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  • Nitophyllum (genus of red algae)

    Nitophyllum, genus of red algae in the family Delesseriaceae, consisting of about 25 marine species distributed throughout coastal regions. The genus was named in 1830 by British botanist and mycologist Robert Kaye Greville. The best-characterized member, Nitophyllum punctatum, is known for its

  • Nitophyllum divaricatum (red algae)

    Nitophyllum: Less well-characterized is N. divaricatum, a species native to the Galapagos Islands that may be at risk of decline from climate change and increased herbivory associated with the loss of predators in the region.

  • Nitophyllum punctatum (red algae)

    Nitophyllum: The best-characterized member, Nitophyllum punctatum, is known for its distinctive rose colour and delicate ribbonlike fronds; it has been described from intertidal pools or subtidal areas along the coasts of every continent. Less well-characterized is N. divaricatum, a species native to the Galapagos Islands that may be at…

  • Nitra (Slovakia)

    Nitra, town, southwestern Slovakia. It lies along the Nitra River. The centre of the Nitra principality in the beginning of the 9th century, it was later a stronghold and religious centre. The first Christian church in what is now Slovakia was established there in ad 830 and consecrated by Saints

  • Nitra (historical region, Slovakia)

    Czechoslovak history: Moravia: About 833 Mojmír attached the Nitra region (the western part of modern Slovakia) to his domain. His successor (after 846), Rostislav, consolidated the country and defended it successfully. His relations with the East Frankish empire (since 843 under Louis the German) were determined by political considerations and by the advance…

  • Nitramex (chemical compound)

    explosive: Nitramon and Nitramex explosives: An important advance in explosives technology was the development by du Pont in 1934 of Nitramon, a canned product with a typical formula of 92 percent ammonium nitrate, 4 percent dinitrotoluene, and 4 percent paraffin wax. Some grades contain metallic ingredients such as…

  • Nitramon (chemical compound)

    explosive: Nitramon and Nitramex explosives: An important advance in explosives technology was the development by du Pont in 1934 of Nitramon, a canned product with a typical formula of 92 percent ammonium nitrate, 4 percent dinitrotoluene, and 4 percent paraffin wax. Some grades contain metallic ingredients…

  • nitrate (chemical compound)

    Nitrate, any member of either of two classes of compounds derived from nitric acid, HNO3. The salts of nitric acid are ionic compounds containing the nitrate ion, NO-3, and a positive ion, such as NH4+ in ammonium nitrate. Esters of nitric acid are covalent compounds having the structure R―O―NO2,

  • nitrate film stock (film)

    motion picture: Preservation of film: One reason is that inflammable nitrate film stock, which was generally used until the 1940s, when it was replaced by acetate, is chemically unstable. Also, as film runs through a projector, it is eventually worn, scratched, or damaged. Still another factor is that commercial conditions of filmmaking discouraged preservation; the…

  • nitrate mineral

    Nitrate and iodate minerals, small group of naturally occurring inorganic compounds that are practically confined to the Atacama Desert of northern Chile; the principal locality is Antofagasta. These minerals occur under the loose soil as beds of grayish caliche (a hard cemented mixture of

  • nitrate of soda (chemical compound)

    Chile saltpetre, sodium nitrate, a deliquescent crystalline sodium salt that is found chiefly in northern Chile (see

  • nitratine (chemical compound)

    Chile saltpetre, sodium nitrate, a deliquescent crystalline sodium salt that is found chiefly in northern Chile (see

  • nitration (chemical reaction)

    nitro compound: …made by the reaction, called nitration, between nitric acid and an organic compound. Nitration of aromatic compounds, such as benzene or toluene, is commonly effected by treating them with a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids at temperatures of 100° C or lower. These temperatures are not high enough for…

  • nitre (chemical compound)

    Saltpetre, any of three naturally occurring nitrates, distinguished as (1) ordinary saltpetre, or potassium nitrate, KNO3; (2) Chile saltpetre, cubic nitre, or sodium nitrate, NaNO3; and (3) lime saltpetre, wall saltpetre, or calcium nitrate, Ca(NO3)2. These three nitrates generally occur as

  • nitric acid (chemical compound)

    Nitric acid, (HNO3), colourless, fuming, and highly corrosive liquid (freezing point ?42 °C [?44 °F], boiling point 83 °C [181 °F]) that is a common laboratory reagent and an important industrial chemical for the manufacture of fertilizers and explosives. It is toxic and can cause severe burns. The

  • nitric oxide (chemical compound)

    Nitric oxide (NO), colourless toxic gas that is formed by the oxidation of nitrogen. Nitric oxide performs important chemical signaling functions in humans and other animals and has various applications in medicine. It has few industrial applications. It is a serious air pollutant generated by

  • nitride (chemical compound)

    Nitride, any of a class of chemical compounds in which nitrogen is combined with an element of similar or lower electronegativity, such as boron, silicon, and most metals. Nitrides contain the nitride ion (N3?), and, similar to carbides, nitrides can be classified into three general categories:

  • nitriding (industrial process)

    Nitriding, process for hardening the surface of steel objects by introducing nitrogen (N) into it, where it combines with iron and other alloying elements to form hard metallic nitrides. Nitriding is usually done by heating steel objects in gaseous ammonia (NH3) at temperatures between 500 and 550

  • nitrification (chemistry)

    nitrogen cycle: Nitrification, a process carried out by nitrifying bacteria, transforms soil ammonia into nitrates (NO3?), which plants can incorporate into their own tissues.

  • nitrification-denitrification (sanitation engineering)

    wastewater treatment: Removal of plant nutrients: A method called nitrification-denitrification can be used to remove the nitrates. It is a two-step biological process in which ammonia nitrogen is first converted into nitrates by microorganisms. The nitrates are further metabolized by another species of bacteria, forming nitrogen gas that escapes into the air. This process…

  • nitrifying bacteria

    Nitrifying bacterium, any of a small group of aerobic bacteria (family Nitrobacteraceae) that use inorganic chemicals as an energy source. They are microorganisms that are important in the nitrogen cycle as converters of soil ammonia to nitrates, compounds usable by plants. The nitrification p

  • nitrifying bacterium

    Nitrifying bacterium, any of a small group of aerobic bacteria (family Nitrobacteraceae) that use inorganic chemicals as an energy source. They are microorganisms that are important in the nitrogen cycle as converters of soil ammonia to nitrates, compounds usable by plants. The nitrification p

  • nitrile

    Nitrile, any of a class of organic compounds having molecular structures in which a cyano group (―C ≡ N) is attached to a carbon atom (C). Nitriles are colourless solids or liquids with distinctive odours. Acrylonitrile is produced in large quantities by a process called ammoxidation that depends o

  • nitrile hydratase (enzyme)

    acrylamide: Manufacture and applications of acrylamide: …1980 an enzyme known as nitrile hydratase, which is also capable of generating acrylamide from acrylonitrile, was discovered in microorganisms. This enzyme subsequently succeeded the use of sulfuric acid and copper catalysts in the industrial production of acrylamide.

  • nitrile rubber (synthetic rubber)

    Nitrile rubber (NBR), an oil-resistant synthetic rubber produced from a copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene. Its main applications are in fuel hoses, gaskets, rollers, and other products in which oil resistance is required. In the production of NBR, acrylonitrile (CH2=CHCN) and butadiene

  • nitrile-butadiene rubber (synthetic rubber)

    Nitrile rubber (NBR), an oil-resistant synthetic rubber produced from a copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene. Its main applications are in fuel hoses, gaskets, rollers, and other products in which oil resistance is required. In the production of NBR, acrylonitrile (CH2=CHCN) and butadiene

  • nitrite (chemical compound)

    Nitrite, any member of either of two classes of compounds derived from nitrous acid. Salts of nitrous acid are ionic compounds containing the nitrite ion, NO-2, and a positive ion such as Na+ in sodium nitrite (NaNO2). Esters of nitrous acid are covalent compounds having the structure R―O―N―O, in

  • nitro compound (chemical compound)

    Nitro compound, any of a family of chemical compounds in which the nitro group (―O―N=O) forms part of the molecular structure. The most common examples are organic substances in which a carbon atom is linked by a covalent bond to the nitrogen atom of the nitro group. Nitro compounds are polar, and

  • nitro dye (dye)

    dye: Xanthene and related dyes: Its derivative with a nitro group ortho to sulfur is methylene green, which has excellent lightfastness on acrylics. Some thiazines—namely, those with X = NR but lacking the ―N(CH3)2 groups—are antihistamines. A number of oxazines and acridines are good leather dyes. Mauve is an azine but is of only…

  • nitro group (chemistry)

    phenol: Electrophilic aromatic substitution: …of oxidizing groups such as nitro groups. Nitro groups are strongly deactivating (i.e., make the aromatic ring less reactive), however, and it is often difficult to add a second or third nitro group to an aromatic compound. Three nitro groups are more easily substituted onto phenol, because the strong activation…

  • nitroacetic acid (chemical compound)

    carboxylic acid: Acidity: …acid than acetic acid, and nitroacetic acid, NO2CH2 COOH, is even stronger. (The NO2 group is a very strong electron-withdrawing group.) An even greater effect is found in trichloroacetic acid, Cl3CCOOH, whose acid strength is about the same as that of hydrochloric acid.

  • Nitrobacter (bacteria)

    nitrifying bacterium: …to plants) to nitrates (Nitrobacter, Nitrospina, and Nitrococcus). In agriculture, irrigation with dilute solutions of ammonia results in an increase in soil nitrates through the action of nitrifying bacteria.

  • Nitrobacter winogradsky (bacteria)

    bacteria: Autotrophic metabolism: …ammonia (NH4+) to nitrite, and Nitrobacter winogradskyi oxidizes nitrite to nitrate. Thiobacillus oxidizes thiosulfate and elemental sulfur to sulfate, and A. ferrooxidans oxidizes ferrous ions to the ferric form. This diverse oxidizing ability allows A. ferrooxidans to tolerate high concentrations of many different ions, including iron, copper, cobalt, nickel, and…

  • Nitrobacteraceae

    Nitrifying bacterium, any of a small group of aerobic bacteria (family Nitrobacteraceae) that use inorganic chemicals as an energy source. They are microorganisms that are important in the nitrogen cycle as converters of soil ammonia to nitrates, compounds usable by plants. The nitrification p

  • nitrobenzene (chemical compound)

    Nitrobenzene, the simplest aromatic nitro compound, having the molecular formula C6H5NO2. It is used in the manufacture of aniline, benzidine, and other organic chemicals. Nitrobenzene is a colourless to pale yellow, oily, highly toxic liquid with the odour of bitter almonds. Nitrobenzene was

  • nitrocellulose (chemical compound)

    Nitrocellulose, a mixture of nitric esters of cellulose, and a highly flammable compound that is the main ingredient of modern gunpowder and is also employed in certain lacquers and paints. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries it was the basis of the earliest man-made fibres and plastic

  • Nitrococcus (bacterium)

    nitrifying bacterium: &gt;Nitrococcus). In agriculture, irrigation with dilute solutions of ammonia results in an increase in soil nitrates through the action of nitrifying bacteria.

  • nitrocotton (explosive)

    Christian Friedrich Sch?nbein: …was the first to describe guncotton (nitrocellulose). His teaching posts included one at Epsom, Eng., before he joined the faculty at the University of Basel, Switz. (1828), where he was appointed professor of chemistry and physics in 1835.

  • nitrogen (chemical element)

    Nitrogen (N), nonmetallic element of Group 15 [Va] of the periodic table. It is a colourless, odourless, tasteless gas that is the most plentiful element in Earth’s atmosphere and is a constituent of all living matter. atomic number 7 atomic weight 14.0067 melting point ?209.86 °C (?345.8 °F)

  • nitrogen assimilation (biology)

    nitrogen cycle: Nitrates and ammonia resulting from nitrogen fixation are assimilated into the specific tissue compounds of algae and higher plants. Animals then ingest these algae and plants, converting them into their own body compounds.

  • nitrogen budget (biochemistry)

    Nitrogen cycle, circulation of nitrogen in various forms through nature. Nitrogen, a component of proteins and nucleic acids, is essential to life on Earth. Although 78 percent by volume of the atmosphere is nitrogen gas, this abundant reservoir exists in a form unusable by most organisms. Through

  • nitrogen cycle (biochemistry)

    Nitrogen cycle, circulation of nitrogen in various forms through nature. Nitrogen, a component of proteins and nucleic acids, is essential to life on Earth. Although 78 percent by volume of the atmosphere is nitrogen gas, this abundant reservoir exists in a form unusable by most organisms. Through

  • nitrogen dioxide (chemical compound)

    air pollution: Nitrogen dioxide: Of the several forms of nitrogen oxides, nitrogen dioxide—a pungent, irritating gas—is of most concern. It is known to cause pulmonary edema, an accumulation of excessive fluid in the lungs. Nitrogen dioxide also reacts in the atmosphere to form nitric acid, contributing to the…

  • nitrogen euphoria (medicine)

    Nitrogen narcosis, effects produced by the gas nitrogen when it is breathed under increased pressure. Nitrogen, a major constituent of air, is quite inert and passes into the fluids and tissues of the body without undergoing chemical change. Even though it is not used to sustain the bodily

  • nitrogen fixation (chemical reaction)

    Nitrogen fixation, any natural or industrial process that causes free nitrogen (N2), which is a relatively inert gas plentiful in air, to combine chemically with other elements to form more-reactive nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, nitrates, or nitrites. Under ordinary conditions, nitrogen does

  • nitrogen group element (chemical element group)

    Nitrogen group element, any of the chemical elements that constitute Group 15 (Va) of the periodic table. The group consists of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), arsenic (As), antimony (Sb), bismuth (Bi), and moscovium (Mc). The elements share certain general similarities in chemical behaviour, though

  • nitrogen hydride (chemical compound)

    spectroscopy: Fluorescence: …the potential energy curves for nitrogen hydride (NH) shown in Figure 7B. The curves for the 1Σ+ and 1Π states intersect at a radius value of 0.2 nanometre. If a molecule in the 1Π excited electronic state is in a vibrational level corresponding to the energy value of this intersection…

  • nitrogen monoxide (chemical compound)

    Nitric oxide (NO), colourless toxic gas that is formed by the oxidation of nitrogen. Nitric oxide performs important chemical signaling functions in humans and other animals and has various applications in medicine. It has few industrial applications. It is a serious air pollutant generated by

  • nitrogen mustard (chemical compound)

    heterocyclic compound: Three-membered rings: …in the pharmacological action of nitrogen mustards, which were among the first anticancer drugs developed (see drug: Cancer chemotherapy). Intramolecular ring closure, as in the case of the anticancer agent mechlorethamine, produces an intermediate aziridinium ion, the biologically active agent, which attacks rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells by…

  • nitrogen narcosis (medicine)

    Nitrogen narcosis, effects produced by the gas nitrogen when it is breathed under increased pressure. Nitrogen, a major constituent of air, is quite inert and passes into the fluids and tissues of the body without undergoing chemical change. Even though it is not used to sustain the bodily

  • nitrogen oxide (chemical compound)

    oxide: Oxides of nitrogen: …2HNO3 + NO Nitrogen (N) forms oxides in which nitrogen exhibits each of its positive oxidation numbers from +1 to +5.

  • nitrogen tetroxide (chemical compound)

    ammonia: Hydrazine: and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, (H3C)2NNH2, with liquid dinitrogen tetroxide, N2O4. Three tons of the methyl hydrazine mixture were required for the landing on the Moon, and about one ton was required for the launch from the lunar surface. The major commercial uses of hydrazine are as a blowing agent (to make holes…

  • nitrogen-fixing bacteria (biology)

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria, microorganisms capable of transforming atmospheric nitrogen into fixed nitrogen (inorganic compounds usable by plants). More than 90 percent of all nitrogen fixation is effected by these organisms, which thus play an important role in the nitrogen cycle. Two kinds of

  • nitroglycerin (chemical compound)

    Nitroglycerin, a powerful explosive and an important ingredient of most forms of dynamite. It is also used with nitrocellulose in some propellants, especially for rockets and missiles, and it is employed as a vasodilator in the easing of cardiac pain. Pure nitroglycerin is a colourless, oily,

  • nitroguanidine (chemical compound)

    guanidine: Of the derivatives, nitroguanidine, obtained by the action of sulfuric acid on the nitrate, has been used to some extent as a constituent of explosives; its peculiarity is the low temperature produced in the explosion. Aminoguanidine and substituted aminoguanidine are intermediates in the synthesis of a variety of…

  • nitromersol (chemical compound)

    Nitromersol, synthetic mercury-containing organic compound used as an antiseptic for the skin and mucous membranes and as a disinfectant for sterilizing surgical instruments. It is related to merbromin (Mercurochrome) and thimerosal (Merthiolate). Nitromersol disinfects by the action of the mercury

  • nitrosamine (chemical compound)

    amine: Substitution: …aromatic) to N-nitroso compounds (nitrosamines): R2NH + HNO2 → R2N―NO. Some nitrosamines are potent cancer-inducing substances, and their possible formation is a serious consideration when nitrites, which are salts of nitrous acid, are present in foods or pharmaceutical preparations. Tertiary amines give rise to nitrosamines more slowly; an alkyl…

  • nitroso compound (chemical compound)

    Nitroso compound, any of a class of organic compounds having molecular structures in which the nitroso group (-N=O) is attached to a carbon or nitrogen atom. Substances in which this group is attached to an oxygen atom are called nitrites, that is, esters of nitrous acid; those in which the

  • nitrosoamine (chemical compound)

    amine: Substitution: …aromatic) to N-nitroso compounds (nitrosamines): R2NH + HNO2 → R2N―NO. Some nitrosamines are potent cancer-inducing substances, and their possible formation is a serious consideration when nitrites, which are salts of nitrous acid, are present in foods or pharmaceutical preparations. Tertiary amines give rise to nitrosamines more slowly; an alkyl…

  • nitrosobenzene (chemical compound)

    spectroscopy: Factors determining absorption regions: …nitroso group (NO) to give nitrosobenzene, C6H5NO, modifies the energy level spacings and shifts the absorption from the ultraviolet into the violet-blue region, yielding a compound that is pale yellow to the eye. Such shifts in spectral absorptions with substitution can be used to aid in characterizing the electron distributions…

  • Nitrosococcus (bacteria)

    nitrifying bacterium: to nitrites (Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira, Nitrosococcus, and Nitrosolobus) and bacteria that convert nitrites (toxic to plants) to nitrates (Nitrobacter, Nitrospina, and Nitrococcus). In agriculture, irrigation with dilute solutions of ammonia results in an increase in soil nitrates through the action of nitrifying bacteria.

  • Nitrosolobus (bacteria)

    nitrifying bacterium: Nitrosospira, Nitrosococcus, and Nitrosolobus) and bacteria that convert nitrites (toxic to plants) to nitrates (Nitrobacter, Nitrospina, and Nitrococcus). In agriculture, irrigation with dilute solutions of ammonia results in an increase in soil nitrates through the action of nitrifying bacteria.

  • Nitrosomonas (bacteria genus)

    nitrifying bacterium: …convert ammonia to nitrites (Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira, Nitrosococcus, and Nitrosolobus) and bacteria that convert nitrites (toxic to plants) to nitrates (Nitrobacter, Nitrospina, and Nitrococcus). In agriculture, irrigation with dilute solutions of ammonia results in an increase in soil nitrates

  • Nitrosomonas europaea (bacteria)

    bacteria: Autotrophic metabolism: For example, Nitrosomonas europaea oxidizes ammonia (NH4+) to nitrite, and Nitrobacter winogradskyi oxidizes nitrite to nitrate. Thiobacillus oxidizes thiosulfate and elemental sulfur to sulfate, and A. ferrooxidans oxidizes ferrous ions to the ferric form. This diverse oxidizing ability allows A. ferrooxidans to tolerate high

  • nitrosonium ion (chemistry)

    coordination compound: Nitrosyl complexes: Because the nitrosonium ion (NO+) is isoelectronic with carbon monoxide and because its mode of coordination to transition metals is potentially similar to that of carbon monoxide, metal nitrosyls have been recognized as similar to carbonyls and are sometimes formulated as NO+ complexes. Carbonyl ligands can be…

  • Nitrospina (bacteria)

    nitrifying bacterium: …to plants) to nitrates (Nitrobacter, Nitrospina, and Nitrococcus). In agriculture, irrigation with dilute solutions of ammonia results in an increase in soil nitrates through the action of nitrifying bacteria.

  • Nitrospira (bacteria)

    nitrifying bacterium: …convert ammonia to nitrites (Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira, Nitrosococcus, and Nitrosolobus) and bacteria that convert nitrites (toxic to plants) to nitrates (Nitrobacter, Nitrospina, and Nitrococcus). In agriculture, irrigation with dilute solutions of ammonia results in an increase in soil nitrates through the action of nitrifying bacteria.

  • nitrostarch (chemical compound)

    explosive: Nitrostarch explosives: Nitrostarch, which is closely related to nitrocellulose, attracted early attention, but it was not until about 1905 that it proved possible to produce it in a stable form. In general nitrostarch explosives are similar to the straight and ammonia dynamites except that nitrostarch…

  • nitrosyl, metal

    coordination compound: Nitrosyl complexes: Nitrosyl complexes can be formed by the reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with many transition metal compounds or by reactions involving species containing nitrogen and oxygen. Some of these complexes have been known for many years—e.g., pentaaquanitrosyliron(2+) ion, [Fe(H2O)5NO]2+, which formed in the…

  • nitrous (chemical compound)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), one of several oxides of nitrogen, a colourless gas with pleasant, sweetish odour and taste, which when inhaled produces insensibility to pain preceded by mild hysteria, sometimes laughter. (Because inhalation of small amounts provides a brief euphoric effect and nitrous oxide

  • nitrous acid (chemical compound)

    Nitrous acid, (HNO2), an unstable, weakly acidic compound that has been prepared only in the form of cold, dilute solutions. It is useful in chemistry in converting amines into diazonium compounds, which are used in making azo dyes. It is usually prepared by acidifying a solution of one of its

  • nitrous air (chemical compound)

    Nitric oxide (NO), colourless toxic gas that is formed by the oxidation of nitrogen. Nitric oxide performs important chemical signaling functions in humans and other animals and has various applications in medicine. It has few industrial applications. It is a serious air pollutant generated by

  • nitrous oxide (chemical compound)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), one of several oxides of nitrogen, a colourless gas with pleasant, sweetish odour and taste, which when inhaled produces insensibility to pain preceded by mild hysteria, sometimes laughter. (Because inhalation of small amounts provides a brief euphoric effect and nitrous oxide

  • Nitschke, Ray (American football player)

    Ray E. Nitschke, American professional football player who was a powerful middle linebacker for the Green Bay Packers from 1958 to 1972, during which time the team won five National Football League championships and, in 1967 and 1968, the first two Super Bowls; he was elected to the Pro Football

  • Nitschke, Raymond Ernest (American football player)

    Ray E. Nitschke, American professional football player who was a powerful middle linebacker for the Green Bay Packers from 1958 to 1972, during which time the team won five National Football League championships and, in 1967 and 1968, the first two Super Bowls; he was elected to the Pro Football

  • Nitschmann, David (German religious leader)

    Moravian church: History: In 1735 David Nitschmann was consecrated the first bishop of the Renewed Moravian Church. With Nitschmann the Moravians restored their own ministry and soon thereafter the three orders of bishop, presbyter, and deacon.

  • Nitta Yoshisada (Japanese military leader)

    Nitta Yoshisada, Japanese warrior whose support of the imperial restoration of the emperor Go-Daigo was crucial in destroying the Kamakura shogunate, the military dictatorship that governed Japan from 1192 until 1333. The ultimate defeat of Nitta resulted in the end of the imperial restoration and

  • Nitti, Francesco Saverio (prime minister of Italy)

    Francesco Saverio Nitti, Italian statesman who was prime minister for a critical year after World War I. After a career as a journalist and professor of economics, Nitti was elected deputy in 1904. A Left Liberal, he served as minister of agriculture, industry, and commerce in 1911–14 and as

  • Nitti, Frank (American gangster)

    Frank Nitti, American gangster in Chicago who was Al Capone’s chief enforcer and inherited Capone’s criminal empire when Capone went to prison in 1931. Starting as a barber, Nitti became a fence for stolen goods and about 1920 joined Capone’s gang. He was sent to prison for 18 months after pleading

  • Nitto, Francesco Raffele (American gangster)

    Frank Nitti, American gangster in Chicago who was Al Capone’s chief enforcer and inherited Capone’s criminal empire when Capone went to prison in 1931. Starting as a barber, Nitti became a fence for stolen goods and about 1920 joined Capone’s gang. He was sent to prison for 18 months after pleading

  • Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, the (American musical group)

    Maybelle Carter: …country musicians who performed with the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band on the breakthrough crossover album Will the Circle Be Unbroken (1973).

  • Nitu (Indonesian deity)

    Ngada: …and his female component (Nitu), but since 1920 missionaries have worked among the Ngada, and today many Ngada are Roman Catholics.

  • Nityananda (Hindu religious leader)

    Chaitanya movement: …up to his close companions, Nityananda and Advaita. Those three are called the three masters (prabhu), and their images are established in temples of the sect.

  • Nitze, Max (German physician)

    urology: …in 1877 the German urologist Max Nitze developed the cystoscope. The cystoscope is a tubelike viewing instrument equipped with an electric light on its end. By introducing the instrument through the urethra, the urologist is able to view the interior of the bladder. The first decades of the early 20th…

  • Nitze, Paul Henry (American military strategist)

    Paul Henry Nitze, American military strategist (born Jan. 16, 1907, Amherst, Mass.—died Oct. 19, 2004, Washington, D.C.), played a vital role in shaping U.S. nuclear-arms strategy during the Cold War era. In 1950 he was appointed head of policy planning at the Department of State and wrote the f

  • Nitzsche, Bernard Alfred (American musician and producer)

    Bernard Alfred Nitzsche, (“Jack”), American musician, songwriter, and arranger (born April 22, 1937, Chicago, Ill.—died Aug. 25, 2000, Hollywood, Calif.), not only worked with record producer Phil Spector (for whom he developed the “wall of sound”), and such musicians as the Rolling Stones, Neil Y

  • Nitzsche, Jack (American composer)
  • Nitzschia (algae genus)

    algae: Annotated classification: Navicula and Nitzschia (pennates). Class Bicosoecaceae May be included in the Chrysophyceae or in the protozoan group Zoomastigophora; colourless flagellate cells in vase-shaped loricas (wall-like coverings); cell attached to lorica using flagellum as a stalk; lorica attaches to plants, algae, animals, or water surface;

  • Niu Lang (Chinese mythology)

    Zhi Nü: …Nü fell in love with Niu Lang, the cowherd, and was married to him. For a long time Zhi Nü was so deeply in love that she had no thoughts of heaven. Finally she returned to her heavenly home where her husband joined her. The emperor, irate that his daughter…

  • Niu Tianci zhuan (work by Lao She)

    Lao She: In Niu Tianci zhuan (1934; “The Life of Niu Tianci”), Lao She changed his individualist theme to one stressing the importance of the total social environment and the futility of the individual’s struggle against such an environment. His new theme found its clearest expression in his…

  • Niuafo?ou (island, Tonga)

    Niuafo?ou, northernmost island of Tonga, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. It is part of the Niuatoputapu, or Niuas, group of islands. The generally wooded land area of 19 square miles (49 square km) includes a volcanic peak 935 feet (285 metres) high, several lakes—including a large crater lake

  • Niuatoputapu (island, Tonga)

    Niuatoputapu, one of the northernmost islands of Tonga, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. Of volcanic origin, the island has an area of 6 square miles (16 square km) and rises to 479 feet (146 metres). It is part of the Niuatoputapu, or Niuas, group of islands that also includes Niuafo?ou and

  • Niue (island, Pacific Ocean)

    Niue, internally self-governing island state in free association with New Zealand. It is the westernmost of the Cook Islands but is administratively separate from them. Niue lies some 1,340 miles (2,160 km) northeast of Auckland, New Zealand, and 240 miles (385 km) east of the Vava?u Group of

  • Niutachi (people)

    Missouri, North American Indian people of the Chiwere branch of the Siouan language family. In their historic past the Missouri people, together with the Iowa and the Oto, separated from the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) and moved southwest. The Missouri tribe settled at the confluence of the Grand and

  • niuzhong (Chinese bell)

    zhong: …for vertical suspension are called niuzhong. The earliest known yongzhong dates to the 10th century bc, and the earliest niuzhong to the 8th century bc. At the time, the shape of both the yongzhong and the niuzhong was not round but rather like a squashed cylinder or two tiles attached…

  • Nivedita (Irish-born teacher)

    Nivedita, Irish-born schoolteacher who was a follower of the Indian spiritual leader Vivekananda (Narendranath Datta) and became an influential spokesperson promoting Indian national consciousness, unity, and freedom. The eldest child of Mary and Samuel Richmond Noble, Margaret became a teacher at

  • Nivedita, Sister (Irish-born teacher)

    Nivedita, Irish-born schoolteacher who was a follower of the Indian spiritual leader Vivekananda (Narendranath Datta) and became an influential spokesperson promoting Indian national consciousness, unity, and freedom. The eldest child of Mary and Samuel Richmond Noble, Margaret became a teacher at

  • Nivelle, Robert (French military officer)

    Robert Nivelle, commander in chief of the French armies on the Western Front for five months in World War I. His career was wrecked by the failure of his offensive in the spring of 1917. Nivelle graduated from the école Polytechnique in 1878, served in Indochina, Algeria, and China as an artillery

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    Robert Nivelle, commander in chief of the French armies on the Western Front for five months in World War I. His career was wrecked by the failure of his offensive in the spring of 1917. Nivelle graduated from the école Polytechnique in 1878, served in Indochina, Algeria, and China as an artillery

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