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  • Nkhata Bay (town, Malawi)

    Nkhata Bay, town located in northern Malawi. Its port has a sheltered anchorage on the western shore of Lake Nyasa (Lake Malawi) near the mouth of the Luweya River and is equipped with modern floating and piled jetties. The port exports the agricultural produce of the hinterland. Nkhata Bay is also

  • Nkhotakota (Malawi)

    Nkhotakota, town, central Malawi. It lies on the shores of Lake Nyasa (Lake Malawi). It originated as a group of villages in the 19th century, served as a depot for Swahili-Arab ivory and slave traders, and became the largest traditional African town in the country. It is situated on the slope of a

  • nkisi (west-central African lore)

    Nkisi, in west-central African lore, any object or material substance invested with sacred energy and made available for spiritual protection. One tradition of the Kongo people of west-central Africa holds that the god Funza gave the world the first nkisi. Africans uprooted during the Atlantic

  • NKK Corporation (Japanese company)

    NKK Corporation, major Japanese industrial company and one of the country’s largest steelmakers. Headquarters are in Tokyo. Nippon Kōkan KK was founded in 1912 to make products using the steel from Japan’s first steel mills. The company’s innovative seamless steel pipe proved superior to c

  • Nkole (people)

    Nkole, a people of the Interlacustrine Bantu-speaking group who occupy the area of southwestern Uganda between Lakes Edward and George and the Tanzania border. Numbering about 1,500,000 in the late 20th century, the Nkole were traditionally divided into two quite distinct social groups: the

  • Nkomati Accord (Mozambique-South Africa [1984])

    Mozambique: Mozambique as a one-party state: …and South Africa signed the Nkomati Accord, under which each country would no longer support the other country’s opposition movement (ANC in South Africa and Renamo in Mozambique). Because this agreement did little to curb Renamo’s activity and was violated by South Africa, Frelimo continued attempts to end the conflict…

  • Nkomo, Joshua (Zimbabwean political leader)

    Joshua Nkomo, black nationalist in Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia), who, as leader of the Zimbabwe African People’s Union (ZAPU), was Prime Minister Robert Mugabe’s longtime rival. Nkomo was the son of a teacher and lay preacher in Matabeleland. Although often regarded as of Ndebele (formerly called

  • Nkomo, Joshua Mqabuko Nyongolo (Zimbabwean political leader)

    Joshua Nkomo, black nationalist in Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia), who, as leader of the Zimbabwe African People’s Union (ZAPU), was Prime Minister Robert Mugabe’s longtime rival. Nkomo was the son of a teacher and lay preacher in Matabeleland. Although often regarded as of Ndebele (formerly called

  • Nkonde (people)

    Nyakyusa, Bantu-speaking people living in Mbeya region, Tanzania, immediately north of Lake Nyasa, and in Mala?i. Their country comprises alluvial flats near the lake and the mountainous country beyond for about 40 miles (65 km). Those living in Mala?i are called Ngonde (or Nkonde). Plantains are

  • nkongi (African fetish)

    African art: Lower Congo (Kongo) cultural area: The nkongi, a group of fetishes characteristic of the coast and the Mayombé forest, consist mainly of human figures, but there are some that combine the forms of a dog and a leopard, sometimes with two heads. The nkongi fetish is often completely covered by nails…

  • Nkongolo Mwamba (Luba mythological figure)

    Luba: …moral character and private behaviour: Nkongolo Mwamba, the red king, and Ilunga Mbidi Kiluwe, a prince of legendary black complexion. The differences between the two are profound: Nkongolo Mwamba is the drunken and cruel despot, Ilunga Mbidi Kiluwe, the refined and gentle prince. Nkongolo the red is a man without…

  • Nkongsamba (Cameroon)

    Nkongsamba, town located in western Cameroon. Nkongsamba lies at the foot of Mount Manengouba (7,861 feet [2,396 metres]). The French agricultural policy of intensive exploitation contributed to the town’s growth in the 20th century. It is the terminus of the railway from Douala and has road

  • Nkongsomba (Cameroon)

    Nkongsamba, town located in western Cameroon. Nkongsamba lies at the foot of Mount Manengouba (7,861 feet [2,396 metres]). The French agricultural policy of intensive exploitation contributed to the town’s growth in the 20th century. It is the terminus of the railway from Douala and has road

  • nkoni (musical instrument)

    African music: Lutes: &gt;nkoni (which was noted by Ibn Ba??ū?ah in 1353) may have originated in ancient Egypt. The khalam is claimed to be the ancestor of the banjo. Another long-necked lute is the ramkie of South Africa.

  • Nkore (people)

    Nkole, a people of the Interlacustrine Bantu-speaking group who occupy the area of southwestern Uganda between Lakes Edward and George and the Tanzania border. Numbering about 1,500,000 in the late 20th century, the Nkole were traditionally divided into two quite distinct social groups: the

  • Nkosi, Lewis (South African author)

    Lewis Nkosi, South African author, critic, journalist, and broadcaster. After attending a technical college in Durban for a year, Nkosi worked as a journalist, first in 1955 for the Zulu-English weekly paper Ilanga lase Natal (“Natal Sun”) and then for the Drum magazine and as chief reporter for

  • Nkosi, Xolani (South African activist)

    Nkosi Johnson, (Xolani Nkosi), South African activist (born Feb. 4, 1989, Daveytown, S.Af.—died June 1, 2001, Johannesburg, S.Af.), became the human face of AIDS in South Africa and an iconic figure in the campaign to raise money and public awareness about the disease. Johnson, who was born H

  • Nkota Kota (Malawi)

    Nkhotakota, town, central Malawi. It lies on the shores of Lake Nyasa (Lake Malawi). It originated as a group of villages in the 19th century, served as a depot for Swahili-Arab ivory and slave traders, and became the largest traditional African town in the country. It is situated on the slope of a

  • NKOTB (American music group)

    Mark Wahlberg: …member of the successful band New Kids on the Block, helped him begin a music career. In 1990 Mark styled himself as Marky Mark and formed Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch. The band’s debut album, Music for the People (1991), which featured cowriting and arrangements by brother Donnie, was…

  • NKP (political party, South Korea)

    Kim Young-Sam: …a centre-right party, called the Democratic Liberal Party (DLP), that dominated Korean politics. As the candidate of the DLP, Kim won election to the presidency in December 1992, defeating Kim Dae-Jung and another opposition candidate, Chung Joo-Youn, chairman of the Hyundai chaeb?l (conglomerate).

  • Nkpopi (African dance step)

    African dance: Rhythm: …upright carriage with high kicks; Nkpopi is a leaping dance; Etukwa requires the torso to be inclined to the earth as the feet drum a staccato beat; Nzaukwu Nabi is a stamping step with sudden pauses.

  • Nkrumah, Kwame (president of Ghana)

    Kwame Nkrumah, Ghanaian nationalist leader who led the Gold Coast’s drive for independence from Britain and presided over its emergence as the new nation of Ghana. He headed the country from independence in 1957 until he was overthrown by a coup in 1966. Kwame Nkrumah’s father was a goldsmith and

  • Nkubito, Alphonse Marie (Rwandan politician)

    Alphonse Marie Nkubito, Rwandan Hutu politician who was a longtime campaigner for human rights, founded the Association for the Defense of Human Rights, and was minister of justice in the Tutsi-dominated government from July 1994 to August 1995 (b. 1954--d. Feb. 13,

  • Nkurunziza, Pierre (president of Burundi)

    Pierre Nkurunziza, Burundian educator and former leader of a Hutu rebel group. He became president of Burundi in 2005. Nkurunziza was raised in the province of Ngozi in northern Burundi, the son of a Tutsi mother and a Hutu father. His father had served as governor of two provinces before being

  • NKVD (Soviet agency)

    NKVD, Soviet secret police agency, a forerunner of the KGB

  • NL (baseball)

    National League (NL), oldest existing major-league professional baseball organization in the United States. The league began play in 1876 as the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, replacing the failed National Association of Professional Base Ball Players. The league’s supremacy was

  • NLA (South Sudan government)

    South Sudan: Constitutional history: …power was bicameral, comprising the National Legislative Assembly (NLA) and the Council of States. Upon independence, the NLA body consisted of members of the previous regional legislative body, the South Sudan Legislative Assembly, and South Sudanese who had seats in Sudan’s National Assembly. The majority of NLA members were directly…

  • NLC (library, Beijing, China)

    Beijing: Museums and libraries: …holds the collections of the National Library of China, is located in the southern Haidian district, just west of the zoo. The library inherited books and archives from the renowned Imperial Wenyuange library collection of the Qing dynasty that has existed for more than 500 years and that, in turn,…

  • NLD (political party, Myanmar)

    Myanmar: Administrative framework: …the main opposition party, the National League for Democracy (NLD).

  • NLF (political organization, Vietnam)

    National Liberation Front (NLF), Vietnamese political organization formed on December 20, 1960, to effect the overthrow of the South Vietnamese government and the reunification of North and South Vietnam. An overtly communist party was established in 1962 as a central component of the NLF, but both

  • NLF (political organization, Yemen)

    Aden: …Yemen (FLOSY) and the Marxist-oriented National Liberation Front (NLF), for eventual control of the country. It was as a part of the NLF-ruled People’s Republic of Southern Yemen that Aden achieved its independence on Nov. 30, 1967, and became the national capital in 1968 of what was known as South…

  • NLRB (United States government organization)

    National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), independent federal agency created by the U.S. Congress in 1935 to administer the National Labor Relations Act (also called the Wagner Act). The act was amended in 1947 through the Taft-Hartley Act and in 1959 through the Landrum-Griffin Act. The primary

  • NLS (computer science)

    computer: The graphical user interface: …remarkable demonstration of the “NLS” (oNLine System), which featured a keyboard and a mouse, a device he had invented that was used to select commands from a menu of choices shown on a display screen. The screen was divided into multiple windows, each able to display text—a single line…

  • NLU (American labour organization)

    National Labor Union (NLU), in U.S. history, a political-action movement that from 1866 to 1873 sought to improve working conditions through legislative reform rather than through collective bargaining. The NLU began in 1866 with a convention in Baltimore, Md., called to organize skilled and

  • nm (unit of measurement)

    spectroscopy: Basic features of electromagnetic radiation: …units of angstroms or in nanometres. One angstrom (abbreviated by the symbol ?) is 10?10 metre, which is also the typical diameter of an atom. One nanometre (nm) is 10?9 metre. The micrometre (μm), which equals 10?6 metre, is often used to describe infrared radiation.

  • NMAAHC (museum, Washington, D.C., United States)

    National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), museum of the Smithsonian Institution located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., that presents the history, art, and culture of African American people from slavery to the present day. It was established by an act of Congress

  • Nmai Hka (river, Myanmar)

    Nmai Hka, river in northern Myanmar (Burma). It rises in the Languela glacier and flows generally south, joining the Mali River to form the Irrawaddy River. The Nmai, which is virtually unnavigable because of the strong current, is about 300 miles (480 km) l

  • NMD system (United States)

    Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty: With this in mind, a National Missile Defense (NMD) system was proposed in the United States. Although it would involve no more than 100 interceptors, it was a system designed to provide nationwide defense and so would be inconsistent with the ABM treaty. For this reason, Russia publicly opposed the…

  • NMDA receptor (biology)

    nervous system: Amino acids: …excitatory amino acid receptors, the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor has been thoroughly characterized. Patch-clamp studies show that this receptor is influenced by the presence of magnesium ions (Mg2+). In the absence of Mg2+, activated NMDA receptors open nonspecific cationic channels with no variation when the voltage is changed. With Mg2+…

  • NMFS (United States government agency)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: …disseminating global environmental data The National Marine Fisheries Service, for managing and conserving the coastal fisheries within the 200-mile (320-km) exclusive economic zone of the United States The National Ocean Service, for activities related to the health and productivity of the oceans and coasts bordering the United States The National…

  • nmi (unit of measurement)

    mile: A nautical mile was originally defined as the length on the Earth’s surface of one minute (160 of a degree) of arc along a meridian (north-south line of longitude). Because of a slight flattening of the Earth in polar latitudes, however, the measurement of a nautical…

  • NML (American political organization)

    United States: Urban reforms: The National Municipal League, organized in 1894, united various city reform groups throughout the country; corrupt local governments were overthrown in such cities as New York in 1894, Baltimore in 1895, and Chicago in 1896–97. And so it went all over the country well into the…

  • NMP

    defense economics: Settling on a standard: …communist economies, which use a net material product (NMP) system. The NMP excludes many expenditures, including state administration and defense, normally included under GDP. This complicates comparisons between these systems.

  • NMR (scientific technique)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), selective absorption of very high-frequency radio waves by certain atomic nuclei that are subjected to an appropriately strong stationary magnetic field. This phenomenon was first observed in 1946 by the physicists Felix Bloch and Edward M. Purcell independently of

  • NMR (political party, Suriname)

    Suriname: Suriname since independence: The National Military Council (Nationale Militaire Raad; NMR), installed after the coup, called on the moderate wing of the PNR to form a cabinet composed mostly of civilians. After the new cabinet proclaimed that Suriname would return to democracy in two years, the Dutch government agreed…

  • NMR spectroscopy (chemistry)

    chemical analysis: Nuclear magnetic resonance: The absorption that occurs in different spectral regions corresponds to different physical processes that occur within the analyte. Absorption of energy in the radiofrequency region is sufficient to cause a spinning nucleus in some atoms to move to a different spin state…

  • NMT

    music therapy: Approaches in music therapy: …choose to be trained in neurologic music therapy (NMT). Training in this approach focuses on understanding and applying scientific, evidence-based practices, usually for the purpose of neurorehabilitation (the recovery of neurologic function). Examples of techniques employed in this approach include auditory perception training, patterned sensory enhancement, and therapeutic singing, which…

  • NNL (American baseball organization)

    Negro league: The Negro National League and the Eastern Colored League: Foster was a visionary who dreamed that the champion of his black major league would play the best of the white league clubs in an interracial world series. His original plan called for a black major league…

  • NNLC (American organization)

    Coleman Young: …helped found in 1951 the National Negro Labor Council (NNLC), which sought jobs for African Americans. In 1952 Young, who had developed a reputation as a radical, was called before the House Committee on Un-American Activities. His pugnacious testimony earned him widespread publicity, and he later disbanded the NNLC so…

  • NNP (political party, South Africa)

    National Party (NP), South African political party, founded in 1914, which ruled the country from 1948 to 1994. Its following included most of the Dutch-descended Afrikaners and many English-speaking whites. The National Party was long dedicated to policies of apartheid and white supremacy, but by

  • NNSS (nuclear testing site, Nevada, United States)

    Nevada Test Site (NTS), nuclear testing site operated by the U.S. Department of Energy and located in Nye County, Nevada, that saw a total of 928 nuclear explosive tests between January 1951 and September 1992. The site—containing 28 areas in total—is located 65 miles (105 km) northwest of Las

  • No (chemical element)

    Nobelium (No), synthetic chemical element of the actinoid series of the periodic table, atomic number 102. The element was named after Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel. Not occurring in nature, nobelium was first claimed by an international team of scientists working at the Nobel Institute of Physics

  • No (film by Larraín [2012])

    Gael García Bernal: In No (2012) he portrayed a real-life Chilean advertising consultant whose work on a 1988 television campaign was credited with influencing the results of a national referendum that effectively ended the rule of dictator Augusto Pinochet. In the biopic Rosewater (2014), directed by comic Jon Stewart,…

  • NO (chemical compound)

    Nitric oxide (NO), colourless toxic gas that is formed by the oxidation of nitrogen. Nitric oxide performs important chemical signaling functions in humans and other animals and has various applications in medicine. It has few industrial applications. It is a serious air pollutant generated by

  • no ball (cricket)

    cricket: Extras: …reach of the striker); (4) no balls (improperly bowled balls; for a fair delivery the ball must be bowled, not thrown, the arm neither bent nor jerked, and in the delivery stride some part of the bowler’s front foot must be behind or covering the popping crease), off which a…

  • No Child Left Behind Act (United States education [2001])

    No Child Left Behind (NCLB), U.S. federal law aimed at improving public primary and secondary schools, and thus student performance, via increased accountability for schools, school districts, and states. The act was passed by Congress with bipartisan support in December 2001 and signed into law by

  • No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (United States education [2001])

    No Child Left Behind (NCLB), U.S. federal law aimed at improving public primary and secondary schools, and thus student performance, via increased accountability for schools, school districts, and states. The act was passed by Congress with bipartisan support in December 2001 and signed into law by

  • No Child Left Behind—a Progress Report

    U.S. Pres. George W. Bush’s much-heralded No Child Left Behind (NCLB) education program finished its fourth year of operation with a mixed record of success and problems. The plan was a revision of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 and served as the federal government’s most

  • No Cities to Love (album by Sleater-Kinney)

    Sleater-Kinney: …appearance with a well-received album, No Cities to Love (2015), after which they resumed touring. The band took a new, experimental direction with their next album, The Center Won’t Hold (2019), which was produced by Annie Clark (byname St. Vincent). Just before its release, Weiss announced that she was leaving…

  • No Consultations Today (work by Ibuse)

    Ibuse Masuji: …the war, Honjitsu kyūshin (1949; No Consultations Today), characterizing a town by the patients who come to the doctor’s office, and Yōhai taichō (1950; A Far-Worshiping Commander), an antimilitary satire, were especially well received. Ibuse received the Order of Culture for the novel Kuroi ame (1966; Black Rain), which deals…

  • No Country for Old Men (film by Joel and Ethan Coen [2007])

    Coen brothers: …meditation on good and evil, No Country for Old Men, an adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s novel of the same name. The film won four Academy Awards, and the Coens received Oscars for best picture, best director, and best adapted screenplay. They followed that with Burn After Reading (2008), a CIA…

  • No Country for Old Men (novel by McCarthy)

    Cormac McCarthy: McCarthy’s later works included No Country for Old Men (2005; film 2007), a bloody modern western that opens with a drug deal gone bad. In the postapocalyptic The Road (2006; film 2009), a father and son struggle to survive after a disaster (left unspecified) that has all but destroyed…

  • No Cross, No Crown (tract by Penn)

    William Penn: Quaker leadership and political activism: …wrote his most famous book, No Cross, No Crown (1669). In this work he expounded the Quaker-Puritan morality with eloquence, learning, and flashes of humour, condemning the worldliness and luxury of Restoration England and extolling both Puritan conceptions of ascetic self-denial and Quaker ideals of social reform. No Cross, No…

  • No Day of Triumph (work by Redding)

    African American literature: The 1940s: Saunders Redding’s No Day of Triumph (1942), the story of an alienated Northern professional’s quest for redemptive immersion in Southern black working-class communities; and Wright’s Black Boy.

  • No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (film by Scorsese [2005])

    Martin Scorsese: Films of the 2000s: Gangs of New York, The Aviator, and The Departed: No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (2005) was a wide-ranging exploration of the iconic singer-songwriter, and the concert film Shine a Light (2008) starred the Rolling Stones.

  • No Doubt (American musical group)

    Gwen Stefani: …singer for the rock-ska band No Doubt before starting a solo career.

  • No Down Payment (film by Ritt [1957])

    Martin Ritt: First films: Ritt’s follow-up film, No Down Payment (1957), was a forgettable glossy soap opera set in the suburbs. More typical of Ritt’s work to come was The Long, Hot Summer (1958). Scripted by Harriet Frank, Jr., and Irving Ravetch, with whom Ritt would collaborate repeatedly, the film was a…

  • No Escape (film by Dowdle [2015])

    Pierce Brosnan: …next year Brosnan appeared in No Escape as an undercover British agent who assists a family in escaping from a fictional Asian country in the midst of a coup. In 2017 he starred opposite Jackie Chan in the revenge thriller The Foreigner. Brosnan portrayed a powerful Texas rancher in the…

  • No Exit (play by Sartre)

    No Exit, one-act philosophical drama by Jean-Paul Sartre, performed in 1944 and published in 1945. Its original, French title, Huis clos, is sometimes also translated as In Camera or Dead End. The play proposes that “hell is other people” rather than a state created by God. The play begins with a

  • No Exit (album by Blondie)

    Blondie: …they released a new album, No Exit, the following year. Blondie continued to tour sporadically, and the band’s later albums included The Curse of Blondie (2004), Panic of Girls (2011), and Pollinator (2017). In 2006 the group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

  • No Exit (film by Audry [1954])

    Arletty: …screen version of Jean-Paul Sartre’s No Exit (Huits-clos, 1954) and a cameo role in one of the few films she made for a non-French company, The Longest Day (1962). Although by 1963 she had become almost blind, she eventually returned to the stage, notably in the leading role in Jean…

  • No Fences (album by Brooks)

    Garth Brooks: In 1990 Brooks released No Fences, a blockbuster that sold more than 17 million copies on the strength of singles such as “Friends in Low Places.” While his music blurred the line between pop and country, his live performances eschewed country traditions altogether, embracing instead the spectacle of 1970s…

  • nō flute (flute)

    Japanese music: Onstage music: If the Noh flute is used as well, it is restricted to cadence signals; if a simple bamboo flute (takebue or shinobue) is substituted, it plays an ornamented (ashirai) version of the tune. There are many sections, however, in which the drum patterns and Noh flute melodies…

  • No Good Deed (film by Rafelson [2002])

    Bob Rafelson: Films of the late 1980s and beyond: Yet another film noir, No Good Deed (2002)—starring Samuel L. Jackson as a policeman who is captured and then held hostage by a gang readying itself for a big score—was Rafelson’s last major release as director as he stepped away from the director’s chair in the early 21st century.

  • No Good Deed (film by Miller [2014])

    Taraji P. Henson: …All by Myself (both 2009), No Good Deed (2014), and Term Life (2016).

  • No Great Mischief (novel by MacLeod)

    Alistair MacLeod: MacLeod’s long-awaited first novel, No Great Mischief, was published in 2000. It was written over the course of 13 years and chronicles the lives of several generations of Scottish immigrants on Cape Breton. MacLeod was the first Canadian writer to receive the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award (2001). Until…

  • No hay cosa como callar (play by Calderón)

    Pedro Calderón de la Barca: Secular plays: …Is Not Always True”) and No hay cosa como callar (1639; “Silence Is Golden”) mark the peak of this development; although the conventions of comedy remain, the overtones are tragic. Both plays also implicitly criticize the accepted code of honour. Calderón’s rejection of the rigid assumptions of the code of…

  • No Highway in the Sky (film by Koster [1951])

    Henry Koster: The 1950s: No Highway in the Sky (1951) was a departure for Koster. The thriller (adapted from the Nevil Shute novel) starred Stewart as an engineer who discovers a fatal flaw in a new model of aircraft but has trouble convincing others of his theory; Marlene Dietrich…

  • No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need (work by Klein)

    Naomi Klein: No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need (2017) was written in response to the administration of U.S. Pres. Donald Trump. Klein’s later books included The Battle for Paradise: Puerto Rico Takes on the Disaster Capitalists (2018), which focused…

  • No Latitude for Error (book by Hillary)

    Edmund Hillary: …Antarctica (1958; with Fuchs) and No Latitude for Error (1961). On his expedition of Antarctica in 1967, he was among those who scaled Mount Herschel (10,941 feet [3,335 metres]) for the first time. In 1977 he led the first jet boat expedition up the Ganges River and continued by climbing…

  • No Laughing Matter (novel by Wilson)

    English literature: Fiction: Britain was Angus Wilson’s No Laughing Matter (1967), a book that set a triumphant seal on his progress from a writer of acidic short stories to a major novelist whose work unites 19th-century breadth and gusto with 20th-century formal versatility and experiment.

  • No Line on the Horizon (album by U2)

    U2: …releasing its 12th studio album, No Line on the Horizon (2009). Longtime collaborators Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois played a bigger role in the production and songwriting, and the layered textures of the album’s most experimental work crept back prominently in the mix.

  • No Logo (work by Klein)

    Naomi Klein: In 2000 Klein published No Logo, an analysis of the marketing and branding practices of global corporations. It examined the ways in which contemporary capitalism sought to reframe individuals’ consciousnesses along branded lines. No Logo was translated into dozens of languages, and it made Klein into an international media…

  • No Longer at Ease (work by Achebe)

    Chinua Achebe: In the sequel No Longer at Ease (1960) he portrayed a newly appointed civil servant, recently returned from university study in England, who is unable to sustain the moral values he believes to be correct in the face of the obligations and temptations of his new position.

  • No Man of Her Own (film by Ruggles [1932])

    Wesley Ruggles: The sound era: His films from 1932 include No Man of Her Own, a solid romance with Clark Gable and Carole Lombard; it marked the only time those actors—who later became romantically involved and were married from 1939 to 1942, when Lombard died in a plane crash—acted together on-screen. The Monkey’s Paw (1933)…

  • No Man’s Land (play by Pinter)

    Jason Robards: Wilderness! (1988), and Harold Pinter’s No Man’s Land (1994).

  • No Man’s Land (World War II)

    Christmas Truce: …both the trenches and the No Man’s Land that separated them into a cold, muddy morass. For those on the Western Front, daily life was miserable, but it was a misery that was shared by enemies who were, in some places, separated by 50 yards (46 metres) or less. The…

  • No Man’s Land (work by Onetti)

    Juan Carlos Onetti: …novel Tierra de nadie (1942; No Man’s Land) Onetti again presents a nihilistic view of city life devoid of any spiritual meaning.

  • No Man’s Land (film by Tanovic [2001])
  • No Man’s Meat and The Enchanted Pimp (work by Callaghan)

    Morley Callaghan: …Morley Callaghan’s Stories (1959) and No Man’s Meat and The Enchanted Pimp (1978).

  • No me preguntes cómo pasa el tiempo (work by Pacheco)

    José Emilio Pacheco: …cómo pasa el tiempo (1969; Don’t Ask Me How the Time Goes By) includes poems in which there is a nostalgic desire to relive the past, sometimes coupled with a fine sense of irony. The short stories in El principio del placer (1972; “The Pleasure Principle”) are united by the…

  • No More Drama (album by Blige)

    Mary J. Blige: …on the Billboard charts, and No More Drama (2001), Blige’s fifth album, which presented an artist who is happy with the woman she has become. Her 2006 release, Reflections (2006), provided a retrospective of her work.

  • No More War! (work by Pauling)

    Linus Pauling: Humanitarian activities: …also promulgated through his book No More War! (1958), a passionate analysis of the implications of nuclear war for humanity. In 1960 he was called upon to defend his actions regarding a test ban before a congressional subcommittee. By refusing to reveal the names of those who had helped him…

  • No Nature (poetry by Snyder)

    Gary Snyder: No Nature, consisting mostly of poems previously published in other volumes, was a finalist for the 1992 National Book Award. He also received critical acclaim for Mountains and Rivers Without End (1996), which completed a series that Snyder had begun writing in 1956. The collection…

  • No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference (speeches by Thunberg)

    Greta Thunberg: ” No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference (2019) is a collection of her speeches.

  • No One Killed Jessica (film by Gupta [2011])

    Vidya Balan: In No One Killed Jessica (2011), a true crime tale of a woman searching for her sister’s killer, Balan (known to her many fans as simply Vidya) proved that a film without a male lead could be a commercial success. She shocked audiences and earned sex-symbol…

  • No One Writes to the Colonel (work by García Márquez)

    Gabriel García Márquez: Works: …tiene quien le escriba (1961; No One Writes to the Colonel); and a few short stories. Then came One Hundred Years of Solitude, in which García Márquez tells the story of Macondo, an isolated town whose history is like the history of Latin America on a reduced scale. While the…

  • No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II (book by Goodwin)

    Doris Kearns Goodwin: …Prize in history for her No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II (1994), and in 2005 she published Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, which focused on Lincoln’s management of his presidential cabinet. The book served as the primary source…

  • No Passion Spent: Essays 1978-1995 (work by Steiner)

    George Steiner: In 1996 Steiner published No Passion Spent: Essays 1978–1995, about language and its relation to both religion and literature.

  • No Place to Be Somebody (play by Gordone)

    African American literature: The turn of the 21st century: …of a black hustler-poet in No Place to Be Somebody (produced 1969), Joseph A. Walker earned a prestigious Tony Award (presented by two American theatre organizations) for the best play of 1973 for the smash Broadway hit The River Niger (produced 1972), and Charles H. Fuller, Jr., claimed a Pulitzer…

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