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  • Nordhoff, Charles Bernard (American author)

    Mutiny on the Bounty: …the Bounty, romantic novel by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall, published in 1932. The vivid narrative is based on an actual mutiny, that against Capt. William Bligh of the HMS Bounty in 1789. Related by Roger Byam, a former midshipman and linguist aboard the vessel, the novel describes how…

  • Nordic Bronze Age

    history of Europe: The Bronze Age: …a distinct local tradition: the Nordic Bronze Age. At this point, the absence of local raw material did not prevent the society from integrating bronze as a basic material in its culture nor did the dependency on trade partners for bronze mean that the local material culture developed without its…

  • Nordic combined (sport)

    Nordic skiing: The Nordic combined is a separate test consisting of a 10-km cross-country race and special ski-jumping contest, with the winner determined on the basis of points awarded for performance in both. Cross-country racing is sometimes called Nordic racing. There are numerous factors that differentiate the various…

  • Nordic Council of Ministers (Scandinavian political organization)

    Nordic Council of Ministers, organization of the Nordic states of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden for the purpose of consultation and cooperation on matters of common interest. The Council was established in February 1971 under an amendment to the Helsinki Convention (1962) between

  • Nordic Games (winter sports)

    skiing: Alpine skiing: …Oslo (from 1892) and the Nordic Games (held quadrennially from 1901 to 1917 and 1922 to 1926) to be the only proper representation of the sport of skiing. In 1930, however, the Nordic skiing countries of Norway, Sweden, and Finland finally withdrew their resistance and allowed Alpine events to be…

  • Nordic literature

    Scandinavian literature, the body of works, both oral and written, produced within Scandinavia in the North Germanic group of languages, in the Finnish language, and, during the Middle Ages, in the Latin language. Scandinavian literature traditionally consists of works in modern Swedish, Norwegian,

  • Nordic Museum (museum, Stockholm, Sweden)

    museum: History museums: …of traditional life at the Nordic Museum in Stockholm. This was followed 18 years later by the first open-air museum, at Skansen. Museums of both types soon appeared in other countries. The former National Museum of Popular Arts and Traditions in Paris exemplified a national approach within a museum building.…

  • Nordic Orion (ship)

    Northwest Passage: Contemporary issues: …occurred in 2013 when the Nordic Orion, with a load of coal and escorted by icebreakers, sailed from Vancouver, enroute to Finland. The following year a cargo ship, the Nunavik, completed the journey without an icebreaker escort.

  • Nordic Pavilion (building, Venice, Italy)

    Sverre Fehn: …received widespread notice with his Nordic Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1962; it won the Biennale’s Golden Lion Award for national pavilions.

  • Nordic racing (sport)

    Cross-country skiing, skiing in open country over rolling, hilly terrain as found in Scandinavian countries, where the sport originated as a means of travel as well as recreation and where it remains popular. In its noncompetitive form the sport is also known as ski touring. The skis used are

  • Nordic script (calligraphy)

    runic alphabet: …the 12th century ad; and Nordic, or Scandinavian, used from the 8th to about the 12th or 13th century ad in Scandinavia and Iceland. After the 12th century, runes were still used occasionally for charms and memorial inscriptions until the 16th or 17th century, chiefly in Scandinavia. The Early Germanic…

  • Nordic Seven Years’ War (European history)

    Erik XIV: …war in 1563, initiating the Seven Years’ War of the North. The Swedish king led his forces with moderate effectiveness and was able to gain a stalemate with Denmark in the first years of the war. His fear of treason caused his judgment to break down in 1567, and he…

  • Nordic skiing

    Nordic skiing, techniques and events that evolved in the hilly terrain of Norway and the other Scandinavian countries. The modern Nordic events are the cross-country races (including a relay race) and ski-jumping events. The Nordic combined is a separate test consisting of a 10-km cross-country

  • Nordica, Lillian (American opera singer)

    Lillian Nordica, American soprano, acclaimed for her opulent voice and dramatic presence, especially in Wagnerian roles. Nordica grew up from the age of six in Boston, studied at the New England Conservatory of Music, and then gave recitals in the United States and London before resuming study in

  • Nordiska Museet (museum, Stockholm, Sweden)

    museum: History museums: …of traditional life at the Nordic Museum in Stockholm. This was followed 18 years later by the first open-air museum, at Skansen. Museums of both types soon appeared in other countries. The former National Museum of Popular Arts and Traditions in Paris exemplified a national approach within a museum building.…

  • Nordiske Digte (work by Oehlenschl?ger)

    Adam Gottlob Oehlenschl?ger: …the historical plays published in Nordiske Digte (1807; “Nordic Poems”), Oehlenschl?ger broke somewhat with the Romantic school and turned to Nordic history and mythology for his materials. In this collection are the historical tragedy Hakon Jarl hin Rige (“Earl Haakon the Great”), based on that Danish national hero, and Baldur…

  • nordiske Oldsager, Museum for de (museum, Copenhagen, Denmark)

    museum: Museums of antiquities: The Museum of Northern Antiquities was opened in Copenhagen in 1819 (it was there that its first director, Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, developed the three-part system of classifying prehistory into the Stone, Bronze, and Iron ages). This museum was merged with three others (of ethnography, antiquities, and…

  • Nordlands trompet (work by Dass)

    Petter Dass: …trompet (written 1678–1700; published 1739; The Trumpet of Nordland), a rhyming description of Nordland that depicts, with loving accuracy and homely humour, its natural features, people, and occupations. Written in an easy, swinging metre, it is addressed to the common people.

  • Nordli, Odvar (prime minister of Norway)

    Norway: Political and social change: …1976, he was succeeded by Odvar Nordli. Gro Harlem Brundtland, Norway’s first woman prime minister, took over the government and party leadership from Nordli in February 1981. Her government was defeated at the polls in September of that year, and a Conservative, K?re Willoch, became prime minister. Brundtland returned as…

  • Nordlicht, Das (work by D?ubler)

    Theodor D?ubler: His major work, Das Nordlicht (1910, much revised and republished in 1921; “The Northern Lights”), an epic of more than 30,000 lines, is an original cosmic myth. D?ubler expresses his visionary ideas in sweeping, hyperbolic language that sometimes borders on the bizarre or grotesque. His other poetical works…

  • N?rdlingen (Germany)

    N?rdlingen, city, Bavaria Land (state), southern Germany. It lies on the Eger River, northwest of Augsburg. A seat of the bishop of Regensburg in 898, it became a free imperial city in 1215. Several battles in the Thirty Years’ War (17th century) and the French revolutionary wars (18th century)

  • N?rdlingen, Battle of (European history [1645])

    Henri de La Tour d'Auvergne, vicomte de Turenne: Command of the French forces in Germany: …met the Bavarians in the Battle of N?rdlingen and reached the Danube River but with such heavy losses in infantry that they soon had to return to the Rhine.

  • N?rdlingen, Battle of (European history [1634])

    Battle of N?rdlingen, (Sept. 5–6, 1634), battle fought near N?rdlingen in southern Germany. A crushing victory for the Habsburgs in the Thirty Years’ War, it ended Swedish domination in southern Germany, and it led France to become an active participant in the war. In the summer of 1634 the

  • Nordmeyer, Sir Arnold Henry (New Zealand politician)

    Sir Arnold Henry Nordmeyer, New Zealand politician, an influential figure in the New Zealand Labour Party for more than 30 years. Nordmeyer graduated from the University of Otago and served as a Presbyterian minister from 1925 until he entered the New Zealand Parliament in 1935. He helped draft the

  • Nordoff-Robbins music therapy

    music therapy: Approaches in music therapy: Nordoff-Robbins music therapy (also known as creative music therapy), for example, is an improvisational approach to therapy that also involves the composition of music. It was originally created by American composer and music therapist Paul Nordoff and British music therapist Clive Robbins as a therapeutic…

  • Nordraach, Rikard (Norwegian composer)

    Rikard Nordraak, Norwegian composer perhaps best known as the composer of the music for the Norwegian national anthem, “Ja, vi elsker dette landet” (1864; “Yes, We Love This Land”). Nordraak began composing music as a child. He was sent at age 15 to Copenhagen, Den., for training in business, but

  • Nordraak, Rikard (Norwegian composer)

    Rikard Nordraak, Norwegian composer perhaps best known as the composer of the music for the Norwegian national anthem, “Ja, vi elsker dette landet” (1864; “Yes, We Love This Land”). Nordraak began composing music as a child. He was sent at age 15 to Copenhagen, Den., for training in business, but

  • Nordrhein-Westfalen (state, Germany)

    North Rhine–Westphalia, Land (state) of western Germany. It is bordered by the states of Lower Saxony to the north and northeast, Hessen to the east, and Rhineland-Palatinate to the south and by the countries of Belgium to the southwest and the Netherlands to the west. The state of North

  • Nordrhein-Westfalia (state, Germany)

    North Rhine–Westphalia, Land (state) of western Germany. It is bordered by the states of Lower Saxony to the north and northeast, Hessen to the east, and Rhineland-Palatinate to the south and by the countries of Belgium to the southwest and the Netherlands to the west. The state of North

  • Nordri (Norse mythology)

    Midgard: …held up by four dwarfs, Nordri, Sudri, Austri, and Vestri (the four points of the compass), and became the dome of the heavens. The sun, moon, and stars were made of scattered sparks that were caught in the skull.

  • Nordsternbund (German literary society)

    Adelbert von Chamisso: In 1804 he founded the Nordsternbund, a society of Berlin Romanticists. From 1807 to 1812 Chamisso toured France and Switzerland, participating in the literary circle of Madame de Sta?l. In 1812 he enrolled at the University of Berlin, devoting himself to scientific studies.

  • Nordstr?m, Gunnar (Finnish physicist)

    brane: …the work of Finnish physicist Gunnar Nordstr?m, who proposed a theory of gravity and electromagnetism with four spatial dimensions in 1914. German mathematician Theodor Kaluza in 1919 and Swedish physicist Oskar Klein in 1925 proposed a four-dimensional spatial theory, after Einstein’s discovery of general relativity in 1916. In general relativity,…

  • Nordstr?m, Ludvig Anselm (Swedish author)

    Ludvig Anselm Nordstr?m, Swedish writer whose realistic, socially conscious works are set in the Norrland region in which he matured. Born of a Swedish father and an English mother, Nordstr?m was much influenced by English writers, especially Charles Dickens, Thomas Carlyle, Laurence Sterne, H.G.

  • Nordyke (American company)

    automotive industry: The independents: …technological or personal interests, including Nordyke and Marmon, makers of Marmon luxury cars, and E.L. Cord, who marketed front-wheel-drive cars between 1929 and 1937. The depression years of the 1930s eliminated all but the largest independent manufacturers and increased still further the domination of the Big Three. Motor vehicle production…

  • Nore (ship)

    ship's bell: …after the mutiny at the Nore (1797), followed a special numbering in the dogwatch. From 4:00 to 8:00 pm, the usual bells are struck except that at 6:30 pm only one bell is struck instead of five; two at 7:00 pm; three at 7:30 pm; and eight bells at 8:00…

  • Nore, The (sandbank, England, United Kingdom)

    The Nore, sandbank in the Thames Estuary, extending between Shoeburyness (north) and Sheerness (south), county of Kent, southeastern England. The Nore Lightship, anchored 4 miles (6 km) southeast of Shoeburyness, was the first to be established in English waters (1732). The Nore anchorage was

  • Noregs konunga s?gur (work by Snorri)

    Heimskringla, (c. 1220; “Orb of the World”), collection of sagas of the early Norwegian kings, written by the Icelandic poet-chieftain Snorri Sturluson. It is distinguished by Snorri’s classical objectivity, realistic psychology, and historically feasible (if not always accurate) depiction of cause

  • Noremberg (Germany)

    Nürnberg, city, Bavaria Land (state), southern Germany. Bavaria’s second largest city (after Munich), Nürnberg is located on the Pegnitz River where it emerges from the uplands of Franconia (Franken), south of Erlangen. The city was first mentioned in 1050 in official records as Noremberg, but it

  • Norén, Lars (Swedish dramatist)

    Swedish literature: Political writing: Lars Norén, regarded by many as the greatest Swedish playwright since Strindberg, has dealt with the love-hate relationships of modern dysfunctional families in emotionally powerful and sombre plays spiced with absurd humour, such as Natten ?r dagens mor (1982; “Night Is Mother to the Day”).…

  • Norén, Noomi (Swedish actress)

    Noomi Rapace, Swedish actress who was best known for portraying Lisbeth Salander in film adaptations of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy of crime novels. Norén was the daughter of a Swedish actress and a Spanish flamenco singer. As a young child she lived with her mother and stepfather in

  • norepinephrine (hormone)

    Norepinephrine, substance that is released predominantly from the ends of sympathetic nerve fibres and that acts to increase the force of skeletal muscle contraction and the rate and force of contraction of the heart. The actions of norepinephrine are vital to the fight-or-flight response, whereby

  • norethandrolone (chemical compound)

    steroid: Progesterones: Among the latter is norethandrolone (20).

  • Norfolk (county, Massachusetts, United States)

    Norfolk, county, eastern Massachusetts, U.S., southwest and south of Boston, bordered by Massachusetts Bay to the northeast and Rhode Island to the southwest. It consists of an upland region, including the Blue Hills, that is drained by the Charles and Neponset rivers. The main parklands are

  • Norfolk (Nebraska, United States)

    Norfolk, city, Madison county, northeastern Nebraska, U.S., on the North Fork Elkhorn River, about 110 miles (175 km) northwest of Omaha. Settled in 1866 by German farmers from Ixonia and Watertown, Wis., its name, originally proposed as North Fork, was abbreviated to Norfork and then changed by

  • Norfolk (Virginia, United States)

    Norfolk, independent city and port, southeastern Virginia, U.S. It lies on the Elizabeth River in the Tidewater region, at the mouth of Chesapeake Bay. Norfolk is part of an urban complex that includes the cities of Portsmouth (west), Chesapeake (south), Virginia Beach (east), and, northward across

  • Norfolk (county, England, United Kingdom)

    Norfolk, administrative and historic county of eastern England. It is bounded by Suffolk (south), Cambridgeshire and Lincolnshire (west), and the North Sea (north and east). The administrative county comprises seven districts: Breckland, Broadland, North Norfolk, and South Norfolk; the boroughs of

  • Norfolk (breed of sheep)

    Suffolk: …1800 to 1850 by mating Norfolk horned ewes with Southdown rams. Suffolks are prolific, early maturing sheep with excellent mutton carcasses. They are energetic, and the whole carriage is alert, showing stamina and quality. The breed is not desirable for wool production. The fleeces are short in staple and light…

  • Norfolk and Western Railway Company (American railway)

    Norfolk and Western Railway Company, former American railroad that originated as an eight-mile single-track line in 1838 to connect Petersburg and City Point (now Hopewell), Virginia. In 1870 the City Point Rail Road and others were consolidated as the Atlantic, Mississippi and Ohio Railroad. In

  • Norfolk Broads (waterways, England, United Kingdom)

    The Broads, system of inland waterways in the administrative and historic county of Norfolk, England, consisting of shallow lakes formed by the broadening of the Rivers Bure and Yare, which connect many of the waterways. The individual Broads vary in size from mere pools to the 296-acre

  • Norfolk County Courthouse (building, Dedham, Massachusetts, United States)

    Dedham: The Norfolk County Courthouse was the scene of the famous Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti murder trial of the 1920s. The town is primarily residential, and its economy is based on services and light manufacturing. Area 11 square miles (28 square km). Pop. (2000) 23,464; (2010)…

  • Norfolk four-course system (agriculture)

    Norfolk four-course system, method of agricultural organization established in Norfolk county, England, and in several other counties before the end of the 17th century; it was characterized by an emphasis on fodder crops and by the absence of a fallow year, which had characterized earlier

  • Norfolk Island (island, Australia)

    Norfolk Island, external territory of Australia, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, 1,041 miles (1,676 km) northeast of Sydney. The island is about 5 miles (8 km) long and 3 miles (5 km) wide. It is volcanic in origin, and its generally rugged terrain, with a mean elevation of 360 feet (110 m)

  • Norfolk Island pine (plant)

    Norfolk Island pine, (Araucaria heterophylla), evergreen timber and ornamental conifer of the family Araucariaceae, native to Norfolk Island, situated in the South Pacific Ocean between New Caledonia and New Zealand. The wood of large trees is used in construction, furniture, and shipbuilding. The

  • Norfolk Island, Territory of (island, Australia)

    Norfolk Island, external territory of Australia, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, 1,041 miles (1,676 km) northeast of Sydney. The island is about 5 miles (8 km) long and 3 miles (5 km) wide. It is volcanic in origin, and its generally rugged terrain, with a mean elevation of 360 feet (110 m)

  • Norfolk plover (bird)

    thickknee: The European stone curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus), called Norfolk plover in England, breeds across southern Europe to India and northern Africa. A tropical African species is known as the water dikkop (B. vermiculatus). The double-striped thickknee (B. bistriatus) inhabits the American tropics. Others are the great stone…

  • Norfolk Rhapsodies (works by Williams)

    Ralph Vaughan Williams: His three Norfolk Rhapsodies (numbers 2 and 3 later withdrawn), notably the first in E minor (first performed, 1906), were the first works to show his assimilation of folk song contours into a distinctive melodic and harmonic style. His nine symphonies cover a vast expressive range. Especially…

  • Norfolk rising of 1549 (England)

    Robert Ket: …which was afterwards known as Ket’s Rebellion. He was either a tanner or, more probably, a small landowner.

  • Norfolk Trotter (horse breed)

    harness racing: Early history.: England’s Norfolk Trotter, which emerged as a breed around 1750, was purely a road horse, but its speed led to its being used for road racing as a diversion for its owners. Most of its matches were trotting a given distance within a specified time.

  • Norfolk, John Howard, 1st Duke of, Earl Marshal (English noble)

    John Howard, 1st duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal, English lord who supported the Yorkist kings in the Wars of the Roses. John Howard was the son of Sir Robert Howard by his wife, Margaret, daughter of Thomas Mowbray, the 1st Duke of Norfolk of that family. In 1455 John Howard was sent to Parliament

  • Norfolk, John Howard, 1st Duke of, Earl Marshal, Lord Howard (English noble)

    John Howard, 1st duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal, English lord who supported the Yorkist kings in the Wars of the Roses. John Howard was the son of Sir Robert Howard by his wife, Margaret, daughter of Thomas Mowbray, the 1st Duke of Norfolk of that family. In 1455 John Howard was sent to Parliament

  • Norfolk, Miles Francis Stapleton Fitzalan-Howard, 17th Duke of (British noble)

    Miles Francis Stapleton Fitzalan-Howard, 17th duke of Norfolk, British peer and public servant (born July 21, 1915, London, Eng.—died June 24, 2002, Hambleden, Buckinghamshire, Eng.), inherited (1975) the oldest dukedom in Britain (created by King Richard II in 1397) and with it the ceremonial r

  • Norfolk, Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of (English noble [1443-1524])

    Thomas Howard, 2nd duke of Norfolk, noble prominent during the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII of England. Son of the 1st Duke of Norfolk, Thomas Howard early shared his father’s fortunes; he fought at Barnet for Edward IV and was made steward of the royal household and created Earl of Surrey in

  • Norfolk, Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of, Earl of Surrey, Earl Marshal (English noble [1443-1524])

    Thomas Howard, 2nd duke of Norfolk, noble prominent during the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII of England. Son of the 1st Duke of Norfolk, Thomas Howard early shared his father’s fortunes; he fought at Barnet for Edward IV and was made steward of the royal household and created Earl of Surrey in

  • Norfolk, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of (English noble [1473-1554])

    Thomas Howard, 3rd duke of Norfolk, powerful English noble who held a variety of high offices under King Henry VIII. Although he was valuable to the king as a military commander, he failed in his aspiration to become the chief minister of the realm. Howard was the brother-in-law of King Henry VII

  • Norfolk, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of, Earl of Surrey, Earl Marshal (English noble [1473-1554])

    Thomas Howard, 3rd duke of Norfolk, powerful English noble who held a variety of high offices under King Henry VIII. Although he was valuable to the king as a military commander, he failed in his aspiration to become the chief minister of the realm. Howard was the brother-in-law of King Henry VII

  • Norfolk, Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of (English noble [1538-1572])

    Thomas Howard, 4th duke of Norfolk, English nobleman executed for his intrigues against Queen Elizabeth I on behalf of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, a Roman Catholic claimant to the English throne. He was the son of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, who was put to death for alleged treasonable

  • Norfolk, Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of, Earl of Surrey, Earl Marshal (English noble [1538-1572])

    Thomas Howard, 4th duke of Norfolk, English nobleman executed for his intrigues against Queen Elizabeth I on behalf of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, a Roman Catholic claimant to the English throne. He was the son of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, who was put to death for alleged treasonable

  • Norfolk, Thomas Howard, Earl of (English noble)

    Thomas Howard, 2nd earl of Arundel, English noble prominent during the reigns of James I and Charles I and noted for his art collections of marbles and manuscripts. The son of Philip Howard, the first earl of the Howard line, he was educated at Westminster School and at Trinity College, Cambridge.

  • Norfolk, Thomas Mowbray, 1st Duke of (English noble [1366–1399])

    Thomas Mowbray, 1st duke of Norfolk, English lord whose quarrel with Henry of Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford (later King Henry IV, reigned 1399–1413), was a critical episode in the events leading to the overthrow of King Richard II (reigned 1377–99) by Bolingbroke. The quarrel dominates the first

  • Norfolk, Thomas Mowbray, 1st Duke of, Earl of Nottingham, Earl Marshal (English noble [1366–1399])

    Thomas Mowbray, 1st duke of Norfolk, English lord whose quarrel with Henry of Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford (later King Henry IV, reigned 1399–1413), was a critical episode in the events leading to the overthrow of King Richard II (reigned 1377–99) by Bolingbroke. The quarrel dominates the first

  • Norfolk, Thomas Mowbray, 2nd Duke of, Earl of Nottingham (English noble)

    Henry IV: …of the 1st duke of Norfolk, and Richard Scrope, archbishop of York, executed for conspiring with Northumberland to raise another rebellion. Although the worst of Henry’s political troubles were over, he then began to suffer from an affliction that his contemporaries believed to be leprosy—it may have been congenital syphilis.…

  • Norfolk, Thomas Mowbray, 2nd Duke of, Earl of Nottingham (English noble)

    Henry IV: …of the 1st duke of Norfolk, and Richard Scrope, archbishop of York, executed for conspiring with Northumberland to raise another rebellion. Although the worst of Henry’s political troubles were over, he then began to suffer from an affliction that his contemporaries believed to be leprosy—it may have been congenital syphilis.…

  • Norfolk, Thomas Mowbray, 2nd Duke of, Earl of Nottingham, Earl Marshal (English noble)

    Henry IV: …of the 1st duke of Norfolk, and Richard Scrope, archbishop of York, executed for conspiring with Northumberland to raise another rebellion. Although the worst of Henry’s political troubles were over, he then began to suffer from an affliction that his contemporaries believed to be leprosy—it may have been congenital syphilis.…

  • Norfolk, Thomas of Brotherton, earl of (English noble)

    Thomas of Brotherton, earl of Norfolk, half brother of King Edward II of England and of Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent. He was created Earl of Norfolk in 1312 and was given vast lands in England, Wales, and Ireland; Edward II further distinguished him by creating him marshal of England. However,

  • Norgay, Tenzing (Tibetan mountaineer)

    Tenzing Norgay, (Nepalese: “Wealthy-Fortunate Follower of Religion”) Tibetan mountaineer who in 1953 became, with Edmund (later Sir Edmund) Hillary of New Zealand, the first person to set foot on the summit of Mount Everest, the world’s highest peak (29,035 feet [8,850 metres]; see Researcher’s

  • Norge

    Norway, country of northern Europe that occupies the western half of the Scandinavian peninsula. Nearly half of the inhabitants of the country live in the far south, in the region around Oslo, the capital. About two-thirds of Norway is mountainous, and off its much-indented coastline lie, carved by

  • Norge (airship)

    Umberto Nobile: …North Pole in the dirigible Norge, from Spitsbergen (now Svalbard), north of Norway, to Alaska.

  • Norge, Géo (Belgian author)

    Géo Norge, Belgian poet whose love of language found expression in a concise, often playful style. In the 1920s Norge flirted with the avant-garde, writing some loosely experimental plays (which were criticized by the Surrealists) and joining Raymond Rouleau in an experimental theatre group, Groupe

  • Norges Statsbaner (government agency, Norway)

    Norway: Transportation and telecommunications: …electrified, is operated by the Norwegian State Railways (Norges Statsbaner), which sustains large annual operating deficits. Vestlandet has never had north-south railway connections, only routes running east from Stavanger and Bergen to Oslo and from ?ndalsnes to Domb?s on the line linking Oslo and Trondheim. The connection from Bod? to…

  • norgestrel (chemistry)

    levonorgestrel: …the mirror compound (enantiomer) of norgestrel, which was synthesized in the early 1960s by American scientist Herschel Smith at the U.S.-based company Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

  • Norheim, Sondre (Norwegian athlete and inventor)

    Sondre Norheim, Norwegian skier who revolutionized ski design and ski equipment and helped to standardize certain aspects of the sport. Norheim in 1860 was the first to use bindings of willow, cane, and birch root around the heel from each side of the toe strap to fasten the boot to the ski, thus

  • nori (red algae)

    Laver, (genus Porphyra), genus of 60–70 species of marine red algae (family Bangiaceae). Laver grows near the high-water mark of the intertidal zone in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. It grows best in cold nitrogen-rich water. Laver is harvested, dried, and used as food in greater

  • noria (waterwheel)

    Noria, undershot waterwheel used to raise water in primitive irrigation systems. It was described by the Roman architect Vitruvius (c. 1st century bce). As the noria turns, pots or hollow chambers on the rim fill when submerged and empty automatically into a trough when they reach or exceed the

  • Norian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Norian Stage, middle of three divisions in the Upper Triassic Series, representing those rocks deposited worldwide during Norian time (228 million to 208.5 million years ago) in the Triassic Period. The stage was named after an ancient Roman province south of the Danube River in present-day

  • Noric Alps (mountains, Europe)

    Noric Alps, segment of the Eastern Alps extending across southern Austria between the Hohe Tauern range and Katschberg Pass (west) and the city of Graz on the Mur River (east). With the Drava River to the south and the upper Mur River to the north, the mountains rise to Eisenhut (8,008 feet [2,441

  • Noricum (ancient kingdom, Europe)

    Noricum, region of Europe north of what is now Italy, roughly comprising modern central Austria and parts of Bavaria, Ger. Noricum was originally a kingdom controlled by a Celtic confederacy that dominated an earlier Illyrian population. It reached its greatest extent during the early period: on

  • Noricum affair

    Austria: Restoration of sovereignty: However, more scandals (notably the Noricum affair, involving the illegal sale of arms to Iran by a state-owned company), division within the Austrian People’s Party, and the public’s continued dissatisfaction with backroom deals weakened support for the coalition, while the environmentalist Greens (in parliament since 1986) and the Freedom Party…

  • Noriega Morena, Manuel Antonio (Panamanian military leader)

    Manuel Noriega, Panamanian military leader, commander of the Panamanian Defense Forces (1983–89), who, for the years of his command, was the actual power behind the civilian president. Noriega was born into a poor family of Colombian extraction. Educated at one of the top high schools in Panama, he

  • Noriega y Guerra, José Servando Teresa de Mier (Mexican friar)

    Latin American literature: Historiographies: …controversial figure, the Mexican friar José Servando Teresa de Mier Noriega y Guerra lived and wrote in Spain, France, and other European countries. In Memorias (probably first published in 1856 in a book about Servando Teresa de Mier; The Memoirs of Fray Servando Teresa de Mier) and Historia de la…

  • Noriega, Manuel (Panamanian military leader)

    Manuel Noriega, Panamanian military leader, commander of the Panamanian Defense Forces (1983–89), who, for the years of his command, was the actual power behind the civilian president. Noriega was born into a poor family of Colombian extraction. Educated at one of the top high schools in Panama, he

  • Norikura, Mount (volcano, Japan)

    Hida Range: Recent volcanoes, including Mount Norikura (9,928 feet [3,026 m]) and Mount Ontake (10,049 feet [3,063 m]), rest upon the granitic foundation. The Hida Range as a whole is characterized by rugged landforms dissected by deep river gorges. The highest peaks are found near the centre of the range,…

  • Norilsk (Russia)

    Norilsk, city, Krasnoyarsk kray (territory), central Russia, in the Rybnaya Valley amid the Putoran Mountains. Founded in 1935, Norilsk lies north of the Arctic Circle and is one of the world’s leading producing centres for nickel and platinum. Copper is also mined. Power is supplied to Norilsk by

  • Norilsk Nickel (Russian company)

    Mikhail Prokhorov: …to a controlling stake in Norilsk Nickel, the largest nickel and palladium producer in the world, among other companies. UNEXIM was also the auctioneer of the Norilsk loan and rejected another, higher bid in favour of its own. The “loans for shares” program enabled Prokhorov, Potanin, and a select few…

  • Norin River (river, Central Asia)

    Naryn River, river in Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan that is fed by the glaciers and snows of the central Tien Shan (mountains). It becomes the Syr Darya (river) after merging with the Karadarya in the Fergana Valley. The Naryn River flows westward for 430 miles (700 km), receiving many tributaries and

  • Norische Alpen (mountains, Europe)

    Noric Alps, segment of the Eastern Alps extending across southern Austria between the Hohe Tauern range and Katschberg Pass (west) and the city of Graz on the Mur River (east). With the Drava River to the south and the upper Mur River to the north, the mountains rise to Eisenhut (8,008 feet [2,441

  • norite (rock)

    mineral deposit: Immiscible melts: …of a mafic rock called norite lies above a discontinuous zone of gabbro, some of which contains numerous broken fragments of the underlying basement rocks and some of which is rich in sulfide ore minerals of nickel, copper, and platinum-group metals. Many hypotheses have been suggested for the origin of…

  • norito (Japanese prayer)

    Norito, in the Shintō religious practices of Japan, words, or prayer, addressed by worshipers to a deity. The efficacy of prayer is founded on the concept of koto-dama, the spiritual power that resides in words. According to ancient belief, beautiful, correct words bring about good, whereas ugly,

  • NORJACK (American history)

    D.B. Cooper: …in its history, known as NORJAK (Northwest Hijacking). Initially the agency believed that Cooper knew both planes and the area, and it was speculated that he served in the military, possibly as a paratrooper; later, however, it was decided that he was not an experienced skydiver because the jump was…

  • norm (geology)

    igneous rock: Classification of igneous rocks: …mineral composition is called the norm, and the minerals constituting the standard set are termed normative minerals, since they are ordinarily found in igneous rocks. The rock under analysis may then be classified according to the calculated proportions of the normative minerals.

  • norm (mathematics)

    triangle inequality: Measures are called norms, which are typically indicated by enclosing an entity from the space in a pair of single or double vertical lines, | | or || ||. For example, real numbers a and b, with the absolute value as a norm, obey a version of the…

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