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  • No Pussyfooting (album by Fripp and Eno)

    Brian Eno: No Pussyfooting (1973), a collaboration with guitarist Robert Fripp from King Crimson, used tape-echo and tape-delay techniques to create new sounds and reached the Top 30 in Britain. Eno’s next album, Here Come the Warm Jets (1973), was soon followed by the proto-punk single “Seven…

  • No Regrets for Our Youth (film by Kurosawa [1946])

    Kurosawa Akira: First films: …Waga seishun ni kuinashi (1946; No Regrets for Our Youth) portrays the history of Japanese militarism from 1933 through the end of the war in terms of a person executed on suspicion of espionage during the war. Of the many postwar films criticizing Japanese militarism, this was the most successful,…

  • No reino de Caliban (work by Ferreira)

    Manuel Ferreira: …anthology of Lusophone African poetry, No reino de Caliban (1975–81; “On the Kingdom of Caliban”), contains more than 1,000 pages of biographical and historical information on Lusophone African literatures. He also published a two-volume history of African literatures written in Portuguese, Literaturas africanas de express?o portuguesa (1977). Ferreira was a…

  • Nō Rūz (Zoroastrianism and Parsiism)

    Nowruz, festival celebrating the new year on the Persian calendar, usually beginning on March 21 on the Gregorian calendar. Though it is a largely secular celebration, it is often associated with and influenced by Zoroastrianism and Parsiism, in which Nowruz is a religious holiday. The festival is

  • No Saints or Angels (novel by Klíma)

    Ivan Klíma: …Ani svatí, ani andělé (2001; No Saints or Angels), about cultural and personal havoc in contemporary Prague. His biography of ?apek, The Life and Work of Karel ?apek, was published in 2002.

  • No Secrets (album by Simon)

    Carly Simon: …So Vain,” like the album No Secrets, reached number one on the Billboard chart in 1973. She eventually revealed the subject of the song to be actor Warren Beatty. She had a major hit with her album Hotcakes (1974), which included “Haven’t Got Time for the Pain” as well as…

  • No Strings Attached (album by *NSYNC)

    Justin Timberlake: …start, and their second effort, No Strings Attached (2000), became one of the fastest-selling albums in history, selling more than 14 million copies and featuring a string of hits, including the chart-topping “It’s Gonna Be Me.” Timberlake began his solo recording career in 2001 after the release of *NSYNC’s third…

  • No Strings Attached (film by Reitman [2011])

    Natalie Portman: …Kutcher in the romantic comedy No Strings Attached (2011) and portraying a warrior princess in the bawdy period comedy Your Highness (2011). Portman then appeared as an unfaithful wife in Terrence Malick’s Hollywood parable Knight of Cups (2015) and as a hard-bitten pioneer in the vengeance tale Jane Got a…

  • No Sweetness Here (work by Aidoo)

    Ama Ata Aidoo: In No Sweetness Here (1970), a collection of short stories, Aidoo exercised the oral element of storytelling, writing tales that are meant to be read aloud. These stories and Anowa (1970), another problem play, are concerned with Western influences on the role of women and on…

  • No theatre (Japanese drama)

    Noh theatre, traditional Japanese theatrical form and one of the oldest extant theatrical forms in the world. Noh—its name derived from nō, meaning “talent” or “skill”—is unlike Western narrative drama. Rather than being actors or “representers” in the Western sense, Noh performers are simply

  • No Time (song by Bachman and Cummings)

    the Guess Who: International success: “No Time,” which was originally included on Canned Wheat, was re-recorded for American Woman and became its third hit single. American Woman reached No. 9 on the Billboard Pop Albums chart, making it the only Guess Who album to reach the Top 10.

  • No Time for Comedy (play by Behrman)

    S.N. Behrman: In response, Behrman wrote No Time for Comedy (1939), in which the protagonist, an author of light comedy, criticizes himself for his failure to address effectively serious contemporary problems. His work is closely associated with the Theatre Guild.

  • No Time for Sergeants (film by LeRoy [1958])

    Mervyn LeRoy: Return to Warner Brothers: Mister Roberts, The Bad Seed, and Gypsy: The hit service comedy No Time for Sergeants (1958) captured the spirit of Ira Levin’s Broadway show and laid the groundwork for Andy Griffith’s television career. Home Before Dark (1958) was a drama about a woman’s (Jean Simmons’s) efforts to readjust to a normal life after spending a year…

  • No Time for Sergeants (play [1955])

    Andy Griffith: …made his Broadway debut in No Time for Sergeants and earned a Tony Award nomination for his portayal of an air force draftee. He reprised the role for the 1958 movie after having made a strong film debut in A Face in the Crowd (1957). Griffith received a second Tony…

  • No Time like the Present (novel by Gordimer)

    Nadine Gordimer: Her final novel, No Time like the Present (2012), follows veterans of the battle against apartheid as they deal with the issues facing modern South Africa.

  • No Voyage and Other Poems (poetry by Oliver)

    Mary Oliver: …Oliver’s first book of poetry, No Voyage and Other Poems (1963). These lyrical nature poems are set in a variety of locales, especially the Ohio of Oliver’s youth. Her childhood plays a more central role in The River Styx, Ohio, and Other Poems (1972), in which she attempted to re-create…

  • no wave (music)

    Sonic Youth: …height of the postpunk “no wave” movement (dissonant, noisy, experimental music generally created by untrained musicians). Both performed in the guitar orchestras of avant-garde composer Glenn Branca. In 1981 Sonic Youth formed, with Moore and Ranaldo on guitar and Moore’s girlfriend (later wife) Gordon on bass; the band went…

  • No Way Out (film by Mankiewicz [1950])

    No Way Out, American film noir, released in 1950, that was among the first movies to deal directly with racism. It features the memorable film debut of Sidney Poitier. The taut narrative focuses on Ray Biddle (played by Richard Widmark), a bigoted white small-time crook who accuses an African

  • No Way Out (album by Puff Daddy)

    Sean Combs: …murdered, and Combs’s first album, No Way Out—released that summer under the moniker Puff Daddy—included the Grammy-winning single “I’ll Be Missing You,” a musical eulogy featuring the voice of Wallace’s widow and the melody from the Police’s “Every Breath You Take.” Several more singles from No Way Out dominated the…

  • No Way Out (film by Donaldson [1987])

    The Big Clock: …political Cold War thriller called No Way Out, starred Kevin Costner and Gene Hackman.

  • ‘No’ to ieru Nihon (essay by Ishihara and Morita)

    Ishihara Shintarō: …Nō to ieru Nihon (The Japan That Can Say No). Intended for publication in Japan only, where it became a best seller—although it subsequently appeared in English without Morita’s comments—the essay argued that Japan should wean itself from its reliance on the United States and that Americans were guilty…

  • No, Lake (lagoon, Africa)

    Nile River: Physiography: …Sudan, joining the Al-Jabal at Lake No, a large lagoon where the main stream takes an easterly direction. The waters of the Al-Ghazāl undergo extensive loss through evaporation, and only a small proportion of them ever reach the Nile. A short distance above Malakal the main stream is joined by…

  • no-effect level (nutrition)

    food additive: Toxicological testing and health concerns: …toxicological effects is called the no-effect level (NOEL). The NOEL is generally divided by 100 to determine a maximum acceptable daily intake (ADI).

  • no-fault divorce (law)

    adultery: …many states began to permit “no-fault” divorces, which do not require an injured party to prove specific misdeeds. Most American states allow couples to divorce on either a fault or a no-fault basis, and many use no-fault divorce exclusively. The shift to no-fault divorce significantly reduced the importance of adultery…

  • no-hit game (baseball)

    Nolan Ryan: …“Ryan Express,” pitched his seventh no-hit game, establishing another record. He also held the major league record for most games with 15 or more strikeouts in a career (26). In 1993 Ryan retired from baseball, and in 1999 he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. At the end…

  • no-hitter (baseball)

    Nolan Ryan: …“Ryan Express,” pitched his seventh no-hit game, establishing another record. He also held the major league record for most games with 15 or more strikeouts in a career (26). In 1993 Ryan retired from baseball, and in 1999 he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. At the end…

  • nō-kan (flute)

    Japanese music: Onstage music: If the Noh flute is used as well, it is restricted to cadence signals; if a simple bamboo flute (takebue or shinobue) is substituted, it plays an ornamented (ashirai) version of the tune. There are many sections, however, in which the drum patterns and Noh flute melodies…

  • no-miracle argument (philosophy)

    Hilary Putnam: Realism and meaning: …be known as the “no-miracle” argument for realism. Putnam was equally critical of conventionalism, the view that logic, mathematics, and extensive portions of science do not express truths but are based on human stipulations—i.e., convention.

  • no-punch straight-dough process (baking)

    baking: The straight-dough method: …the second mix, and the no-punch method, involving extremely vigorous mixing. The straight-dough method is rarely used for white breads because it is not sufficiently adaptable to allow compensation for fluctuations in ingredient properties.

  • Nō-Rūz (Zoroastrianism and Parsiism)

    Nowruz, festival celebrating the new year on the Persian calendar, usually beginning on March 21 on the Gregorian calendar. Though it is a largely secular celebration, it is often associated with and influenced by Zoroastrianism and Parsiism, in which Nowruz is a religious holiday. The festival is

  • no-see-um (insect)

    Biting midge, (family Ceratopogonidae), any member of a family of small, bloodsucking insects in the fly order, Diptera, that are often serious pests along seashores, rivers, and lakes and may attack in great numbers and cause extreme discomfort. The nickname no-see-ums is descriptive, for,

  • no-till agriculture (agriculture)

    Till-less agriculture, cultivation technique in which the soil is disturbed only along the slit or in the hole into which the seeds are planted; reserved detritus from previous crops covers and protects the seedbed. The practice is one of several primitive farming methods that have been revived a

  • no-time dough process (baking)

    baking: No-time methods: One set of procedures intended to eliminate the traditional bulk fermentation step are the “no-time” methods. Popular in the United Kingdom and Australia, these processes generally require an extremely energy-intensive mixing step, sometimes performed in a partially vacuumized chamber. Rather high additions of…

  • No. 1 crossbar system (telecommunications)

    telephone: Electromechanical switching: …system, however, was the AT&amp;T No. 1 crossbar system, first installed in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1938. A series of improved versions followed the No. 1 crossbar system, the most notable being the No. 5 system. First deployed in 1948, the No. 5 crossbar system became the workhorse of the Bell…

  • No. 1 ESS

    telephone: Electronic switching: …1965, became known as the No. 1 ESS. The No. 1 ESS employed a special type of reed switch known as a ferreed. Normally, a reed switch is constructed of two thin metal strips, or reeds, which are sealed in a glass tube. When an electromagnetic coil surrounding the tube…

  • No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency, The (novel by McCall Smith)

    Alexander McCall Smith: …the latter that the novel The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency emerged. First published in Great Britain in 1998, it sold slowly at first, and it did not appear in the United States until 2002, after McCall Smith had already published two more books centred on Mma Ramotswe (Mma being…

  • No. 4 ESS

    telephone: Digital switching: …United States was the AT&amp;T-designed No. 4 ESS, placed into service in 1976. The No. 4 ESS was a toll system capable of serving a maximum of 53,760 two-way trunk circuits. It was soon followed by several other time-division systems for switching local calls. Among these was the AT&amp;T No.…

  • No. 5 ESS

    telephone: Digital switching: Among these was the AT&amp;T No. 5 ESS, improved versions of which could handle 100,000 lines.

  • NOAA (United States agency)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. governmental agency established in 1970 within the Department of Commerce to study Earth’s oceans, atmosphere, and coastal areas insofar as they affect the land surface and coastal regions of the United States. The organization is

  • Noachian flood (geological history)

    geochronology: The emergence of modern geologic thought: …primeval ocean, represented by the Noachian flood (his two “Universal,” or Primary, rock series), or (2) sculpturing and deposition during the retreat of this ocean from the land (his two “Partial,” or disintegrated, rock series). Werner’s interpretation, which came to represent the so-called Neptunist conception of the Earth’s beginnings, found…

  • Noachian Laws (Judaism)

    Noahide Laws, a Jewish Talmudic designation for seven biblical laws given to Adam and to Noah before the revelation to Moses on Mt. Sinai and consequently binding on all mankind. Beginning with Genesis 2:16, the Babylonian Talmud listed the first six commandments as prohibitions against idolatry, b

  • Noah (film by Aronofsky [2014])

    Jennifer Connelly: …Noah (Crowe) in Aronofsky’s epic Noah (2014), and she costarred with Ewan McGregor in American Pastoral (2016), an adaptation of the novel by Philip Roth. She then played the wife of a firefighter in Only the Brave (2017), which was inspired by the true events of the Granite Mountain Hotshots’…

  • Noah (biblical figure)

    Noah, the hero of the biblical Flood story in the Old Testament book of Genesis, the originator of vineyard cultivation, and, as the father of Shem, Ham, and Japheth, the representative head of a Semitic genealogical line. A synthesis of at least three biblical source traditions, Noah is the i

  • Noah’s Ark (biblical story)

    Mount Ararat: …with the mountain on which Noah’s Ark came to rest at the end of the Flood. The name Ararat, as it appears in the Bible, is the Hebrew equivalent of Urardhu, or Urartu, the Assyro-Babylonian name of a kingdom that flourished between the Aras and the Upper Tigris rivers from…

  • Noah’s Ark (film by Curtiz [1928])

    Michael Curtiz: Early life and work: …the part-sound films Tenderloin and Noah’s Ark (both 1928). Reminiscent of D.W. Griffith’s Intolerance (1916), Noah’s Ark featured a pair of parallel stories, one recounting the famous biblical flood, the other a World War I-era romance.

  • Noah, Book of (religious text)

    biblical literature: The Book of Enoch: …were Hebrew fragments of the Book of Noah, either one of the sources of Enoch or a parallel elaboration of the same material. Passages of the Book of Noah were included in Enoch by its redactor (editor). Scholars generally agree that the somewhat haphazard redaction of the book was made…

  • Noah, Trevor (South African comedian)

    The Daily Show: …in 2015, South African comedian Trevor Noah became host.

  • Noah, Yannick (French tennis player)

    Thomas Muster: …30, 1989, having just defeated Yannick Noah of France to advance to the finals of the Lipton International in Key Biscayne, Florida, and poised to solidify a spot in the top 10, Muster was unloading gear from the trunk of his car when it was struck by another car, severing…

  • Noahide Laws (Judaism)

    Noahide Laws, a Jewish Talmudic designation for seven biblical laws given to Adam and to Noah before the revelation to Moses on Mt. Sinai and consequently binding on all mankind. Beginning with Genesis 2:16, the Babylonian Talmud listed the first six commandments as prohibitions against idolatry, b

  • noaide (Sami shaman)

    Noiade, in Sami religion, a shaman who mediated between the people that he served and the supernatural beings and forces that he either confronted or made use of for the benefit of his clients. The shamanic practices of the Finno-Ugric peoples have been best preserved among the Khanty (Ostyak) and

  • Noailles, Adrien-Maurice, 3e duc de (French duke)

    Adrien-Maurice, 3e duke de Noailles, the third duc de Noailles, son of Anne-Jules of Noailles; he served in all the most important wars of the reign of Louis XV in Italy and Germany and became a marshal in 1734. His last command was in the War of the Austrian Succession, when he was beaten by the

  • Noailles, Anna de (French poet)

    Anna de Noailles, poet, a leading literary figure in France in the pre-World War I period. The daughter of a Romanian prince and granddaughter of a Turkish pasha, she adopted France and its language for her life and writings even before her marriage to a French count. Her friends included the

  • Noailles, Anne, 1er duc de (French duke)

    Anne, 1er duke de Noailles, count of Noailles (grandson of the first count, Antoine of Noailles) who was created the first duc de Noailles and a peer of France in 1663. He had played an important part in the Fronde and had become a protégé of Cardinal Mazarin. He was made premier captain of Louis

  • Noailles, Anne-Jules, 2e duc de (French duke)

    Anne-Jules, 2e duke de Noailles, duke of Noailles, marshal of France, son of Anne of Noailles, the first duke. He was made field marshal at the age of 23 and was named lieutenant general and commander in chief of Languedoc in 1682. By then he had become one of the greatest generals of France, and,

  • Noailles, Jean-Paul-Fran?ois, 5e duc de (French general and chemist)

    Jean-Paul-Fran?ois, 5th duke de Noailles, son of Louis of Noailles, lieutenant general, and member of the French Académie des Sciences. Though he served in the army, his tastes were scientific, and for his eminence as a chemist he was elected to the Académie des Sciences in 1777. He became duc

  • Noailles, Louis, 4e duc de (French duke)

    Louis, 4e duke de Noailles, duc d’Ayen until the death of his father (Adrien-Maurice) in 1766, when he became the duc de Noailles. He served in most of the wars of the 18th century without particular distinction but was nevertheless made a marshal of France, as the marshal of Noailles, in 1775. He

  • Noailles, Louis-Antoine de (French cardinal)

    Louis-Antoine de Noailles, cardinal and archbishop of Paris who, with his brother, the second duc de Noailles, made the name Noailles one of the most honoured in France. Educated in Paris and receiving a doctorate in theology from the Sorbonne, he became successively bishop of Cahors (1679), bishop

  • Noailles, Louis-Marie, vicomte de (French statesman and army officer)

    Louis-Marie, viscount de Noailles, second son of the marshal of Mouchy and one of the most distinguished members of the Noailles family in France. The vicomte de Noailles served the Franco-American cause brilliantly under the marquis de Lafayette in the American Revolution against the British and

  • Noakhali (Bangladesh)

    Noakhali, port city, southern Bangladesh. It lies on the Noakhali watercourse near the estuary of the Meghna River as it empties into the Bay of Bengal. The port is connected by road and rail with Comilla and by boat with Barisal. The milling of jute, rice, flour, and oilseeds; chemical and soap

  • Nōami (Japanese artist)

    Nōami, Japanese poet, painter, and art critic, the first nonpriest who painted in the suiboku (“water-ink”), or Chinese, style. Nōami was in charge of the art collection of Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, the military dictator who ruled Japan from 1368 to 1394, and was perhaps the first great art expert in J

  • Noatak National Monument (park, Alaska, United States)

    Noatak National Preserve, protected area encompassing a large, pristine mountain-ringed river basin in northwestern Alaska, U.S. The preserve is situated in the Brooks Range, located north of the Arctic Circle, and contains the basin of the Noatak River, an intact and unaltered ecosystem. It

  • Noatak National Preserve (park, Alaska, United States)

    Noatak National Preserve, protected area encompassing a large, pristine mountain-ringed river basin in northwestern Alaska, U.S. The preserve is situated in the Brooks Range, located north of the Arctic Circle, and contains the basin of the Noatak River, an intact and unaltered ecosystem. It

  • Nob Hill (area, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States)

    Albuquerque: Cultural life: Since the 1990s, however, Nob Hill, the area along Central Avenue (old Route 66) east of the University of New Mexico campus, has grown to become the heart of Albuquerque’s culture and nightlife. Restaurants, art galleries, theatres, and cinemas are plentiful, as are bookstores that sometimes feature readings and…

  • Nob Hill (film by Hathaway [1945])

    Henry Hathaway: Early work: With Nob Hill (1945), Hathaway ventured into Technicolor musicals; the film, which starred George Raft and Joan Bennett, was set in San Francisco’s saloon scene at the turn of the 20th century.

  • Nob Hill (hill, California, United States)

    San Francisco: City site: The best known are Nob Hill, where the wealthy “nobs” (nabobs) built extravagant mansions in the 1870s, and Telegraph Hill, which once looked down on the Barbary Coast, a neighbourhood formerly alive with gaudy wickedness. As a result of the pioneer planners’ prejudice in favour of a squared-off grid,…

  • nobat (music)

    Southeast Asian arts: Malaysia: Before Malaysian independence, the nobat, an old royal instrumental ensemble dating back to about the 16th century, played exclusively for important court ceremonies in the palaces of the sultans of Perak, Kedah, Selangor, and Trengganu. Today, in Kedah, the ensemble consists of five instruments: one big goblet drum (negara),…

  • Nobatae (Nubian people)

    Sudan: Medieval Christian kingdoms: …by a people called the Nobatae by the ancient geographers and the X-Group by modern archaeologists, who are still at a loss to explain their origins. The X-Group were clearly, however, the heirs of Kush, for their whole cultural life was dominated by Meroitic crafts and customs, and occasionally they…

  • Nobatia (historical kingdom, Africa)

    Sudan: Medieval Christian kingdoms: …was divided into three kingdoms: Nobatia, with its capital at Pachoras (modern Faras); Maqurrah, with its capital at Dunqulah (Old Dongola); and the kingdom of ?Alwah in the south, with its capital at Sūbah (Soba) near what is now Khartoum. Between 543 and 575 these three kingdoms were converted to…

  • Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Storting, The (Scandinavian organization)

    Norwegian Nobel Committee, group of five individuals responsible for selecting the annual winners of the Nobel Prize for Peace. Members are appointed to a six-year term on the committee by the Storting (the Norwegian parliament). Until 1936, members of the Norwegian government were elected to the

  • Nobel Foundation (Scandinavian organization)

    Nobel Foundation, private institution founded in 1900 to coordinate the various provisions of the will of Alfred Nobel, in which he set aside funds to establish the Nobel Prizes. The foundation administers these funds. The foundation’s representative body, the Board, is headquartered in S

  • Nobel Industries AB (Swedish company)

    AkzoNobel: Nobel Industries AB was created in 1984 by the merger of the Swedish chemical firm KemaNobel with the Swedish weapons maker Bofors. This merger reunited the two largest companies that had once been owned by Alfred Nobel, the 19th-century inventor of dynamite and founder of…

  • Nobel Peace Prize (award)
  • Nobel Prize (award)

    Nobel Prize, any of the prizes (five in number until 1969, when a sixth was added) that are awarded annually from a fund bequeathed for that purpose by the Swedish inventor and industrialist Alfred Nobel. The Nobel Prizes are widely regarded as the most prestigious awards given for intellectual

  • Nobel Prize in Chemistry (award)
  • Nobel Prize in Economics (award)
  • Nobel Prize in Literature (award)
  • Nobel Prize in Physics (award)
  • Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (award)
  • Nobel Prize Winners by Year

    The Nobel Prizes are awarded annually from a fund bequeathed for that purpose by the Swedish inventor and industrialist Alfred Bernhard Nobel. They are widely regarded as the most prestigious awards given for intellectual achievement in the world and are conferred in six categories: physics,

  • Nobel’s will (Scandinavian legal document)

    Nobel’s will, The following is the relevant portion of Alfred Bernhard Nobel’s will establishing the Nobel

  • Nobel, Alfred (Swedish inventor)

    Alfred Nobel, Swedish chemist, engineer, and industrialist who invented dynamite and other more powerful explosives and who also founded the Nobel Prizes. Alfred Nobel was the fourth son of Immanuel and Caroline Nobel. Immanuel was an inventor and engineer who had married Caroline Andrietta Ahlsell

  • Nobel, Alfred Bernhard (Swedish inventor)

    Alfred Nobel, Swedish chemist, engineer, and industrialist who invented dynamite and other more powerful explosives and who also founded the Nobel Prizes. Alfred Nobel was the fourth son of Immanuel and Caroline Nobel. Immanuel was an inventor and engineer who had married Caroline Andrietta Ahlsell

  • Nobel, Immanuel (Swedish chemist)

    explosive: Nitroglycerin: …largely a laboratory curiosity until Immanuel Nobel and his son Alfred made extensive studies of its commercial potential in the years 1859–61. In 1862 they built a crude plant at Heleneborg, Sweden; Alfred, a chemist, was basically responsible for the design of this factory that was efficient and relatively safe…

  • nobelium (chemical element)

    Nobelium (No), synthetic chemical element of the actinoid series of the periodic table, atomic number 102. The element was named after Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel. Not occurring in nature, nobelium was first claimed by an international team of scientists working at the Nobel Institute of Physics

  • Nobeoka (Japan)

    Nobeoka, city, Miyazaki ken (prefecture), Kyushu, Japan, on the delta of the Gokase River (Gokase-gawa). It developed as a castle town in the 12th century and has been a fishing port since the mid-18th century. Nobeoka is now the largest industrial city of the prefecture. Several large chemical

  • Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45-m Telescope (telescope, Nobeyama, Japan)

    radio telescope: Filled-aperture telescopes: …45-metre (148-foot) radio dish near Nobeyama, Japan, is used for observations at wavelengths as short as 3 mm (0.12 inch). The French-Spanish Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) in Grenoble, France, operates a 30-metre (100-foot) antenna at an altitude of 2,850 metres (9,350 feet) on Pico Veleta in the Spanish…

  • Nobi (work by ōoka Shōhei)

    ōoka Shōhei: …best-known novel is Nobi (1951; Fires on the Plain; filmed 1952), which tells the story of Tamura, a sick Japanese soldier wandering in the Philippine jungles in the aftermath of the war who eventually goes mad and is saved by his Christian faith. The novel was widely translated and ranks…

  • Nobile, Umberto (Italian explorer)

    Umberto Nobile, Italian aeronautical engineer and pioneer in Arctic aviation who in 1926, with the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen and Lincoln Ellsworth of the United States flew over the North Pole in the dirigible Norge, from Spitsbergen (now Svalbard), north of Norway, to Alaska. As a general

  • Nobili, Robert de (Jesuit missionary)

    India: The Portuguese: …Roberto de Nobili (1577–1656), nicknamed the White Brahman, and the Jesuit missions to the court of the Mughal emperor Akbar. Of the latter, there was the Inquisition at Goa and the forcible subjection of the Syrian church to Rome at the Synod of Diamper in 1599.

  • Nobilior, Marcus Fulvius (Roman noble)

    Quintus Ennius: His patron was Marcus Fulvius Nobilior, whom he accompanied on his campaign in Aetolia and whose son Quintus obtained Roman citizenship for Ennius (184 bc). Nothing else of significance is known about his life.

  • Nobilissima Visione, St. Francis (ballet by Massine)

    Léonide Massine: Nobilissima Visione, St. Francis (1938) had libretto and music by Paul Hindemith and decor by Pavel Tchelichew. Surrealist painter Salvador Dalí designed three major experimental ballets. Because of disagreements with de Basil, Massine resigned and formed his new Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, which he…

  • nobility

    Aristocracy, government by a relatively small privileged class or by a minority consisting of those felt to be best qualified to rule. As conceived by the Greek philosophers Plato (c. 428/427–348/347 bce) and Aristotle (384–322 bce), aristocracy means the rule of the few best—the morally and

  • Nobility, Charter to the (Russian history)

    Charter to the Gentry, (1785) edict issued by the Russian empress Catherine II the Great that recognized the corps of nobles in each province as a legal corporate body and stated the rights and privileges bestowed upon its members. The charter accorded to the gentry of each province and county in

  • Nobis, Tommy (American football player)

    Atlanta Falcons: …a defense led by linebacker Tommy Nobis and defensive end Claude Humphrey, narrowly missing out on a play-off spot in the process.

  • noble (coin)

    coin: Gold coinage: …currency in 1351 with a noble of 120 grains of gold and its subdivisions, the half- and quarter-noble. In the same year, the silver penny was reduced to 18 grains and the groat issued (on Flemish models). The noble was valued at six shillings and eightpence (12 mark). Its obverse,…

  • noble

    Aristocracy, government by a relatively small privileged class or by a minority consisting of those felt to be best qualified to rule. As conceived by the Greek philosophers Plato (c. 428/427–348/347 bce) and Aristotle (384–322 bce), aristocracy means the rule of the few best—the morally and

  • Noble Beast (album by Bird)

    Andrew Bird: In 2009 Bird released Noble Beast, and its debut at number 12 on the Billboard album chart marked a career high. He returned with Break It Yourself (2012), which found him partially abandoning the oblique wordplay that distinguished his previous work in favour of greater emotional directness.

  • noble cane (plant)

    sugarcane: Breeding: …cane (Saccharum officinarum), a Javan noble cane which was developed from a wild cane species, S. robustom. Noble canes, which represent the highest development of the species, are characterized by thick barrel-shaped internodes, or segments; large soft-rinded juicy stalks; and high sugar content.

  • Noble Eightfold Path (Buddhism)

    Eightfold Path, in Buddhism, an early formulation of the path to enlightenment. The idea of the Eightfold Path appears in what is regarded as the first sermon of the founder of Buddhism, Siddhartha Gautama, known as the Buddha, which he delivered after his enlightenment. There he sets forth a

  • Noble Endeavour (Indonesian political organization)

    Budi Utomo, (Indonesian: “Noble Endeavour”) the first Indonesian nationalist organization. It was founded on May 20, 1908, a day now designated by the Indonesian government as the Day of National Awakening. Budi Utomo originated through the efforts of Mas Wahidin Sudirohusodo (1852–1917), a

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