<var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"><listing id="79jxb"></listing></video></cite><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem></span></cite><cite id="79jxb"><noframes id="79jxb"><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem><cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"><cite id="79jxb"></cite></span></cite><var id="79jxb"><video id="79jxb"></video></var>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<menuitem id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"></strike></menuitem><menuitem id="79jxb"></menuitem>
<var id="79jxb"><strike id="79jxb"><thead id="79jxb"></thead></strike></var>
<cite id="79jxb"><span id="79jxb"></span></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<cite id="79jxb"></cite>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
<var id="79jxb"></var>
You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Newest Method of Languages (work by Comenius)

    John Amos Comenius: Educational reform: …Didactic, forming part of his Newest Method of Languages, he reinterpreted the principle of nature that he had described in The Great Didactic as a principle of logic. He put forward certain self-evident principles from which he derived a number of maxims, some of them full of common sense and…

  • Newfield (Connecticut, United States)

    Bridgeport, city, coextensive with the town (township) of Bridgeport, Fairfield county, southwestern Connecticut, U.S. The city, the most populous in the state, is a port on Long Island Sound at the mouth of the Pequonnock River. Settled in 1639, it was first known as Newfield and later as

  • Newfound Gap (mountain pass, United States)

    Great Smoky Mountains: A transmountain highway crosses at Newfound Gap (5,046 feet [1,538 metres]).

  • Newfoundland (breed of dog)

    Newfoundland, breed of working dog developed in Newfoundland, possibly from crosses between native dogs and the Great Pyrenees dogs taken to North America by Basque fishermen in the 17th century. Noted for rescuing persons from the sea, the Newfoundland is a huge, characteristically gentle and

  • Newfoundland (island, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Newfoundland and Labrador: … composed of the island of Newfoundland and a larger mainland sector, Labrador, to the northwest. It is the newest of Canada’s 10 provinces, having joined the confederation only in 1949; its name was officially changed to Newfoundland and Labrador in 2001. The island, which was named the “newfoundelande,” or New…

  • Newfoundland and Labrador (province, Canada)

    Newfoundland and Labrador, province of Canada composed of the island of Newfoundland and a larger mainland sector, Labrador, to the northwest. It is the newest of Canada’s 10 provinces, having joined the confederation only in 1949; its name was officially changed to Newfoundland and Labrador in

  • Newfoundland and Labrador, flag of (Canadian provincial flag)

    Canadian provincial flag consisting of a white field (background) bearing four blue triangles at the hoist, two longer white triangles outlined in red, and a stylized gold-and-red arrow pointing toward the fly end.English fishermen worked off the shores of the island of Newfoundland from the late

  • Newgate novel (English literature)

    Oliver Twist: Context and reception: …be classed as a “Newgate novel” (named after Newgate Prison in London). While critics often condemned such novels as immoral, the public usually enjoyed them. Because the novel was also published serially, the anticipation of waiting for the next installment (and its many cliffhangers) also likely contributed to its…

  • Newgate Prison (historical prison, London, United Kingdom)

    Western architecture: Great Britain: Dance’s Newgate Prison, London (1769; demolished 1902), was among the most original English buildings of the century, a grim, rusticated complex combining the romantic drama of Piranesi with the discipline of Palladio and the Mannerist details of Giulio Romano in an imaginative paradigm of Neoclassicism. Holland…

  • Newhall, Beaumont (American photography historian, writer, and curator)

    Beaumont Newhall, American photography historian, writer, and curator known for founding, and serving as the first curator of, the department of photography at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). Newhall was first exposed to photography by his mother, who ran a commercial portraiture studio out of

  • Newhall, Nancy (American photography critic, conservationist, and editor)

    Nancy Newhall, American photography critic, conservationist, and editor who was an important contributor to the development of the photograph book as an art form. Newhall attended Smith College and was a member of the Art Students League of New York. Her career began when in 1943 she became acting

  • Newham (borough, London, United Kingdom)

    Newham, inner borough of London, England. It is bordered to the east by the River Roding and Barking Creek, to the south by the River Thames, and to the west by the River Lea. Nearly all of Newham lies within the historic county of Essex. Newham was established in 1965 by amalgamation of North

  • Newhart (American television program)

    Bob Newhart: …employed on his later sitcom Newhart (1982–90), set in a Vermont town full of eccentrics. For his role as an innkeeper, Newhart received three Emmy nominations. Later sitcom efforts—Bob (1992–93) and George &amp; Leo (1997–98)—were less successful. A guest appearance on The Big Bang Theory in 2013, however, won him…

  • Newhart, Bob (American actor and comedian)

    Bob Newhart, American comedian and actor who achieved fame as a stand-up performer and later starred in television sitcoms. He was known for his genial mild-mannered persona and for his skillfully delivered observational humour and understated satire. Newhart grew up in a middle-class family in the

  • Newhart, George Robert (American actor and comedian)

    Bob Newhart, American comedian and actor who achieved fame as a stand-up performer and later starred in television sitcoms. He was known for his genial mild-mannered persona and for his skillfully delivered observational humour and understated satire. Newhart grew up in a middle-class family in the

  • Newhaven (England, United Kingdom)

    Newhaven, town (parish), Lewes district, administrative county of East Sussex, historic county of Sussex, southeastern England. It lies at the mouth of the River Ouse. “New” haven developed after the great storm of 1570, when the course of the lower Ouse shifted westward from its former outlet at

  • Newhouse family (American publishing company)

    Newhouse family, family that built the second largest publishing empire in the United States in the second half of the 20th century. The family’s fortunes began with Samuel Irving Newhouse (b. May 24, 1895, New York, N.Y., U.S.—d. Aug. 29, 1979, New York City), who was born Solomon Neuhaus and was

  • Newhouse, Donald E. (American publisher)

    Newhouse family: (1927–2017), and Donald E. Newhouse (b. 1930), who greatly expanded the family holdings. Under their leadership, Advance Publications purchased Random House (1980) and several other book publishers and became one of the largest American magazine publishers with such titles as The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Gentleman’s Quarterly,…

  • Newhouse, S. I. (American publisher)

    Newhouse family: The family’s fortunes began with Samuel Irving Newhouse (b. May 24, 1895, New York, N.Y., U.S.—d. Aug. 29, 1979, New York City), who was born Solomon Neuhaus and was later known as S.I. Newhouse. He was working as a clerk for Judge Herman Lazarus in Bayonne, N.J., when Lazarus took…

  • Newhouse, Samuel I. Jr. (American publisher)

    Newhouse family: …was managed by two sons, Samuel I. Newhouse, Jr. (1927–2017), and Donald E. Newhouse (b. 1930), who greatly expanded the family holdings. Under their leadership, Advance Publications purchased Random House (1980) and several other book publishers and became one of the largest American magazine publishers with such titles as The…

  • Newhouse, Samuel Irving (American publisher)

    Newhouse family: The family’s fortunes began with Samuel Irving Newhouse (b. May 24, 1895, New York, N.Y., U.S.—d. Aug. 29, 1979, New York City), who was born Solomon Neuhaus and was later known as S.I. Newhouse. He was working as a clerk for Judge Herman Lazarus in Bayonne, N.J., when Lazarus took…

  • Newhouse, Ted (American publisher)

    Ted Newhouse, American publisher who with his brothers founded a publishing empire that grew to comprise such holdings as 26 newspapers, the Condé Nast magazine group, business journals, and cable television systems (b. July 19, 1903, Bayonne, N.J.--d. Nov. 28, 1998, New York,

  • Newhouse, Theodore (American publisher)

    Ted Newhouse, American publisher who with his brothers founded a publishing empire that grew to comprise such holdings as 26 newspapers, the Condé Nast magazine group, business journals, and cable television systems (b. July 19, 1903, Bayonne, N.J.--d. Nov. 28, 1998, New York,

  • Newhouser, Hal (American baseball player)

    Hal Newhouser, American left-handed baseball pitcher for the Detroit Tigers (1939-53) and the Cleveland Indians (1954-55) who was the only pitcher to win consecutive (1944-45) Most Valuable Player awards; he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1992 (b. May 20, 1921, Detroit, Mich.--d. Nov.

  • Newhouser, Harold (American baseball player)

    Hal Newhouser, American left-handed baseball pitcher for the Detroit Tigers (1939-53) and the Cleveland Indians (1954-55) who was the only pitcher to win consecutive (1944-45) Most Valuable Player awards; he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1992 (b. May 20, 1921, Detroit, Mich.--d. Nov.

  • Newington (area, London, United Kingdom)

    Newington, area in the borough of Southwark, London. It lies southeast of Waterloo Station and west of Bermondsey. In the 19th century the area was developed as a residential suburb, and several roads and railways were built, converting Newington into a transportation hub for London south of the

  • Newk (American musician)

    Sonny Rollins, American jazz musician, a tenor saxophonist who was among the finest improvisers on the instrument to appear since the mid-1950s. Rollins grew up in a neighbourhood where Thelonious Monk, Coleman Hawkins (his early idol), and Bud Powell were playing. After recording with the latter

  • Newland, John (American actor and director)

    John Newland, American actor and director (born Nov. 23, 1917, Cincinnati, Ohio—died Jan. 10, 2000, Los Angeles, Calif.), was best known for his role as host of the 1959–61 television series Alcoa Presents (also known as One Step Beyond), which purported to be dramatized tales of true occurrences o

  • Newlands, John (English chemist)

    John Newlands, English chemist whose “law of octaves” noted a pattern in the atomic structure of elements with similar chemical properties and contributed in a significant way to the development of the periodic law. Newlands studied at the Royal College of Chemistry, London, fought as a volunteer

  • Newlands, John Alexander Reina (English chemist)

    John Newlands, English chemist whose “law of octaves” noted a pattern in the atomic structure of elements with similar chemical properties and contributed in a significant way to the development of the periodic law. Newlands studied at the Royal College of Chemistry, London, fought as a volunteer

  • Newley, Anthony George (British actor and musician)

    Anthony George Newley, British entertainer, composer, lyricist, playwright, and director who was most famous for his roles in two shows he also co-wrote (with Leslie Bricusse) and directed: Stop the World—I Want to Get Off (1961), which gave him his signature songs “What Kind of Fool Am I?” and

  • Newlin, Dika (American musicologist, composer, and pianist)

    Dika Newlin, American musicologist, composer, and pianist (born Nov. 22, 1923, Portland, Ore.—died July 22, 2006, Richmond, Va.), had a career that embraced musical scholarship, classical performance, and immersion in pop-music culture. A precocious only child, Newlin began to read by age 3, s

  • newly industrialized country (economics)

    Newly industrialized country (NIC), country whose national economy has transitioned from being primarily based in agriculture to being primarily based in goods-producing industries, such as manufacturing, construction, and mining, during the late 20th and early 21st centuries. An NIC also trades

  • Newlywed Game, The (American television show)

    Chuck Barris: …shows The Dating Game and The Newlywed Game but was perhaps best remembered as the creator and host of the comic talent show The Gong Show, which originally aired from 1976 to 1978.

  • Newlyweds: Nick and Jessica, The (American television show)

    Television in the United States: Reality TV: …was a former Playboy model; The Newlyweds: Nick and Jessica (MTV, 2003–05), chronicling the ultimately failed marriage of singers Nick Lachey (formerly of the boy band 98 Degrees) and Jessica Simpson; and Surreal Life (WB/VH1, 2003–06), a sort of Real World populated by where-are-they-now? personalities. Most of these shows were…

  • Newman (Western Australia, Australia)

    Newman, mining town, northwestern Western Australia. It lies in the East Pilbara region near Mount Newman, the highest peak (3,455 feet [1,053 metres]) in the Ophthalmia Range, about 735 miles (1,180 km) northeast of Perth. The area was inhabited by the Martu Aboriginal people for some 26,000

  • Newman’s Own (American company)

    Paul Newman: Philanthropy: He launched the successful Newman’s Own line of food products in 1982, with its profits going to a number of charitable causes. Some 25 years after its founding, the food line comprised about 80 products and was sold worldwide, generating a reported $250 million of profits donated to charity.…

  • Newman, Alfred (American composer)

    Anastasia: Production notes and credits:

  • Newman, Arnold (American photographer)

    Arnold Newman, American photographer, who specialized in portraits of well-known people posed in settings associated with their work. This approach, known as “environmental portraiture,” greatly influenced portrait photography in the 20th century. Newman studied art at the University of Miami in

  • Newman, Arnold Abner (American photographer)

    Arnold Newman, American photographer, who specialized in portraits of well-known people posed in settings associated with their work. This approach, known as “environmental portraiture,” greatly influenced portrait photography in the 20th century. Newman studied art at the University of Miami in

  • Newman, Barnett (American artist)

    Barnett Newman, American painter whose large, austerely reductionist canvases influenced the colour-field painters of the 1960s. The son of Polish immigrants, Newman studied at New York City’s Art Students League (1922–26) and at the City College of New York, from which he graduated in 1927. He

  • Newman, Baruch (American artist)

    Barnett Newman, American painter whose large, austerely reductionist canvases influenced the colour-field painters of the 1960s. The son of Polish immigrants, Newman studied at New York City’s Art Students League (1922–26) and at the City College of New York, from which he graduated in 1927. He

  • Newman, David (American screenwriter)

    Robert Benton: Early films: …cowrote (with fellow Esquire editor David Newman) the book for the Broadway show It’s a Bird…It’s a Plane…It’s Superman. The two then collaborated on the script for the film Bonnie and Clyde (1967). The crime drama was considered pioneering for its frank depiction of violence and sexuality, and Benton and…

  • Newman, David (American musician)

    David Newman, (“Fathead”), American jazz and pop musician (born Feb. 24, 1933, Corsicana, Texas—died Jan. 20, 2009, Kingston, N.Y.), wedded the harmonic and rhythmic sophistication of bop to blues melody as the tenor-saxophone soloist (1954–64 and 1970–71) in Ray Charles’s small and big bands and

  • Newman, David Fathead (American musician)

    David Newman, (“Fathead”), American jazz and pop musician (born Feb. 24, 1933, Corsicana, Texas—died Jan. 20, 2009, Kingston, N.Y.), wedded the harmonic and rhythmic sophistication of bop to blues melody as the tenor-saxophone soloist (1954–64 and 1970–71) in Ray Charles’s small and big bands and

  • Newman, Edwin (American broadcast journalist)

    Edwin Harold Newman, American broadcast journalist (born Jan. 25, 1919, New York, N.Y.—died Aug. 13, 2010, Oxford, Eng.), was known for his cultured intellect and his droll sense of humour during a 32-year career at NBC News. Newman earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from the

  • Newman, James Roy (American lawyer and mathematician)

    James Roy Newman, American lawyer, best known for his monumental four-volume historical survey of mathematics, The World of Mathematics (1956). Newman earned a law degree from Columbia University in New York City and served with various U.S. government agencies. He helped to write the bill that

  • Newman, Josh (American politician)

    recall election: In 2018 California state senator Josh Newman, a Democrat, lost his recall election.

  • Newman, Larry (American aeronautical engineer)

    Ben L. Abruzzo: …Abruzzo, with Maxie Anderson and Larry Newman, made the first transatlantic balloon flight in the Double Eagle II. In 1979 Abruzzo and Anderson won the Gordon Bennett race in the Double Eagle III.

  • Newman, Lionel (American conductor and composer)
  • Newman, Mount (mountain, Western Australia, Australia)

    Pilbara: …of the principal mines is Mount Newman, from which ore is shipped by rail northward to Port Hedland. Another railroad carries ore from Paraburdoo and Mount Tom Price to Dampier, an ore port west of old Roebourne. Salt is produced at Dampier and Port Hedland.

  • Newman, Paul (American actor and philanthropist)

    Paul Newman, American actor and director whose striking good looks, intelligence, and charisma became hallmarks in a film career that spanned more than 50 years, during which time he became known for his compelling performances of iconic antiheroes. He was also active in a number of philanthropic

  • Newman, Paul Leonard (American actor and philanthropist)

    Paul Newman, American actor and director whose striking good looks, intelligence, and charisma became hallmarks in a film career that spanned more than 50 years, during which time he became known for his compelling performances of iconic antiheroes. He was also active in a number of philanthropic

  • Newman, Randall Stuart (American musician)

    Randy Newman, American composer, songwriter, singer, and pianist whose character-driven, ironic, and often humorous compositions won him a cult audience and praise from critics but were atypical of the singer-songwriter movement of the 1970s that gave him his start as a performer. Born in Los

  • Newman, Randy (American musician)

    Randy Newman, American composer, songwriter, singer, and pianist whose character-driven, ironic, and often humorous compositions won him a cult audience and praise from critics but were atypical of the singer-songwriter movement of the 1970s that gave him his start as a performer. Born in Los

  • Newman, Riley (American physicist)

    gravity: The inverse square law: …conducted by the American physicist Riley Newman and his colleagues, a test mass hung on a torsion balance was moved around in a long hollow cylinder. The cylinder approximates a complete gravitational enclosure and, allowing for a small correction because it is open at the ends, the force on the…

  • Newman, Robert (British businessman)

    BBC Proms: In 1894 Robert Newman, the manager of London’s newly constructed Queen’s Hall, conceived of a series of concerts that would be available to the public at an affordable price and that would cultivate a broader audience for classical and contemporary art music. To realize his vision, he…

  • Newman, St. John Henry (British theologian)

    St. John Henry Newman, influential churchman and man of letters of the 19th century, who led the Oxford movement in the Church of England and later became a cardinal deacon in the Roman Catholic Church. His eloquent books, notably Parochial and Plain Sermons (1834–42), Lectures on the Prophetical

  • Newman, William Stein (American musicologist)

    William Stein Newman, American musicologist and educator (born April 6, 1912, Cleveland, Ohio—died April 27, 2000, Chapel Hill, N.C.), was a leading historian of music who in 1963 published a seminal three-volume work, The History of the Sonata (The Sonata in the Baroque Era, The Sonata in the C

  • Newmanry (code-breaking unit)

    Colossus: Breaking the messages: …Tunny-breaking unit called the “Newmanry,” after its founder and leader, mathematician Max Newman.

  • Newmar, Julie (American actress and dancer)

    Batman: Batman in the Silver Age: …role that was shared with Julie Newmar) were among the celebrities who made appearances as Batman’s foes. The show was an immediate hit, spawning an unprecedented wave of Bat-merchandise. The Batman newspaper strip resumed, and a theatrical movie was churned out for the summer of 1966. Late in the series,…

  • Newmark, Craig (American software engineer)

    Craigslist: …was launched in 1995 by Craig Newmark, a software engineer, as a free e-mail service that described upcoming events in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Over time, Newmark set up a Web site with a forum for members to communicate with one another. As an increasing number of…

  • Newmarket (England, United Kingdom)

    Newmarket, town, Forest Heath district, administrative and historic county of Suffolk, eastern England. It lies on chalk downland 70 miles (110 km) north of London. It is the home of the Jockey Club and has been celebrated for its horse races since the time of James I (reigned 1603–25); it is also

  • Newmeyer, Fred (American director)

    Safety Last!: Production notes and credits:

  • Newmeyer, Julie (American actress and dancer)

    Batman: Batman in the Silver Age: …role that was shared with Julie Newmar) were among the celebrities who made appearances as Batman’s foes. The show was an immediate hit, spawning an unprecedented wave of Bat-merchandise. The Batman newspaper strip resumed, and a theatrical movie was churned out for the summer of 1966. Late in the series,…

  • Newmont Mining Corporation (American company)

    Uzbekistan: Resources: …by a subsidiary of the Newmont Mining Corporation in the Muruntau field in the Kyzylkum Desert of north-central Uzbekistan. It was intended to be a joint venture with the government, but Newmont Mining Corporation’s share was forfeited in a legal battle in 2007.

  • Newnes, George (British publisher)

    history of publishing: General periodicals: …Britain to discover this was George Newnes, who liked snipping out any paragraph that appealed to him. In 1881 he turned his hobby to advantage by publishing a penny magazine, Tit-Bits from all the Most Interesting Books, Periodicals and Contributors in the World, soon shortened to Tit-Bits (in 1968 restyled…

  • Newport (Kentucky, United States)

    Newport, city, one of the seats (1796) of Campbell county (the other is Alexandria), Kentucky, U.S. It adjoins Covington (west) and lies opposite Cincinnati, Ohio, on the Ohio River near the mouth of the Licking River. The first settlement (about 1790) was named for Christopher Newport, commander

  • Newport (county borough, Wales, United Kingdom)

    Newport: …Casnewydd, town, industrial seaport, and county borough, historic county of Monmouthshire (Sir Fynwy), Wales.

  • Newport (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Newport, town, industrial seaport, and county borough, historic county of Monmouthshire (Sir Fynwy), Wales. The town is located at the mouth of the River Usk where it enters the River Severn estuary. A medieval borough with a castle (now in ruins) dating from about 1126, the town of Newport enjoyed

  • Newport (Isle of Wight, England, United Kingdom)

    Newport, town (parish), Isle of Wight, historic county of Hampshire, southern England. It lies near the centre of the diamond-shaped island at the head of the River Medina’s estuary, 5 miles (8 km) from its mouth at Cowes. Newport was probably the Roman settlement of Medina, but there is no trace

  • Newport (Arkansas, United States)

    Newport, city, seat of Jackson county, northeastern Arkansas, U.S. It lies on the White River at the foothills of the Ozark Mountains, about 45 miles (72 km) southwest of Jonesboro. Newport was founded in 1870 by the Cairo and Fulton (now Union Pacific) Railroad after townspeople of Jacksonport, to

  • Newport (Oregon, United States)

    Newport, city, seat (1954) of Lincoln county, western Oregon, U.S. It lies on the north shore of Yaquina Bay at the Pacific Ocean. Settled in 1855 as a fishing village, it was laid out in 1866 and developed as a seaside resort with steamer connections to San Francisco. The city serves the lumber

  • Newport (county, Rhode Island, United States)

    Newport, county, southeastern Rhode Island, U.S. It lies between Massachusetts to the north and east and the Atlantic Ocean to the south and west and includes Conanicut, Prudence, and Rhode islands in Narragansett Bay. The county was created in 1703. There is no county seat, but the principal

  • Newport (Rhode Island, United States)

    Newport, city, Newport county, southeastern Rhode Island, U.S. It occupies the southern end of Rhode (Aquidneck) Island in Narragansett Bay (there bridged to Jamestown). From the harbour on the west, the city rises up a gentle hillside to a low plateau. Newport was founded in 1639 by a group of

  • Newport (Vermont, United States)

    Newport, city, seat of Orleans county, northern Vermont, U.S., at the south end of Lake Memphremagog, near the Canadian border. The first house in the settlement (originally called Duncansboro) was built in 1793 by Deacon Martin Adams. The name Newport was adopted in 1816. Newport town (township;

  • Newport Beach (California, United States)

    Newport Beach, city, Orange county, southern California, U.S. It lies along Newport Bay (Pacific inlet), south of Long Beach. Captain Samuel S. Dunnells sailed into the bay in 1870 looking for “new port” facilities; he developed Newport Landing, which in 1873 became a lumber terminal. Known as

  • Newport Folk Festival (music festival, Newport, Rhode Island, United States)

    Newport Folk Festival, folk-music festival, held annually in Newport, R.I., U.S., that focuses primarily on American traditions. Founded by music producer George Wein, his business partner Albert Grossman, and several singer-songwriters, the Newport Folk Festival, first staged in 1959, had the aim

  • Newport Jazz Festival (music festival, Newport, Rhode Island, United States)

    Newport: …was the site of the Newport Jazz Festival from 1954 until 1971, when it was moved to New York City. A festival of classical music is held annually in Newport in July, and a revived jazz festival is held there in August.

  • Newport LST (naval craft)

    landing ship, tank: …most prominent were the diesel-powered Newport LSTs, which were built for the U.S. Navy in the 1960s. These vessels displaced more than 8,000 tons fully loaded and transported amphibious craft, tanks, and other combat vehicles, along with 400 men, at speeds of up to 20 knots. Such speeds were made…

  • Newport News (Virginia, United States)

    Newport News, independent city and port of entry, southeastern Virginia, U.S. It lies on the north side of Hampton Roads (harbour) and the mouth of the James River. With Portsmouth, Hampton, and Norfolk, it constitutes the Port of Hampton Roads. The site was settled by Daniel Gookin (1621), who

  • Newport of the West (Wisconsin, United States)

    Lake Geneva, resort city, Walworth county, southeastern Wisconsin, U.S. It lies on the northeastern shore of Lake Geneva (Geneva Lake) at its outlet, the White River, about 45 miles (70 km) southwest of Milwaukee. It was settled in 1836 and was named for Geneva, New York. Gristmills and sawmills

  • Newport, Anne (American author)

    Anne Newport Royall, traveler and writer and one of the very first American newspaperwomen. She was married in 1797 to Captain William Royall, a gentleman farmer who served in the American Revolution and died in 1813. In her 50s Anne Royall began to journey across the country, and from 1826 to 1831

  • Newport, Christopher (British sea captain)

    Christopher Newport, British sea captain who was one of the founders of the Jamestown Colony. Newport went to sea at a young age, and he quickly rose to the rank of a master mariner. After years spent as a privateer attacking Spanish settlements and raiding Spanish ships, he was made a captain in

  • Newquay (England, United Kingdom)

    Newquay, town (parish), Cornwall unitary authority, southwestern England. It is located at the southern end of Watergate Bay on the Atlantic Ocean coast and at the head of the River Gannel estuary. The town is almost entirely a modern seaside resort, having grown since the mid-19th century from a

  • Newry (Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Newry, town, Newry, Mourne and Down district, southeastern Northern Ireland. It lies along the River Clanrye and Newry Canal, near Carlingford Lough (inlet of the sea) and the Mourne Mountains. The town developed around a Cistercian abbey founded on the Clanrye by St. Malachy about 1144 and was

  • Newry and Mourne (former district, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Newry and Mourne, former district (1973–2015) astride the former counties of Armagh and Down, now part of Newry, Mourne and Down district, southeastern Northern Ireland. It was bordered by the former districts of Armagh and Banbridge to the north and Down to the northeast, by the Irish Sea to the

  • Newry, Mourne and Down (district, Northern Ireland)

    Newry, Mourne and Down, district, southeastern Northern Ireland. It is bounded to the northeast by the Ards and North Down district and Strangford Lough, to the east by the Irish Sea, to the south and west by the republic of Ireland, to the northwest and west by the Armagh City, Banbridge and

  • news (communications)

    A.S. Abell: …to speed the transmission of news. In a historic “news beat,” the express delivered in Baltimore the news of the U.S. Army victory at Vera Cruz, Mexico, before the U.S. government had learned of it. Abell then sent word of the victory by telegram to President James K. Polk. He…

  • news agency (journalism)

    News agency, organization that gathers, writes, and distributes news from around a nation or the world to newspapers, periodicals, radio and television broadcasters, government agencies, and other users. It does not generally publish news itself but supplies news to its subscribers, who, by sharing

  • news aggregator (media publishing platform)

    News aggregator, online platform or software device that collects news stories and other information as that information is published and organizes the information in a specific manner. This is accomplished in several ways. Some aggregators are curated by people to whom certain types of information

  • News Corporation Ltd. (international company [1979])

    Fox Broadcasting Company: When Murdoch’s conglomerate News Corporation split into separate publishing and television/film entities in 2013, Fox Broadcasting was among the companies transferred to his media holding company 21st Century Fox.

  • News from Nowhere (novel by Morris)

    News from Nowhere, prose work by William Morris, published serially in The Commonweal in 1890 and as a book later the same year. Most of the work consists of a vision of England in the year 2090 presented as a dream of William Guest, a thin disguise for Morris himself. Poverty, misery, and the

  • News from Nowhere; or, An Epoch of Rest, Being Some Chapters from a Utopian Romance (novel by Morris)

    News from Nowhere, prose work by William Morris, published serially in The Commonweal in 1890 and as a book later the same year. Most of the work consists of a vision of England in the year 2090 presented as a dream of William Guest, a thin disguise for Morris himself. Poverty, misery, and the

  • News of a Kidnapping (work by García Márquez)

    Gabriel García Márquez: Works: …Noticia de un secuestro (News of a Kidnapping).

  • News of the World (British newspaper)

    News of the World, British tabloid newspaper (1843–2011) headquartered in London. It was published weekly by News Group Newspapers Ltd. of News International, a subsidiary of Great Britain’s largest newspaper publisher, News Corporation Ltd., the media conglomerate founded and headed by

  • news service (journalism)

    News agency, organization that gathers, writes, and distributes news from around a nation or the world to newspapers, periodicals, radio and television broadcasters, government agencies, and other users. It does not generally publish news itself but supplies news to its subscribers, who, by sharing

  • News, The (Australian newspaper)

    Rupert Murdoch: Early life and career: …inheritance, the Sunday Mail and The News, both of Adelaide; he quickly converted the latter into a paper dominated by news of sex and scandal, often writing its banner headlines himself. The News’s circulation soared, and he then went about instituting similar changes in papers that he bought in Sydney,…

  • newscast (radio or television)

    Newscast, radio or television summary of news events read by a newscaster or produced with a combination of reading and audio tape for radio or a combination of reading and film or video tape for television. It ranges from the one-minute dateline radio summary (usually a reading of five or six

  • Newsday (American newspaper)

    Newsday, evening daily tabloid newspaper published in Long Island, N.Y., to serve residents of suburban Nassau and Suffolk counties, east of New York City. It was established in 1940, as residential suburbs began to expand. Its founders were Harry Guggenheim and Alicia Patterson, daughter of

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
91国产福利在线观看