has been the seat of the metropolitan bishop of Fílippoi (ancient

  • Neapolis (district, Syracuse, Italy)

    Syracuse: …less striking than those in Neapolis, which was long a country district. Archaeological remains in Neapolis include the Greek theatre of Hieron II (3rd century bc), a Roman amphitheatre (2nd century ad), and an altar of Hieron II, pillaged in 1526 to provide building materials for defensive walls. The nymphaeum…

  • Neapolis (Tunisia)

    Nabeul, town in northeastern Tunisia located on the Gulf of Hammamet. Formerly a Phoenician settlement, it was destroyed by the Romans in 146 bce and later rebuilt as a Roman colony called Neapolis. It is a noted pottery and ceramics handicraft centre and the eastern terminus of a railroad from

  • Neapolis (ancient city, Ukraine)

    Simferopol: …city is the site of Neapolis, occupied by the Scythians from the 3rd century bce to the 4th century ce; but modern Simferopol was founded by the Russians in 1784, adjacent to the Tatar settlement of Ak-Mechet, after the annexation of the Crimean Peninsula. Simferopol has a wide range of…

  • Neapolitan opera (music)

    Neapolitan opera, style of Italian opera written chiefly by 18th-century composers working in Naples. See opera

  • Neapolitan school (Italian art)

    Western painting: Late Baroque and Rococo: In the early 18th century, Neapolitan painting under Francesco Solimena developed from the brilliant synthesis of Pietro da Cortona’s grand manner and Venetian colour that Giordano had evolved in the late 17th century. The impact, also, of Preti is revealed by his predilection for brownish shadows; but, compared to the…

  • NEAR (spacecraft)

    Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Shoemaker (NEAR Shoemaker), first spacecraft to orbit and then land on an asteroid (Eros, a near-Earth asteroid, on Feb. 12, 2001). The NEAR spacecraft was launched by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration on Feb. 17, 1996. Its destination, Eros, was

  • Near and the Far, The (work by Myers)

    L.H. Myers: …as a single volume entitled The Near and the Far. A feeling of embittered despair also emerges from this monumental work. Four years after its publication Myers committed suicide.

  • Near Dark (film by Bigelow [1987])

    Kathryn Bigelow: …to the big screen with Near Dark, a vampire film that became a cult classic. Two years later she married director James Cameron (divorced 1991). She described Blue Steel (1989), which she cowrote and directed, as a “woman’s action film.” The crime drama starred Jamie Lee Curtis as a policewoman…

  • Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (spacecraft)

    Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Shoemaker (NEAR Shoemaker), first spacecraft to orbit and then land on an asteroid (Eros, a near-Earth asteroid, on Feb. 12, 2001). The NEAR spacecraft was launched by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration on Feb. 17, 1996. Its destination, Eros, was

  • Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Shoemaker (spacecraft)

    Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Shoemaker (NEAR Shoemaker), first spacecraft to orbit and then land on an asteroid (Eros, a near-Earth asteroid, on Feb. 12, 2001). The NEAR spacecraft was launched by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration on Feb. 17, 1996. Its destination, Eros, was

  • Near East

    Near East, usually the lands around the eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea, including northeastern Africa, southwestern Asia, and, occasionally, the Balkan Peninsula. The term Near East was used by the first modern Western geographers to refer to the nearer part of the Orient, a region

  • near infrared interactance (physics)

    human nutrition: Body mass, body fat, and body water: …to estimate body fat; and near infrared interactance, in which an infrared light aimed at the biceps is used to assess fat and protein interaction. Direct measurement of the body’s various compartments can only be performed on cadavers.

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