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  • Nermernuh (people)

    Comanche, North American Indian tribe of equestrian nomads whose 18th- and 19th-century territory comprised the southern Great Plains. The name Comanche is derived from a Ute word meaning “anyone who wants to fight me all the time.” The Comanche had previously been part of the Wyoming Shoshone.

  • Nernst equation (chemistry)

    electrochemical reaction: The Nernst equation: For a particular value of E the two partial current densities must become equal. This value of potential is the reversible electrode potential. From equation (1) one can deduce equation (2):

  • Nernst lamp (electrical device)

    Walther Nernst: Early research: The Nernst lamp was manufactured for several years by Allgemeine Elektrizit?tsgesellschaft (AEG) in Berlin, and thousands of Nernst lamps decorated a specially constructed German pavilion at the 1900 Paris International Exhibition. Nernst’s work on a number of similar dielectric bulbs and his research on metal filaments…

  • Nernst potential (biology)

    nervous system: Ions: …difference is then called the equilibrium potential. (It is also called the Nernst potential, after Walther Nernst, a German physical chemist who, in the late 19th century, developed equations for calculating the electrical potential at which there is no longer a net flux of a specific ion across a membrane.)

  • Nernst, Walther (German chemist)

    Walther Nernst, German scientist who was one of the founders of modern physical chemistry. His theoretical and experimental work in chemistry, including his formulation of the heat theorem, known as the third law of thermodynamics, gained him the 1920 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Nernst was educated

  • Nernst, Walther Hermann (German chemist)

    Walther Nernst, German scientist who was one of the founders of modern physical chemistry. His theoretical and experimental work in chemistry, including his formulation of the heat theorem, known as the third law of thermodynamics, gained him the 1920 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Nernst was educated

  • Nero (Roman emperor)

    Nero, the fifth Roman emperor (54–68 ce), stepson and heir of the emperor Claudius. He became infamous for his personal debaucheries and extravagances and, on doubtful evidence, for his burning of Rome and persecutions of Christians. Nero’s father, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, died about 40 ce, and

  • Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (Roman emperor)

    Nero, the fifth Roman emperor (54–68 ce), stepson and heir of the emperor Claudius. He became infamous for his personal debaucheries and extravagances and, on doubtful evidence, for his burning of Rome and persecutions of Christians. Nero’s father, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, died about 40 ce, and

  • Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus (Roman emperor)

    Nero, the fifth Roman emperor (54–68 ce), stepson and heir of the emperor Claudius. He became infamous for his personal debaucheries and extravagances and, on doubtful evidence, for his burning of Rome and persecutions of Christians. Nero’s father, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, died about 40 ce, and

  • Nero Claudius Drusus (Roman commander [38 bc–9 bc])

    Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus, younger brother of Tiberius (who later became emperor) and commander of the Roman forces that occupied the German territory between the Rhine and Elbe rivers from 12 to 9 bc. Drusus was born shortly after the divorce of his mother, Livia Drusilla, from Tiberius

  • Nero Deep (trench, Pacific Ocean)

    Mariana Trench: In 1899 Nero Deep (31,693 feet [9,660 metres]) was discovered southeast of Guam. That sounding was not exceeded until a 32,197-foot (9,813-metre) hole was found in the vicinity 30 years later. In 1957, during the International Geophysical Year, the Soviet research ship Vityaz sounded a new world…

  • Nero, Gaius Claudius (Roman military commander)

    Gaius Claudius Nero, Roman military commander during the latter half of the Second Punic War (218–201 bce). He was elected co-consul in 207 bce and later that year engineered a Roman victory at the Battle of the Metaurus (Metauro) in northeastern Italy. The battle marked a turning point in the war

  • Nero, Tiberius Claudius (Roman high priest and magistrate)

    Tiberius: Background and youth: Tiberius’s father, also named Tiberius Claudius Nero, a high priest and magistrate, was a former fleet captain for Julius Caesar. His mother, the beautiful Livia Drusilla, was her husband’s cousin and may have been only 13 years old when Tiberius was born. In the civil wars following the assassination…

  • Nerodia (reptile genus)

    water snake: …the most abundant genus is Nerodia, which is made up of 11 species that range from southern Canada south through the eastern United States and eastern Mexico. The northern water snake (N. sipedon), the most common species, inhabits the eastern half of the United States, southern Ontario, and southern Quebec.…

  • Nerodia clarkii (reptile)

    water snake: The salt marsh snake (N. clarkii) lives in the brackish water habitats of the southeastern United States, and adults typically grow to 0.3–0.7 metre (1–2 feet) long. There are three morphologically distinct subspecies: the salt marsh snake (N. clarkii clarkii) of the Gulf Coast region is…

  • Nerodia sipedon (reptile)

    water snake: The northern water snake (N. sipedon), the most common species, inhabits the eastern half of the United States, southern Ontario, and southern Quebec. It is a moderately large snake that can reach lengths of 1 to 1.4 metres (3 to 4.5 feet). The body is coloured…

  • Nerolin II (chemical compound)

    chemical compound: Ethers and epoxides: An aromatic ether known as Nerolin II (2-ethoxynaphthalene) is used in perfumes to impart the scent of orange blossoms. Cyclic ethers, such as tetrahydrofuran, are commonly used as organic solvents. Although ethers contain two polar carbon-oxygen bonds, they are much less reactive than alcohols or phenols.

  • Nerone (film by Petrolini)

    Ettore Petrolini: Of these, it is Nerone (1930; “Nero”), an anthology of his best-developed characterizations, that best captures Petrolini’s range and engaging personality. In addition, he wrote several books, including an autobiography, Abbasso Petrolini (1922; “Down with Petrolini”), and a collection of miscellaneous writings, Al mio pubblico (1937; “To My Public”),…

  • Nerone (opera by Boito)

    Arrigo Boito: Boito’s second opera, Nerone, occupied him for nearly 50 years; completed after his death by Vincenzo Tommasini and Arturo Toscanini, it was produced in Milan in 1924, but, despite its grand design and spectacle, it lacked the musical character that distinguished Mefistofele.

  • Neronov, Ivan (Russian priest)

    Nikon: …Stefan Vonifatyev, and the priests Ivan Neronov and Avvakum Petrovich (all, like him, natives of the Nizhny Novgorod region). This group of priests strove to revitalize the church by bringing about closer contact with the mass of the faithful, and they also sought to purify religious books and rituals from…

  • nerpa (mammal)

    seal: Seal diversity: The Baikal seal (Phoca sibirica) of Lake Baikal in Siberia, Russia, is the smallest at 1.1–1.4 metres (3.6–4.6 feet) long and 50–130 kg (110–290 pounds), but some female fur seals weigh less. The largest is the male elephant seal (genus Mirounga leonina) of coastal California (including…

  • Nerses I the Great, Saint (patriarch of Armenia)

    Saint Nerses I the Great, ; feast day, February 19), patriarch of the Armenian church from about 353. A descendant of St. Gregory the Illuminator (240–332), who converted the Armenian king to Christianity and became the first patriarch of Armenia, Nerses was the most important figure in the country

  • Nerses IV Shnorhali (patriarch of Armenia)

    Armenian chant: …12th century the catholicos (patriarch) Nerses IV Shnorhali (“the Gracious”) is credited with musical reforms of the chant. He is said to have simplified the texts of the religious poetry and the melodies of the chant, bringing it closer to the style of Armenian folk music. Nerses also wrote a…

  • Nerthus (Germanic deity)

    Nerthus, ancient Germanic goddess known from a report of her given by the Roman historian Tacitus, who in his Germania (late 1st century ad) refers to her as Terra Mater, or Mother Earth, and says that she was worshiped by seven tribes (among whom were the Angles, who later invaded England). Her

  • Nerud, John Andrew (American Thoroughbred horse trainer and breeder)

    John Andrew Nerud, American Thoroughbred horse trainer and breeder (born Feb. 9, 1913, Minatare, Neb.—died Aug. 13, 2015, Old Brookville, N.Y.), trained more than 1,000 winning horses, including 27 that won stakes races, and helped create the Breeders’ Cup race. He spent most of his 44-year career

  • Neruda (film by Larrain [2016])

    Gael García Bernal: He then starred in Neruda (2016) as an inspector chasing the Nobel Prize-winning poet Pablo Neruda. García Bernal later lent his voice to the animated film Coco (2017), about a boy who goes on a journey through the Land of the Dead to uncover his family’s long-kept secret. His…

  • Neruda, Jan (Czech poet)

    Czech literature: The 18th and 19th centuries: …the poet and short-story writer Jan Neruda, known for his sardonic sketches in Povídky malostranské (1878; “Tales of Little Quarter”). Other notable figures of the Máj group were the novelist Karolina Světlá and the poet Vítězslav Hálek.

  • Neruda, Pablo (Chilean poet)

    Pablo Neruda, Chilean poet, diplomat, and politician who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1971. He was perhaps the most important Latin American poet of the 20th century. Neruda was the son of José del Carmen Reyes, a railway worker, and Rosa Basoalto. His mother died within a month of

  • Nerva (Roman emperor)

    Nerva, Roman emperor from Sept. 18, 96, to January 98, the first of a succession of rulers traditionally known as the Five Good Emperors. A member of a distinguished senatorial family, Nerva was distantly related by marriage to the Julio-Claudian house and had been twice consul (71 ce and 90) when,

  • Nerva Caesar Augustus (Roman emperor)

    Nerva, Roman emperor from Sept. 18, 96, to January 98, the first of a succession of rulers traditionally known as the Five Good Emperors. A member of a distinguished senatorial family, Nerva was distantly related by marriage to the Julio-Claudian house and had been twice consul (71 ce and 90) when,

  • Nerval, Gérard de (French poet)

    Gérard de Nerval, French Romantic poet whose themes and preoccupations were to greatly influence the Symbolists and Surrealists. Nerval’s father, a doctor, was sent to serve with Napoleon’s Rhine army; his mother died when he was two years old, and he grew up in the care of relatives in the

  • nerve (anatomy)

    Nerve, in anatomy, a glistening white cordlike bundle of fibres, surrounded by a sheath, that connects the nervous system with other parts of the body. The nerves conduct impulses toward or away from the central nervous mechanism. In humans 12 pairs, the cranial nerves, are attached to the brain,

  • nerve cell (anatomy)

    Neuron, basic cell of the nervous system in vertebrates and most invertebrates from the level of the cnidarians (e.g., corals, jellyfish) upward. A typical neuron has a cell body containing a nucleus and two or more long fibres. Impulses are carried along one or more of these fibres, called

  • nerve conduction studies (medicine)

    nervous system disease: Electromyography: …fibres can be measured with nerve conduction studies (NCS). The muscle is stimulated with a small electrical charge, which generates an impulse. The impulse moves along the nerve fibre and eventually reaches a muscle, which contracts. NCS can localize the site or sites of peripheral nerve disease and may even…

  • nerve deafness (hearing disorder)

    deaf-blindness: Hearing and visual impairment: A sensorineural hearing loss is caused by damage to the inner ear or the auditory nerve. A mixed hearing loss is diagnosed when an individual has both a conductive and a sensorineural hearing loss. Cortical deafness is caused by damage to the auditory cortex of the…

  • nerve deafness, congenital (ear disorder)

    ear disease: Congenital nerve deafness: Congenital nerve deafness, a defect of the auditory nerve in the cochlea, may be present at birth or acquired during or soon after birth. Usually both inner ears are affected to a similar degree, and as a rule there is a severe…

  • nerve ending (anatomy)

    automata theory: The finite automata of McCulloch and Pitts: …with its complex of neurons, nerve endings, and synapses (separating gap between neurons) can generate, codify, store, and use information. The “all or none” nature of the threshold of neurons is often referred to in formulating purely logical schemata or in constructing the practical electronic gates of computers. Any physical…

  • nerve fibre (anatomy)

    Axon, portion of a nerve cell (neuron) that carries nerve impulses away from the cell body. A neuron typically has one axon that connects it with other neurons or with muscle or gland cells. Some axons may be quite long, reaching, for example, from the spinal cord down to a toe. Most axons of

  • nerve gas (chemical compound)

    Nerve gas, Weapon of chemical warfare that affects the transmission of nerve impulses through the nervous system. The organophosphorus nerve agents Tabun, Sarin, and Soman were developed by Germany during World War II but not used. They and a newer agent, VX, were produced in huge quantities by the

  • nerve impulse (physiology)

    anesthetic: Local anesthetics: …anesthetics can block conduction of nerve impulses along all types of nerve fibres, including motor nerve fibres that carry impulses from the brain to the periphery. It is a common experience with normal dosages of an anesthetic, however, that, while pain sensation may be lost, motor function is not impaired.…

  • nerve net (anatomy)

    Nerve net, primitive nerve arrangement forming the entire nervous system of many cnidarians and a part of more advanced nervous systems. Cytoplasmic processes join the nerve cells (neurons) of nerve nets. In cnidarians the neurons are joined to epithelial receptors and to contractile cells. In

  • nerve plexus (anatomy)

    nervous system: Simple bilateral systems: …give rise to the peripheral nerve plexuses. The submuscular nerve plexus—consisting of sensory cells, ganglion cells, and their processes—is situated in the loose tissue (mesenchyme) below the subepidermal musculature. Another subepidermal plexus is located at the bases of the epithelial cells above the muscular layer.

  • nerve terminal (anatomy)

    automata theory: The finite automata of McCulloch and Pitts: …with its complex of neurons, nerve endings, and synapses (separating gap between neurons) can generate, codify, store, and use information. The “all or none” nature of the threshold of neurons is often referred to in formulating purely logical schemata or in constructing the practical electronic gates of computers. Any physical…

  • nerve tissue (anatomy)

    human body: Organization of the body: …form the body’s musculature; (3) nerve tissues, which conduct electrical impulses and make up the nervous system; and (4) connective tissues, which are composed of widely spaced cells and large amounts of intercellular matrix and which bind together various body structures. (Bone and blood are considered specialized connective tissues, in…

  • nerve-growth factor (biochemistry)

    growth: Internal factors: A protein called nerve-growth factor is important for the growth of some parts of the mammalian nervous system. If too much of the nerve-growth factor is present, growth of sympathetic nerve fibres is extensive and aberrant. If the nerve-growth factor is eliminated from the body—by injection of an…

  • Nervi, Pier Luigi (Italian engineer and architect)

    Pier Luigi Nervi, Italian engineer and architect, internationally renowned for his technical ingenuity and dramatic sense of design, especially as applied to large-span structures built of reinforced concrete. His important works include a prefabricated 309-foot-span arch for the Turin Exhibition

  • Nervii (people)

    history of the Low Countries: The Roman period: …the Menapii; in Artois, the Nervii; between the Schelde and the Rhine, the Eburones and the Aduatuci; and, in what is now Luxembourg, the Treveri. North of the Rhine, the Frisii (Frisians) were the principal inhabitants, although the arrival of the Romans brought about a number of movements: the Batavi…

  • Nervo, Amado (Mexican author)

    Amado Nervo, poet and diplomat, generally considered the most distinguished Mexican poet of the late 19th- and early 20th-century literary movement known as Modernismo. Nervo’s introspective poetry, characterized by deep religious feeling and simple forms, reflects his struggle for

  • Nervo, Juan Crisóstomo Ruiz de (Mexican author)

    Amado Nervo, poet and diplomat, generally considered the most distinguished Mexican poet of the late 19th- and early 20th-century literary movement known as Modernismo. Nervo’s introspective poetry, characterized by deep religious feeling and simple forms, reflects his struggle for

  • Nervous Conditions (novel by Dangarembga)

    African literature: English: Tsitsi Dangarembga wrote Nervous Conditions (1988), a story of two Shona girls, Tambudzai and Nyasha, both attempting to find their place in contemporary Zimbabwe. Nyasha has been abroad and wonders about the effect that Westernization has had on her and her family, while Tambudzai is longing to break…

  • nervous regulation (biology)

    nervous system: Stimulus-response coordination: …another integrative system called the nervous system. A nervous system can be defined as an organized group of cells, called neurons, specialized for the conduction of an impulse—an excited state—from a sensory receptor through a nerve network to an effector, the site at which the response occurs.

  • nervous system (anatomy)

    Nervous system, organized group of cells specialized for the conduction of electrochemical stimuli from sensory receptors through a network to the site at which a response occurs. All living organisms are able to detect changes within themselves and in their environments. Changes in the external

  • nervous system disease

    virus: Chronic and slowly progressive diseases: …diseases, particularly those affecting the nervous system, have been identified. A fatal neurological disorder of sheep, called scrapie, has an incubation period of years and may be caused by a heat-resistant protein called a prion, which is self-replicating. Similar, rather obscure agents have been identified for two uncommon fatal disorders…

  • nervous system disease, human

    Nervous system disease, any of the diseases or disorders that affect the functioning of the human nervous system. Everything that humans sense, consider, and effect and all the unlearned reflexes of the body depend on the functioning of the nervous system. The skeleton and muscles support and

  • Nervous System of the Human Body, The (work by Bell)

    Sir Charles Bell: …of his 1811 volume, entitled The Nervous System of the Human Body (1830). In these books Bell distinguished between sensory nerves that conduct impulses to the central nervous system and motor nerves that convey impulses from the brain or from other nerve centres to a peripheral organ of response. He…

  • nervous system, human (anatomy)

    Human nervous system, system that conducts stimuli from sensory receptors to the brain and spinal cord and conducts impulses back to other parts of the body. As with other higher vertebrates, the human nervous system has two main parts: the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) and the

  • nervous tension (psychology and biology)

    Stress, in psychology and biology, any environmental or physical pressure that elicits a response from an organism. In most cases, stress promotes survival because it forces organisms to adapt to rapidly changing environmental conditions. For example, in response to unusually hot or dry weather,

  • nervus intermedius (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Facial nerve (CN VII or 7): The intermediate nerve contains autonomic (parasympathetic) as well as general and special sensory fibres. Preganglionic autonomic fibres, classified as general visceral efferent, project from the superior salivatory nucleus in the pons. Exiting with the facial nerve, they pass to the pterygopalatine ganglion via the greater petrosal…

  • NES (video game console)

    Nintendo console, groundbreaking eight-bit video game console created by Japanese designer Uemura Masayuki. The Nintendo console, or Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), was released as the Famicom in Japan on July 15, 1983. The Famicom offered the ability to play popular arcade games such as

  • Nesbenebded (king of Egypt)

    Smendes, king of ancient Egypt (1070–44 bce), founder of the 21st dynasty (1075–c. 950 bce), who established the capital at Tanis, in the northeast Nile River delta, while high priests of Amon ruled Thebes and Upper Egypt. Smendes, a native of the delta, probably secured his right to rule through

  • Nesbit, E. (English author)

    E. Nesbit, British children’s author, novelist, and poet. Nesbit spent her childhood in France and Germany and later led an ordinary country life in Kent, which provided scenes for her books. She was interested in socialism and was one of the founders of the association known as the Fellowship of

  • Nesbit, Edith (English author)

    E. Nesbit, British children’s author, novelist, and poet. Nesbit spent her childhood in France and Germany and later led an ordinary country life in Kent, which provided scenes for her books. She was interested in socialism and was one of the founders of the association known as the Fellowship of

  • Nesbit, Evelyn (American showgirl)

    Stanford White: …jealous husband of the showgirl Evelyn Nesbit, with whom White had had a love affair.

  • Nesbitt, John (American musician)

    jazz: Other notables of the 1920s: …composing and arranging talents of John Nesbitt, whose work was mistakenly credited to Redman for many decades. Nesbitt was obviously aware and respectful of Ellington’s fast-tempo “stomp” pieces. And like Morton, Nesbitt was intent on utilizing his 10- or 11-piece jazz orchestra to produce the most varied yet balanced integration…

  • Nesbitt, Mike (British politician)

    Ulster Unionist Party: History: …leader by former news broadcaster Mike Nesbitt in March 2012.

  • Nesb?, Jo (Norwegian writer and musician)

    Jo Nesb?, Norwegian writer and musician, best known internationally for a series of crime novels featuring hard-boiled detective Harry Hole (pronounced Hoo-la in Norwegian). Nesb? grew up in Molde, western Norway. While in school, he also played guitar and sang in a pop-rock band. He graduated from

  • Nesch, Rolf (German artist)

    Rolf Nesch, German-born Norwegian printmaker and painter who was one of the first artists to use metal collage in printmaking. Nesch was educated in Germany at art schools in Stuttgart and Dresden. He was greatly influenced by the Expressionist painter Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, under whom he studied

  • Neseb?r (Bulgaria)

    Neseb?r, historic town and resort, eastern Bulgaria, on the Black Sea coast. Neseb?r is situated on an island connected to the mainland by a narrow strip of land. The Greek colony of Mesembria was founded on the site late in the 6th century bc and thrived on the trade between Greece and Thrace. It

  • Nesef (Uzbekistan)

    Karshi, city, southern Uzbekistan, in the Karshi oasis, on the Kashka River. At least 1,000 years old, it lay on the caravan route from Samarkand and Bukhara to Afghanistan and India; it was known as Nakhsheb, or Nesef, until the 14th century, when a fort (Turkic karshi, “against”) was built there.

  • Nesha (archaeological site, Turkey)

    Kültepe, (Turkish: “Ash Hill”), ancient mound covering the Bronze Age city of Kanesh, in central Turkey. Kültepe was known to archaeologists during the 19th century, but it began to attract particular attention as the reputed source of so-called Cappadocian tablets in Old Assyrian cuneiform writing

  • neshani (Ottoman official)

    calligraphy: Arabic calligraphy: …by a skilled calligrapher, the neshan?.

  • Neshri (Ottoman historian)

    Ne?ri, historian who was a prominent figure in early Ottoman historiography. There is a great deal of controversy over the particulars of Ne?ri’s identity and the events of his life. Some have attributed to him the name Mehmed, although details with which to confirm this are scarce; others have

  • Nesili

    Hittite language, most important of the extinct Indo-European languages of ancient Anatolia. Hittite was closely related to Carian, Luwian, Lydian, Lycian, and Palaic (see also Anatolian languages). Hittite is known primarily from the approximately 30,000 cuneiform tablets or fragments of tablets

  • Nesimi, Seyid ?madeddin (poet)

    Seyid ?madeddin Nesimi, mystical poet of the late 14th and early 15th centuries who wrote in Turkish, Persian, and Arabic. Very little about his early life is known. He became acquainted with the founder of an extremist religious sect, the ?urūfīs, the Iranian mystic Fa?l Allāh of Astarābād, who

  • Nesin, Aziz (Turkish writer)

    Aziz Nesin, (MEHMET NUSRET), Turkish satirist and militant secularist novelist and short-story writer who published over 90 books and plays attacking bureaucracy and hypocrisy from a left-wing perspective (b. Dec. 20, 1915--d. July 6,

  • Nesiotes (Greek sculptor)

    Critius and Nesiotes: Nesiotes, (flourished late 5th century bc, Athens), Greek sculptors known for their bronze figures of the tyrannicides Harmodius and Aristogiton, copies of the original bronzes executed by Antenor about 510 bc, which were taken by Xerxes I to Susa and subsequently lost. The copies were…

  • Nesite language

    Anatolia: The Hittite occupation of Anatolia: …these Indo-Europeans called their language Nesite (after the city of Nesa), it is still, confusingly, called Hittite. Besides Nesite, two other Indo-European dialects were found in Anatolia: Luwian (Luvian), spoken by immigrants into southwest Anatolia late in the Early Bronze Age and later written with the pictographs commonly called Hittite…

  • Nesmith, Mike (American musician and actor)

    the Monkees: …England—February 29, 2012, Stuart, Florida), Mike Nesmith (byname of Robert Michael Nesmith; b. December 30, 1942, Houston, Texas, U.S.), and Peter Tork (byname of Peter Thorkelson; b. February 13, 1942, Washington, D.C., U.S.—d. February 21, 2019).

  • Nesmith, Robert Michael (American musician and actor)

    the Monkees: …England—February 29, 2012, Stuart, Florida), Mike Nesmith (byname of Robert Michael Nesmith; b. December 30, 1942, Houston, Texas, U.S.), and Peter Tork (byname of Peter Thorkelson; b. February 13, 1942, Washington, D.C., U.S.—d. February 21, 2019).

  • Nesnesitelná lehkost bytí (novel by Kundera)

    The Unbearable Lightness of Being, novel by Milan Kundera, first published in 1984 in English and French translations. In 1985 the work was released in the original Czech, but it was banned in Czechoslovakia until 1989. Through the lives of four individuals, the novel explores the philosophical

  • Nesokia bunnii (rodent)

    bandicoot rat: N. bunnii, however, is as large as the greater bandicoot rat, with thick fur and a very long tail relative to body length. An excellent swimmer, it lives in natural marshes at the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in southeastern Iraq and builds…

  • Nesokia indica (rodent)

    bandicoot rat: …two species of Nesokia, the short-tailed bandicoot rat, or pest rat (N. indica), is almost the size of the lesser bandicoot rat, with soft brown fur and a short tail. Its range extends from northern Bangladesh through Central Asia to northeastern Egypt and also north of the Himalayas from Turkmenistan…

  • Nesolagus netscheri (mammal)

    rabbit: Diversity and conservation status: The Sumatran rabbit (Nesolagus netscheri) is known to live in the island’s southwestern montane forests. Only two sightings of the species have occurred in the 21st century. Although its population size is unknown, the IUCN has considered the Sumatran rabbit critically endangered since 1996. Another striped rabbit (N.…

  • Nesolagus timminsi (mammal)

    rabbit: Diversity and conservation status: Another striped rabbit (N. timminsi) distantly related to the Sumatran rabbit was discovered in the Annamite mountains of Laos and Vietnam during the late 1990s; however, information related to its conservation status remains incomplete.

  • Nesomimus (bird)

    mockingbird: The Galapagos mockingbird (Nesomimus) has various races or subspecies on the different islands, showing an adaptive radiation similar to, but not as extreme as, that found in the Galapagos finch.

  • Nesomyinae (mammal)

    Muridae: …dendromurines, and Malagasy rats and mice). Also unresolved are the affinities of subfamilies containing only one genus (mouselike hamsters, the maned rat).

  • Nesomyinae (mammal)

    Muridae: …rats and mice, dendromurines, and Malagasy rats and mice). Also unresolved are the affinities of subfamilies containing only one genus (mouselike hamsters, the maned rat).

  • nesosilicate (mineral)

    Nesosilicate, compound with a structure in which independent silicate tetrahedrons (each consisting of a central silicon atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms at the corners of a tetrahedron) are present. Because none of the oxygen atoms is shared by other tetrahedrons, the chemical formula contains

  • Nespelem (people)

    Plateau Indian: Language: Nespelim, Spokan, Kalispel, Pend d’Oreille, Coeur d’Alene, and Flathead peoples. Some early works incorrectly denote all Salishan groups as “Flathead.”

  • Nespelim (people)

    Plateau Indian: Language: Nespelim, Spokan, Kalispel, Pend d’Oreille, Coeur d’Alene, and Flathead peoples. Some early works incorrectly denote all Salishan groups as “Flathead.”

  • Ne?ri (Ottoman historian)

    Ne?ri, historian who was a prominent figure in early Ottoman historiography. There is a great deal of controversy over the particulars of Ne?ri’s identity and the events of his life. Some have attributed to him the name Mehmed, although details with which to confirm this are scarce; others have

  • Ness, Eliot (American crime fighter)

    Eliot Ness, American crime fighter, head of a nine-man team of law officers called the “Untouchables,” who opposed Al Capone’s underworld network in Chicago. A graduate of the University of Chicago, Ness was 26 when, in 1929, he was hired as a special agent of the U.S. Department of Justice to head

  • Ness, Loch (lake, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Loch Ness, lake, lying in the Highland council area, Scotland. With a depth of 788 feet (240 metres) and a length of about 23 miles (36 km), Loch Ness has the largest volume of fresh water in Great Britain. It lies in the Glen Mor—or Great Glen, which bisects the Highlands—and forms part of the

  • Nesselrode, Karl Robert Vasilyevich, Graf (Russian foreign minister)

    Karl Vasilyevich, Count Nesselrode, foreign minister of imperial Russia (1822–56) whose policy toward the Ottoman Empire helped precipitate the Crimean War (1853–56). The son of a German count of the Holy Roman Empire who served as Russia’s ambassador to Portugal, Nesselrode entered the Russian

  • Nessie (legendary creature)

    Loch Ness monster, large marine creature believed by some people to inhabit Loch Ness, Scotland. However, much of the alleged evidence supporting its existence has been discredited, and it is widely thought that the monster is a myth. Reports of a monster inhabiting Loch Ness date back to ancient

  • Nessus (Greek mythology)

    Heracles: …taking her home, the Centaur Nessus tried to violate her, and Heracles shot him with one of his poisoned arrows. The Centaur, dying, told Deianeira to preserve the blood from his wound, for if Heracles wore a garment rubbed with it he would love none but her forever. Several years…

  • nest (zoology)

    Nest, structure created by an animal to house its eggs, its young, or, in some cases, itself. Nests are built by a few invertebrates, especially the social insects, and by some members of all the major vertebrate groups. The social insects (termites, ants, bees, and wasps) build the only true nests

  • Nest of Simple Folk, A (novel by O’Faolain)

    Sean O'Faolain: …first collection of stories, and A Nest of Simple Folk (1933), a novel set in the period between the Easter Rising (1916) and the establishment of the Irish Free State (1921), allowed him to write full-time. O’Faolain produced only four novels, including Bird Alone (1936) and Come Back to Erin…

  • nest-building (zoology)

    Nest, structure created by an animal to house its eggs, its young, or, in some cases, itself. Nests are built by a few invertebrates, especially the social insects, and by some members of all the major vertebrate groups. The social insects (termites, ants, bees, and wasps) build the only true nests

  • nest-mate eviction

    cuculiform: Brood parasitism: …form of behaviour, that of nest-mate eviction, that ensures that it will not have to compete with members of the foster brood for food. Within a few hours of hatching, the blind, naked, young cuckoo develops a strong urge to evict any objects, such as eggs or other nestlings, from…

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