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  • New York Cubans (baseball team)

    Latin Americans in Major League Baseball Through the First Years of the 21st Century: The 1930s through World War II: One such team was the New York Cubans (a team of black Latins, and not just Cubans). The Cubans played in the Negro leagues from 1935 to the early 1950s and won the championship in that pivotal year of 1947, when Jackie Robinson broke the colour barrier. Players included future…

  • New York Curb Agency (finance)

    NYSE Amex Equities, major U.S. stock exchange that also handles trades in options, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), corporate bonds, and other investment vehicles. Trading on NYSE Amex Equities—originally known as the “Curb” (because its transactions took place outdoors during much of its

  • New York Curb Exchange (finance)

    NYSE Amex Equities, major U.S. stock exchange that also handles trades in options, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), corporate bonds, and other investment vehicles. Trading on NYSE Amex Equities—originally known as the “Curb” (because its transactions took place outdoors during much of its

  • New York Daily News (American newspaper)

    New York Daily News, morning daily tabloid newspaper published in New York City, once the newspaper with the largest circulation in the United States. The New York Daily News was the first successful tabloid newspaper in the United States. It was founded in 1919 as the Illustrated Daily News by

  • New York Diet Kitchen Association (American organization)

    Abigail Hopper Gibbons: …1873 she helped found the New York Diet Kitchen Association, which, upon a physician’s prescription, provided food to the ailing poor. She also helped establish the Protestant Asylum for Infants and was president of the New York Committee for the Prevention of State Regulation of Vice, established in opposition to…

  • New York Dolls, the (American rock group)

    The New York Dolls, American band whose raw brand of glam rock revitalized the New York City underground music scene in the 1970s, foreshadowing punk rock by half a decade. The members were lead singer David Johansen (b. January 9, 1950, New York, New York, U.S.), lead guitarist Johnny Thunders

  • New York Evening Enquirer (American newspaper)

    National Enquirer, American weekly newspaper based in Boca Raton, Florida, and best known for its celebrity gossip, crime news, and investigative reporting. Owned by American Media, Inc., and distributed nationwide, the Enquirer is commonly termed a “supermarket tabloid” because of its wide

  • New York Evening Post (American newspaper)

    E. L. Godkin: …Henry Villard, owner of the New York Evening Post. The Nation then became a weekly edition of the Post. Godkin was the Post’s editor in chief from 1883 until his retirement in 1900.

  • New York Fashion Week (fashion event, New York City, New York, United States)

    Gisele Bündchen: …made her runway debut at New York Fashion Week—one of the industry’s four major semiannual events. In 1997 Bündchen appeared on the cover of the Brazilian edition of the leading fashion magazine Vogue (October), gaining industry recognition. Despite a more curvaceous figure that stood in stark contrast to the waifish…

  • New York Film Festival (American film festival)

    New York Film Festival, noncompetitive film festival held annually at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City. It is considered to be one of the most prestigious film festivals in the United States. The New York Film Festival was first held in 1963 and featured films from the United

  • New York Five (architectural group)

    Peter Eisenman: …as one of the “New York Five,” along with future postmodernists Richard Meier and Michael Graves.

  • New York Gazette (American newspaper)

    William Bradford: …first New York newspaper, the New York Gazette. Many of his descendants were also printers.

  • New York Giants (American football team)

    New York Giants, American professional gridiron football team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Giants have won four National Football League (NFL) championships (1927, 1934, 1938, and 1956) and four Super Bowls (1987, 1991, 2008, and 2012). The Giants were noted for their early successes

  • New York Giants (American baseball team)

    San Francisco Giants, American professional baseball team based in San Francisco. The Giants have won eight World Series titles and 23 National League (NL) pennants. The franchise that would become the Giants was established in 1883 in New York City and was initially known as the Gothams. In 1885

  • New York Globetrotters (American basketball team)

    Harlem Globetrotters, predominantly black professional U.S. basketball team that plays exhibition games all over the world, drawing crowds as large as 75,000 to see the players’ spectacular ball handling and humorous antics. The team was organized in Chicago in 1926 as the all-black Savoy Big Five.

  • New York Gothams (American baseball team)

    San Francisco Giants, American professional baseball team based in San Francisco. The Giants have won eight World Series titles and 23 National League (NL) pennants. The franchise that would become the Giants was established in 1883 in New York City and was initially known as the Gothams. In 1885

  • New York Hat, The (work by Loos)

    Anita Loos: …film of her first scenario, The New York Hat, was produced in 1912 by D.W. Griffith and starred Mary Pickford and Lionel Barrymore. By the age of 20 Loos was a professional screenwriter, and she eventually worked on more than 60 silent films.

  • New York Head Shop and Museum (poetry by Lorde)

    Audre Lorde: …Other People Live (1973) and New York Head Shop and Museum (1974), were more rhetorical and political.

  • New York Herald (American newspaper)

    New York Herald, American daily newspaper published from 1835 to 1924 in New York City. It was one of the first papers created in the penny-press movement, and it developed many aspects of modern American journalism, including nonpartisan political reporting and business coverage. The Herald was

  • New York Herald-Tribune (American newspaper)

    New York Herald, American daily newspaper published from 1835 to 1924 in New York City. It was one of the first papers created in the penny-press movement, and it developed many aspects of modern American journalism, including nonpartisan political reporting and business coverage. The Herald was

  • New York Highlanders (American baseball team)

    New York Yankees, American professional baseball team based in the borough of the Bronx in New York City. One of the most famous and successful franchises in all of sports, the Yankees have won a record 27 World Series titles and 40 American League (AL) pennants. The franchise began in 1901 in

  • New York Infirmary for Women and Children (infirmary, New York City, New York, United States)

    Elizabeth Blackwell: …enlarged, was incorporated as the New York Infirmary for Women and Children. In January 1859, during a year-long lecture tour of Great Britain, she became the first woman to have her name placed on the British medical register. At the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861, she helped…

  • New York Islanders (American hockey team)

    New York Islanders, American professional ice hockey team based in Brooklyn, New York, that plays in the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Islanders have won four Stanley Cup titles (1980–83). Founded in 1972, the Islanders—based in Uniondale, New York, for their first 42

  • New York Jets (American football team)

    New York Jets, American professional gridiron football team based in Florham Park, New Jersey, that plays in the National Football League (NFL). Behind the play of future Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Namath, the Jets won a historic upset in the 1969 Super Bowl over the Baltimore Colts. The Jets

  • New York Journal (American newspaper)

    New York World: …Randolph Hearst bought the competing New York Journal in 1895, he lured Pulitzer’s celebrated Sunday newspaper staff to the Journal with the promise of raises; all but one secretary accepted Hearst’s offer. Pulitzer lured them back to the World with raises of his own, but then Hearst made a counteroffer,…

  • New York Journal-American (American newspaper)

    New York World: …Randolph Hearst bought the competing New York Journal in 1895, he lured Pulitzer’s celebrated Sunday newspaper staff to the Journal with the promise of raises; all but one secretary accepted Hearst’s offer. Pulitzer lured them back to the World with raises of his own, but then Hearst made a counteroffer,…

  • New York Knickerbocker Base Ball Club (American baseball club)

    baseball: Early years: …New York City, organized the New York Knickerbocker Base Ball Club, which formulated a set of rules for baseball, many of which still remain. The rules were much like those for rounders, but with a significant change in that the runner was put out not by being hit with the…

  • New York Knickerbockers (American basketball team)

    New York Knicks, American professional basketball team based in New York City. The Knicks (which is a shortened version of their official nickname, Knickerbockers) have won two National Basketball Association (NBA) championships (1970 and 1973) and are among the most lucrative franchises in

  • New York Knicks (American basketball team)

    New York Knicks, American professional basketball team based in New York City. The Knicks (which is a shortened version of their official nickname, Knickerbockers) have won two National Basketball Association (NBA) championships (1970 and 1973) and are among the most lucrative franchises in

  • New York Ledger (American newspaper)

    Sara Payson Willis Parton: …she was engaged by the New York Ledger to write a weekly column for the unprecedented sum of $100 each; she maintained that association for the rest of her life. Willis was not only one of the first woman columnists in the field of journalism, but she was also one…

  • New York Liberty (American basketball team)

    Carol Blazejowski: …and general manager of the New York Liberty professional team. She was promoted to president of the team in 2008 but left the Liberty in 2010. In 1994 Blazejowski became one of the few women inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

  • New York Magazine (American magazine)

    Milton Glaser: …served as art director of New York Magazine (1968–76), which he cofounded with Clay Felker. From 1975 to 1977 Glaser was vice president and design director of the Village Voice. As his career progressed over the last half of the 20th century, his range of design activities came to encompass…

  • New York Manumission Society (American organization)

    New York Manumission Society, early abolitionist group (founded 1785) that worked to end the slave trade in New York, to ban slavery, to gradually emancipate slaves, and to protect and defend free people of colour. The group provided both legal and financial aid to those ends. The society’s desire

  • New York Marathon (race)

    New York City Marathon, 26.2-mile footrace held every November through the five boroughs of New York City. The New York City Marathon often draws the largest number of participants of all annual marathons, and it is—with the Berlin, Boston, Chicago, London, and Tokyo marathons—one of the world’s

  • New York Mets (American baseball team)

    New York Mets, American professional baseball team based in Flushing, Queens, New York. The Mets have won two World Series championships (1969, 1986) and five National League (NL) pennants. The Mets trace their roots to the proposed Continental League, whose formation was announced in 1959 by New

  • New York Morning Journal (American newspaper)

    New York World: …Randolph Hearst bought the competing New York Journal in 1895, he lured Pulitzer’s celebrated Sunday newspaper staff to the Journal with the promise of raises; all but one secretary accepted Hearst’s offer. Pulitzer lured them back to the World with raises of his own, but then Hearst made a counteroffer,…

  • New York Nets (American basketball team)

    American Basketball Association: …ABA, with four ABA teams—the New York Nets, the Denver Nuggets, the San Antonio Spurs, and the Indiana Pacers—absorbed into the NBA, a dispersal draft of certain ABA players by NBA teams, and the remaining players granted permission to act as free agents.

  • New York Philharmonic (American orchestra)

    New York Philharmonic, symphony orchestra based in New York, New York, the oldest major symphony orchestra in the United States in continual existence and one of the oldest in the world. Founded in 1842 as the Philharmonic Society of New York under the conductorship of American-born Ureli Corelli

  • New York Post (American newspaper)

    Murray Kempton: …and then columnist with the New York Post from the 1940s. His political and social commentaries, noted for their uniquely rich and elegant style, moral insight, and sense of fair play, touched on many subjects, especially current affairs. Excepting two periods when he left the Post, he continued there until…

  • New York Public Library (library, New York City, New York, United States)

    New York Public Library (NYPL), one of the great libraries of the world and the largest city public library in the United States. It was established in 1895 through the consolidation of the privately endowed Lenox and Astor libraries and the $2,000,000 Tilden Foundation trust. The library’s central

  • New York Rangers (American hockey team)

    New York Rangers, American professional ice hockey team based in New York City. One of the oldest teams in the National Hockey League (NHL), the Rangers play in the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference. The team has won the Stanley Cup, the NHL’s championship trophy, four times (1928, 1933,

  • New York Renaissance Big Five (American basketball team)

    New York Rens, American professional basketball team that was among the most accomplished and storied teams in the history of the game. The Rens, an African American-owned all-black team based in the Harlem section of New York City during the era of segregated basketball teams, won the first world

  • New York Rens (American basketball team)

    New York Rens, American professional basketball team that was among the most accomplished and storied teams in the history of the game. The Rens, an African American-owned all-black team based in the Harlem section of New York City during the era of segregated basketball teams, won the first world

  • New York Review of Books, The (American periodical)

    literary criticism: Functions: … (London) Times Literary Supplement and The New York Review of Books, are far from indulgent toward popular works. Sustained criticism can also be found in monthlies and quarterlies with a broad circulation, in “little magazines” for specialized audiences, and in scholarly journals and books.

  • New York school (art group)

    New York school, those painters who participated in the development of contemporary art from the early 1940s in or around New York City. During and after World War II, leadership in avant-garde art shifted from war-torn Europe to New York, and the New York school maintained a dominant position in

  • New York Shakespeare Festival (American theatre)

    Joseph Papp: …York City, Papp founded the New York Shakespeare Festival, which became a unique institution in the New York theatrical milieu. The festival gave free performances of Shakespearean plays in various locations around the city, including outdoor productions in Central Park. (In 1962 the company received a newly built, permanent home…

  • New York Shakespeare Festival Public Theatre (American theatre)

    Joseph Papp: In 1967 he founded the New York Shakespeare Festival Public Theatre, which concentrated on contemporary and experimental dramas. Several of its productions eventually traveled to Broadway, including Hair (1967), Sticks and Bones (1971), That Championship Season (1972), and A Chorus Line (1975). The latter musical became one of the longest-running…

  • New York slave rebellion of 1712 (American history)

    New York slave rebellion of 1712, a violent insurrection of slaves in New York City that resulted in brutal executions and the enactment of harsher slave codes. The population of New York City in 1712 numbered between 6,000 and 8,000 people, of whom approximately 1,000 were slaves. Unlike Southern

  • New York slave rebellion of 1741 (United States history)

    New York slave rebellion of 1741, a supposed large-scale scheme plotted by black slaves and poor white settlers to burn down and take over New York City. Possibly fueled by paranoia, the city’s white population became convinced that a major rebellion was being planned. After a witch-hunt-like

  • New York Society for Promoting the Manumission of Slaves, and Protecting Such of Them as Have Been, or May Be Liberated (American organization)

    New York Manumission Society, early abolitionist group (founded 1785) that worked to end the slave trade in New York, to ban slavery, to gradually emancipate slaves, and to protect and defend free people of colour. The group provided both legal and financial aid to those ends. The society’s desire

  • New York State Barge Canal (canal system, New York, United States)

    New York State Canal System, system of state-owned, state-operated waterways, 524 miles (843 km) in length, linking the Hudson River with Lake Erie, with extensions to Lakes Ontario and Champlain and Cayuga and Seneca lakes (in the Finger Lakes region). It incorporates the Erie Canal, from Troy via

  • New York State Canal System (canal system, New York, United States)

    New York State Canal System, system of state-owned, state-operated waterways, 524 miles (843 km) in length, linking the Hudson River with Lake Erie, with extensions to Lakes Ontario and Champlain and Cayuga and Seneca lakes (in the Finger Lakes region). It incorporates the Erie Canal, from Troy via

  • New York State Federation of Labor (American labour organization)

    George Meany: …a vice president of the New York State Federation of Labor, and he served as its president from 1934 to 1939. His work moved to the national level with his 1939 election as secretary-treasurer of the American Federation of Labor (AFL). Upon the death of William Green in 1952, Meany…

  • New York State Thruway (highway, New York, United States)

    New York: Transportation: The Thruway connects at Albany to the Adirondack Northway, which extends northward to Canada. In central New York a major highway runs from the Pennsylvania state line to Canada, passing through Binghamton, Syracuse, and Watertown. At Syracuse this route intersects with the Thruway, maintaining the city…

  • New York Stock and Exchange Board (stock exchange, New York City, New York, United States)

    New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), one of the world’s largest marketplaces for securities and other exchange-traded investments. The exchange evolved from a meeting of 24 stockbrokers under a buttonwood tree in 1792 on what is now Wall Street in New York City. It was formally constituted as the New

  • New York Stock Exchange (stock exchange, New York City, New York, United States)

    New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), one of the world’s largest marketplaces for securities and other exchange-traded investments. The exchange evolved from a meeting of 24 stockbrokers under a buttonwood tree in 1792 on what is now Wall Street in New York City. It was formally constituted as the New

  • New York Stories (film by Allen, Coppola and Scorsese [1989])

    Woody Allen: The 1980s: …hilarious contribution to the triptych New York Stories (1989)—“Oedipus Wrecks,” about an attorney whose nagging mother (Mae Questel) transmogrifies into an omniscient spectre—was widely acknowledged to be the film’s strongest segment. Allen’s next project, Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), ranks among his finest films. An ambitious Fyodor Dostoyevsky-like meditation on the…

  • New York Subways Advertising Company (American company)

    graphic design: Postwar graphic design in the United States: In a 1947 poster promoting New York subway advertising, for example, Rand created a design from elemental geometric forms and colours that can be read as both an abstracted figure as well as a target, conveying the concept that one can “hit the bull’s-eye,” or reach potential audiences for plays,…

  • New York Sun (American newspaper)

    New York Sun, daily newspaper published from 1833 to 1950 in New York City, long one of the most influential of American newspapers. The Sun was the first successful penny daily newspaper in the United States. The name was revived for a print and online newspaper in the early 21st century. The New

  • New York Tendaberry (recording by Nyro)

    Laura Nyro: …the Thirteenth Confession (1968) and New York Tendaberry (1969). Nyro incorporated a diversity of influences in her writing and performing, drawing on rhythm and blues, soul, gospel, folk, jazz, and Brill Building- and Tin Pan Alley-style pop. Despite “retiring” from the music scene twice in the 1970s, Nyro continued to…

  • New York Times Co. v. Sullivan (law case)

    New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, legal case in which, on March 9, 1964, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously (9–0) that, for a libel suit to be successful, the complainant must prove that the offending statement was made with “ ‘actual malice’—that is, with knowledge that it was false or with

  • New York Times Index, The (newspaper index)

    Adolph Simon Ochs: …began in 1913 to publish The New York Times Index, the only complete U.S. newspaper index.

  • New York Times, The (American newspaper)

    The New York Times, morning daily newspaper published in New York City, long the newspaper of record in the United States and one of the world’s great newspapers. Its strength is in its editorial excellence; it has never been the largest newspaper in terms of circulation. The Times was established

  • New York Titans (American football team)

    New York Jets, American professional gridiron football team based in Florham Park, New Jersey, that plays in the National Football League (NFL). Behind the play of future Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Namath, the Jets won a historic upset in the 1969 Super Bowl over the Baltimore Colts. The Jets

  • New York Town (film by Vidor [1941])

    Charles Vidor: Rita Hayworth: Cover Girl and Gilda: In the romantic comedy New York Town (1941), Fred MacMurray played a photographer in New York City who befriends a newly arrived woman (Mary Martin) and helps her locate the city’s eligible males while at the same time falling in love with her. Less successful was The Tuttles of…

  • New York Tribune (American newspaper)

    Margaret Fuller: …critic on Greeley’s newspaper, the New York Tribune. She encouraged American writers and crusaded for social reforms but made her greatest contribution, she thought, as an interpreter of modern European literature.

  • New York Trilogy, The (work by Auster)

    Paul Auster: …detective stories published collectively as The New York Trilogy (1987). It comprises City of Glass (1985), about a crime novelist who becomes entangled in a mystery that causes him to assume various identities; Ghosts (1986), about a private eye known as Blue who is investigating a man named Black for…

  • New York University (university, New York City, New York, United States)

    New York University, private institution of higher learning in New York, New York, U.S., that includes 13 schools, colleges, and divisions at five major centres in the borough of Manhattan. It was founded in 1831 as the University of the City of New York, its school of law established in 1835 and

  • New York University Tisch School of the Arts (school, New York City, New York, United States)

    Lawrence Rhodes: …at the New York University Tisch School of the Arts, where he eventually became chairman of the dance department. From 1989 to 1999 he was artistic director of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens. In 2002 Rhodes became artistic director of the Juilliard School’s dance division; he held the post until 2017.

  • New York v. Cathedral Academy (law case)

    New York v. Cathedral Academy, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on December 6, 1977, ruled (6–3) that a New York statute that allowed nonpublic schools—including those with religious affiliations—to be reimbursed for state-mandated services was a violation of the establishment clause, which

  • New York v. Ferber (law case)

    obscenity: Developments in the 20th century: In New York v. Ferber (1982), the Supreme Court upheld the use of strict standards of obscenity in cases involving children, maintaining that the government’s interest in protecting children was “compelling” and “surpassing.” In Osborne v. Ohio (1990), the court upheld a law that criminalized the…

  • New York v. Quarles (law case)

    confession: Confession in contemporary U.S. law: Shortly thereafter, in New York v. Quarles (1984), the court approved a “public safety” exception to the Miranda requirements, under which confessions obtained in violation of Miranda are admissible if the police officers’ questions were “reasonably prompted by a concern for the public safety.” Another noteworthy weakening of…

  • New York Weekly Journal (American colonial newspaper)

    John Peter Zenger: …his first issue of the New York Weekly Journal—the political organ of a group of residents who opposed the policies of the colonial governor William Cosby. Although many of the articles were contributed by his more learned colleagues, Zenger was still legally responsible for their content as publisher. For a…

  • New York World (American newspaper)

    New York World, daily newspaper published in New York City from 1860 to 1931, a colourful and vocal influence in American journalism in its various manifestations under different owners. The World was established in 1860 as a penny paper with a basically religious orientation. It supported

  • New York World-Journal-Tribune (American newspaper)

    New York Herald, American daily newspaper published from 1835 to 1924 in New York City. It was one of the first papers created in the penny-press movement, and it developed many aspects of modern American journalism, including nonpartisan political reporting and business coverage. The Herald was

  • New York World-Telegram (American newspaper)

    New York World, daily newspaper published in New York City from 1860 to 1931, a colourful and vocal influence in American journalism in its various manifestations under different owners. The World was established in 1860 as a penny paper with a basically religious orientation. It supported

  • New York Yacht Club (American organization)

    America's Cup: …cup donated it to the New York Yacht Club in 1857 for a perpetual international challenge competition. In 1987 the San Diego Yacht Club took control of the U.S. competition.

  • New York Yankees (American baseball team)

    New York Yankees, American professional baseball team based in the borough of the Bronx in New York City. One of the most famous and successful franchises in all of sports, the Yankees have won a record 27 World Series titles and 40 American League (AL) pennants. The franchise began in 1901 in

  • New York Zoological Gardens (zoo, New York City, New York, United States)

    Bronx Zoo, zoo in New York City that is one of the finest in the world with over 5,000 animals of more than 700 species. When it opened in 1899 the wooded 265-acre (107-hectare) grounds, in the northwestern area of New York City’s northern borough of the Bronx, included spacious enclosures for

  • New York Zoological Park (zoo, New York City, New York, United States)

    Bronx Zoo, zoo in New York City that is one of the finest in the world with over 5,000 animals of more than 700 species. When it opened in 1899 the wooded 265-acre (107-hectare) grounds, in the northwestern area of New York City’s northern borough of the Bronx, included spacious enclosures for

  • New York Zoological Society

    zoo: Function and purpose: The New York Zoological Society maintains an Institute for Research in Animal Behavior and, in Trinidad, the William Beebe Tropical Research Station. In Great Britain the Zoological Society of London maintains, in addition to a modern hospital and pathology laboratories, two general research institutes—the Nuffield Institute…

  • New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad Company (American company)

    New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad Company, American railroad that began operations between Buffalo, N.Y., and Chicago in 1882. That same year William H. Vanderbilt purchased control because its tracks paralleled those of his Lake Shore and Michigan Southern road between Buffalo and

  • New York, flag of (United States state flag)

    U.S. state flag consisting of a dark blue field (background) with a central coat of arms.The arms feature a sun symbol, two supporters, and the motto “Excelsior” (“Ever upward”) on a ribbon. The scene depicted under the sun in the coat of arms is a view of the Hudson River. The supporters of the

  • New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company (American railway)

    New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company, American railroad operating in southern New England and New York. It was absorbed by the Penn Central Transportation Company in 1969. It was built up from about 125 small railroads, the earliest of which began operation in 1834 as the Hartford and

  • New York, New York (song by Kander and Ebb)

    Kander and Ebb: …title song from the film New York, New York (1977), which became a standard for Frank Sinatra. They also wrote material for the Emmy Award-winning Liza with a Z: A Concert for Television (1972) and other television specials. In 1991 Kander and Ebb were inducted into the Theatre Hall of…

  • New York, New York (film by Scorsese [1977])

    Martin Scorsese: Films of the 1970s: Mean Streets, Taxi Driver, and New York, New York: …only until the release of New York, New York (1977), a rethinking of the 1950s Hollywood musical, marked by nonnaturalistic lighting and elaborate sets. Deliberately stylized to evoke past screen triumphs by Vincente Minnelli and George Cukor, it featured De Niro as the cocky Jimmy Doyle, a novice saxophone player…

  • New York, State University of (university, New York, United States)

    State University of New York, state-supported system of higher education established in 1948 with some 64 campuses located throughout the state of New York. SUNY was officially organized more than 150 years after the state legislature, in its first session (1784) after the American Revolution,

  • New York, The City University of (university, New York City, New York, United States)

    City University of New York, The, system of higher education institutions in New York, New York, U.S. It was created in 1961 to combine New York City’s municipally supported colleges (now numbering 21, including the CUNY Baccalaureate Program). The university includes the Graduate School and

  • New Yorker, The (American magazine)

    The New Yorker, American weekly magazine, famous for its varied literary fare and humour. The founder, Harold W. Ross, published the first issue on February 21, 1925, and was the magazine’s editor until his death in December 1951. The New Yorker’s initial focus was on New York City’s amusements and

  • New Youth (Chinese periodical)

    Chen Duxiu: Role in the intellectual revolution: …Magazine”) in Shanghai, later renamed Xinqingnian (“New Youth”). In its pages he proposed that the youth of China undertake a vast intellectual, literary, and cultural revolution to rejuvenate the nation. Many of the young writers who contributed to the monthly—among them Hu Shi, a liberal promoter of the vernacular literature,…

  • New Zealand

    New Zealand, island country in the South Pacific Ocean, the southwesternmost part of Polynesia. New Zealand is a remote land—one of the last sizable territories suitable for habitation to be populated and settled—and lies more than 1,000 miles (1,600 km) southeast of Australia, its nearest

  • New Zealand Association (British colonial company)

    New Zealand: Annexation and further settlement: The New Zealand Company, founded in 1839 to colonize on the principles laid down by Edward Gibbon Wakefield, sent a survey ship, the Tory, in May 1839. The agents on board were to buy land in both islands around Cook Strait. The company moved hastily because…

  • New Zealand bellbird (bird)

    bellbird: Anthornis melanura of New Zealand is a honeyeater (family Meliphagidae) that lives in virgin forest; both sexes sing in beautifully chiming choruses, and both sexes of this 23-cm (9-inch) bird are dark green in colour.

  • New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation (New Zealand company)
  • New Zealand Company (British company)

    New Zealand Company, (1839–58), British joint-stock company responsible for much of the early settlement of New Zealand. It attempted to colonize in accordance with the theories of Edward Gibbon Wakefield. Formed in 1839 after a parent New Zealand Association failed to receive a royal charter to

  • New Zealand earthquakes of 2010–2011 (New Zealand)

    Christchurch earthquakes of 2010–11, series of tremors that occurred within and near the city of Christchurch, New Zealand, and the Canterbury Plains region from early September 2010 to late December 2011. The severest of those events were the earthquake (magnitude from 7.0 to 7.1) that struck on

  • New Zealand First (political party, New Zealand)

    New Zealand Labour Party: …entered a coalition government with New Zealand First and “confidence and supply” support from the Green Party. Jacinda Ardern became the first Labour prime minister in nearly a decade.

  • New Zealand fur seal (mammal)

    fur seal: Other species, including the once-numerous New Zealand fur seal (A. forsteri), the Galapagos fur seal (A. galapagoensis), and the Juan Fernandez fur seal (A. philippii), all of which were hunted nearly to the point of extinction, have been protected by law.

  • New Zealand Gazette (New Zealand newspaper)

    history of publishing: Continental Europe and other countries: …New Zealand’s earliest newspaper, the New Zealand Gazette, was printed by emigrants even before their departure from London. The second issue awaited the installation of printing facilities in Wellington in 1840, when large-scale colonization was begun, but in the same year the New Zealand Advertiser was added to the list.…

  • New Zealand Labour Party (political party, New Zealand)

    New Zealand Labour Party, political party established in 1916 in a merger of various socialist and trade-union groups, including the Unified Labour Party (founded in 1910) and the Social Democratic Party (founded in 1913). It has traditionally been strongest among trade unionists and low-income

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