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  • Norway maple (plant)

    maple: The Norway maple (A. platanoides), a handsome, dense, round-headed tree, has spectacular greenish-yellow flower clusters in early spring; many cultivated varieties are available with unusual leaf colour (red, maroon, bronze, or purple) and growth form (columnar, globular, or pyramidal).

  • Norway rat (rodent)

    rat: The brown rat, Rattus norvegicus (also called the Norway rat), and the house rat, R. rattus (also called the black rat, ship rat, or roof rat), live virtually everywhere that human populations have settled; the house rat is predominant in warmer climates, and the brown rat…

  • Norway spruce (plant)

    spruce: Major species: The Norway spruce (P. abies), an important timber and ornamental tree native to northern Europe, is used in reforestation both there and in North America.

  • Norway, Church of (Norwegian Lutheran denomination)

    Church of Norway, established, state-supported Lutheran church in Norway, which changed from the Roman Catholic faith during the 16th-century Protestant Reformation. Unsuccessful attempts were made to win converts to Christianity in Norway during the 10th century, but in the 11th century Kings Olaf

  • Norway, flag of

    national flag consisting of a red field bearing a large blue cross outlined in white. The flag has a width-to-length ratio of 8 to 11.On February 27, 1814, the crown prince Christian Frederick created the first distinctive Norwegian national flag. An expression of local opposition to the Swedish

  • Norway, history of

    Norway: History: The earliest traces of human occupation in Norway are found along the coast, where the huge ice shelf of the last ice age first melted between 11,000 and 8000 bce. The oldest finds are stone tools dating from 9500 to 6000 bce, discovered in…

  • Norway, Kingdom of

    Norway, country of northern Europe that occupies the western half of the Scandinavian peninsula. Nearly half of the inhabitants of the country live in the far south, in the region around Oslo, the capital. About two-thirds of Norway is mountainous, and off its much-indented coastline lie, carved by

  • Norway, Nevil Shute (Australian novelist)

    Nevil Shute, English-born Australian novelist who showed a special talent for weaving his technical knowledge of engineering into the texture of his fictional narrative. His most famous work, On the Beach (1957), reflected his pessimism for humanity in the atomic age. Shute was educated at

  • Norwegian (people)

    Norway: Ethnic groups: …most parts of Norway the nucleus of the population is Nordic in heritage and appearance. Between 60 and 70 percent have blue eyes. An influx of people from southern Europe has been strong in southwestern Norway. Nord-Norge has about nine-tenths of the estimated 30,000 to 40,000 Sami—the country’s first inhabitants—living…

  • Norwegian Antarctic Expedition

    Antarctica: Discovery of the Antarctic poles: …explorer Roald Amundsen of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition of 1910–12 reached it. One month later, on January 17, 1912, Scott of the British Antarctic Terra Nova Expedition of 1910–13 also reached the South Pole. Whereas Amundsen’s party of skiers and dog teams, using the Axel Heiberg Glacier route, arrived back…

  • Norwegian Basin (basin, Atlantic Ocean)

    North Polar Basin: …Central Polar Basin and the Norwegian Basin, by a sill, or narrow underwater ridge, lying between north Greenland and the Svalbard archipelago of Norway. The larger of the two parts, the Central Polar Basin, has a maximum depth of 16,995 feet (5,180 m) and occupies a triangular area stretching across…

  • Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions (Norwegian labour organization)

    Norway: Labour and taxation: …influential labour union is the Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions (Landsorganisasjonen i Norge; LO), which was established in 1899 and has more than 800,000 members. Other important labour unions are the Confederation of Vocational Unions (Yrkesorganisasjonenes Sentralforbund; YS) and the Federation of Norwegian Professional Associations (Akademikerne).

  • Norwegian Current (oceanography)

    ocean current: The subpolar gyres: …its equatorward side and the Norwegian Current that carries relatively warm water northward along the coast of Norway. The heat released from the Norwegian Current into the atmosphere maintains a moderate climate in northern Europe. Along the east coast of Greenland is the southward-flowing cold East Greenland Current. It loops…

  • Norwegian cyclone model (meteorology)

    weather forecasting: Progress during the early 20th century: …been referred to as the Norwegian cyclone model. This theory pulled together many earlier ideas and related the patterns of wind and weather to a low-pressure system that exhibited fronts—which are rather sharp sloping boundaries between cold and warm air masses. Bjerknes pointed out the rainfall/snowfall patterns that are characteristically…

  • Norwegian elkhound (breed of dog)

    Norwegian elkhound, breed of dog that originated thousands of years ago in western Norway, where it was used as an all-purpose hunter, shepherd, guard, and companion. It generally excels in tracking European elk and has also been used for hunting bears and lynx. A medium-sized dog with erect,

  • Norwegian Folktales (work by Asbj?rnsen and Moe)

    Norske folkeeventyr, (1841–44; Eng. trans. Norwegian Folktales), collections of folktales and legends, by Peter Christen Asbj?rnsen and J?rgen Engebretsen Moe, that had survived and developed from Old Norse pagan mythology in the mountain and fjord dialects of Norway. The authors, stimulated by a

  • Norwegian Glacier Museum (museum, Fj?rland, Norway)

    Sverre Fehn: Fehn’s Norwegian Glacier Museum (completed 1991) in Fj?rland, Nor.—a long, low-lying, white-and-gray concrete structure with sloping ends—echoed the steep glaciers that surrounded it. His Hedmark Cathedral Museum (1979) in Hamar, Nor., was built astride the historic ruins of a 14th-century cathedral and manor house. Some of…

  • Norwegian Gyral (ocean current)

    Norwegian Gyral, cyclonic ocean current flow centred at 68° N, 13° W in the Norwegian Sea. The Norwegian Gyral separates the Norway Current from a southeastward-flowing branch of the East Greenland

  • Norwegian Gyre (ocean current)

    Norwegian Gyral, cyclonic ocean current flow centred at 68° N, 13° W in the Norwegian Sea. The Norwegian Gyral separates the Norway Current from a southeastward-flowing branch of the East Greenland

  • Norwegian Institute of Technology (institution, Norway)

    Norway: Education: …and Industrial Research at the Norwegian Institute of Technology (SINTEF) was created in 1950 as an independent organization at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology to stimulate research and develop cooperation with other public and private research institutions and with private industry. SINTEF is financed by the state and…

  • Norwegian Labour Party (political party, Norway)

    Norway: Political process: The Norwegian Labour Party (Det Norske Arbeiderparti; DNA), the ruling party from before World War II until the mid-1960s, advocates a moderate form of socialism. In its many years of governing Norway, however, it nationalized only a few large industrial companies. The Conservative Party (H?yre), which…

  • Norwegian language

    Norwegian language, North Germanic language of the West Scandinavian branch, existing in two distinct and rival norms—Bokm?l (also called Dano-Norwegian, or Riksm?l) and New Norwegian (Nynorsk). Old Norwegian writing traditions gradually died out in the 15th century after the union of Norway with

  • Norwegian Law (legal history [1687])

    Scandinavian law: Historical development of Scandinavian law: …V’s Danish Law (1683) and Norwegian Law (1687). The new codes were mainly based on the existing national laws of the two countries, and the influences of German, Roman, and canon laws were comparatively slight. Like the early codes, the newer codes consisted of public as well as private law…

  • Norwegian literature

    Norwegian literature, the body of writings by the Norwegian people. The roots of Norwegian literature reach back more than 1,000 years into the pagan Norse past. In its evolution Norwegian literature was closely intertwined with Icelandic literature and with Danish literature. Only after the

  • Norwegian Nobel Committee (Scandinavian organization)

    Norwegian Nobel Committee, group of five individuals responsible for selecting the annual winners of the Nobel Prize for Peace. Members are appointed to a six-year term on the committee by the Storting (the Norwegian parliament). Until 1936, members of the Norwegian government were elected to the

  • Norwegian Pavilion (building, Brussels, Belgium)

    Sverre Fehn: …Exhibition in Brussels, where his Norwegian Pavilion captured first prize in the design competition. Built in the International style, the low wooden building embodied horizontality with its wide, overhanging, segmented eaves. Fehn again received widespread notice with his Nordic Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1962; it won the Biennale’s…

  • Norwegian Refugee Council (Norwegian organization)

    Jan Egeland: … before becoming secretary-general of the Norwegian Refugee Council in 2013.

  • Norwegian Sea (sea, North Atlantic Ocean)

    Norwegian Sea, section of the North Atlantic Ocean, bordered by the Greenland and Barents seas (northwest through northeast); Norway (east); the North Sea, the Shetland and Faroe islands, and the Atlantic Ocean (south); and Iceland and Jan Mayen Island (west). The sea reaches a maximum depth of

  • Norwegian Shipping and Trade Mission (government agency, Norway)

    Norway: World War II: The government, through the Norwegian Shipping and Trade Mission (Nortraship), directed the merchant fleet, which made an important contribution to the Allied cause. Half of the fleet, however, was lost during the war.

  • Norwegian Society (literary organization)

    Norske Selskab, (Norwegian: “Norwegian Society”) organization founded in 1772 by Norwegian students at the University of Copenhagen to free Norwegian literature from excessive German influence and from the dominance of Danish Romanticism. The Norske Selskab, which lasted until 1812, not only was a

  • Norwegian State Railways (government agency, Norway)

    Norway: Transportation and telecommunications: …electrified, is operated by the Norwegian State Railways (Norges Statsbaner), which sustains large annual operating deficits. Vestlandet has never had north-south railway connections, only routes running east from Stavanger and Bergen to Oslo and from ?ndalsnes to Domb?s on the line linking Oslo and Trondheim. The connection from Bod? to…

  • Norwegian Trench (submarine trough, North Sea)

    Norway Deep, undersea trough in the northeastern North Sea. It extends southward from ?lesund in western Norway, running parallel to the Norwegian coast and curving around the southern tip of Norway into the Skagerrak (the strait between southern Norway and the Jutland peninsula of Denmark) as far

  • Norwegian whist (playing card)

    whist: Miscellaneous variants: Norwegian whist is a no-trump partnership game. Each deal is played either grand, the aim being to win most tricks, or nullo, the aim being to lose most. Each player in turn, starting with eldest, may pass or bid grand or nullo. The first bid…

  • Norwegian Wood (song by Lennon and McCartney)

    sitar: …several songs, beginning with “Norwegian Wood” (1965). Other musicians of the period imitated sitar sounds on the guitar; some used an electric “sitar” that modified the instrument for ease of performance but preserved its primary tone colour. In the early 21st century Shankar’s daughter Anoushka Shankar became a prominent…

  • Norwegian-British-Swedish Expedition

    Antarctica: National rivalries and claims: The international Norwegian-British-Swedish Expedition of 1949–52 carried out extensive explorations from Maudheim Base on the Queen Maud Land coast in the territory claimed in 1939 by Norway. The United States had shown little interest in Antarctica since the Ronne expedition and the U.S. naval “Operation Windmill,” both…

  • Norwest Corporation (American corporation)

    Norwest Corporation, former American holding company that owned subsidiary commercial banks in a number of western and midwestern U.S. states. Norwest and Wells Fargo & Company merged in 1998, and the newly formed business took the latter’s name. The company was incorporated as Northwest

  • Norwich (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Norwich: (district), administrative and historic county of Norfolk, England. It is located along the River Wensum above its confluence with the River Yare, about 100 miles (160 km) northeast of London.

  • Norwich (Connecticut, United States)

    Norwich, city, coextensive with the town (township) of Norwich, New London county, east-central Connecticut, U.S. It lies at the confluence of the Yantic and Shetucket rivers, which at that point form the Thames. The settlement, which was begun in 1659 and named for Norwich, England, by a company

  • Norwich (England, United Kingdom)

    Norwich, city (district), administrative and historic county of Norfolk, England. It is located along the River Wensum above its confluence with the River Yare, about 100 miles (160 km) northeast of London. The site does not seem to have been occupied until Saxon times, when the village of Northwic

  • Norwich school (art)

    Norwich school, significant group of English regional landscape painters that was established in 1803 as the Norwich Society of Artists and flourished in Norwich, Norfolk, in the first half of the 19th century. The work of the leaders of the group, John Crome and John Sell Cotman, was inspired by

  • Norwich Society of Artists (art)

    Norwich school, significant group of English regional landscape painters that was established in 1803 as the Norwich Society of Artists and flourished in Norwich, Norfolk, in the first half of the 19th century. The work of the leaders of the group, John Crome and John Sell Cotman, was inspired by

  • Norwich terrier (breed of dog)

    Norwich terrier, short-legged terrier breed developed about 1880 in England, where it soon became a fad with Cambridge students. It was later used by various American hunt clubs and has also drawn notice as a rabbit hunter. It is stockily built, with a broad head and erect ears, and it has a dense,

  • Norwich University (university, Northfield, Vermont, United States)

    Norwich University, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Northfield, Vt., U.S. The university is composed of the largely military college in Northfield and the nonmilitary Vermont College in Montpelier; there is also a branch campus in Brattleboro. All Northfield campus

  • Norwich ware (pottery)

    Norwich ware, delft (tin-glazed) earthenware produced in Norwich, Norfolk, Eng., of which little is known. About 1567 two Flemish potters, Jasper Andries and Jacob Janson, who had moved to Norwich from Antwerp, may have made paving tiles and vessels for apothecaries and others. So far nothing made

  • Norwid, Cyprian (Polish poet)

    Cyprian Norwid, Polish poet, playwright, painter, and sculptor who was one of the most original representatives of late Romanticism. An orphan early in life, Norwid was brought up by relatives and was largely self-taught. He found life in Poland difficult after the suppression of the Polish

  • Norwid, Cyprian Kamil (Polish poet)

    Cyprian Norwid, Polish poet, playwright, painter, and sculptor who was one of the most original representatives of late Romanticism. An orphan early in life, Norwid was brought up by relatives and was largely self-taught. He found life in Poland difficult after the suppression of the Polish

  • Norwood (film by Haley [1970])

    Charles Portis: …a novelist with Norwood (1966; film 1970), the tale of a cheerfully naive ex-marine who wanders from state to state in an attempt to collect a $70 debt. Though some critics found the novel to be thinly plotted, Portis was praised for his memorable characters, especially the numerous eccentrics and…

  • Norwood (novel by Portis)

    Charles Portis: …debuted as a novelist with Norwood (1966; film 1970), the tale of a cheerfully naive ex-marine who wanders from state to state in an attempt to collect a $70 debt. Though some critics found the novel to be thinly plotted, Portis was praised for his memorable characters, especially the numerous…

  • Norwood (Massachusetts, United States)

    Norwood, town, Norfolk county, eastern Massachusetts, U.S., on the Neponset River, 14 miles (23 km) southwest of Boston. Settled in 1678, it was incorporated (from parts of Dedham and Walpole) in 1872. The town has a diversified economy, and many corporate offices are located there; products

  • Norwood, Melita Sirnis (British secretary and spy)

    Melita Sirnis Norwood, British secretary and spy (born March 25, 1912, Pokesdown, Hampshire, Eng.—died June 2, 2005, London, Eng.), worked quietly for the British Non-Ferrous Metals Research Association from 1932 until her retirement in 1972, but in September 1999 it was revealed that she had b

  • Norwood, Richard (English navigator)

    navigation: Distance and speed measurements: …Practice (1637) the English navigator Richard Norwood recommended the use of a line knotted at intervals of 50 feet (15 metres) and a 30-second sandglass; knotted intervals of 47 to 48 feet (14.3 to 14.6 metres) and a 28-second sandglass were later adopted to accord with nautical miles of slightly…

  • Norworth, Jack (American songwriter)

    baseball: Baseball and the arts: …delight and wonder expressed in Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer’s “Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” a 1908 ditty that became baseball’s national anthem. For artists, the ballpark has often been an escape from the real world, an idyllic place where fans don’t care if they “never get…

  • Noryl (plastic)

    major industrial polymers: Polyphenylene oxide (PPO): under the trademarked name of Noryl. It is used in telecommunications and computer equipment, automotive parts, appliances, pipes, and valves.

  • NOS (Dutch organization)

    Netherlands: Media and publishing: …access to the airwaves by Netherlands Broadcasting Corporation, which is responsible for news and the programming of unreserved airtime. The government itself exerts no influence on the programming, and advertising is restricted and is controlled by a separate foundation. All public broadcasting is financed by a licensing fee and by…

  • Nos (work by Gogol)

    Russian literature: Nikolay Gogol: ” “Nos” (1836; “The Nose”), a parable on the failure of all explanatory systems, relates an utterly inexplicable incident and the attempts to come to terms with it. Both “Shinel” (1842; “The Overcoat”), which is probably the most influential Russian short story, and “Zapiski sumasshedshego” (1835; “The Diary…

  • Nosair, El Sayyid (American militant)

    Omar Abdel Rahman: In 1990 El Sayyid Nosair, an Egyptian man linked to Abdel Rahman, was arrested and tried for the murder of Jewish political extremist Rabbi Meir Kahane in New York. Nosair was acquitted of the murder but convicted of lesser related charges. When federal agents raided Nosair’s New…

  • Nosaka Sanzō (Japanese politician)

    Nosaka Sanzō, politician who was the leading figure in the Japanese Communist Party (JCP) throughout the late 1950s and ’60s. He was responsible for the party’s pursuit of its revolutionary goals through peaceful participation in parliamentary politics. Nosaka first became interested in Communism

  • nose (anatomy)

    Nose, the prominent structure between the eyes that serves as the entrance to the respiratory tract and contains the olfactory organ. It provides air for respiration, serves the sense of smell, conditions the air by filtering, warming, and moistening it, and cleans itself of foreign debris

  • nose ring (ornament)

    Nose ring, ornament inserted through different parts of the nose for personal adornment and used sometimes to signify social rank. Nose ornaments have been found especially among people in India, New Guinea, Polynesia, the pre-Columbian Americas, Australia, and parts of Africa. Sometimes, the ala,

  • Nose, The (opera by Shostakovich)

    Dmitry Shostakovich: Early life and works: His satiric opera The Nose (composed 1927–28), based on Nikolay Gogol’s story Nos, displayed a comprehensive awareness of what was new in Western music, although already it seems as if the satire is extended to the styles themselves, for the avant-garde sounds are contorted with wry humour. Not…

  • Nose, The (work by Gogol)

    Russian literature: Nikolay Gogol: ” “Nos” (1836; “The Nose”), a parable on the failure of all explanatory systems, relates an utterly inexplicable incident and the attempts to come to terms with it. Both “Shinel” (1842; “The Overcoat”), which is probably the most influential Russian short story, and “Zapiski sumasshedshego” (1835; “The Diary…

  • nosean (mineral)

    Nosean, variety of the feldspathoid mineral sodalite

  • noseband (part of bridle)

    horsemanship: Aids: The noseband, a strap of the bridle that encircles the horse’s nose, may be either a cavesson, with a headpiece and rings for attaching a long training rein, or a noseband with a headstrap, only necessary if a standing martingale is used. A variety of other…

  • nosebleed (medical disorder)

    Nosebleed, an attack of bleeding from the nose. It is a common and usually unimportant disorder but may also result from local conditions of inflammation, small ulcers or polypoid growths, or severe injuries to the skull. Vascular disease, such as high blood pressure, may provoke it, and such d

  • Noseda, Gianandrea (Italian conductor)

    National Symphony Orchestra: Gianandrea Noseda assumed the music directorship in 2017.

  • nosegay (floral decoration)

    Nosegay, small, hand-held bouquet popular in mid- 19th-century Victorian England as an accessory carried by fashionable ladies. Composed of mixed flowers and herbs and edged with a paper frill or greens, the arrangement was sometimes inserted into a silver filigree holder. When supplied by an

  • noselite (mineral)

    Nosean, variety of the feldspathoid mineral sodalite

  • Nosema (genus of fungi)

    Nosema, genus of spore-forming parasitic single-celled organisms, of the phylum Microsporidia, found in host cells where it undergoes repeated asexual divisions followed by spore formation. The species N. bombycis, which causes the epidemic disease pébrine in silkworms, attacks all tissues and all

  • Nosema apis (fungus)

    Nosema: Another species, N. apis, attacks the gut epithelium of honeybees (especially workers) and causes nosema disease, a serious form of dysentery in animals.

  • Nosema bombycis (fungus)

    Nosema: The species N. bombycis, which causes the epidemic disease pébrine in silkworms, attacks all tissues and all developmental stages from embryo to adult. In advanced infections, small brown spots cover the body of the silkworm. Diseased larvae, which either are unable to spin cocoons or else spin…

  • Nosema ceranae (fungus)

    colony collapse disorder: Suspected causes: …the single-celled microsporidians (parasitic fungus) Nosema ceranae and N. apis and the invasive varroa mite (Varroa destructor).

  • nosema disease (pathology)

    Nosema: …honeybees (especially workers) and causes nosema disease, a serious form of dysentery in animals.

  • Nosey Kate (American plainswoman)

    Kate Elder, plainswoman and frontier prostitute of the old American West, companion and possible wife of Doc Holliday (q.v.). Nothing is known of her background before she turned up in a Fort Griffin, Texas, saloon in the fall of 1877, working as a barroom prostitute. There she met Holliday, with

  • Nosferatu (film by Murnau)

    F.W. Murnau: …of Murnau’s first major work, Nosferatu (1922), which is regarded by many as the most effective screen adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Eschewing psychological overtones, Murnau treated the subject as pure fantasy and, with the aid of noted cinematographer Fritz Arno Wagner, produced appropriately macabre visual effects, such as negative…

  • Nosferatu, the Vampyre (film by Herzog [1979])

    Werner Herzog: …Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht (1979; Nosferatu the Vampyre, a version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula that is an homage to F.W. Murnau’s film of the same name), Woyzeck (1979), Fitzcarraldo (1982), and Schrei aus Stein (1991; Scream of Stone).

  • Nosferatu—eine Symphonie des Grauens (film by Murnau)

    F.W. Murnau: …of Murnau’s first major work, Nosferatu (1922), which is regarded by many as the most effective screen adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Eschewing psychological overtones, Murnau treated the subject as pure fantasy and, with the aid of noted cinematographer Fritz Arno Wagner, produced appropriately macabre visual effects, such as negative…

  • Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht (film by Herzog [1979])

    Werner Herzog: …Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht (1979; Nosferatu the Vampyre, a version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula that is an homage to F.W. Murnau’s film of the same name), Woyzeck (1979), Fitzcarraldo (1982), and Schrei aus Stein (1991; Scream of Stone).

  • Noshaq, Mount (mountain, Afghanistan)

    Hindu Kush: Physiography: …Hindu Kush, which are Mounts Noshaq (Nowshāk; 24,557 feet [7,485 metres]), Istoro Nal (24,242 feet [7,389 metres]), and Tirich Mir. Most major glaciers of the Hindu Kush—among them Kotgaz, Niroghi, Atrak, and Tirich—are in the valleys of this section.

  • noshi (Japanese dress)

    dress: Japan: …the 12th century were the noshi (courtiers’ everyday costumes) and the kariginu, worn for hunting. Both of these garments were voluminous hip-length jackets worn with baggy trousers tied at the ankles. As political control shifted from the emperor to the newly formed shogunate, it became necessary to devise special costumes…

  • Noshiro (Japan)

    Noshiro, city, Akita ken (prefecture), Honshu, Japan. It is located at the mouth of the Yoneshiro River, where it meets the Japan Sea. During the Tokugawa period (1603–1867), the city was a trading centre and shipping port for products (mostly rice) from the Yoneshiro Plain. Toward the end of the

  • Noske, Gustav (German politician)

    Gustav Noske, right-wing Social Democratic German politician, notorious for his ruthless suppression of a communist uprising in Berlin, who was defense minister of the Weimar Republic from 1919 to 1920. A member of the Reichstag (parliament), Noske became controversial within his own party for his

  • Nosob River (river, Namibia)

    Nossob River, intermittently flowing river, west-central Namibia, formed by two intermittent streams, the White Nossob and the Black Nossob, both of which rise northeast of Windhoek (the national capital). Their confluence is north of Leonardville, which is located near the tropic of Capricorn.

  • Nosodendridae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Nosodendridae (wounded-tree beetles) Widely distributed; found under bark. Family Ptinidae (spider beetles) Long legs; spiderlike appearance; sometimes infest stored products; about 500 widely distributed species. Superfamily

  • nosology (medicine)

    William Cullen: …influential classification of disease (nosology) consisting of four major divisions: pyrexiae, or febrile diseases; neuroses, or nervous diseases; cachexiae, diseases arising from bad bodily habits; and locales, or local diseases. This system, which Cullen described in his work Synopsis Nosologiae Methodicae (1769), was based on the observable symptoms that…

  • Nossa Senhora da Concei??o de Campinas de Mato Grosso (Brazil)

    Campinas, city, eastern S?o Paulo estado (state), southeastern Brazil, located in the highlands near the Atibaia River at 2,274 feet (693 metres) above sea level. Formerly known as Nossa Senhora da Concei??o de Campinas de Mato Grosso and as S?o Carlos, it was given town status and was made the

  • Nossa Senhora da Concei??o dos Guarulhos (Brazil)

    Guarulhos, city, southeastern S?o Paulo estado (state), Brazil, on the Tietê River at 2,493 feet (760 metres) above sea level; it forms part of the greater S?o Paulo metropolitan area. Founded in 1560 and formerly called Nossa Senhora da Concei??o dos Guarulhos, it was made the seat of a

  • Nossa Senhora das Dores de Tatuibi (Brazil)

    Limeira, city, east-central S?o Paulo estado (state), Brazil, on the headwaters of Tatu Stream, a tributary of the Piracicaba River. Known at various times as Tatuibi, Rancho de Limeira, and Nossa Senhora das Dores de Tatuibi, it was elevated to city status in 1863. Limeira processes local crops

  • Nossa Senhora do Carmo (church, Ouro Prêto, Brazil)

    Ouro Prêto: …facade of the Church of Nossa Senhora do Carmo are his masterpieces. The Oratory Museum contains a notable collection of portable altars. Pop. (2010) 70,227.

  • Nossa Senhora dos Prazeres de Itapetininga (Brazil)

    Itapetininga, city, in the highlands of east-central S?o Paulo estado (state), Brazil. It lies at 2,200 feet (670 metres) above sea level, near the Itapetininga River. Formerly called Nossa Senhora dos Prazeres de Itapetininga, it was given town status in 1770 and was made the seat of a

  • Nossi-Bé (island, Madagascar)

    Nosy Be, island lying about 5 miles (8 km) off the northwestern shore of Madagascar. The name means “Big Island.” It is 19 miles (30 km) long, 12 miles (19 km) wide, and has an area of about 120 square miles (310 square km). Formed by volcanoes, the island is forested and has numerous craters and

  • Nossob River (river, Namibia)

    Nossob River, intermittently flowing river, west-central Namibia, formed by two intermittent streams, the White Nossob and the Black Nossob, both of which rise northeast of Windhoek (the national capital). Their confluence is north of Leonardville, which is located near the tropic of Capricorn.

  • Nossop River (river, Namibia)

    Nossob River, intermittently flowing river, west-central Namibia, formed by two intermittent streams, the White Nossob and the Black Nossob, both of which rise northeast of Windhoek (the national capital). Their confluence is north of Leonardville, which is located near the tropic of Capricorn.

  • Nostoc (cyanobacteria genus)

    Nostoc, genus of blue-green algae with cells arranged in beadlike chains that are grouped together in a gelatinous mass. Ranging from microscopic to walnut-sized, masses of Nostoc may be found on soil and floating in quiet water. Reproduction is by fragmentation. A special thick-walled cell

  • Nostra aetate (religious declaration)

    anti-Semitism: The origins of Christian anti-Semitism: …the Vatican II declaration of Nostra aetate (Latin: “In Our Era”) in 1965, which transformed Roman Catholic teaching regarding Jews and Judaism.

  • Nostradamus (French astrologer)

    Nostradamus, French astrologer and physician, the most widely read seer of the Renaissance. Nostradamus began his medical practice in Agen sometime in the 1530s, despite not only never having taken a medical degree but also apparently having been expelled from medical school. In 1544 he moved to

  • Nostratic hypothesis (proposed language family)

    Nostratic hypothesis, proposed, but still controversial, language family of northern Eurasia. The term Nostratic was proposed in 1903 by the Danish linguist Holger Pedersen to encompass Indo-European, Uralic, Altaic, Afro-Asiatic, and possibly other language families under one broad category.

  • Nostredame, Michel de (French astrologer)

    Nostradamus, French astrologer and physician, the most widely read seer of the Renaissance. Nostradamus began his medical practice in Agen sometime in the 1530s, despite not only never having taken a medical degree but also apparently having been expelled from medical school. In 1544 he moved to

  • nostril (anatomy)

    nose: …are known as nares or nostrils. The roof of the mouth and the floor of the nose are formed by the palatine bone, the mouth part of which is commonly called the hard palate; a flap of tissue, the soft palate, extends back into the nasopharynx, the nasal portion of…

  • Nostromo (novel by Conrad)

    Nostromo, novel by Joseph Conrad, published in 1904 and considered one of Conrad’s strongest works. Nostromo is a study of revolution, politics, and financial manipulation in a fictional South American republic. The work anticipates many of the political crises of Third World countries in the 20th

  • Nostromo: A Tale of the Seaboard (novel by Conrad)

    Nostromo, novel by Joseph Conrad, published in 1904 and considered one of Conrad’s strongest works. Nostromo is a study of revolution, politics, and financial manipulation in a fictional South American republic. The work anticipates many of the political crises of Third World countries in the 20th

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