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  • neutron capture (physics)

    Neutron capture, type of nuclear reaction in which a target nucleus absorbs a neutron (uncharged particle), then emits a discrete quantity of electromagnetic energy (gamma-ray photon). The target nucleus and the product nucleus are isotopes, or forms of the same element. Thus phosphorus-31, on

  • neutron detector (instrument)

    radiation measurement: Neutron detectors: The general principle of detecting neutrons involves a two-step process. First, the neutron must interact in the detector to form charged particles. Second, the detector must then produce an output signal based on the energy deposited by these charged particles. Many of the…

  • neutron diffraction (physics)

    liquid: Molecular structure of liquids: …g: first, by X-ray or neutron diffraction from simple fluids and, second, by computer simulation of the molecular structure and motions in a liquid. In the first, the liquid is exposed to a specific, single wavelength (monochromatic) radiation, and the observed results are then subjected to a mathematical treatment known…

  • neutron flux (physics)

    radiation measurement: Neutron-activation foils: …radioactivity, the intensity of the neutron flux to which the sample has been exposed can be deduced from this radioactivity measurement. In order to induce enough radioactivity to permit reasonably accurate measurement, relatively intense neutron fluxes are required. Therefore, activation foils are frequently used as a technique to measure neutron…

  • neutron optics (physics)

    Neutron optics, branch of physics dealing with the theory and applications of the wave behaviour of neutrons, the electrically neutral subatomic particles that are present in all atomic nuclei except those of ordinary hydrogen. Neutron optics involves studying the interactions of matter with a beam

  • neutron star (astronomy)

    Neutron star, any of a class of extremely dense, compact stars thought to be composed primarily of neutrons. Neutron stars are typically about 20 km (12 miles) in diameter. Their masses range between 1.18 and 1.97 times that of the Sun, but most are 1.35 times that of the Sun. Thus, their mean

  • neutron-activation analysis (physics)

    radiation measurement: Neutron-activation foils: For radiation energies of several MeV and lower, charged particles and fast electrons do not induce nuclear reactions in absorber materials. Gamma rays with energy below a few MeV also do not readily induce reactions with nuclei. Therefore, when nearly any material is…

  • neutron-gamma reaction (physics)

    Neutron capture, type of nuclear reaction in which a target nucleus absorbs a neutron (uncharged particle), then emits a discrete quantity of electromagnetic energy (gamma-ray photon). The target nucleus and the product nucleus are isotopes, or forms of the same element. Thus phosphorus-31, on

  • neutron-scattering (physics)

    neutron optics: …the field of neutron optics, neutron-scattering studies have yielded insight into the fundamental nature of magnetism, probed the detailed structure of proteins embedded in cell membranes, and provided a tool for examining stress and strain in jet engines.

  • neutropenia (pathology)

    blood disease: Leukopenia: …the number of neutrophils (neutropenia). Of itself, neutropenia causes no symptoms, but persons with neutropenia of any cause may have frequent and severe bacterial infections. Agranulocytosis is an acute disorder characterized by severe sore throat, fever, and marked fatigue associated with extreme reduction in the number of neutrophilic granulocytes…

  • neutrophil (leukocyte)

    Neutrophil, type of white blood cell (leukocyte) that is characterized histologically by its ability to be stained by neutral dyes and functionally by its role in mediating immune responses against infectious microorganisms. Neutrophils, along with eosinophils and basophils, constitute a group of

  • neutrophilia (pathology)

    neutrophil: …in the blood is called neutrophilia. This condition is typically associated with acute inflammation, though it may result from chronic myelogenous leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissues. An abnormally low number of neutrophils is called neutropenia. This condition can be caused by various inherited disorders that affect the immune…

  • neutrophyllic leukocyte (leukocyte)

    Neutrophil, type of white blood cell (leukocyte) that is characterized histologically by its ability to be stained by neutral dyes and functionally by its role in mediating immune responses against infectious microorganisms. Neutrophils, along with eosinophils and basophils, constitute a group of

  • Neuve-Chapelle, Battle of (European history)

    World War I: The Western Front, 1915: …tried a new experiment at Neuve-Chapelle on March 10, when its artillery opened an intense bombardment on a 2,000-yard front and then, after 35 minutes, lengthened its range, so that the attacking British infantry, behind the second screen of shells, could overrun the trenches ravaged by the first. But the…

  • Neuville, Lemercier de (French puppeteer)

    puppetry: Styles of puppet theatre: The moving spirit, however, was Lemercier de Neuville, who went on to create a personal puppet theatre that played in drawing rooms all over France until nearly the end of the century.

  • Neuyomny buben (work by Remizov)

    Aleksey Mikhaylovich Remizov: …the publication in 1910 of Neuyomny buben (“The Indefatigable Tambourine”). This story of provincial life is among his best works, and it embodies many of the characteristics often found in his writing, including elements of the weird, the grotesque, and the whimsical. That same year Remizov published the short novel…

  • Neva Left (album by Snoop Dogg)

    Snoop Dogg: Snoop returned to rap for Neva Left (2017) and followed up with a double album of gospel music, Snoop Dogg Presents Bible of Love (2018).

  • Neva River (river, Russia)

    Neva River, river in Leningrad oblast (province), northwestern Russia. The river issues from Lake Ladoga at Shlisselburg and flows 46 miles (74 km) west to the Gulf of Finland in the Baltic Sea. Its drainage basin covers 109,000 square miles (282,000 square km) and includes Lakes Ladoga, Onega,

  • Neva, Battle of the (Russian history)

    Battle of the Neva, (July 15, 1240), military engagement in which the Novgorod army defeated the Swedes on the banks of the Neva River; in honour of this battle the Novgorod commander, Prince Alexander Yaroslavich, received the surname Nevsky. The conflict between the Swedes and the Novgorodians

  • Nevada (state, United States)

    Nevada, constituent state of the United States of America. It borders Oregon and Idaho to the north, Utah to the east, Arizona to the southeast, and California to the west. It ranks seventh among the 50 U.S. states in terms of total area. It also, however, is one of the most sparsely settled.

  • Nevada de Santa Marta, Sierra (mountain range, Colombia)

    Santa Marta Mountains, Andean mountain range, northern Colombia, bounded on the north by the Caribbean Sea and encircled on three sides by the coastal lowlands. The volcanic massif rises abruptly from the coast, culminating in snowcapped Pico (peak) Cristóbal Colón (18,947 ft [5,775 m] above sea

  • Nevada Fall (waterfall, California, United States)

    Nevada Fall, waterfall located on the Merced River in Yosemite National Park, east-central California, U.S. It is situated about 5 miles (8 km) above the confluence of the Merced River with Tenaya Creek. One of the park’s major falls, it flows year-round and has a drop of 594 feet (181 metres). The

  • Nevada Gaming Commission (government agency, Nevada, United States)

    Las Vegas: Emergence of the contemporary city: …late 1950s the newly established Nevada Gaming Commission—which was responsible for licensing and overseeing gambling operations—began to curtail severely the freedom of gangsters to operate in the city. In the early 1960s the commission formulated its so-called “Black Book”; seeking to remove corruption from the gambling industry, the commission listed…

  • Nevada joint fir (plant)

    Ephedra: Major species and uses: californica), Nevada joint fir (E. nevadensis), rough joint fir (E. aspera), and Torrey’s Mormon tea (E. torreyana). The plants have been used by native peoples and pioneers as sources of food and medicinals, and stem fragments of species in the southwestern United States and Mexico are…

  • Nevada keno (gambling game)

    keno: …Reno, Nevada, under the name Race-Horse Keno, with names of horses instead of numbers on the tickets so as not to conflict with state laws concerning lotteries. Those Nevada laws were changed in 1951, after which keno became a game with numbers. Today keno is played (with many daily drawings)…

  • Nevada National Security Site (nuclear testing site, Nevada, United States)

    Nevada Test Site (NTS), nuclear testing site operated by the U.S. Department of Energy and located in Nye County, Nevada, that saw a total of 928 nuclear explosive tests between January 1951 and September 1992. The site—containing 28 areas in total—is located 65 miles (105 km) northwest of Las

  • Nevada Proving Grounds (nuclear testing site, Nevada, United States)

    Nevada Test Site (NTS), nuclear testing site operated by the U.S. Department of Energy and located in Nye County, Nevada, that saw a total of 928 nuclear explosive tests between January 1951 and September 1992. The site—containing 28 areas in total—is located 65 miles (105 km) northwest of Las

  • Nevada Smith (film by Hathaway [1966])

    Henry Hathaway: Later work: …box-office hit was followed by Nevada Smith (1966), a sequel to The Carpetbaggers (1964). The western proved highly popular, thanks in large part to the performance of Steve McQueen. Although The Last Safari (1967) and Five Card Stud (1968) received tepid responses from filmgoers, Hathaway scored a major hit with…

  • Nevada State Capitol (building, Carson City, Nevada, United States)
  • Nevada Test Site (nuclear testing site, Nevada, United States)

    Nevada Test Site (NTS), nuclear testing site operated by the U.S. Department of Energy and located in Nye County, Nevada, that saw a total of 928 nuclear explosive tests between January 1951 and September 1992. The site—containing 28 areas in total—is located 65 miles (105 km) northwest of Las

  • Nevada, Emma (American opera singer)

    Emma Nevada, American opera singer, one of the finest coloratura sopranos of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Emma Wixom grew up in Nevada City, California, and in Austin, Nevada. She graduated from Mills Seminary (now College) in Oakland, California, in 1876. In Vienna on a European study

  • Nevada, flag of (United States state flag)

    U.S. state flag consisting of a dark blue field (background) with an emblem in the upper hoist corner including a wreath, a star, the name of the state, and the inscription “Battle born.”An early state flag, in use from 1905 to 1915, had silver and gold stars and the words “silver,” “Nevada,” and

  • Nevada, University of (university system, Nevada, United States)

    University of Nevada, public coeducational institution of higher learning in Nevada, U.S., comprising campuses in Reno and Las Vegas. It is part of the Nevada System of Higher Education. The Reno campus, established as a land-grant college, has eight schools and colleges: the Donald W. Reynolds

  • Nevadan orogeny (geology)

    Nevadan orogeny, mountain-building event in western North America that started in the Late Jurassic Epoch about 156 million years ago. This event is generally considered to be the first significant phase of Cordilleran mountain building, which continued into the Early Cretaceous Epoch. The name is

  • Nevado de Toluca National Park (park, Mexico)

    Nevado de Toluca National Park, park in México state, central Mexico. It is situated in the municipality of Zinacantepec, on the Mexico–Toluca–Guadalajara highway west of Mexico City. Established in 1936, it has an area of 259 square miles (671 square km). The park’s chief feature is the dormant,

  • Nevado del Ruiz (volcano, Colombia)

    Mount Ruiz, volcano in the Cordillera Central of the Andes, west-central Colombia, noted for its two eruptions on Nov. 13, 1985, which were among the most destructive in recorded history. Located about 80 miles (130 km) west of Bogotá, it is the northernmost of some two dozen active volcanoes

  • Nevado Huascarán (mountain, Peru)

    Mount Huascarán, mountain peak of the Andes of west-central Peru. The snowcapped peak rises to 22,205 feet (6,768 m) above sea level in the Cordillera Blanca, east of the Peruvian town of Yungay. It is the highest mountain in Peru and is a favourite of mountaineers and tourists. In 1962 a thaw

  • Nevā?ī, Mir ?Alī Shīr (Turkish poet)

    ?Alī Shīr Navā?ī, Turkish poet and scholar who was the greatest representative of Chagatai literature. Born into an aristocratic military family, he studied in Herāt and in Meshed. After his school companion, the sultan ?usayn Bayqarah, succeeded to the throne of Herāt, Navā?ī held a number of

  • névé (geology)

    Firn, (German: “of last year”, ) partially compacted granular snow that is the intermediate stage between snow and glacial ice. Firn is found under the snow that accumulates at the head of a glacier. It is formed under the pressure of overlying snow by the processes of compaction,

  • Neve, Felipe de (Spanish colonial governor)

    Los Angeles: Spanish colonial outpost: Felipe de Neve and 44 settlers from Sonora and Mazatlán established a pueblo near a river they called Río de Porciúncula, where the Native American village of Yang-na (or Yabit) was located. They called the new settlement El Pueblo de la Reina de los Angeles…

  • Nevele Pride (American racehorse)

    Nevele Pride, (foaled 1965), American harness racehorse (Standardbred), the fastest trotter in history. He won 57 victories out of the 67 races he entered, earning more than $870,000 in his career of three seasons. Foaled by Thankful and sired by Star’s Pride, Nevele Pride was irritable and

  • Nevelskoy, Gennady I. (Russian explorer)

    Amur River: History: …by the Russian naval officer Gennady I. Nevelskoy proved that Sakhalin is an island and that, therefore, the Amur is accessible from the south and not from the north alone, as the Russians previously had supposed. Systematic study of the river system followed this discovery, as the Russians sought to…

  • Nevelson, Louise (American sculptor)

    Louise Nevelson, American sculptor known for her large monochromatic abstract sculptures and environments in wood and other materials. In 1905 she moved with her family from Ukraine to Rockland, Maine. She married businessman Charles Nevelson in 1920 and later left her husband (divorced 1941) and

  • Never a Dull Moment (album by Stewart)

    Rod Stewart: ” His next album, Never a Dull Moment (1972), and its single “You Wear It Well” were also hits, as Stewart’s solo work eclipsed his efforts with the Faces. Among other subsequent hits were “Tonight’s the Night (Gonna Be Alright)” and Stewart’s version of Cat Stevens’s “The First Cut…

  • Never Been Kissed (film by Gosnell [1999])

    Drew Barrymore: … (1998), a Cinderella-like story, and Never Been Kissed (1999), which she also executive produced.

  • Never Come Morning (work by Algren)

    Nelson Algren: Never Come Morning (1942) tells of a Polish petty criminal who dreams of escaping from his squalid Northwest Side Chicago environment by becoming a prizefighter. Before the appearance of Algren’s next book—the short-story collection The Neon Wilderness (1947), which contains some of his best writing—he…

  • Never Fear (film by Lupino [1949])

    Ida Lupino: Directing: …her official directing debut with Never Fear (1949; also known as The Young Lovers), a low-budget drama in which Not Wanted star Sally Forrest played a young dancer stricken with polio. With that film Lupino became Hollywood’s first credited female director since the retirement of Dorothy Arzner in 1943. In…

  • Never for Ever (album by Bush)

    Kate Bush: Bush returned in 1980 with Never for Ever, which produced such hits as “Babooshka” and was praised for its musical sophistication. On The Dreaming (1982), the first album she produced entirely on her own, she employed new synthesizer technology to create densely layered arrangements for songs that explored such subjects…

  • Never Let Me Down (album by Bowie)

    David Bowie: …to have the heart (Never Let Me Down [1987]) and would-be artistic statements for which he had lost his shrewdness (Outside [1995]). As of the late 1990s, he seemed a spent force, and perhaps Bowie’s greatest innovation in this era was the creation of Bowie Bonds, financial securities backed…

  • Never Let Me Go (work by Ishiguro)

    Kazuo Ishiguro: In 2005 Ishiguro published Never Let Me Go (filmed 2010), which through the story of three human clones warns of the ethical quandries raised by genetic engineering. The Buried Giant (2015) is an existential fantasy tale inflected by Arthurian legend.

  • Never Love a Stranger (novel by Robbins)

    Harold Robbins: Robbins wrote his first novel, Never Love a Stranger (1948; film 1958), while working for the studio. The book chronicles a young New York boy’s life of crime and dissolution. It was among several other works (by different authors) containing scenes of sex and violence that became the subject of…

  • Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols (album by the Sex Pistols)

    the Sex Pistols: …By the time their album Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols reached number one in early November, Rotten, Vicious, Jones, and Cook had recorded together for the last time.

  • Never on Sunday (song by Hadjidakis)
  • Never on Sunday (film by Dassin [1960])

    Melina Mercouri: …good-hearted prostitute in the film Never on Sunday (1960). This film gained her an international reputation that would serve her well in politics. Her involvement in politics was triggered by her indignation over the military coup that brought a handful of army colonels to power in Greece in 1967.

  • Never Say Never Again (film by Kershner [1983])

    Irvin Kershner: Star Wars, James Bond, and RoboCop: …blockbuster James Bond franchise with Never Say Never Again (1983), which marked Connery’s long-awaited return to the role he had first made famous some 20 years before.

  • Never So Few (film by Sturges [1959])

    John Sturges: Bad, Magnificent, and Great: The World War II drama Never So Few (1959) offered a noteworthy cast that included Frank Sinatra, Steve McQueen, Gina Lollobrigida, and Charles Bronson.

  • Never Too Much (recording by Vandross)

    Luther Vandross: …first album for that label, Never Too Much, sold more than one million copies, and its title song was a number-one rhythm-and-blues hit. So began a long string of million-selling albums that featured Vandross’s distinctive baritone, precise phrasing, and unabashedly romantic songs, including “Here and Now,” for which he won…

  • Never Wave at a WAC (film by McLeod [1953])

    Norman Z. McLeod: Danny Kaye and Bob Hope: In Never Wave at a WAC (1953), Rosalind Russell portrayed a socialite who enlists in the army, thinking she will be able to spend more time with her officer boyfriend. Next was Casanova’s Big Night (1954), which starred Hope as an 18th-century Venetian tailor who pretends…

  • Nevermind (album by Nirvana)

    alternative rock: …from their epochal 1991 album, Nevermind. The sheer immediacy of its expert guitar distortions and layered orchestrations—influenced by the organized noise of British pop groups such as the Cure and My Bloody Valentine—assured that “grunge,” as the music based on those feedback sounds was called, would become an international pop…

  • Nevers (France)

    Nevers, town, Nièvre département, Bourgogne-Franche-Comté région, central France, south-southeast of Paris. Situated on the high right bank of the Loire River at its confluence with the Nièvre River, it is a typical old provincial town that has been modernized after the establishment of new

  • Nevers faience (pottery)

    Nevers faience, French tin-glazed earthenware introduced from Italy to Nevers in 1565, by two brothers named Corrado. As the Conrade family, they and their descendants dominated Nevers faience manufacture for more than a century. The earliest authenticated piece of Nevers, dated 1589, is a large

  • Nevers glass figure (glassware)

    Nevers glass figure, any of the ornamental glassware made in Nevers, Fr., from the late 16th century through the early 19th. Only a few inches high, they have been mistaken for fine porcelain but were made of glass rods and tubes and were often made on a wire armature. The subjects are religious,

  • Nevers, Ernest Alonzo (American athlete)

    Ernie Nevers, American collegiate and professional football and baseball player, who was considered one of the greatest football players of all time. Nevers played at tackle for Superior (Wis.) High School, and as a fullback at Stanford University (Calif.) he was called by Pop Warner the greatest

  • Nevers, Ernie (American athlete)

    Ernie Nevers, American collegiate and professional football and baseball player, who was considered one of the greatest football players of all time. Nevers played at tackle for Superior (Wis.) High School, and as a fullback at Stanford University (Calif.) he was called by Pop Warner the greatest

  • Nevers, Lodewijk van (count of Flanders)

    Louis I, count of Flanders and of Nevers (from 1322) and of Réthel (from 1325), who sided with the French against the English in the opening years of the Hundred Years’ War. Grandson and heir of Robert of Bethune, count of Flanders, Louis was brought up at the French court and married Margaret of

  • Neves, Aécio (Brazilian politician)

    Brazil: Brazil since 1990: …finisher—the Brazilian Social Democratic Party’s Aécio Neves, the former governor of Minas Gerais state, whose late surge garnered him about 34 percent of the vote. The runoff in late October proved to be one of the closest presidential elections in recent Brazilian history: Rousseff won a second term by capturing…

  • Neves, Lucas Moreira Cardinal (Brazilian cardinal)

    Lucas Moreira Cardinal Neves, Brazilian-born Roman Catholic prelate (born Sept. 16, 1925, S?o Joao del Rei, Braz.—died Sept. 8, 2002, Rome, Italy), served in key Vatican posts (1974–87) and as archbishop (1987–98) of S?o Salvador da Bahia, where he spurred construction of a refuge for children a

  • Neves, Tancredo de Almeida (Brazilian politician)

    S?o Jo?o del Rei: …museums and a memorial to Tancredo de Almeida Neves, a popular statesman who was born in the city. Pop. (2010) 84,404.

  • Neveu de Rameau, Le (novel by Diderot)

    Rameau’s Nephew, novel by Denis Diderot, written between 1761 and 1774 but not published during the author’s lifetime. J.W. von Goethe translated the text into German in 1805, and Goethe’s translation was published in French as Le Neveu de Rameau in 1821. The first printing from the original

  • nevi (skin blemish)

    Nevus, congenital skin lesion, or birthmark, caused by abnormal pigmentation or by proliferation of blood vessels and other dermal or epidermal structures. Nevi may be raised or may spread along the surface of the skin. In other types, such as the blue nevus, proliferative tissue is buried deep

  • Neville’s Cross, Battle of (England [1346])

    Battle of Neville’s Cross, (Oct. 17, 1346), English victory over the Scots—under David II—who, as allies of the French, had invaded England in an attempt to distract Edward III from the Siege of Calais (France). Edward, however, had foreseen the invasion and left a strong force in the northern

  • Neville, Art (American musician)

    soul music: …in the ultrafunky work of Art Neville’s group the Meters. Atlantic Records produced smoldering soul smashes in New York City—notably by Aretha Franklin and Donny Hathaway; Wonder and the Jackson 5 created some of the era’s great soul records in Los Angeles; and in Philadelphia, Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff…

  • Neville, John (British-born Canadian actor and director)

    John Reginald Neville, British-born Canadian actor and director (born May 2, 1925, London, Eng.—died Nov. 19, 2011, Toronto, Ont.), achieved stardom with his natural and wide-ranging performances in Shakespearean plays and, as artistic director, revivified several Canadian theatres. Neville studied

  • Neville, John, Earl of Northumberland (English noble)

    John Neville, earl of Northumberland, leading partisan in the English Wars of the Roses. He was the son of Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury, and the brother of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, the “Kingmaker.” John Neville was a ringleader in the conflict between the Nevilles and Percys in 1453,

  • Neville, Ralph (English noble)

    Ralph Neville, 1st earl of Westmorland, English noble who, though created earl by King Richard II, supported the usurpation of the crown by Henry IV and did much to establish the Lancastrian dynasty. The eldest son of John, 3rd Baron Neville, he was knighted during a French expedition in 1380,

  • Neville, Ralph (English noble)

    Ralph Neville, 1st earl of Westmorland, English noble who, though created earl by King Richard II, supported the usurpation of the crown by Henry IV and did much to establish the Lancastrian dynasty. The eldest son of John, 3rd Baron Neville, he was knighted during a French expedition in 1380,

  • Neville, Richard (Australian writer and editor)

    Richard Neville, (Richard Clive Neville), Australian writer and editor (born Dec. 15, 1941, Sydney, N.S.W., Australia—died Sept. 4, 2016, Byron Bay, N.S.W., Australia), founded and edited the countercultural magazine Oz in Australia and the U.K. and was prosecuted in sensational obscenity trials in

  • Neville, Richard (English noble)

    Richard Neville, 16th earl of Warwick, English nobleman called, since the 16th century, “the Kingmaker,” in reference to his role as arbiter of royal power during the first half of the Wars of the Roses (1455–85) between the houses of Lancaster and York. He obtained the crown for the Yorkist king

  • Neville, Richard Clive (Australian writer and editor)

    Richard Neville, (Richard Clive Neville), Australian writer and editor (born Dec. 15, 1941, Sydney, N.S.W., Australia—died Sept. 4, 2016, Byron Bay, N.S.W., Australia), founded and edited the countercultural magazine Oz in Australia and the U.K. and was prosecuted in sensational obscenity trials in

  • Nevin, Arthur Finley (American composer)

    Ethelbert Woodbridge Nevin: His brother Arthur Finley Nevin (1871–1943), a composer and conductor, did research on the music of the Blackfoot Indians and used this music in his opera Poia (Berlin, 1910).

  • Nevin, Ethelbert Woodbridge (American composer)

    Ethelbert Woodbridge Nevin, American composer of light songs and piano pieces. Nevin studied in New York City, Boston, and Berlin, first appearing as a pianist in Pittsburgh (1886) and later in Boston, Chicago, New York City, and other U.S. cities. His early songs on English and German texts were

  • Nevin, John Williamson (American Protestant theologian)

    John Williamson Nevin, American Protestant theologian and educator who contributed to the “Mercersburg theology”—a movement that attempted to counter the popular Protestant revivalism of antebellum America. After graduating from the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1826, Nevin taught there and at

  • Nevinnomyssk (Russia)

    Nevinnomyssk, city, Stavropol kray (territory), western Russia, on the Kuban River at the mouth of the Bolshoy (Great) Zelenchuk River. Until the mid-1950s it was an agricultural market town, but in 1962 a chemical complex utilizing nearby natural gas reserves was constructed. A fertilizer plant

  • Nevins, Allan (American author)

    Allan Nevins, American historian, author, and educator, known especially for his eight-volume history of the American Civil War and his biographies of American political and industrial figures. He also established the country’s first oral history program. Nevins was raised on a farm in western

  • Nevins, Marian (American musician)

    MacDowell Colony: …founded in 1907 by pianist Marian Nevins MacDowell (1857–1956) and her husband, composer Edward Alexander MacDowell (1860–1908), at their summer home in Peterborough, N.H. They had found inspiration in the wooded setting and envisaged a sanctuary for other creative artists.

  • Nevinson, John (English highwayman)

    John Nevison, Yorkshire highwayman of Restoration England, made famous in ballads and folklore. Beginning as a youthful thief, Nevison furthered his escapades in Holland, where he was arrested for thievery and imprisoned, escaped, fought with English regiments in Flanders, and then deserted for

  • Nevinson, John (English highwayman)

    John Nevison, Yorkshire highwayman of Restoration England, made famous in ballads and folklore. Beginning as a youthful thief, Nevison furthered his escapades in Holland, where he was arrested for thievery and imprisoned, escaped, fought with English regiments in Flanders, and then deserted for

  • Nevinson, William (English highwayman)

    John Nevison, Yorkshire highwayman of Restoration England, made famous in ballads and folklore. Beginning as a youthful thief, Nevison furthered his escapades in Holland, where he was arrested for thievery and imprisoned, escaped, fought with English regiments in Flanders, and then deserted for

  • Nevis Peak (mountain, Saint Kitts and Nevis)

    Saint Kitts and Nevis: Land: …almost entirely of a mountain, Nevis Peak (3,232 feet [985 metres]), which is flanked by the lower Round Hill (1,014 feet [309 metres]) on the north and by Saddle Hill (1,850 feet [564 metres]) on the south. Its area is 36 square miles (93 square km). The soil of Nevis…

  • Nevison, John (English highwayman)

    John Nevison, Yorkshire highwayman of Restoration England, made famous in ballads and folklore. Beginning as a youthful thief, Nevison furthered his escapades in Holland, where he was arrested for thievery and imprisoned, escaped, fought with English regiments in Flanders, and then deserted for

  • Nevison, William (English highwayman)

    John Nevison, Yorkshire highwayman of Restoration England, made famous in ballads and folklore. Beginning as a youthful thief, Nevison furthered his escapades in Holland, where he was arrested for thievery and imprisoned, escaped, fought with English regiments in Flanders, and then deserted for

  • Nevitte, Emma Dorothy Eliza (American author)

    Emma Southworth, one of the most popular of the 19th-century American sentimental novelists. For more than 50 years, her sentimental domestic novels reached a wide audience in the United States and Europe. After teaching school for five years, Emma Nevitte married Frederick Southworth, an itinerant

  • Nevi?im (Old Testament)

    Nevi?im, the second division of the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament, the other two being the Torah (the Law) and the Ketuvim (the Writings, or the Hagiographa). In the Hebrew canon the Prophets are divided into (1) the Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings) and (2) the Latter Prophets

  • Nevrologichesky Vestnik (Russian publication)

    Vladimir Bekhterev: Bekhterev founded the Nevrologichesky Vestnik (“Neurology Journal”), the first Russian journal on nervous diseases, in 1896. His insistence on a purely objective approach to the study of behaviour and his conviction that complex behaviours could be explained through the study of reflexes influenced the growing behaviourist movement of…

  • NEVS (Swedish company)

    Saab AB: …purchased by the start-up company National Electric Vehicle Sweden (NEVS).

  • Nev?ehir (Turkey)

    Nev?ehir, city, central Turkey. It lies on the lower slopes of a hill crowned by a ruined citadel dating from the Seljuq period. Other monuments include the mosque Kur?unlu Cami, with its attached madrasah (religious school), hospice, and library, built in the early 18th century by Damad ?brahim

  • Nevsheherli ibrahim Pa?a (Ottoman vizier [1660–1730])

    Ahmed Nedim: …of the grand vizier, Nevsheherli ?brahim Pa?a, received an appointment as a librarian. Later, he became the Sultan’s close friend—thus his name Nedim, meaning Boon Companion. He lived during the Tulip Age (Lale Devri) of Ottoman history, in the reign of Sultan Ahmed III (1703–30), so called because a fad…

  • Nevsky Prospect (story by Gogol)

    Nikolay Gogol: Mature career: In another, “Nevsky prospekt” (“Nevsky Prospect”), a tragic romantic dreamer is contrasted to an adventurous vulgarian, while in the revised finale of “Portret” (“The Portrait”) the author stresses his conviction that evil is ineradicable in this world. In 1836 Gogol published in Pushkin’s Sovremennik (“The Contemporary”) one…

  • Nevsky Prospekt (avenue, Saint Petersburg, Russia)

    St. Petersburg: Admiralty Side: …and best known is the Nevsky. One of the world’s great thoroughfares, Nevsky Prospekt cuts southeastward across the peninsula formed by the northward loop of the Neva to the vicinity of the Alexander Nevsky Abbey, crossing the smaller Moyka and Fontanka rivers. The Anichkov Bridge across the latter is graced…

  • Nevsky prospekt (story by Gogol)

    Nikolay Gogol: Mature career: In another, “Nevsky prospekt” (“Nevsky Prospect”), a tragic romantic dreamer is contrasted to an adventurous vulgarian, while in the revised finale of “Portret” (“The Portrait”) the author stresses his conviction that evil is ineradicable in this world. In 1836 Gogol published in Pushkin’s Sovremennik (“The Contemporary”) one…

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